Citation
Northglenn City Hall

Material Information

Title:
Northglenn City Hall thesis program
Creator:
Allison, John
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
approximately 150 leaves in various foliations : illustrations (1 color), charts, maps, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Municipal buildings -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Northglenn ( lcsh )
Municipal buildings ( fast )
Colorado -- Northglenn ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
John Allison.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
08677633 ( OCLC )
ocm08677633
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1981 .A85 ( lcc )

Full Text
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN AURARIA LIBRARY

n@rthglennrM
n on On

thesis
halite
program
h
l
johnallison
may1981o\7ii(g


NORTHGLENN CITY HALL THESIS PROGRAM
JOHN ALLISON MAY, 1981


TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. INTRODUCTION I
II. BACKGROUND II
A. City of Northglenn II-A-1
B. Northglenn City Hall II-B-1
III. CITY POLICIES III
IV. FACTS IV
A. Socioeconomic Profile IV-A
B. Zoning IV-B
C. Utilities IV-C
D. Geology IV-D
E. Soil Conditions IV-E
F. Circulation IV-F
G. Climate IV-G
H. Solar Data IV-H
I. Adjacent Land Uses IV-1
J. Site IV-J
V. CODE REQUIREMENTS V
A. 1979 Uniform Building Code Requirements V-A-l
B. Federal Standards for Prisons and Jails V-B-l
VI. USER NEEDS ANALYSIS VI
VII. OTHER CITY HALLS VII
VIII. USER RELATIONSHIPS VIII
IX. NORTHGLENN CITY HALL DESIGN IX
A. Design Philosophy IX-A-1
B. Design Graphics/Models IX-B
C. General Building Design IX-C-1
D. Administration Uses IX-D-1
E. Council/Court Uses IX-E-1
F. Support Uses IX-F-1
G. Police Uses IX-G-1
H. Mechanical/Structural Systems IX-H-1
X. APPENDIX
A. Soils Conditions


I


CHAPTER I
-INTRODUCTION-
My Architectural Thesis for Spring, 1981 will be to design a new City Hall for the City of Northglenn, Colorado. My work will parallel the actual City Hall project which is presently well under way at this writing, with a design having been selected by R. V. Lord and Associates of Boulder, Colorado and construction having started.
For my program, I am drawing on the resources pertinant to the City Hall's needs analysis which were generated by employees of the City of Northglenn. Wayne Ethridge and Susan Yu of Northglenn's Department of Community Development have helped me on this project with information, maps and other data which is included throughout this report. Lieutenant Anthony Divirgilio of the Northglenn Police Department has helped me with information critical to his department's specific requirements. I have also worked with Patrick Tyler, an architect with R. V. Lord and Associates.
As Outlined by the City, the City Hall will be about 41,000 square feet and will be located near the north part of Northglenn between Interstate 25 and Community Center Drive.( SEE MAP 1 )
It will consolidate most of the City's functions which are presently housed in several separate facilities dispersed throughout Northglenn. Uses to be housed in the City Hall will include the City's Manager and related offices, attorneys, finance personnel, parks department, and planning department. In addition, the City council, Court chambers and police facilities will be located there.
1-1


GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Northglenn is a suburban bedroom community with most of its residents driving to Denver to work. The heart of Northglenn is developed into a major regional shopping center and an Interstate Highway passes through its spine. It is a fragmented city with little other than housing and its shopping center to identify with. Its new City Hall has been delegated a location in the northern part of Northglenn, further fragmenting major City functions.
It seems only by happenstance that the new City Hall site is situated next to a recently completed Community Center and Northglenn's nicest park. The land on which it will be built only became available for purchase a few months before proposal requests were sent to architects for bid. But these adjacencies are important and can be used to enhance the stature of Northglenn's civic functions in this otherwise secondary location.
Northglenn's City Hall, like all City Halls should represent municipal government to people living in the City as well as to visitors. It should be accesible and easy to use. Physically, it whould be responsive and inviting. For the people working in the City Hall, it should be a pleasant place to work and a major advancement over the dispersed facilities that they have experienced over the past ten years.
For me, it will be an opportunity to express my feelings in physical form about my observations after having worked in and with municipal government for the past five years.
1-2


CITY HALL SITE
dfl
CITY OF NORTHGLENN
CITT MAlL / SITE
[ 3 NOHTMQL6KIKJ

r^ENVCR
\j \r*

TjOOO


II


CHAPTER II-A
-BACKGROUND-CITY OF NORTHGLENN-
The area where the City of Northglenn is today was a vast plain of short wild grasses and open expanse 150 years ago. It was not the type of place that settlers moving west would establish themselves on because of close proximity to a waterway or adjacency to teaming hunting grounds. It was a place for passing through; Arapahoe Indians seeking Buffalo; Trading expeditions and explorers heading farther west. The location and the town's early history evaded historian's pens in their descriptions of the settling of Colorado. Best accounts of permanent development indicate that cattle was grazed in the vicinity in the early 1870's. These cattle along with irrigation ditches belonged to the first settlers on the land that is today Northglenn. Wheat and fields of corn began to grow as a vestige to this development.
Today, several of those early irrigation ditches still ribbon across the land, but the buffalo grass, and tall grain has been replaced by kentucky blue grass and suburban tract houses. Northglenn is still a place to pass through for many, but its primary function today is that of a bedroom community serving Denver to the South.
It was still vacant land as late as the mid 1950's, serving as the northern most boundary of a sprawling Denver metropolitan area. The suburban cities of Thornton and Westminster were fast approaching the area with their boundaries. Then, in 1959, the vision of three men, who would become the managing partners of a development company called Perl-Mack began to take shape. An
II-A-1


opening of show homes was held, heralding the beginning of a "totally planned community" covering 2,360 acres.
These developers worked with a planning team headed by William F. Henninger, a former City of Denver Planning Director to lay out the project. They envisioned a City with a population of 16,000 people by 1965 with a 73 acre shopping center, 130 acre industrial park, and 202 acres for schools and parks. During the early stages of development, 104th Avenue was a dirt road and what is now Interstate 25 passing through Northglenn was the U.S. 87 extension of 1-25 from the south.
Early accounts of the development glowed with positives, and in 1961 Life Magazine in conjunction with the National Association of Home Builders named Northglenn as "the most perfectly planned community in America." In 1963 the people living in Northglenn moved toward incorporation, and a nine member election commission was set up by an Adams County Judge. Although a vote to incorporate was made in 1964, it was later invalidated in District Court because of a boundary dispute with another group seeking to incorporate in north Thornton. This was resolved in 1968 and Northglenn ultimately incorporated in 1969. Today, the City of Northglenn has over 33,000 residents and is enclosed by Westminster to the west and Thornton on its other three sides.
11A 2


CHAPTER II-B
-BACKGROUND-NORTHGLENN CITY HALL-
The Perl-Mack Developers established a site for municipal shops, a civic center and municipal complex in east Northglenn adjacent to a proposed 130 acre light industrial park when the community was first laid out; the current City Hall and Police station are located at 10969 Irma Drive. But with the development of the City past its 1965 population projection, its functions outgrew its facilities there.
In 1974 a search began for a site to build a new City Hall, and4 a year later a site was chosen at 112th Avenue on the west side of 1-25 near the City's water storage tanks. In conjunction with the development of a new City Hall, a proposal was also made to link east and west Northglenn across 1-25 at this point with an overpass. An architect was chosen to complete a site analysis and a preliminary plan for the new City Hall, and an engineer was retained to complete a design for the proposed overpass.
Drawings and a model were completed and final cost estimates for each of the projects were submitted to the City Council for their consideration. The estimated cost of the City Hall was $3.6 million and the overpass and roadway project were an additional $2 million. After considering the submitted proposals, the City Council felt the cost of building the proposed City Hall was too high, and the additional cost of the overpass was prohibitive. As a result both projects were tabled.
But the problem of inadequate facilities presisted. The City's
II-B-1


functions had fragmented and were located in facilities throughout
the city. The council chambers and police facilities were on
Irma Drive: the maintenance facilities were near the water tanks
in mobile homes at 112th Avenue at 1-25, and most of the rest of
the offices were in leased space on Melody Drive. The issue came
to a head early in 1980 when rent options began forcing the City out of
these leased spaces. As a result, the Council gave the go ahead
for another City Hall search. This time the planning staff was
authorized to complete a use needs report and a new search for
land was made.
A site became available adjacent to the new Community Center
2
Facility in north Northglenn for $90/Ft. ( SEE MAP 1 ) and the
City purchased the 4 acre tract using its general fund. Requests were made for design proposals and in less than four months an architect and a design were chosen. The cost for the new City Hall will be $2.5 million and the expected completion date is August,
1981.
11 B 2


Ill


CHAPTER III
-CITY POLICIES-
In 1976, the City completed an Interum Comprehensive Plan. Included as part of that Plan was a goal to provide desirable and adequate community facilities to serve the residents and businesses of Northglenn. One objective to reach that goal was to determine the future public service needs in order to project municipal space requirements. As has been mentioned in the Background portion of this document, that need analysis was completed by the City's Planning Staff for inclusion in architectural bid requests in July of 1980. This document entitled "Northglenn City Government Space Needs Study" is included here in Chapter VI and will be discussed in greater detail there. Based on that space needs study, and from its previous experience with the earlier City Hall search, the City Council submitted a list of detailed requests to architectural firms bidding on the design. The Statement of Intent and General Parameters, from that report are included below.
I T 1-1


STATEMENT OF INTENT NORTHGLENN MUNICIPAL BUILDING
It is the intent of the City of Northglenn to build a AO,000 gross square foot office building on City-owned property located south of the Northglenn Community Center. The City will award a contract for construction of a new municipal building based, in part, on the following criteria and standards:
1. The City Hall will be constructed using, whenever possible, conventional construction techniques and materials under a design/build approach.
The budget for the building is $50.00 to $55.00 per square foot.
2. The building will be a 2-story structure with the main entry facing south and the lower story being a garden level. A separate entry will be provided on the north side of the structure.
3. While the structure will be essentially an office building, the City will be examining bid proposals for details that will create a building that is a better than average reflection of current building standards, exterior/interior appointments, and overall architectural and landscape architectural treatment.
A. The building must be at least 85.5% space efficient.
5. The building will have a brick exterior that closely matches in color and texture the brick used in construction of the Northglenn Community Center. The City recognizes that the City Hall should have its own identity, but should not be wholly inconsistent with the Community Center.
6. The City anticipates that the building will be located on the eastern portion of the area set aside for construction of the building, and the building will be oriented on the site to take full advantage of passive solar heating. The building will also be protected from excessive heat gain during the summer months.
7. All items listed on the attached "General Parameters for Northglenn's Municipal Building" will be addressed by bidders. This list has been approved by the Mayor and City Council.
Bidders are encouraged to provide as much detail as possible in their proposals so that an adequate review can be conducted by Northglenn's staff and consultants. City Council will determine which of the proposals submitted is the most appropriate and will award a contract for completion of the working drawings and construction of the building. It is the Mayor and Council's'goal to award this contract in September of 1980 and to have the building completed by August of 1981.
111-2


GENERAL PARAMETERS FOR NORTHGLENN'S MUNICIPAL BUILDING
1. A design/build approach will be utilized for construction of City Hall.
2. The building will contain 40,000 square feet.
3. The building is intended to accomodate only City of Northglenn Municipal functions.
4. The site for the building will be immediately south of the Northglenn Community Center.
5. The building will be 2 stories, with a garden level and main floor entry. Bids will be solicited with an elevator as an alternate bid item.
6. A brick exterior which closely matches the color and texture of the brick on the Northglenn Community Center will be a requirement of the design/build package.
7. Parking for City Hall will be based on requirements and needs of the Municipal Center, and will be included with all proposals.
8. City Hall will be designed for retrofitting of solar heating, but
a conventional HVAC system and hot water heat will be utilized initially.
9. Solar hot water heating will be included in the initial package.
10. The City Hall site will be fully landscaped (up to a maximum of four acres) and a landscaping allowance will be included with all design/build proposals.
11. City Hall will contain separate court and Council chambers which will have ceilings that are as high as can be permitted given standard building approaches and systems.
12. One sally port and four holding cells will be provided for Police functions.
13. All proposals shall include an emergency generator and appurtenances for the building.
14. Public address and security system(s), exercise equipment, locker and shower rooms, protective and one-way glass, three flag poles, and an allowance for furniture for the Council Chambers, court room, Judge's Chambers, jury room, lobby and visitors area will be included in all proposals.
15. An audio/visual display system for the Council Chambers will be included with all proposals.
111 3




omuM


CHAPTER IV-A
-SOCIO-ECONOMIC PROFILE-
The total population in Northglenn in 1960 was 200. By 1970 it had grown to 27,937 and in 1979, the Northglenn Community Development Department estimated the population to be 33,598.
Of a total 9622 housing units in Northglenn in 1979, 7350 or 76% were single family units and 2272 or 24% were multi-family units. The average vacancy rate of multi-family units was estimated to be 3% in 1979.
Census tract 85.02 which includes the City Hall site, stretches from Interstate 25 on the west to the east boundary of Northglenn and from 120th Avenue on the north to 112th Avenue to the south.
( SEE MAP 2 ) In 1979, this census tract contained 13,003 people. Of a total 3692 housing units, 2512 or 68% were single family units and 1180 or 32% were multi-family units. Most of the multifamily units have been built since 1970 and are near Washington Street to the east and south of the City Hall site.
This information shows Northglenn to be growing, although the city's fastest rate of growth occured in the decade after its inception. There is a good mix of housing types with the area adjacent to the City Hall site having a high percentage of multifamily units. A new 132 unit townhouse development to the southeast of the site across Community Center Drive will add to that percentage.
Northglenn's commercial development consists of "strip development" along Washington Street and 104th Avenues and the
IV-A-1


73 acre Northglenn Shopping Center and its related shops between 1-25 and Melody Drive and 104th Avenue and Kennedy Drive which is near the physical center of Northglenn. ( SEE MAP 3 ) The Mall was constructed in 1968 as part of the initial Perl-Mack Development package and was touted as "the first (commercial center) in America planned and zoned to prevent haphazard fringe shops and spot and strip zoning." Its success has played a large part in the land values and rents of building space in the vicinity rising rapidly: (Including the building which the City now leases space from).
Northglenn has an industrial park on its eastern boundary which contains 140 acres. ( SEE MAP 3 ) The Union Pacific Railroad tracks border it. It competes with a larger industrial park just north of 120th Avenue and east of 1-25 called Washington Park.
This develpment is just north of the City Hall site. It contains 100 acres and borders 1-25 for h mile. It already houses seven business complexes with future expansion likely.
IV/ A 2


IV-
3=
I
w


-AI
33
I
33




CHAPTER IV-B
ZONING
The City Hall site was changed from an R-4, high density housing designation to C-0, commercial zone in order to allow for development of the City Hall building. Uses by right in this zone include general offices, medical and dental offices and pharmacies and telephone exchanges.
LOT REQUIREMENTS:
Lot requirements include a minimum front setback of 50 feet.
The east side of the site will be treated as the front since it abuts Community Center Drive. There is a 12 foot side setback requirement on one side (either north or south) because there is no rear access available from 1-25. There is no side setback required on the other side if walls are located on property lines. Otherwise a minimum of a 5 foot setback is required on that side.
The minimum rear setback is 15 feet.
HEIGHT REQUIREMENTS:
Building Heights are not to exceed 30' 0" from grade.
PARKING:
There shall be an allowance for paving all parking and vehicular circulation areas.. Paving shall be designed to reflect the soil conditions and loading factors associated with an office building.
At least 77 parking spaces will be provided for police parking in a separate location and not less than 220 total spaces shall be provided. Six-inch (6") vertical concrete curbing shall be used in all parking and circulation areas. Grades of less than 3/4
IV-B-1


of one percent in paved areas are strongly discouraged. Handicapped parking shall be provided.
COMMUNITY CENTER DRIVE CURB CUTS, BUS PULLOUT AREA AND SIDEWALKS:
The design shall include two curb cuts on Community Center Drive of approximately 30' in width, a 4' wide concrete attached sidewalk along the entire eastern border of the City Hall site.
A bus pullout area designed according to Regional Transportation District standards and bus routing shall be provided on Community Center Drive in the immediate vicinity of the building.
EXTERIOR LIGHTING:
Lighting facilities shall be so arranged that they neither unreasonably disturb occupants of adjacent residential properties nor interfere with traffic and shall not exceed 25 feet in height. FENCING:
All sides of the lot abutting a residential district shall be enclosed with a fence, hedge, berm, or wall having a height of not less than 6 feet.
ON-SITE SIDEWALKS, GREENWAY/TRAIL EXTENSION AND BICYCLE PARKING:
The design shall contain a sufficient number of sidewalks to provide pedestrian and wheelchair circulation around at least 3 sides of the proposed building. The sidewalks shall be no less than 5 feet in width. In addition, the design shall contain an extension of the Greenway/Trail System from the building to the existing Trail located just north of the northern boundary of the site. The Trail shall be no less than 8'-0" in width and shall be designed to reflect the architectural character of the building Parking for no less than 15 bicycles shall be provided on the site
IV-B-2


and a device bicycles, or
or devices to securely lock the frame and wheel of to completely enclose them, shall be included.
IV-B-3


IV-c


CHAPTER IV-C
-UTILITIES-
Map 4 indicates the locations of water, sewer, gas and electric lines adjacent to and serving the site.
WATER:
There is an 8 inch water line 10 feet east of the Community Center Drive right-of-way.
SEWER:
There is an 8 inch sewer line on Community Center Drive with man hole covers as indicated.
GAS:
A 3 inch gas line is 7 feet east of the west property line. ELECTRICAL:
An electrical power line runs parallel to the easterly line of the 1-25 right-of-way.
Public Service has indicated that the existing electric line and the gas line have sufficient capacity to serve the building. All utilities should be underground.
IV-C-1


IV-C-2


IV -D


CHAPTER IV-D
-GEOLOGY-
The geological formation making up the Northglenn City Hall site is called the Denver formation and is part of larger divisions from either the Paleocene or Upper Cretaceous formations. This formation is characterized by claystone, siltstone, sandstone, and conglomerate composed primarily of volcanic debris. The clay-stone and siltstone has partly altered to montmorillonitic clay which swells when wet, and causes damage to buildings, roads and other structures. The Denver Formation underlies most of the Denver metropolitan area.
TOPOGRAPHY:
Map 5 shows the topography of the site with the highest elevation being about 5415 feet on the southern edge and sloping at a steady rate of 4.5% to a low point of about 5399 feet on the northern boundary.
DRAINAGE PATTERNS:
Runoff on the site flows in an even south to north pattern across the site into a drainage ditch that borders the low level along the northern boundary. Runoff is carried in the ditch in a westerly direction under 1-25 and disperses in an open field on the west side.
IV-D-1




IV-E


CHAPTER IV-E
-SOIL CONDITIONS-
An independent soils analysis was completed on the site by Empire Laboratories, Inc. in Fort Collins for R. V. Lord and Associates, selected architects for the Northglenn City Hall. Test data is printed in Appendix 1 of this document and specific design recommendations are printed here.
IV-E-1


The following are our recoimendatlons for development of the site as Influenced by the subsurface conditions encountered 1n the test borings.
Site Grading
The upper six (6) Inches of existing topsoil should be stripped within proposed building and paving areas. The topsoil can be stockpiled on the site and used for final grading outside building and pavement areas. Following stripping of the topsoil, the upper six (6) inches of the subgrade should be scarified and recompacted 1n place at two percent (2%) above optimum moisture content to a minimum of ninety percent (901) of Standard Proctor Density ASTM D 69C-78. (See Appendix
c.)
Material excavated beneath the topsoil is suitable for use as compacted fill 1n building and pavement areas. Additional off-s1te fill required should be a material approved by the geotechnical engineer.
Fill in structure and paving areas should be placed two percent (21) wet of optimum moisture content and compacted to a minimum of ninety-five percent (552) of Standard Proctor Density ASTM D 698-78.
We anticipate that no unusual problems will be encountered during excavation for utilities. The overburden materials should be stable on temporary 1:1 cut slopes.
Backfill placed 1n utility trenches 1n open and planted areas should be compacted 1n uniform lifts at optimum moisture to at least ninety percent (902) of Standard Proctor Density ASTM D 698-78 the full depth of the trench. The upper four (4) feet of backfill placed 1n utility trenches under roadways and paved areas should be compacted at or near optimum moisture to at least ninety-five percent (951) of Standard Proctor Density ASTM D C58-70, and the lower portion of these trenches should be compacted to at least ninety percent (901) of Standard Proctor Density ASTM D G98-78. Addition of moisture to and/or drying of the subsoils may be required to assure proper compaction.
IV/ E 2


Qualified geotechnical personnel should be present to observe stripping of the topsoil* scarification of the subgrade, and placenent and compaction of fill. In-place density tests should_be performed to verify the degree of compaction being attained in the field.
Foundations
Based upon the anticipated structural loads and the subsurface conditions encountered in the test borings, we recommend that the structure be supported on straight-shaft drilled piers end bearing In the bedrock. Piers drilled a minimum of three (3) feet into the firm bedrock may be designed for a maximum allowable end bearing pressure of fifteen thousand (15,000) pounds per square foot. An estimated skin friction of one thousand five hundred (1500) pounds per square foot will be developed for that portion of the pier embedded into the firm bedrock stratum. To counteract swelling pressures which will develop if the subsoils become wetted, all piers should be designed for a minimum dead load of ten thousand (10,000) pounds per square foot. Where this minimum dead load requirement cannot be satisfied, skin friction from additional embedment into the firm bedrock should be used to resist uplift. All piers should be reinforced their full length to resist tensile stresses created by swelling pressures acting on the pier. It is essential that all grade beams have a minimum four (4) inch void between the bottom of the bean and the soil below. The anticipated settlement of piers under the above maximum loading should be negligible.
The drilled piers should be designed to resist all induced lateral forces. The ultimate passive resistance of the near-surface sandy silty clay should be computed using the equation Pp 125Z + 3000 pounds per square foot where Z is the depth below the top of pier.
To facilitate cleaning, dewatering, and inspection of piers, minimum twenty-four (24) inch diameter piers should be used. We anticipate that the piers can be drilled and concreted without casing. Temporary casing nay be required 1f sloughing of the overburden occurs or 1f seepage or groundwater 1s encountered.
IV-E-3


It 1s recormended that qualified geotechnical personnel be present during drilling operations to Identify and verify penetration Into the firm bedrock, make certain that all piers are of proper diameter and plumbness and that they are thoroughly cleaned and dewatered, and ensure that reinforcing steel and concrete are properly placed.
Slabs on Grade
Due to the high swell potential of the overburden materials at the site and potential for slab niovement, we recomend that slab-on-grade construction not be used. A structural slab with a void below 1s recommended. Ue suggest that a minimum of four (4) Inches of gravel be placed 1n the bottom of the crawl-space below the structural slab.
Conventional slab-on-grade construction can be used for slabs outside the rain structural system. Preparation to subgrade elevation should be accomplished as previously discussed.
We recommend that slabs on grade be underlain by a minimum of four
(4) Inches of gravel or crushed rock free of fines. The granular layer will act as a capillary break and will help to distribute slab loads.
To minimize surface water from entering, we suggest that the slab edges be thickened and extend to the clay soil below the gravel. Prior to placement of the gravel, the subgrade should be prewet. To minimize and control shrinkage cracks which will develop 1n slabs on grade, control joints should be placed every twenty (20) to twenty-five (25) feet with the total area contained within these joints no greater than six hundred twenty-five (625) square feet.
Pavements
Within the proposed pavement areas, stripping of topsoil, scarification of the subgrade, and placement and compaction of fill should be accomplished as discussed 1n the "Site Grading" section of this report. AASHTO classifications of the near-surface materials at the site forming pavement subgrade are A-6 and A-7-6 with a group Index of 15. Based upon this group Index, the following pavement thicknesses are recommended
IV-E-4


Parking Areas
Drive Areas
Select Subbase 4" 5"
Select Base Course 4" 6-
Asphaltic Concrete ZL 2*_
Total Pavement Thickness 10- 13'
He recomend that the subbase material consist of pit-run sand and gravel. The particle dimension should be no greater than four (4)
Inches with the percent passing the No. 200 sieve no greater than twenty percent (20%). The liquid limit of the material should not exceed thirty-five percent (351) while the plasticity Index should not exceed eight percent (6%). The subbase should be placed on the subgrade at optimum moisture content and compacted to a minimum of ninety-five percent (95%) of Standard Proctor Density ASTM D 698-78. (See Appendix
c.)
The base course overlying the subgrade should consist of a hard, durable, crushed rock or stone and filler and should have a minimum "R" value of 80. The composite base course material should be free from vegetable matter and lumps or balls of clay and should neet the Colorado Department of H1ghv/ays Specification Class 6 Aggregate Base Course which follov/s:
Sieve Size % Passinq
3/4" 100
#4 30-65
#8 25-55
#200 3-12
Liquid Limit 30 Maximum Plasticity Index 6 Maximum
The base course should be placed on the subgrade at or near optimum moisture and compacted to at least ninety-five percent (95%) of Standard Proctor Density ASTM D 698-78. It 1s Important that the base course be shaped to grade so that proper drainage of the pavement area 1s obtained.
IV-E-5


The asphaltic concrete should poet City of Northglenn specifications or equivalent and be placed 1n accordance with those specifications.
GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS
(1) Laboratory tests Indicate that water soluble sulfates 1n the soil are positive, and a Type II Modified or Type V cement should be used 1n all concrete exposed to subsoils. All slabs on grade subjected to de-1c1ng chemicals should be composed of a more durable concrete with low water-cement ratios and higher air contents.
(2) Finished grade should be sloped away from the structure on all sides to give positive drainage. Ten percent (10X) for the first ten (10) feet away from the structure 1s the suggested slope.
(3) Backfill around the outside perimeter of the structure should be mechanically compacted at optimum moisture to at least ninety percent (90Z) of Standard Proctor Density ASTM D 698-78. (See Appendix C.) Puddling should not be permitted as a method of compaction.
(4) Gutters and downspouts should be designed to carry roof runoff water well beyond the backfill area.
(5) Underground sprinkling systems should not be installed within ten (10) feet of the structure, and this recommendation should be taken Into account 1n the landscape planning.
(6) It 1s recommended that all compaction requirements specified herein be verified In the field with density tests performed under the direction of the geotechnical engineer.
IV-E-6


(7) It 1s recommended that a registered professional engineer
design the foundations using the recommendations presented 1n this report.
GENERAL COMMENTS
This report has been prepared to aid 1n the evaluation of the property and to assist the architect and/or engineer 1n the design of this project. In the event that any changes 1n the design of the structure or Its location are planned, the conclusions and recommendations contained in this report will not be considered valid unless said changes are reviewed and conclusions of this report modified or approved in writing by Empire Laboratories, Inc., the soils engineer of record.
Every effort was made to provide comprehensive site coverage through careful locations of the test borings, while keeping the site Investigation economically feasible. Variations in soil and groundwater conditions between test borings may be encountered during construction.
In order to permit correlation between the reported subsurface conditions and the actual conditions encountered during construction and to aid 1n carrying out the plans and specifications as originally contemplated, 1t 1s recommended that Empire Laboratories, Inc. be retained to perform, continuous construction review during the excavation and foundation phases of the work. Empire Laboratories, Inc. assures no responsibility for compliance with the recommendations Included 1n this report unless they have been retained to perform adequate on-s1te construction review during the course of construction.
IV-E-7


-ftl
3


CHAPTER IV-F
-CIRCULATION-
The City of Northglenn has an extensive bikepath/greenway system which is illustrated on Map 6. A segment of that system-runs parallel to the north boundary of the City Hall site on the Community Center side of a drainage ditch. It connects Webster Lake and Community Center Drive with the Wagon Road Regional Transportation District Park and Ride at 120th Avenue and Huron Street on the west side of 1-25 via an underpass. As is mentioned in Chapter VI of this Program, all designs should link into the pathway.
AUTO CIRCULATION:
Presently there are between 1500, and 2000 vehicles per day passing the site on Community Center Drive, and its design capacity is 10,000. The development of a City Hall should not exceed this capacity, however it, in conjunction with new development occurring on land adjacent to the City Hall site, will increase the traffic load on Community Center Drive. Certainly if plans in the future materialize to continue Community Center Drive across 1-25 at 112th Avenue, ( SEE MAP 7 ) traffic and access to the new City Hall would increase.
The City of Northglenn is an automobile oriented community and auto convenience to the City Hall is necessary. According to a survey conducted for the 1976 Interim Comprehensive Plan, respondents felt the car could meet most of their needs and there was limited willingness to use rapid transit.
IV-F-1




-AI
i
LJ


IV-G


CHAPTER IV-G
-CLIMATE-
The following document and Map 8 illustrate climate conditions affecting the City Hall site. Prevailing winter winds come from the north and the west and although there are some cottonwood trees along the northern border, there are not enough to diminish the cold assault.
Springtime weather comes from the south and south-easterly directions bringing moist air from the Gulf of Mexico.
Hot summer breezes come from the southwest. There is no foliage or building development fronting the south to break the movement of the summer winds, and the site is west of 1-25 which can affect the micro-climate further as the hot winds blow across the black pavement in the summer.
Webster Lake affects the microclimate positively as a tempering factor in the hot seasons, but its location to the east and north eliminates the chance of breezes passing over it before it reaches the City Hall site.
IV-G-1


Local Climatological Data
Annual Summary With Comparative Data
1979
DENVER, COLORADO
Narrative Climatological Summary
Denver enjoys the mild, sunny, semi-arid climate that prevails over much of the central Rocky Mountain region, without the extremely cold mornings of the high elevations and restricted mountain valleys during the cold part of the year, or the hot afternoons of summer at lower altitudes. Extremely warm or cold weather is usually of short duration.
Air masses from at least four different sources influence Denver's weather: Arctic air from
Canada and Alaska; warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico; warm, dry air from Mexico and the southwest; and Pacific air modified by its passage over coastal ranges and other mountains to the west.
The good climate results largely from Denver's location at the foot of the east slope of the Rocky Mountains in the belt of the prevailing westerlies. During most summer afternoons cumuliform clouds so shade the City that temperatures of 90 or over are reached on an average of only 33 days of the year, and in only one year in five does the mercury very briefly reach the 100 mark.
In the cold season the high altitude and the location of the mountains to the west combine to moderate temperatures. Invasions of cold air from the north, intensified by the high altitude, can be abrupt and severe. On the other hand, many of the cold air masses that spread southward out of Canada over the plains never reach Denver's altitude and move off over the lower plains to the east. Surges of cold air from the west are usually moderated in their descent down the east face of the mountains, and Chinooks resulting from some of these westerly flows often raise the temperature far above that normally to be expected at this latitude in the cold season. These conditions result in a tempering of winter cold to an average temperature above that of other cities situated at the same latitude.
In spring when outbreaks of polar air are waning, they are often met by moist currents from the Gulf
of Mexico. The juxtaposition of these two currents produces the rainy season in Denver, which reaches its peak in May.
Situated a long distance from any moisture source, and separated from the Pacific source by several high mountain barriers, Denver enjoys a low relative humidity, low average precipitation, and considerable sunshine.
Spring is the wettest, cloudiest, and windiest season. Much of the 37 percent of the annual total precipitation that occurs in spring falls as snow during the colder, earlier period of that season. Stormy periods are often interspersed by stretches of mild sunny weather that remove previous snow cover.
Summer precipitation (about 32 percent of the annual total), particularly in July and August, usually falls mainly from scattered local thundershowers during the afternoon and evening. Mornings are usually clear and sunny. Clouds often form during early afternoon and cut off the sunshine at what would otherwise be the hottest part of the day. Many afternoons have a cooling shower.
Autumn is the most pleasant season. Local summer thunderstorms are mostly over and invasions of cold air and severe weather are infrequent, so that there is less cloudiness and a greater percent of possible sunshine than at any other time of the year. Periods of unpleasant weather are generally brief. Precipitation amounts to about 20 percent of the annual total.
Winter has the least precipitation accumulation, only about 11 percent of the annual total, and almost all of it snow. Precipitation frequency, however, is higher than in autumn. There is also more cloudiness and the relative humidity averages higher than in the autumn. Weather can be quite severe, but as a general rule -the severity doesn't last long.
nonn NATIONAL OCEANIC AND / ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND / NATIONAL CLIMATIC CENTER
I IWOO ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION / INFORMATION SERVICE / ASHEVILLE, N.C.
IV-G-2


Meteorological Data For The Current Year
Station: OENVER, COLORADO STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL *P Standard time used: MOUNTAIN Latitude. 390 95' N Longitude: i09 52 w Elevation (ground) : 5203 ,eet Y,#r 1979
I 23062
Month Temperature F Degree days Base 65 F Precipitation in inches Relative humidity, pet. Wind Percent of possible sunshine t I u O C > 2 0 $** ? C < 2 Number of days Average station
Averages Extremes Water equivalent Snow, Ice pellets I 05 1 11 (Loca 1 17 time 1 23 Resultant Average speed m.p.h. Fastest mile Sunrise to sunset Precipitation .01 inch or more Snow, Ice pellets 1.0 inch or more E O 1 L t to It Temperature F pressure mb
Maximum Minimum
E *1 21 Daily minimum > I I 1 S O I 5 O ? 1 ? I 1 .£ Sd S £ <3 3 a 0 s t .£ It s; O (N 5 O i s 0 it it .1 1 6 Q : O 1! O (b) b! 1* ml £l I§ bi Elev 5 332 feet m.s.1.
JAN 30.6 5.9 18.0 59 21 -11 1 195Q c 0.39 0.09 25-26 9.1 3.9 22 69 57 59 68 05 0.0 6.7 27 N W 2 77 6.2 8 8 15 8 3 0 0 0 18 31 11 8 32.7
PEB 7.3 21.1 39.2 71 19 -3 1 859 t 0.92 0.29 27 5.0 2.7 0 63 90 92 69 17 1.1 7.9 29 NW 17 71 6.0 0 0 12 9 3 0 1 0 9 26 2 8 32.7
***P 52. C 29.0 90.5 67 16 13 3 751 t 1.25 0.29 2-3 18.2 9.5 18-19 68 97 99 62 09 0.9 9.0 30 NE 22 n 6. 3 9 7 15 11 5 0 2 0 0 23 0 8 3 3.9
APP 62.1 36.1 99.1 78 23 19 2 973 r 1.91 0.89 10-11 8.1 3.8 10-11 63 35 3 ( 59 10 1.8 9.3 32 NE 19 02 5.5 10 11 9 7 9 1 1 0 1 7 0 8 32.0
M*Y 66.5 93.1 59.8 81 27 29 10 313 2 3.53 1.69 1-2 0.2 3.^ 2-3 72 96 96 66 07 0.9 8.9 28 5 y 6 63 7.1 6 8 17 15 3 8 0 0 0 9 0 039.7
JUN 79.9 51.7 65.8 95 26 92 10 01 112 2.39 1.99 7-0 0.0 0.0 60 35 33 58 16 2.2 8.1 39 NE 29 82 9.0 16 0 6 6 0 9 0 9 0 0 0 83 7.0
JUL 89.5 57.8 73.7 96 16 51 7 0| 275 0.01 0.92 25 0.0 o.q 65 28 27 50 17 2.9 7.9 35 SE 3 02 5.9 8 16 7 . 5 0 10 0 18 0 0 0 8 30.0
AUG 92.5 56.9 69.5 99 6 98 20 20 163 5.85 1.68 9-10 0.0 0.0 66 39 38 57 15 1.7 7.9 .37 W 9 76 9.9 13 9 9 12 0 12 0 9 0 0 0 8 30.1
SEP 80.7 51.8 66. 3 93 8 91 15 58 102 0.36 0.27 13-19 0.0 o.c 57 3C 25 51 17 2.5 8.5 39 N 13 86 3.1 19 6 5 5 0 3 0 3 0 0. 0
OCT 67.7 39.9 53.8 86 7 23 31 397 7 1.28 0.86 20-21 2.7 2.7 29-30 71 93 38 65 09 0.5 8.7 32 NE 8 71 5.5 9 12 10 6 1 1 1 0 0 3 0 836.1
NOV MM 5 22.1 33.3 65 17 9 28 991 0 1.66 1.12 19-2C 22.3 19.C 1 9 21 87 55 69 80 18 1.3 7.6 27 N 21 66 9.6 15 3 12 8 9 0 0 0 9 29 0 8 36.9
DEC 9 7.6 21.9 39.5 66 18 1 12 939 a 1.06 0.95 22-23 16.5 6.0 22-23 69 90 53 63 20 3.3 8.1 90 ** 5 82 5.5 11 7 13 7 9 0 0 0 3 20 0 037.5
AUG JAN A UG NOV 0EC
YEAR 62.6 36.3 99.5 99 6 -11 1 6227 661 20.36 1.68 9-10 90.9 19.0 19-20 67 92 92 62 17 1.3 8.1 90 W 5 77 5.3 132 103 130 99 27 99 5 39 30 151 13 035.0
Normals Means, And Extremes
Means and extremes above are from existing and comparable exposures. Annual extremes have been exceeded at other sites in the locality as follows: Highest temperature 105 in August 1878? maximum monthly precipitation 8.57 in May 1876; minimum monthly precipitation 0.00 in December 1881; maximum precipitation in 24 hours 6.53 in May 1876; maximum monthly snowfall 57.4 in December 1913; maximum snowfall in 24 hours 23.0 in April 1885; fastest mile of wind 65 from West in May 1933.
() Length of record, years, through the current year unless otherwise noted, based on January data.
(b) 70 and above at Alaskan stations.
* Less than one half.
T Trace.
NORMALS Based on record for the 1941-1970 period.
DATE OF AN EXTREME The most recent 1n cases of multiple occurrence.
PREVAILING WIND DIRECTION Record through 1963.
WIND DIRECTION Numerals Indicate tens of degrees clockwise from true north. 00 Indicates calm.
FASTEST MILE WIND Speed Is fastest observed 1-minute value when the direction Is In tens of degrees.


Average Temperature Heating Degree Days
Year Jan Feb | Mar 1 Apr May June July > c 0Q Sept Oct | Nov Dec Annual Season July Aug jSept O o Nov j Dec Jan Feb Mar| Apr May unejTotal
70.9 59.6 35.5 33.3 50.3 191 516 815 1151 939 295 38 6260
i9*p 21.9 33.8 91.2 97.9 58.9
72.1 71.2 61.0 33.6 50.6 7 828 809 560 299 65 6C3*
19*1 32.* 36.2 36.5 96. 3 0 959 902 939 937 175 7? 6833
19.2 27.7 21.8 5P 5829
19*3 33.7 39.5 35.7 59.3 7 230 72 .6056
1999 1995 30.7 31.8 32.9 33.5 33.9 91.9 92.3 91.C 56.5 61.9 72.9 71.5 59.9 53.9 91.3 30.9 99.6 1969-65 0 16 123 375 793 98 1 921 1099 1108 911 295 63 60 SC
1996 11997 1998 1999 1950 31.9 30.8 26.9 16.3 29.9 35.7 28.8 26.6 3C.6 38.6 99.6 36.3 31.9 39.5 38.1 55.1 95.8 51.6 99.2 97.7 51.9 55.6 58.7 57.0 53.0 68.2 62.0 66.9 65.0 66.6 79.6 72.5 72.6 72.9 68.9 71.2 72.8 72.8 71.9 68.9 63.9 66.2 66.7 63.2 60.5 98.2 55.6 51.3 99.5 59.9 33.6 33.0 36.9 98.6 39.1 37.6 33.1 29.6 32.5 36.3 51.2 99.9 99.2 99.6 50.6 1965- 66 1966- 67 1967- 68 1968- 69 1969- 70 6 0 9 10 2 7 9 16 35 n 296 61 1 06 19b 56 30? 391 389 399 601 695 699 729 871 769 929 1018 1 186 1119 998 1122 959 1086 925 1061 1 P1 7 832 865 821 739 691 679 751 1011 969 609 998 655 378 632 209 388 393 209 200 82 135 38 199 78 59CC 566* 6190 6057 6300
1951 1952 1953 1959 1955 26.9 39.9 39.6 36.3 27.2 33.9 35.0 32.7 93.7 27.1 35.8 33.8 93.6 35.3 36.5 93.8 98.2 92.8 53.6 50. 1 57.3 56.8 53.9 57.2 59.0 60.9 72.0 69.7 69.3 69.0 73.5 73.1 79.0 76.8 75.5 70.7 72.3 71.2 72.7 73.1 61.5 65.6 66.0 65.7 63.9 98.2 53.3 59.9 52.5 59.0 38.1 32.3 93.1 99.3 36.2 29.0 32.6 31.9 39.7 35.9 98.3 50.8 51.8 53.5 50.2 1970- 71 1971- 72 1972- 73 1973- 79 1979-75 0 29 92 8 0 0 15 0 9 198 273 107 166 199 589 97 397 321 381 770 771 960 758 8C3 977 1019 1239 1029 109 3 1018 1063 1162 1277 1029 958 83? 820 831 957 817 621 771 671 852 508 966 696 507 621 329 296 290 137 332 25 9 56 67 85 618* 581* 6505 577? 6 3 06
73.9 72.2 69.7 65.5 55.9 37.2 35.7 51.5 790 69 5637
1956 39.0 27.7 90.1 95.5 60.9 7 799 9 1 9 137 0 55CC
1957 25.8 90.7 39.1 91.9 36.8 335 87 5733
1958 32.9 37.9 32.8 99.6 35.8 1950 973 313 81 6 6 P
1959 1960 30.0 27.6 30.2 29.8 37.6 38.1 95.6 50.5 56.2 57.2 68.3 73.2 73.9 65.0 52.0 37.6 39.5 36.5 26.5 99.7 1979-8T 0 20 58 397 991 939
1961 1962 31.7 19.5 35.2 29.9 37.3 38.9 39.6 37.3 96.0 50. 3 55.7 59.8 60.9 66.1 65.5 66.7 71.5 72.9 7 9.8 72.2 72.5 68.7 56.3 62.9 65.9 50.0 53.9 57.9 39.7 91.3 91.7 27.7 33.8 28.5 98.9 99.7 50.8 Cooling Degree Days
1969 1965 30.6 35.0 27.9 27.9 33.0 29.0 96.6 51.2 58.8 57.1 65.0 63.9 75.8 72.7 70.9 70.2 62.5 5 5 7 52.7 55.1 90.0 93.3 33.2 35.0 99.7 99.6 - Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Total
50.5 1969 0 n
1966 28.6 28.9 92.5 99.6 58.7 69.6 1970 0 0 0 n 16 93 222 ?e? 90 0 0 0 653
1968 29.7 39.2 90.6 93.0 53.9 67.8 71.7 68.1 60.9 51.9 35.7 28.9 98.9 1971 p
1969 35.0 35.9 32.2 52.2 59.3 61.5 1972 p
1970 30.6 38.6 33.5 93.7 58.8 65.2 72.0 1973 0 0 0 n 2 138 199 270 21 1 0 0 631
1971 1972 32.1 30.5 30.6 36.2 38.5 99.8 97.8 98.5 59.2 57.0 69.0 68.3 70.6 70.2 72.8 71.0 57.5 62.1 99.9 52.1 39.1 32.9 33.9 29.9 99.5 99.9 1979 1975 0 0 0 c 0 0 C 0 36 3 176 69 3T7 296 157 192 39 39 0 5 0 0 0 0 71? 55*
1973 27.3 35.5 39.9 93.2 55.6 67.5 71.0 73.5 59.9 59.5 39.5 31.6 99.9 1976 0 0
1979 23.7 35.2 93.2 97.9 61.6 68.9 1977 0 0
1975 31.7 30.6 37.3 99.1 59.3 69.3 72.7 1978 0 0 0 0 12 152 308 171 103 2 0 0 7*8
1TT7C , 3 7 ,, ! 19 - rt 7 frf 7 1979 0 0 c p 2 112 275 163 102 7 0 0 661
1977 29.2 38.0 39.9 51.1 60.7 71.9 79.3 70.2 66.6 53.3 90.3 35.1 52.5
1978 25.8 31.9 93.3 50. 3 59.9 66.9 79.7 69.6 65.0 53.1 37.8 29.6 99.7
1979 RECORD 18.0 39.2 90.5 99.1 59.8 65.8 73.7 69.5 66.3 53.8 33.3 39.5 99.5
MEAN 30.0 32.9 38.7 97.5 56.7 66.7 72.7 71.3 62.7 51 .6 39.5 32.3 50.2
WAX 92.7 95.9 51.3 60.2 69.5 80.6 86.5 85.0 76.9 65.5 52.5 95.0 63.9
MIN 17.3 20.3 26.1 39.8 93.9 52.7 58.8 57.6 98.5 37.7 26.5 19.6 37.0
Precipitation Snowfall
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Annual Season July | Aug Sept| Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May|June|Total
1990 1.01 0.67 2.26 1.96 1.99 0.10 1.29 0.25 9.05 0.35 0.76 0.36 19.50 1990-91 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.0 6.3 9.0 1.9 10.2 8.3 0.0 0.0 9?.*
22.05 1992-93 0.0 o.r 0.9 9.6 9.1 9.5 5.0 1.9 7.3 7 9.5 u.o 36.8
0.77 0.15 16.59 1.0
1993 0.23 0.12 0.93 1.09 2.96 1.22 0.72 1.28 0.07 0.27 0.91 0.37 9.12 55.8
1995 1.08 0.70 0.99 0.13 2.55 2.32 2.02 2.19 2.55 1.17 0.78 0.90 0.09 15.39 1995-96 0.0 0.0 T 2.3 3.8 0.8 10.2 9.6 3.2 T 0.8 0.0 25.7
1997-98 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 6.9 6.9 23.7 7.3 22.0 5.5 T 0.0 79.*
1997 1.27 3.91 0.73 0.27 19.06 1998-99 0.0 0.0 9.8 0.9 13.6
1998 1.99 0.99 1.71 2.52 1.89 1.99 0.80 0.91 0.95 0.16 0.65 0.26 12.62 1999-5C 0.0 6.3
1950 0.97 0.20 0.31 2.98 2.80 3.32 0.56 0.27 1.58 1.36 0.12 1.00 0.32 13.93 1950-51 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 11.9 5.9 15.7 10.5 17.6 12.9 0.0 0.3 79.8
1952-53 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.2 19.5 3. 1 7.9 16.5 11.8 12.0 1.7 c.o 68.2
13.93 0.0 0.0 7.2 19.9
1953 0.39 1.39 1.15 1.29 2.66 1.96 1.98 1.25 0.20 0.99 1.00 1.02 19.23 0.0 8.6
1955 0.23 0.85 1.19 0.88 0.98 2.97 1.39 2.99 2.91 2.72 0.66 0.56 0.15 16.05 1955- 56 1956- 57 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 9.1 0.6 7.3 21.3 2.9 6. 3 6.3 5.3 IP.5 1.6 13.0 8.9 3.7 25.5 T 8.8 3.0 0.0 97.8 78.3
1956 1957 1958 0.39 0.32 0.73 0.77 0.73 1.00 0.89 1.09 1.98 0.72 9.13 1.73 2.36 7.31 9.96 0.99 1.09 1.97 9.17 1.29 3.50 1.83 2.03 1.17 0.01 0.92 1.51 0.27 2.62 0.37 1.25 0.99 0.79 0.62 0.06 0.69 13.72 21.58 18.80 1957- 58 1958- 59 1959- 60 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 T T 12.9 3.9 2.6 11.6 3 C 9.7 5.3 0.8 7.7 2. 7 8.9 17.9 10.7 12.0 17.5 18.3 19.9 26.8 9.0 19.1 17.6 9.3 0.0 T T O.C 0.0 3.0 57.1 99.3 80.0
1960 0.77 1.66 0.89 2.56 2.27 0.63 1.31 0.06 1.82 0.38 2.96 2.96 0.99 1.50 19.98 1960- 61 1961- 6? 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.6 9.6 6.2 5.1 11.9 17.8 3. 8 1.0 17.2 7.9 11.3 29.2 6.8 8.6 10.0 6.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 80.6 72.5
1961 1962 1963 0.07 1.33 0.71 0.66 1.05 0.21 2.51 0.52 1.92 1.06 1.10 0.03 9.12 0.89 0.68 1.11 1.52 3.59 1.60 0.59 0.55 1.21 0.96 2.52 9.67 0.19 1.25 0.77 0.05 0.31 0.93 0.68 0.95 0.30 0.17 0.51 19.01 8.95 12.23 1962- 63 1963- 69 1969-65 0.0 0.0 c.o 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.7 0.0 0.0 O.C 1.1 T 5.0 3.5 6. C 1.2 5.9 9.1 2.6 13.2 2.1 12.7 17.1 18.0 18.9 19.9 0.2 12.1 0.3 0.0 1.0 T 0.0 3.0 0.0 36.3 57.3 55.
1965 0.2b 1.00 1.27 1.38 1.20 1.05 1.82 0.82 9.19 6.91 1.06 2.58 0.95 0.36 0.53 21.87 1965- 66 1966- 67 c.o 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.5 T o.n 8.3 5.5 3.0 5.6 1.9 3.6 9.9 19.6 9.9 2.8 6.6 6.9 3.6 2.9 3.0 0.0 0.0 96. 90.7
0.96 0.32 0.17 10.81 1967-68 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.7 9.9 13.1 3.0 7.3 9.2 15.1 T 0.0 58.8
23.31
1968 0.51 0.79 0.85 2.39 0.71 0.50 1.39 2.53 0.59 0.75 0.71 0.51 12.13
1970 0.10 0.01 1.39 0.97 6.12 0.69 3.83 1.81 1.67 0.59 2.97 0.88 1.19 0.09 13.73 1970-71 0.0 0.0 9.6 5.9 9.2 0. 8.6 11.9 9.6 6.0 T 0.0 56.7
1972-73 c.o 0.0 0.0 9.7 19.9 9.8 12.1 3.C 15.1 29.8 1.0 0.0 99.
1972 1973 0.36 1.31 0.99 0.16 0.50 1.76 3.52 3.73 0.99 5.06 2.99 0.20 0.63 2.97 2.71 1.28 2.07 2.85 0.82 0.97 1.69 0.83 0.70 2.89 16.87 22.96 1979-75 c.o 0.0 1.8 1.0 11.9 2. 1 3.6 9.0 19.3 10.9 6.1 0.0 55.7
1979 1975 1.03 0.23 0.82 0.37 1.32 1.19 2.28 1.19 0.06 2.80 2.01 2.11 2.39 2.78 0.16 2.00 0.98 0.29 1.68 0.30 1 .06 1 .88 0.29 0.97 19.03 15.51 1975- 76 1976- 77 0.0 0.0 c.o 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.7 7.2 15.2 9.5 7.3 3.1 3.2 2.9 6.9 3.1 18.7 9.6 1.2 9.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5*.7 3*.
1976 0.19 0.59 1.39 1.27 1.39 0.63 2.31 2.50 1.88 0.93 0.32 0.16 13.91 1977- 78 1978- 79 0.0 0.0 p.n 0.0 0.0 T 3.3 2.7 9.1 6.9 r. 19.? 5.5 9.1 6.2 5.8 8.6 18.2 9.6 8.1 13.5 8.2 O.C 0.0 *6.5 73.2
1978 0.27 0.27 1.07 1.82 3.96 1.17 0.59 0.26 0.07 1.95 0.50 0.82 11.70
1979 0.39 0.92 1.25 1.91 3.53 2.39 0.81 5.85 0.36 1.28 1.66 1.06 20.36
RECORD MEAN 0.97 0.57 1.10 2.00 2.39 1.50 1.70 1.92 1.11 1.01 0.67 0.62 19.56 REC0PD MEAN c.o 0.0 1.7 3.6 8.0 6.6 8.3 7.7 12.8 9.9 1.9 T 59.9
* Indicates a station move or relocation of instruments. See Station Location table.-
Record mean values above are means through the current year for the period beginning in 1872 for temperature and precipitation, 1935 for snowfall. Temperature and precipitation are from City Office locations through 1934. Heating degree days are from City Office locations through Jime 1939. Snowfall if from City Office locations through June 1934. Otherwise the data are from Airport locations.
IV-G-4


BBOSinj)
PREVAILING AIR MOVEMENT
r, DRY. SUMMER AIR
I 2
MO/ST SPRING BREEZES
mi
M


A
AMk
o' 75'

l5o'
IV/ G 5


IV-H


CHAPTER IV-H
-SOLAR DATA-
Illustration 1 is a sun chart which locates the position of the sun at any time of the day, during any month at 40* north latitude which is the approximate latitude of the City Hall site. Map 9 shows the path of the sun as it crosses the site at various times of the year.
IV-H-1



SOLAR CHART
IV-H-2
altitude angles






CHAPTER IV-I
-ADJACENT LAND USES-
The Northglenn City Hall site is immediately bordered by Interstate 25 to the west, Northglenn Community Center to the north, Community Center Drive and Webster Lake to the east and a large tract of undeveloped land to the south. ( SEE MAP 10 )
A 132 unit Park View townhouse development is presently under construction across Community Center Drive and south of Webster Lake, and low profile single family residences line the west side of 1-25.
The vacant land to the south of the site is zoned for medium-
high density residential although discussions with Northglenn
planning officials indicate rezoning may be likely to acommodate 2
a 200,000 ft. corporate headquarters building. Never-the-less, its future status is uncertain.
The Northglenn Community Center to the north of the City Hall site is a two story low profile brick building with a sloped shingled roof. It houses a basketball court, volleyball courts, a swimming pool, weight room, game room and arts and crafts room.
A 300 seat theater provides a center for movies, theater, and community functions.
Webster Lake is approximately 720 feet by 620 feet and is encircled by a bike path/walking trail that links into the larger Northglenn system. There is a play lot and two recreational fields to the south of it. The entire lake is surrounded by large shade trees, and an irrigation canal borders its north and west sides.
IV-I-1


The location of the City Hall site adjacent to the Community Center and Webster Lake provides an opportunity for creating a community complex larger than the separate parts.
IV I 2


Cm]
ADJA
11
ENT LAND USES
SINGLE FAMILY RESIDE
HOLIDAY INN
VACANT LOT
can
\\ PARK
\
%
PARKVIE IN TO INNHOUSES
A
iork
o' 751
l5o'
IV-I-3


J
IV-J


CHAPTER IV-J
-SITE-
The Northglenn City Hall site is made up of approximately four acres of irregularly shaped land. Its broadest dimension faces south and is between 2 and 4 times greater than its north south depth. ( SEE MAP 11 ) This affords a good opportunity to incorporate solar features into the design. Curbs are installed on the east side of the site adjacent to Community Center Drive; the northern portion of the site slopes into a drainage ditch on its border; the west side fronts a right-of-way which slopes down to Interstate 25; and the southern portion slopes up to meet a vast open area.
The site was previously undeveloped and is covered with a low wild grass, and prairie dog mounds dot the landscape. Its openness, irregularity, and slope add to its rural features.
Even with the development projects that are taking place around the site, this aspect persists.
Views available from the site include a glimpse of the Rocky Mountains to the wast and southwest across 1-25. This view is partially obscured by residential rooftops on the opposite side of the freeway. The freeway itself is hidden down a sloped embankment which separates it from the site. Auto and truck noises are minimal because of this.
There is a clear view of the Northglenn Community Center to the north between irregularly spaced cottonwoods which border the drainage ditch and the bike path.
IV-J-1


To the east a pleasant view of Webster Lake opens on the opposite side of Community Center Drive along with its grassy banks and large shade trees. Because the lake has an embankment around its perimeter, the water is actually about the same level as the City Hall site.
To the southeast across Community Center Drive, townhouses are being built. Most of this area is still under construction, but its eventual appearance will be residential.
The view to the south of the site is blocked by a steadily rising slope of vacant land which is exactly like that on the City Hall site. Because of an uncertain development future, this view could vary from residential townhouses to a low profile corporation building.
The City Hall site has an easement 20 feet wide stretching parallel to its eastern boundary adjacent to Community Center Drive for a pipeline which belongs to the City of Thornton. There are no curb cuts now on the site, but two will be required on Community Center Drive.
IV-J-2


447. 3
75'
IV-J-3


V


CHAPTER V
-CODE REOUIREMENTS-
Design of the Northglenn City Hall shall meet or exceed all requirements and provisions of the handicapped access codes of the State of Colorado, the 1979 Uniform Building Code, the 1979 Uniform Fire Code, the 1979 Uniform Mechanical Code, the 1979 ICBO Plumbing Code, the 1978 National Electric Code and the Colorado State Energy Code. The Federal Standards for Prisons and Jails shall also be met or exceeded.
The following reports are analyses of the 1979 Uniform Building Code and The Federal Standards for Prisons and Jail's requirements for physical plants.


CHAPTER V-A
-1979 UNIFORM BUILDING CODE SEARCH-
1. FIRE ZONE DESIGNATION
2. OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION
A 3 Assembly Room for less than 300 people B 2 Municipal Police Stations
Office Buildings also
I 3 Jails
3. OCCUPANCY SEPARATION REQUIREMENTS
A3/B2 = No requirement for fire resistance.
I3/A3 = 3 Hr.
I3/B2 = 2 Hr.
TYPE II
4. EXTERIOR WALL FIRE RATINGS
A - 3 2 Hours less than
5 ft., 1 hr. elsewhere
B - 2 1 hr. less than
20 feet.
I - 3 Permitted in Types I and II
F. R. buildings only. 5. EXTERIOR WALL OPENINGS LIMITATIONS A 3
B 2 1-3
Not permitted less
than 5 ft. Protected less
than 10. feet.
-same-
See Item 4. Above.
sec. 601 sec. 701 sec. 503(a) sec.1001
sec. 503/ Table 5B
sec. 1901
Table 5-A
Table 5-A
V-A-1


6. FIRE-RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS
17-A
IN HRS.
F.R. lhr. N
Exterior Bearing Walls 4 1 N
Interior Bearing Walls 2 1 N
Ext Non Bearing Walls 4 1 N
Structural Frame 2 I N
Perm. Partitions 1 1 N
Shaft Enclosures 2 1 N
Floors 2 1 N
Roofs 1 1 N
Mazanine Floors lhr.
Openings 3/4hr. Fire protection when <20' from
Adj. property line. No openings in ext. walls housing A-3 5' from prop, line and no
openings in B<3' from prop. line.
*No openings shall be permitted in exterior walls of type II-F.R. buildings housing Group I Div. 3 less than 5* from property line.
*When openings are protected due to dist. from prop, line, sum of areas of open, shall not exceed 50% of
7. MAXIMUM FLOOR AREA: SPRINKLERED/UNSPRINKLERED
UNSPRINKLERED F.R. lhr. N.
square ft. for A-3 29,900 13,500 9,100
one story bldg. B-2 39,900 18,000 12,000
1-3 15,100 ( Not Permitted )
*Area for all stories of Multistory bldgs, shall not exceed twice the square footage for one story.
SPRINKLERED
For Area increases, including sprinklering.
8. MAXIMUM FLOOR HEIGHT: SPRINKLERED/UNSPRINKLERED UNSPRINKLERED (Max. height in stories)
F.R. ONE HR. N.
12 2 1
12 4 2
2 (Not Permitted)
SPRINKLERED
Height may be increased by on story with sprinklering.
Sec. 1904(b)
Sec. 504(b) wall
Table 5-C
Sec. 506
Table 5-D
Sec. 507
V-A-2


9. MEANS OF EGRESS-EXITS
A. Occupancy Load: sq. ft./occupant Table 33-A
1) Office-----------100 sq. ft.
2) Assembly Areas-----7 sq. ft.
3) Mech. Eq. Rm.---300 sq. ft.
B. Min. // of Exits *2 or more required if
occupancy exceeds:
1) Office---------------30
2) Assembly Areas-------50
3) Mech. Equip. Rm.-----30
C. Max Travel Distance
unsprinkled: 150'
sprinkled: 200'
Table 33-A
Sec. 3302(c)
D. CorridorsMax. Dead End20'
Min. Width----44"
Height--------7'
Sec. 3304(e) Sec. 3304(b) Sec. 3304(c)
E. MezzanineUse other than storage and greater Sec. 3302(a)
than 2000 sq. ft., or more than 60' in any dimension, shall have 2 stairways to adjacent floor.
Not more than (2) Mez. floors shall be in any rm Sec. 1904(b) No Mez. floor shall cover more than 33 1/3% of Sec. 1904(b)
any rm.
10. MEANS OF EGRESS-DOORS
A. :Section applies to doors serving more than Sec. 3303(a)
10 people.
B. :Doors swing in direction of exit travel
when serving 50 or more.
C. :Every exit door will give access to means Sec. 3303(h)
of egress.
Dimensions: 3'-0" x 6'-8" min. Sec. 3303(e)
Clear width of exit not less than 32"
11. STAIRS
A. Width:
50 occupants or more >44" 50 or less =36"
10 or less =30"
B. Rise/Run:
Rise >4" and <7%"
Run >10"
Sec. 3305(b)
Sec. 3305(c)
V-A-3


. C. Headroom:
6'-6" or more
D. Landings: Dimension = width of stair
in direction of travel. Need not exceed 4'-0" for straight run.
Door swing not to reduce width of landing to less than % its required width at any position in its swing nor by more than 7" when fully opened.
E. Dist. between landings
Not more than 12' vertically.
F. Roof Access
Bldings > 4 stories must have one stairway to roof.
G. Handrails: 30"-34" above nose of treads
extend 6" beyond top & bottom risers.
12. RAMPS
A. Widthsame as stairways
B. Slopenot to exceed 1:12 for those req. in 33-A. Other ramps not to exceed 1:8.
With fixed seating slope can't exceed 1:5.
C. LandingsRamps w/ slopes 1:15 have landings at top & bottom. On intermediate landing for every 5' of rise.
Must measure in direction of run >5' botton\>6'
D. HandrailsReq. for slope>l:15.
13. GUARDRAILS Req:
Unenclosed floor & roof openings, open & glazed landings L ramps, balconies or porches>30" above grade, & roofs used for service.
Height not less than 42"
14. LIGHT, VENTILATION Group B
Natural Light Glazing = 1/10 Floor Area Sec. 705
Ventilation Openings= 1/20 Floor Area or. .Artificial light & hvac.
Sec. 3305(f) Sec. 3305(g)
Sec. 3305(i) Sec. 3305(o)
Sec. 3306(b) Sec. 3306(c)
Sec. 3306(d) Sec. 3306(e)
V-A-3


15. EMERGENCY LIGHTING
Separate circuits, one of which is independently Sec. circuited and controlled are req. for exit lights in A-3 bldgs.
(2) Lamps not less than 15 watts ea. are required.
16. EXIT LIGHTING REQ.
A. Shall be illuminated at any time building is Sec.
occupied at intensity not less than 1 foot
candle.
B. Located at req. exit doorways for Group A-3 and other groups where occupancy exceeds 100.
17. VERTICAL OPENINGS LIMITS & FIRE RATINGS
A. Enclosures required for stairways, ramps, & Sec.
escalators serving more than 2 floors.
B. Openings into enclosures shall have self Sec.
closing fire assemblies w/ protective ratings
of 1 hr. for lhr. walls & l^hr. for 2hr. walls.
C. Shafts housing elevators going through 2 stories shall have vents to outside
18. TOILET RM. FIXT. REQ.
A. Employees>4 requires separate toilets.
B. Must have ext. window>3 ft.^ (openable) or vertical duct not less than 100 in.^ for 1st toilet facility and 50 in. for all others.
C. Stool: > 30" wide space
> 24" in front
Handicapped Facilities
A. One per sex on required floors (Tbl. 33-A)
B. Doorways leading to: Not < 30" wide.
C. Clear space on each side of outside dr.: 44"
D. Inside clr. space: 60" diameter circle.
E. Outside toilet Clr. Spc.: 42" wd. x 48" lng.
F. Grab bars: 32" to 34" above fir.
19. PENTHOUSE LIMITATIONS
A. Not to exceed 28' above roof for tank or Sec.
elevator enclosures.
B. All other cases, not to exceed 12
C. Area shall not exceed 33 1/3% of supporting rf.
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
3312(c)
3312
3308(a)
1706(b)
1706(d)
705
1711(b)
3601(a & b)
U-A-4


20. SKYLIGHT REQUIREMENTS
A. Detailed construction & Placement Requirements (Glass)
B. (Plastic)Max. Area. For CC1 Mater.: 200ft^
Per Unit * For CC2 Mater.: lOOft^
*Aggregate Area: <33 1/3% of roof for CC1
<25% for CC2
*Separation: 4' or greater *From ext. walls: 8'
21. FURNACE & BOILER ROOM RESTRICTIONS
Must have two means of egress when:
A. Area of rm. >500 ft.
B. Largest piece of fuel fired equip. > 400,000BTUH
22. CHIMNEY HEIGHT & CONST. REQ,
For building heating type:
A. Wall thickness: 8"-12"
B. Height above roof: 3'
C. Height above any part of building w/ in 10': 2'
D. Clearance to combustable construction:
Interior: 2"
Exterior: 2"
23. SPRINKLER REQUIREMENTS Group A:
A. In basements > 1500 ft.^
B. Enclosed usable space above or below stairways.
C. Over enclosed platforms > 500 ft.^
24. STANDPIPE REQUIREMENTS
A. Group B-2 bldgs. <4 stories high, but
>20,000 ft.^ per floor.:
B. Nonsprinklered bldgsClass II standpipes
Hose req.?YES
C. Sprinklered bldgs------No standpipes req.
No hose req.
Sec. 3401 Sec. 5207
Sec. 3320(a)
Table 37-B
Sec. 3802(b)
Table 38-A
V-A-5


CHAPTER V-B
-FEDERAL STANDARDS FOR PRISONS & JAILS-Because of the importance of the Physical Plant standards, it is expected that particular attention will be paid to the standards for new facilities in plans for new construction, and that existing facilities will develop plans for meeting the applic able standards over time.
Standards 1.01 through 1.14 apply both to existing and new facilities. 2.01 applies to new facilities only.
Existing and New Facilities
1.01 All housing units (including dormitories, rooms and cells)' and activity areas provide for at a minimum:
Lighting of at least 30 foot candles as measured in accordance with standards developed by the American Society of Illuminating Engineers, which may be operated by the occupant in single cells and rooms;
Heating and ventilating systems to maintain humane comfort in accordance with the Guide Book for the American Society of Heating,
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers;
Acoustics that ensure noise levels which do not interfere with normal human activities (Range not to exceed 65-70 decibels in daytime and 40-45 decibels at night for residential area);
Toilets, showers, wash basins, drinking fountains and hot and cold running water accessible to all inmates, in numbers specified by nationally recommended applicable codes and;
Access to natural light.
In addition, each inmate has a bed,.desk or table, shelf, hooks or closet space, and chair or stool in the room, cell or dormitory.
V-B-1


1.02
When required by the function of the facility, there is sufficient space for a separate and distinct intake/booking area.
1.03 The facility has at least one special purpose cell or room to provide for the temporary detention of persons under the influence of alcohol or narcotics or for persons who are uncontrollably violent or self-destructive.
Discussion: See related standards in Health Care Services.
1.04 A secure property room is provided for the secure storage of items of inmates' personal property. (Not applicable to Long-Term Institutions)
1.05 There are storage rooms for clothing, bedding and facility supplies.
1.06 Dormitory living units house no more inmates than can be safely and effectively supervised in a dormitory setting with a minimum of 60 square feet of floor space per inmate (excluding activity space).
Discussion: Dormitories are large multiple-
occupancy rooms that can be used to house inmates who do not need to be segregated and who pose relatively little risk to the facility or to other inmates. Living conditions should be enhanced by placing privacy partitions between beds and by increasing the space between beds as much as possible.
1.07 Staff offices are readily accessible to inmates and a mininum of physical barriers separate inmates from staff.
1.08 Appropriate employee space is provided for administrative, custodial, professional and clerical staff, including conference rooms, employee lounge, storage room for records, public lobby and toilet facilities.
1.09 Space for food preparation is based on facility size.
Discussion: Where food is prepared in the facility,
the kitchen area should be approximately 10 square feet per inmate; this may be reduced proportionally for larger facilities. Kitchen equipment and food storage facilities should be sufficient for preparation of the necessary quantities of food and high quality meals.
V-B-2


1.12 Where the facility maintains an arsenal, space is provided outside of inmate housing and activity areas for the secure storage, care and issuance of weapons, chemical agents, and other related security equipment.
1.13 Handicapped inmates are housed in a manner which provides for their safety and security. Handicapped inmates are housed
in cells or housing units which are accessible to and usable by them, and which provide the maximum possible integration with the rest of the population. All institutional programs and activities are accessible to and usable by handicapped inmates confined in the facility.
1.14 All parts of the facility which are accessible to the public are accessible to and usable by handicapped persons.
New Facilities Only
2.01 All cells and rooms have natural light and have, at a minimum, 70 square feet of floor space for detention facilities and 80 square feet for long-term institutions, with no less than 7 feet between walls and no less than 8 feet between the floor and ceiling.
V-B-3



VI


CHAPTER VI
-USER NEEDS ANALYSIS-
Prior to the City of Northglenn's request for architects to bid, the City's Department of Community Development headed an exhaustive analysis of space needs for a new City Hall, working closely with all of the governmental personnel who would be housed in the new facilities. The following report entitled "Northglenn City Government Space Needs Study" is included in its entirety.
VI-1


-IA
y
>
M
I l: J,J i rt^Ld dl \l
CITY
GOVERNMENT
SfYHDE
NEEE)S
STUD/


TABLE OF CONTENTS
CITY MANAGERS OFFICE ..........................................VI-4
%
CITY ATTORNEY'S OFFICE .........................................VI-6
COUNCIL/COURT ..................................................VI-7
POLICE DEPARTMENT ..............................................VI-8
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT ................................VI-12
PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT .................................VI-14
PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT .........................................VI-16
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES .................................VI-17
FINANCE DEPARTMENT ..............................................VI-10
GENERAL AREAS ...................................................VI-19
ADDITIONAL AREAS NOT INCLUDED IN
PROJECTED NET SPACE ..........................................VI-20
SUMMARY .........................................................VI-21


>' CITY MANAGER'S OFFICE City Manager 225 Secretary Reception Legal Library Conf. Room
Conference Room 175 City Mgr.
Director of Management Services/Assistant City Manager 200 City Mgr.
Administrative Assistant 150 City Mgr.
Receptionist 50 Main Entry Supervisor
Secretary 120 City Mgr.
d
i Secretary 100 1st Sec'y
City Clerk 150 f City Mgr.
Central Files (Vault) 300 City Clerk
Records Manager (2) / Deputy City Clerk 150 Central Files
Mag Typing 100 All Depts.
Public Information 140. City Mgr. Area
NET AREA CITY MGR/MGMT SERV 1860
Desk, armchair, table, credenza, sofa, 2 guest chairs, 2 vertical files, 20 lineal feet books
For staff meetings of 10-12. Table, approximately 42" x 120", 12 chairs.
Desk, armchair, table or credenza, space for 5 guest chairs, 1 lateral file, 15 lineal feet books, window
Desk, armchair, credenza (with files), 2 guest chairs Receptionist in lobby: desk, secretarial chair
Desk, typing return, secretarial chair, 10 lineal feet books, 4 file cabinets, guest seating for 6, 8 lineal feet counter (to control access to City Manager). Work area Table (perhaps in conference room), supply storage, small Xerox machine
Desk, typing return, secretarial chair
Desk, armchair, credenza, 3 guest chairs, 2 vertical file cabinets, 15 lineal feet books
Fire-proofed room with microfilm table or counter space (12 lineal feet) for cameras and read-out, etc. 3 chairs. Paper shredder in proximity of vault (3j square feet)
2 desks, 2 typing returns, 2 chairs, 1 work table. Office space adjacent to and connecting with Central Files.
Mag typewriter, secretarial chair, shelf storage for disks, sound insulation
Desk, typing return, secretarial chair, 1 4-drawer file, possible light table, 2 guest chairs, drafting table w/stool


, CITY MANAGER'S OFF ICE continued
Personnel Director Personnel Assistants (2) Secretary
Receptlonist/Secretary
(2)
File Room I ntern (future)
Interview Rooms (2) Testing Room
I
in NET AREA PERSONNEL
Purchasing Agent Secretary/Receptionist Buyer (future)
NET AREA PURCHASING
Mai I Room.
NET AREA MAIL ROOM

'150 Lobby
200
100 Personnel Director
200 Department
100 100 Secretary
300 Personnel Assistants
100 If
1250
150 Secretary
100 P. Agent
125 Secretary
375
100
100 #
Desk, armchair, credenza, conference table with 4 guest chairs, 15 lineal feet books
2
2 offices, 100 ft. ea. 2 desks, 2 chairs, 2 work tables, 45 lineal feet books (catalogs) each
Desk, typing return, secretarial chair
Desk, typing return,'secretarial chair, 5 guest chairs, 8 4-drawer vertical files (centrally located), 5 tablet armchairs for filling out applications Secured file room for stored records and files
Enclosed space but dividable: 3 small rooms for oral boards of 5 people each (3 tables and 15 chairs) and training of 20 Two typewriter stations and counter space
Desk, armchair, credenza, 3 guest chairs, 50 lineal feet books
Desk, typing return, secretarial chair, 1 or 2 guest chairs, __files
Separate office
If outer room to the Print Shop should have window into printing area: large Xerox with collator, 8 lineal feet of mail counter with paper storage cabinet below


r
CITY ATTORNEY'S
OFFICES
City Attorney '200 Council
City Mgr.
Legal Secretary/ 150 C. Attorney
Receptionist Library
Law Library/Law Clerk Station 300 Reception
NET AREA_____
CITY ATTORNEY
i
cn
Desk, armchair, credenza, table, 6 guest chairs
Desk, typing return, secretarial chair, 4 2-drawer lateral files (2 can be stacked), 3 guest chairs
Access from Reception, no exterior windows, 30" x 60" work table, 6 chairs 1500 lineal feet shelving, desk and chair


' COUNCI L/COURT
Councll/Court Room 1750 Seating for 100, speaker's raised podium with microphone, projection screen, tack space, curved table with locked drawers or desk for each Council member, table for City Clerk and Deputy Clerk, table or tablet armchairs for the press, staff table or counter to side for staff preparation. Court: impressive desk or judge's bench, prosecution table for 2, defense table for 2, court clerk station by judge,
Court Room 800 Mayor chalkboard, calendar, tack space, jury seating for 6, comfortable witness chair, p.a. system, podium with microphone, space for future court recorder
Council Secretary 135 Publ ic Council Desk, typewriter table, 2 guest chairs, 1 4-drawer file, supply cabinet for Council (3'-6" x 1'-6" x 6'H.), bookshelf
Council Board Room 400 Council Roon 3'-6" x 18' conference table, 20 chairs, display and tack space, space for storing and distributing of data for Council, refrigerator, phone
Council Study 300 Council Anteroom for Council Board Room, $ desks with file drawer each side (1
< Board Room desk for each Council member ), 3 chairs
i Jury Room -0 225 Court Restroom, seating for 6 jurors around table. Lockable, away from judge's chambers and attorney's office
Judge's Chambers 200 Court Executive desk, armchair, credenza, 5 guest chairs, bookcase for 30 lineal feet books, wardrobe for gown. Access to front of court.
Prosecuting Attorney/ 150 Judge Shared office. Desk, armchair, credenza, 3 guest chairs
Assistant Judge , .
Court Clerk 400 Judge 3 desks with typing returns, 6 vertical files, 8 lineal feet of counter with cash register (protected) and storage below for tickets, subpoenas, and other forms, space for storage (presently 3 large storage cabinets)
Mayor's Office NET AREA 250 4610 Desk, chair, round conference table w/4 chairs
COUNCI l/court" * .


' POLICE DEPARTMENT
Lobby 275
Restroom(s) 40 ea. 40 ea. Lobby
1 ntervlew Room lOOea. lOOea. Lobby
Phone/F 1 ngerpr 1 nt 1 ng Area 25 Lobby
Receptionist 70 Lobby Records
Records 250 Receptionist
< *

CD
Chief 200 Public Department
Crime Prevention Tech 200 Public
Captain 175 Chief
Library/Conference 300 Staff Services
Secretary 135 Chief
Fileroom/Storage 100 Secretary
Work Area 135 Secretary
Staff Lieutenant 150 Staff
* Services
Seating for 10 guests, wall display space, professional business environment
Men's and Women's 1 water closet and 1 lavatory (Code may not require
2 restrooms.)
Table, 4 chairs, attractive, relaxing
Public telephone, 7 lineal feet of counter: 4' at 42" height for finger printing, 3' at phone with 1 chair (can be in cove off of library)
Glass barrier to receptionist and records. 5 lineal feet of counter with typing station, switchboard, storage
3 desks with typing returns, 3 secretarial chairs, 5 4-drawer files, private. Semi-private area for computer terminal, 1 72" x 36" table, small Xerox, cash drawer, tack space. Perhaps space for monitor of all building systems?
Desk, swivel armchair, credenza, 5 guest chairs, tack space, private
Includes space for 2: desk, chair, 1 5-drawer letter file, credenza with files, 6 guest chairs, walk-in closet with shelves
Desk, armchair, credenza, 4 guest chairs, tack space, private
Table, 15 chairs, 50-60 lineal feet books, wall tack space, overhead screen
Desk, typing return, secretarial chair, credenza, 2 guest chairs, semi-private
2 42" lateral files, 5 4-drawer existing files, shelves for paper storage Xerox, shelving for office supplies, work table, postage meter Desk, chair, credenza, 2 guest chairs, tack space


. / i/P on >q. cer o scr n
' POL ICE continued
Records Supervisor 125 Records Desk, chair, 2 guest chairs, 2 5-drawer letter files
Planning & Training Officer 150 Desk, chair, 4 5-drawer files, books. Walk-in closet with 40" door for uniforms, briefcases, books, video equipment
Planning & Training Room 550 P & T Officer Multi-purpose, could be for community and interdepartmental use. 30-40 stack chairs, 1 table, chalkboard and tack space
Expansion Space 575 Additional space for staff services
Detective Lieutenant 150 Division Desk, chair, 4 guest chairs, 1 file, desk com radio
Supervisor 125 Detectives Desk, chair, 4 guest chairs, 1 file
. Detectives c 4 800 Modular partitioning in open space: 7 desks, 7 chairs, 1 2-drawer file each or file capability in desk, 7 guest chairs, 7 phones, expansion space for 3 additional detectives, tack space
vo Juvenile Officer 150 Desk, chair, 3 guest chairs, 1 file, 1 bookcase, tack space
1 nterview/Line-up Room 240 Detectives Private, 2 48" x 36" tables, 4 chairs. Room also used for 7 person line-up: sound-proof, intercom system, two-way glass between
Reception 150 Division Desk, typing return, secretarial qhair, 1 4-drawer letter file, 1 8-drawer 3x5 card file (new), credenza with transcriber inside, 4-6 guest chairs (screened from detective and interview area)
Detective Conference/ Library 250 Division Table, 10 chairs, 25-30 lineal feet books, chalk and tack space, phone, ventilated well
Storage Closet 100 Detectives Receptionist Shelves: Form storage, equipment, 1 4-drawer lateral intelligence file, lockable
Crime Scene Tech 120 Evidence .Desk, chair, 2 guest chairs, 2 2-drawer vertical files
Darkroom and Lab 550 Crime Scene T ech


r POLICE continued
Evidence Storage 400 Sally Port
Sally Port 400 Sally Port
Property Storage 256 Sally Port
Patrol Lieutenant 150 Division
Sargents (3) 225 Lieutenant
Secretary 120 Patrol Division
. Briefing 250 Division.
^ Report i 250 Division
cd Lounge 225 Patrol
Armory 15 Entry/Exit
Code Enforcement (3) 200
Air Lock 25 Car Port
Processing 150 .
1 nterrogation/Holding 320 Processing Entry
Men's Room/Lockers 900 Patrol
Women's Room/Lockers 200 Patrol
Interview Rooms (2) lOOea. lOOea.
Secure, storage bins on 3 walls, vault with shelving and files, open floor, desk, chair
Garage with acess to Evidence Storage area Storeroom, may be outdoors if secure
Desk, chair, 4 guest chairs, 1 file
3 desks, 3 chairs, partitioning, tack space, duty roster. Includes space for 1-2 additional sargents
i
Table, 20 chairs, 1 chalkboard, L-shaped room with sargents at bend for oncoming and outgoing shifts
15 3' wide carrels on counter, pigeon holes, tack space
Sofa, lounge chairs, kitchenette (full-size refrigerator, coffee, microwave sink, stove), 3 vending machines, TV, bulletin board, 2 tables, 8 chairs
Storage of ammunition
3 desks, 3chairs, 4 guest chairs, 40 lineal feet books, ___files
Counter, fingerprinting, pistol lock-up, storage, video camera, files
4 holding cells with secure interrogation area adjacent to each containing
1 24" x 36" table and 2 chairs each
2 waterclosets, 2 urinals, 2 lavatories, 2 showers, 80 lockers (total to be shared with Women's Room), briefcase storage
1 watercloset, 1 lavatory, 1 shower, 10 lockers, briefcase storage


t L -1 A
POLICE continued
Exercise Room
400
Emergency Generator
NET AREA POLICE
300
11,316
Includes 15' x 20' emergency generator, electrical/telephone closet (A* x 6') as required.


Area/Posmon
WCJ I % V
-jenc, o
COMMUNITY DEVELOPM ENT
Reception .450 Counter
Building Official 150 1nspectors Reception
Inspectors' Room/Plan Check Room 250 Bldg. Off'l Reception
Director 200 Secretary Bldg. Off'l City Planner Prin. L.A. Reception Intern
Planner/Student Intern 100 Director
Department Secretary 100 Director City Planner
Department Conference Room/library 225 Department
City Planner 150 Director Planners Drafting Reception
Planner 1 (Planning & Zoning) 'Drafting Room/Planner 1 (Land. Design & Const.) 100 300 City Planner P. W. Draft. Planners Director
cn

Counter of 12-15 lineal feet, 24" depth, 42" height, 3-4 guest chairs, tack-display space, 7 4-drawer vertical files, 3 clerical stations behind counter
Separate office with window: Desk, worktable, 2 guest chairs, 10 lineal feet books. Close to reception, but hot visible.
5 small desks, 1 2-drawer file each or in desk, 5 chairs, 40 lineal feet books. Plan check table 36" x 72", 4 guest chairs, 1 plan storage file, plan pigeon holes, 12" x 16" slots, 50 lineal feet books, tack space
Desk, armchair, credenza, 48" diameter table, 4 guest chairs, 1 file, 20 lineal feet books, tack wall
Semi-private work station: desk, chair
Semi-private, desk, typing return, secretarial chair, 2 guest chairs. Not directly accessible to counter
42" x 108" table, 8 chairs, projection, books and reference materials (wall for books and audio-visual cabinet). Away from noise of counter for meetings with architects, builders, contractors, staff, economic development activities
Exterior window, desk, chair, 35" x 72" table, 3 guest chairs, 1 42" lateral file, 20 lineal feet books, 1 guest chair
Semi-private, desk, chair, table, 10 lineal feet books, 1 guest chair
3people at capacity: 2 drafting boards, 2 drafting stools,2- 36" x 72" work tables, light table, 1 full-size desk for planner with chair, 1 small desk for intern
Drafting Rooms of Community Development, Public Works, and Natural Resources will be interconnected.


f COMM. DEV. continued Print Room
Storage
Coffee ,
NET AREA
COMMUNITY DEVELOPM
i
CJ
120
120
2265
:nt
Drafting
Department
Blueprint machine, flat file, 36" x 72" table, 6' x6' plan storage, labeling, binding machine
Shelves on one wall. Form and paper storage, old files and drawings, coffee supplies
Coffee counter area: niche in hallway or drafting room counter with storage below


< PARKS & RECREATION
Director 200 Department Reception 2 Supts.
Recreation Superintender t 150 Director Rec. Supr.
Parks Superintendent, 150 Director Action Secretary
Recreation Supervisors (2) 250 Rec. Supt. Rec. Leader;
Recreation Leaders (3) 300 Rec. Supr. Reception
Department Secretary 125 Director
tx Clerk Typists (2) 200 Reception Recreation
Intern/Work Room / Park District Superviso 350 r Department
'Conference Room * 150 Department
Principle Parks Planner 175 Parks Superintendent
Parks Planner I 150 Principle Planner
Draftsman 125 Principle Planner
Private, desk, armchair, credenza, 42" diameter table, 2 guest chairs, 12 lineal feet books, tack space (4')
Private, desk, chair, reference table, 4 guest chairs, 20 lineal feet books, tack space (4')
Private, desk, chair, reference table, 4 guest chairs, 20 lineal feet books, tack space (4'), possible drafting table
Private, desk, chair, reference table, 4 guest chairs, 20 lineal feet books, tack space (4')
3 desks, 3 chairs, 3 guest chairs, 18 lineal feet books (6' each), screened from public
Partially private, desk, typing return, secretarial chair, 1 guest chair, 1 2-drawer vertical letter file, 6 lineal feet books
Desk, typing return, secretarial chair, 6 lineal feet books
2 desks, 2 typing returns, 2 secretarial chairs, 12 lineal feet books (6' each)
15 lineal feet counter, 24" deep ( 2o desks), 5 chairs, 8 lineal feet additional counter work space, 48" x 96" table, 2 4' x 4' tackboards,4 phone jacks. Work room: Xerox, counter ditto machine, stationery and supply storage, room for 4 people to work, 10 lineal feet counter 18" deep
Table, 8 chairs, tack space with 2 shelves below
Houseplants throughout department to act as screens
Desk, 36" x 72" reference table, chair, drafting stool, 48" x 96" layout table, stick file 4' x 4', 2 guest chairs, storage cabinet w/shelves, tack walls
Desk w/chair, drafting board w/stool, layout table, plan file, '
2 guest chairs
Desk w/chair, drafting board w/stool, layout table, plan file,
2 guest chairs '


;






























mm


A Po n enc )
- PUBLIC WORKS .
Director 200 Community Development
Assistant City Engineer 150 Drafting
Assistant Director' 150 Director
Secretary 100 Director
Drafting Room 475 Department Print Shop
^ R.O.W. Inspector 100

L Space for 2 future offices 225
CTi
NET AREA PUBLIC WORKS 1400

L. I I |
Desk, armchair, sofa, low table, 2 guest chairs, 1-2 lateral files, 20 lineal feet books, tack space
Ded<, armchair, 36" x 60" reference table, 2 guest chairs, 1 lateral file, 20 lineal feet books, tack space
Desk, chair, 2 guest chairs, tack space
Desk, typing return, secretarial chair, 3 guest chairs, possible shared use of small area of counter with Community Development and reception with Natural Resources
3 drafting boards (plus one additional in future), 3 reference tables, ___
plan files, files, tack space
Desk, chair. Access to counter area, but semi-private.
Drafting Rooms of Community Development, Public Works, and Natural Resources will be interconnected.
Once-weekly meetings and Action meetings will need to take place in Action Conference Room.


A l-1 A
. AP6a/ i osliivm Ft AdJ icy W IK-U
NATURAL RESOURCES
Director 200 City Mgr. Desk, armchair, large credenza, round table, 4 guest chairs, 36" x 60" reference table, rolled plan storage, 20 lineal feet books, tack space
Chief Engineer 175 Director Desk, armchair, credenza, 2 guest chairs, sofa lounge, 36" x 60" reference table, 1 lateral file, rolled plan storage, 20 lineal feet books, tack space
Administrator 150 Director Desk, armchair, 2 guest chairs, 30" x 60" reference table, sofa lounge, 1 file, rolled plan storage, tack space
Engineering Tech 11 / Inspector/Engineering Tech I 200 Chief Engr. 2 Desk,2chairsi 3 guest chairs 2-30" x 60" reference table 2 bookcase, 3olineal feet books,2rolled plan storage, tack space
Civil Engineer i ^Secretary (2) '0 200 Director 2 desks, 2 typing returns, 2 secretarial chairs, 2 guest chairs. Space at counter.
Clerk Typist 100 Department Desk, typing return, secretarial chair, 3 guest chairs, 1 file, 24" x 48" reception table. Perhaps radio dispatching equipment will be at this location.
Meter Readers 150 Administrate 3 desks, 3 chairs, 1 guest chair, 3 files (or desks with file drawer)
Llason Officer 125 Administrate Desk, chair, 3 guest chairs, low table, 2 files, 2 bookcases, 20 lineal feet books
Records Room 125 Department 10 files, work table, steel storage (2)
^Drafting Room 200 Department 3 drawing files, drafting table, conference table, 3 guest chairs, reproduction machine
Conference Room 100 Department 1 low table, 5 guest chairs, 30" x 60" chalkboard, storage for surveying equipment
NET AREA 1875 * Drafting Rooms of Community Development, Public Works, and Natural Resources will be interconnected. (
NATURAL RESOURCES


. ArWn^os ' F.. _ u c 1 < i rip
r FINANCE
Director 200 City Mgr. Private, desk, armchair, credenza, A guest chairs, 10 lineal feet books
Deputy Director 150 Director Private, desk, armchair, credenza, guest chairs
Tax Auditor/Sales Clerk 200 Semi-private area: 2 desks, 2 chairs, 2 guest chairs, 2 files
Accounting 5A0 Department 5 desks with reference shelves, 5 chairs, 1 work table, files. Space included for 6th station.
Utility Billing (A) 360 Finance Account'ing Grouped together as unit of Accounting area 1
Records/Vault 200 8 5-drawer files (fire-proof and lockable), 8 lineal feet of counter, 100 lineal feet shelving
. Secretary 120 Director Desk, typing return, secretarial chair, 2 guest chairs, 2 files
Cashier/Receptlon c 80 Lobby Located in Main Lobby. Space fpr 2 cashiers, 5 lineal feet of counter with form storage below, 2 cash registers, 2 stools, locked up at day's end
coData Processing 250 All Depts. Central Data Processing. Desk, secretarial chair, 36" x A8" table, 2 guest chairs, lineal feet shelving
NET AREA FINANCE 2100 f


GENERAL AREAS
Lobby 400 Traffic area to other parts of building. Small waiting area (2 sofas and coffee table), display of City seal, trophies, etc. Will handle breaks from Council meetings. Receptionist (50 sq. ft. reception desk with switchboard and typing space readily accessible to Main Entry) and Cashiers (80 sq. ft.) in Lobby to handle many of public needs.
Action Conference | 400 Comm. Dev. Parks' & Rec Public Works 1 conference table, 20 chairs, sliding map panels (minimum dimension 42"), tack space
Employee Lounge 400 Tables and chairs for 45-50 maximum. Small kitchen area with cabinets, sink, refrigerator, and microwave, vending machines. (Have separate vending area for public). Reading corner with sofa and magazine/book storage.
. Storage c 300 Dead files, central purchasing area office supplies. 7 ballot boxes stored temporarily, etc.
VTelephone Room mm* 100 Telephone switching room
VO Restrooms 100 ea. 100 ea.
Print Shop (storage) 1200 Print shop: offset press, paper cutter, light table, small tack space, counter w/paper storage below, work tables, collator, camera, master copier. Dark room: sink & counter, plate burner, film developing counter, separate switching for dark room and print shop. May be in conjunction with mail room.
Staff Restroom/ Showers/Lockers 750 Men: 1 water closet, 1 urinal, 2 showers, 15-20 lockers (12" w x 36" h) Women: 2 water closets, 2 lavatories, 2 showers, 10-15 lockers (12" w x 36" h)
Janitor 125 Utility sink, floor drain
NET AREA 3875 * 1


ADDITIONAL AREAS NOT INCLUDED IN PROJECTED NET SPACE
Mechanical 2000-2400
Electrical 1 100
>t
l
N)
O
icy
u
ipt
6%+ of gross area
Electrical distribution closets


SUMMARY NET SPACE NEEDS
l
Function Current/Projected Personnel Current/Proj ected Space Needs
City Manager 8/11 1890/1860
Personnel 4/5 1234/1250
Purchasing 2/3 203/375
City Attorney 2.5/3 362/650
Council/Court 3/6 1770/4610
Police 57/85 3858/11,316
Community Development 13/16 1890/2265
Parks and Recreation 16/15 1550/2425
Public Works 6/10 1480/1400
Natural Resources 3/14 393/1875
Finance 11/17 1365/2100
General Areas Lobby /400
Action Conference 325/400
Employee Lounge 236/400
Storage 111/300
Telephone Room 48/100
Restrooms /100 ea. /100 ea.
Print Shop (Storage) /1200
Staff Restrooms/Showers/ Lockers /750
Janitor /125
TOTAL 34,101


VII


CHAPTER VII
-OTHER CITY HALLS-
In an effort to see how other design professionals have solved problems similar to the one I am now facing, I am including a number of articles about City Halls from architectural magazines.
All have something to offer in terms of space use, form, orientation, scale, and the relationship to the setting. All are attempts to solve physical design problems with respect to municipal governments. AIT have something to offer because their designers at some point had to go through a similar process that I am undertaking now.
The resulting solutions differ with respect to the individual designers, the unique locale and time in which they are set.
VII-1


High tech images
-ij
j- 11 - la ra LZh -.crL 1 [' ~**i IS
At glancing angles (opposite page), the skin of the City Hall covers all surfaces in a seemingly uniform sheen. At night (above), the ratio of view glass to the spandrel glazing become obvious.
Part of San Bernardinos larger redevelopment plan, the new City Hall is at once a reflective yet an absorptive influence on the city, expressed in Los Angeles terms
Joan Didion in Slouching Towards Bethlehem describes San Bernardino as haunted by the Mojave just beyond the mountains, devastated by the hot dry Santa Ana wind that comes down the passes at 100 miles an hour and whines through the eucalyptus windbreaks and works on the nerves.
It is here in the old downtown center of the city of 100,000 that one of the best city halls in California has risen. The building is the shape of the street which was closed to form the site, and it recalls something Ignazio Gardella saidhe wanted his buildings to remember what was there before them. The City Hall is by way of being a six-story street. Something else was remembered, unintentionally. When the solar
bronze glass-surfaced structure was dedicated last year, a speaker said that the line of light standards with red globes called to mind that in pioneer days a row of red lights in about the same position lit small business ventures. (Laughter.)
They can afford to laugh in San Bernardino because they have successfully carried through a $100 million redevelopment project for which 93 acres were cleared. Beside the City Hall it includes an exhibit hall/convention center under the raised plaza, an 1100-car parking structure and a 350,000-sd' ft enclosed civic mall across the street to the west. To come are a hotel which will be tied to the convention center at basement level and a civic theater to the north of City Hall. Three department stores and 70 shops will eventually face the mall-
The revitalization of the downtown core has reversed the dwindling retail sales; it has also created a new financial cen ter. Five banks at the fringe include the new Security-Pacif|C by Gruen Associates (Diana and Cesar Pelli). The Gruen of-
V 111-2



fice has been in on the project since the earliest studies in 1963, with Daniel Branigan in charge of planning.
The 600' x 600' blocks and 80-ft-wide streets, laid out by the Mormons in 1851, invited a monumental building with a grand approach. But Cesar Pelli turned the short side of the building toward the street, pressed the parking structure against it and planned the civic theater to push in close. He wanted the City Hall tight in its site.
A man-made rise of 18 ft from street to street does allow a modest solemnity to the leisurely approach. In a city as flat as a tortilla, the suggestion of hill won unexpected approval even though it was the result of ceiling-height considerations in the convention center below the plaza. Another reason ,or the change of grade was to lift the second story of City Hall 10 the top level of the mall in order to connect the two by a bridge. A jolly neighborly thing to do, and rare indeed for a city hall, a retail development and a parking structure to be > terconnected. More cars will be brought in when the four co ners of the civic center, which have been opened to private developers, are filled in.
The parking structure is the only element in the tight Plan ning of civic center to indicate that land was plentiful. Its P^ ence is like a low-growing native, its runners the bridge
circular stair; from these springs a dark exotic, the City
Hal>-


Sal
SSB5S

i in
CITY HALL BUILT FROM WINNING DESIGN
This handsome civic group, incorporating all of the citys offices within its block-square dimensions, resulted from a $2,400,000 municipal bond issue and a statewide two-stage competition for its design. The winning team (originally Stafford, Morin & Long-wood) is a Eugene firm. The solution chosen uses the elegant device of a raised plaza on which to place the structures. This has special advantages: a monumental stairway approach at the main entrance, preservation, as a key part of the landscaping, of a large and old walnut tree, and provision of the required parking under the plaza. The council chamber, set in a reflecting pool (whose translucent bottom daylights the parking area), is the focal point for the plaza. Works of art, specially commissioned from Northwest artists, symbolizes the regions natural features and attributes. The building won an award of merit in the Southwest Oregon, A.I.A., 1964 honors program.
City Hall, Eugene, Oregon. Architects: Morin & Lockwood; structural engineer: W. W. Wilson: mechanical engineers: Marquess & Marquess; electrical engineers: Marquess & Yates; landscape architects: Lloyd Bond & Associates; artists: Jan Zach, sculptor and Andrew Vincent, moralist; contractors: Gale M. Roberts Company _ T t