Citation
Corporate headquarters for Columbine Systems, Inc.

Material Information

Title:
Corporate headquarters for Columbine Systems, Inc.
Alternate title:
Columbine Systems corporate headquarters
Creator:
Bormann, Paul Edward
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
124 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, charts, maps, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Office buildings -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Golden ( lcsh )
Office buildings ( fast )
Colorado -- Golden ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title: Columbine Systems corporate headquarters.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Paul Edward Bormann.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
13238443 ( OCLC )
ocm13238443
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1985 .B665 ( lcc )

Full Text
fto/e \maa/a/
Columbine Systems Corporate Headquarters
ARCHIVES
LD
1190 AT 2 1985 B665


CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS FOR COLUMBINE SYSTEMS, INC.
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture.
-ht:.::'.' ' Date Due
A
! j
PAUL EDI* ARD.BORMA t ^--student


This thesis of Paul Bormann is approved.
University of Colorado at Denver December 1985


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cover
Title Page Signature Page Table of Contents Introduction Thesis Statement Site Information Program in Short Design Resolution Conclusion Appendix
Program in long Legal Perimeters Climate Bibliography


INTRODUCTION
From the beginning it should be stressed that this is an academic exercise; one which gives the student valuable experience in the schematic and design development phases of the architectural process. This exercise is further strengthened by the fact that it is linked to the real world. The connection being the use of an actual client, Columbine Systems Incorporated and an actual site in Golden, Colorado as the location of their new Corporation Headquarters.
The present Columbine Systems facility is cramped and inadequate to accommodate any future growth. The decision making authorities have concluded that a new facility should be constructed in the near future to accommodate the present operations and a projected amount of growth.
A site has been selected on Washington Street between 16th and l*6th Streets. This site is located on the northeast side of Washington Street and has been found to be suitable to house the fifty thousand square foot facility.


Columbine Systems writes and provides computer services on an international scale. The corporation writes software for a variety of clients. Due to the complex nature of the software Columbine provides a major part of their service in the education of their clients in the practical application of their Software.
Keeping in mind that this is an academic project, special emphasis will be put on innovative and experimental aspects in the resolution of the design. This is not to say that the clients program will not be resolved in the final design. The interest here is to meet or surpass all reasonable program requirements. The methods and techniques used in achieving these will be my opportunity to freely explore the design process and the options it can create. The theme of free investigation is the center point in the design resolution of the program.
So, with these thoughts, I respectfully submit this document as required, in partial fulfillment leading to a Masters degree in Archi tecture.
Paul Bormann


THESIS STATEMENT
The design of a Corporate Headquarters beckons the opportunity to design office space at its best. Corporate functioning, budgets and construction sites are all of higher quality than those of other office projects. Those other office projects like speculative urban high rises, suburban sprawl or renovations into office space all lack the opportunity to richly design for a single tenant. Instead these speculative projects are limited to maximizing flexibility in order to accommodate a larger cross section of speculative clients not capable of creating a facility of their own.
Yet the design of a Corporate Headquarters is more than the next generation of office project, that is a speculative office building with a single tenant. In corporate design the entire facility is designed to meet specific functional requirements of the client, therefore, attention must be paid to how the overall design solution reflects the client corporation within.


Recognizing the basic differences between Corporate and Speculative office design, one must address the proper issues which apply. I have selected two such issues which apply above and beyond the many other issues which also apply. The two issues are the corporate image and the creation of a positive work environment.
From time to time, but very rarely, the ARCHITECTURAL RECORD Building Types Study, almost always a collection of structures within a category, focuses upon a single building. We deviate from our pattern when as individual work of architecture boldly addresses and brilliantly solves one or more of the difficult and challenging problems of the type. The building in this instance is the General Foods Corporation Headquarters in Rye, New York by Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates. It is notable for the manner in which the architects have successfully solved two problems, the first functional, the second symbolic.
Corporation headquarters buildings constructed on rural or suburban sites are reached by automobile. Most such buildings, however, do not acknowledge this. Parking is almost never planned for direct proximity to the individual workplace and entrances and lobbies are usually positioned for the convenience of an imaginary pedestrian. KRJD&A's solution to access and parking for GF is bold, direct and merits study.
The other problem shared by corporate headquarters constructed in rural landscapes is one of image. Such buildings tend to be look alikes, anonymous, forgettable. Although there are exceptions, corporation usually don't want to be forgettable, not in the minds of their public, nor of their employees. KRJD&A has designed headquarters buildings for many of the world's most outstanding corporations. They have learned, thereby, that no two corporations are alike. Each


is a particular social entity with a complex character of its own. To better design the General Foods Corporation Headquarters in Rye, New York, they sought to understand that company's unique and to express it architecturally. Discovering GF's strong sense of itself as a corporate family, Roche Dinkeloo built a proud house, a .work of architecture everyone will remember.
This statement underlines the first issue as a design theme the corporate image and its reflection of Columbine. Image can be manipulated through architectural design in many ways. Architectural design of form, building materials and functions of the corporation all can be expressed in methods that accentuate richness needed to support image characteristics. In the Program division of this document an overview has been prepared by Columbine personnel on what they think of as their image. Enclosed is a specific section on this issue as well as general statements made throughout the Program division.
I propose to create a corporate image for Columbine Systems by first recognizing the Image section in the Program division and then using those suggested methods whenever possible. The second method is through architectural design. One method to explore is to touch the


Golden skyline by using as much as the fifty foot height limit as possible. This is intended to get Columbine noticed from afar. The third way to be explored is to design the Columbine facility with respect to its local historical context. This is intended to project Columbine as being a respectful neighbor and being able to conform to the establishment. With these thoughts I will begin the design phases of this thesis project with the above mentioned themes.
Only yesterday, designing an office meant partitioning off the window walls for executives and setting up a few, flexible panels in the center of the floor for the rest of the staff. But these days, increasing numbers of white-collar professionals and corporation are demanding interiors that impart a sense of permanence and distinctive character to counterbalance rapid turnover in management, employees, and computerized technologies. As architect Diana Agrest points out, "Everybody wants an identifiable place to work where they feel comfortable, not an amorphous, no-man's land."
As a result, employers who used to spend just two percent of their budgets on equipping their employees, are beginning to invest more corporate dollars on office furnishings and interiors. In the process, they are discovering that "Design matters profoundly...affecting the quality of work life of individuals and organizations," as Michael Brill, president of the Buffalo Organization of Social and Technological Innovation, asserted at RECORD'S last Interiors Round Table (mid-September 1984, pages 33-47). For the architect, the elevated role of office design means that it can no longer begin with mere physical planning. It first requires an understanding of corporate culture: the idiosyncratic way in which an organization operates and views it own work. According to


Laurence Booth, design partner of Booth/Hansen & Associates: "Office interiors have to become much more site-specific. You have to view the corporate client in precise terms and then determine how to convey a unique image of that client."
The projects illustrated in this Building Types Study attempt to do just that, whether through classical allusion, as in the Helene Cutris Industries headquarters by Booth/Hansen & Associates, or through the reuse of history, as in the restoration of the Reliance Standard Life Insurance Company building by John Milner Associates/David Beck Architects, or through typological transformation, as in the Gramercy office condominiums by Argest and Gandelsonas.
Common to all is a belief that designing for corporate culture is like creating a small town. It calls for a strongly defined structure of private and public spaces, connecting pathways, and commonly shared amenities to encourage a sense of worker community and control over the environment thus to attain the much-touted managerial credo of higher productivity and job satisfaction. Although in the projects shown this goal is achieved through different esthetic sensibilities, in utilizing urban metaphors to make their point, their designs rely on the most coveted of all office commodities: liqj^t and an interesting view of both inside and out.
This statement underlines the second major issue which will be a theme in the design of this project. The creation of a positive work environment through design of interior spaces and amenities. Special attention will be paid to the newest trends and improvements in corporate office design. Such trends will include individual identifiable places to work, encouragement in a sense of worker community, control over the environment and views both inside and outside. These are all to be designed to help increase productivity and decrease turnover with results that distinguish Columbine above and beyond the rest.


I propose to create a positive work environment through architectural design and interior planning. The first method is to create and equal opportunity to see the view, both inside and outside to north and south Table Top mountains. I will at first propose an atrium space inside the office tower space therefore opening small office floors to the atrium which looks out to the view.
The second method will be to expand the already proposed health facility areas by expanding aerobic and weight rooms with outdoor facility space for jogging on the roof of the parking facility.
The third proposal will be the introduction of the possibility of a small number of living units which could be used by client, employees or executives working overnight or travelling from afar.
In conclusion, the first major design theme in the Corporate Headquarters facility for Columbine SYstems will be to design the correct image and to create a positive work environment. I believe that image mostly concerns itself with exterior design, whereas the work environment is mostly internal organization. With these two design themes there is an overall view over the complete facility both inside and outside. So with these two issues at hand and their sub-issues, I will commence with the project of designing a Corporate Headquarters for Columbine Systems as my thesis project for the University of Colorado at Denver, College of Design and Planning,
Architecture Division.


1
Mildred F. Schmertz, "Building Types Study 605: A corporate headquarters Building a Corporate Image, Architectural Record September 1984, ________
Deborah K. Dietsch, "Building Types Study 612: Office interiors" Corporate Culture, Architectural Record April 1985, ___________


SITE INFORMATION
The site that has been selected is located on Washington Street between 15th and 16th Streets. The site is located on the northeast side of Washington Street. The side of the site that faces Jackson Street, has an extreme slope. 15th and 16th Streets are not through streets and terminate along their respective sides. Washington Street north of the site leads to downtown Golden. Washington Street south of the site leads to 6th Avenue by way of 19th Street. The site commands excellent and unobstructed views of both north and south Table Top mountains.
Enclosed in this division is information concerning a Golden City map, an area map at a scale where one inch is equal to four hundred feet, a vicinity map at a scale where one inch is equal to two hundred feet, a site analysis and some site photographs. Larger maps will be kept on file with the student.
Note that the shaded area on the maps enclosed indicates the actual construction site limits.




AREA MAP
r

SCALE lin.
400 ft. NORTH


SITE ANALYSIS
DOWNTOWN
GOLDEN
VIEW OF NORTH
iUNTAIN
COORS
CORTHOUSE AND JAIL
MAJOR ACCESS ROUTE
SCALE 1 in,= 200 ft. NORTH












PROGRAM IN SHORT
Major Spaces
Departments Square Feet
Executive
Chief Executive 180
President 180
2 Executive Assistants
Large Conference Room 800
Marketing
2 Vice-Presidents 240
6 Open Office Spaces 300
Planning & Development
1 Director 120
1 Assistant
Administration
5 Directors 600
5 Managers 500
20 Open Office Spaces 1,000
1 Reception 100
3 Word Processors 50
3 Personal 100
Mail 400
Storage 1,600
Library 200
Systems
2 Directors 400
6 Managers 600
30 Open Office Spaces 1,500
Conference 150
Client Services
2 Directors 240
5 Managers 500
43 Open Office Spaces 2,150
6 Enclosed 300
1 Word Processor 50
2 Classrooms 3,200
Conference 150
Staff Education 400
Data Entry 800
Additional
Central File 200
Mail Room 500
Loading Dock 200
Exercise Room 1,000
Cafeteria 1,200
Totals


PROGRAM CONCEPTS
Department identity by floor separation.
Strong emphasis on client education by separate building.
Flexible office space from square plan.
Executive on top floor for view and isolation.
Access to central files.
Loading dock with access to storage space.
Marketing works closely with executive.
Marketing display in atrium space, lobby and conference.
Reception/main lobby and atrium communicate image, Rocky Mountain view, hospitality.
o
o
Easy access to all departments through atrium.
Noisy classrooms separated in first floor of client services building. Administration department near marketing.


=1
Golden, Colorado


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Golden, Colorado


Site Plan
Columbine Systems Corporate Headquarters


Floor Plan of Level Three *|^Wrl£ i------




I.
Floor Plan of Level Five

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Washington Street Elevation
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Building Section looking South West
Fifteenth Street Elevation
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Floor Plan of Level Six with Building Section
Kale !/*- (-U n__{---------------L


Detail of Wall Section and Elevation
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CONCLUSIONS
In review of this thesis project's production, I have found that many of the same ideas, design concepts of previous semesters were reused and/or reinforced as new ideas to generate the design resolution. The concept of magic lines as design organizers, such as architectural axis or circulation spines, was used in a variety of ways to create a rich architectural atmosphere. Addressing the street edge with the architectural division of the Client Services Department with the same square footage of the existing surface building created a sense of respect for the existing conditions of the site, while at the same time camouflaging the four story employee building.
The employee building was rotated 20% to take full advantage of the view of the mountainous landscape that Golden, Colorado enjoys. At the same time addressing an image of Columbine Systems detailed differently than that of the Client Services Building which address the street. The concept of Columbine Systems as new technology and Golden, Colorado as established permanence is reflected architecturally through glass curtain walls and granite facade parts detailed in such a way so that the glass looks as if it is punching through a granite base. Other concepts include the east termination of 15th Street with a cul-de-sac and clock tower through which architectural vocabulary and the master plan tie the site into an overall urban pattern. The west side of 15th Street is terminated by the Guggenheim Hall of the School of Mines by a copula tower, which is the highest architectural element in the part of Golden.


Landscaping was used to create space in an architectural manner along Washington Street as well as along 15th Street on the interior of the site. Landscaping in the form of a row of trees is used to create space in a circular fashion around the employee back building to define an edge and to camouflage the parking. Respect to the site context was designed into the project by the generation and accentuating of stair towers in the parking facility and in the Client Services Building to hold the edge of Washington and 15th Street at their intersection.
Additional investigation took place in the interior of the complex by use of rich materials and equal access to daylight by creating an atrium building. This produced a positive work environment by giving equal access to an exterior view and/or daylight and an interior view through the atrium. A pleasant design for the cafeteria space with openings onto a private courtyard and an exercise facility on the lower floor add to the positive work environment concept.
The overall concept was to create a very formal and rich organization and then to break it down by rotating grids or placing elements off axis. This created a rich variety of juxtaposed elements all working together to form the Columbine Systems Corporate Headquarters.


Spin-off ideas include a very interesting concept that all graduate semesters can be combined into one large exploration of a continuing idea of design concepts. Such is the case with my graduate education which began with my 600 semester project in the fall of 1983. The project, a railroad station, dealt with the concept that the architectural technology of glass curtain walls and metal panels could reflect the railroad technology of steel and glass. Most importantly, the concept of a magic line or in this case as architectural axis which bisects the building on its center line was utilized. This element organizes the entire building and ties back to the urban fabric of Denver's 17th Street and center line of Union Station. Lastly, continuing the idea that the building looks like a train in elevation by using one circle as a head light of the locomotive.
In the Spring of 1984 the design of the New American House demonstrated the next generation of the use of the single axis/magic line concept by rotating it 20. The stairway organizes the three story townhome by its circulation function. By detailing it at a 20 skew I created a double loaded corridor servicing minor-major functions on opposite sides. Due to fact that the 20 skew originated from the center line of the building's elevation, the townhomes still have a symetrical image. Notice the development of the circle form. Now its primary use is reflected in circular shaped exterior plazas and its minor use is to direct circulation in the stairwell. Note also that the units facing the street are detailed differently than those on the interior of the street defining a difference between the two creating a richer variety and accentuating the functional roles of the two types.


In the Spring of 1985 I designed the Santa Barbara Art Museum for Architecture 700. The design concept was quiet elegance through the division of functions by architectural form. The design of a "fabric building" that contains circulation connecting all small buildings. The magic lines in this project include for the first time the intersection of two lines at a 90 angle located at the center of the courtyard. ALong these lines are located symetrical small buildings and symetrical entryway, however, the total building, like the New American House, is not symetrical. The concept of richness from variety is further explored in this museum form the New American House by the detailing of so many architecturally related forms. Notice the development of circular plazas intersecting to create a precessional space from public to private.
In the Summer of 1985 I took an additional semester of design called "700.5". The project chosen was the design of the Denver Fairmount Masoleum in the style of a deceased American architect of my choice who was John Russell Pope. The Beaux Art style of this architect and its interesting lack of detail, a modern idea, led me to explore concepts not only modern but a mixture of both modern and Beaux Art. The design of a jewel building equal and symetrical on the exterior and interior of the building was used as an organizing device. Notice the next generation of circle ideas. Now it has become a road system surrounding the perimeter of the project. Also the chapel space becomes the innermost space.


This thesis project therefore is based upon the accumulation of ideas from previous semester projects taking the same ideas and further extending them.
From the railroad station the ideas of technology and imagery and the first use of a magic line. The same use of technology as imagery exists in the corporate headquarters.
From the New American House the first use of a 20 skew was employed as a functional resolution to the design solution. This also exists in the 20 skew of the back building for view purposes. Also the architectural delineation of what addresses the street versus interior architecture as potentially different concepts or different detailing.
From the Art Museum the crossing of two axis or magic lines and the use of a circular interior space as well as a "fabric building" functionally as circulation appears in the corporate headquarters between front and back buildings. The circular atrium and lobby spaces as public to private, circle as meaning communal space.
Lastly, the Masoleum's circular landscaping and jewel-like quality present in the back building and its adjacent landscape.


The combined styles of modern and Beaux Art styles to create a new vocabulary also exist in the corporate headquarters.
In conclusion, the ongoing set of ideas has helped me to create a very successful graduate education and will further assist me in creating a successful career in the architectural arts.


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APPENDIX OVERVIEW
Enclosed in this division is information concerning typical office space allocation and design standards as recommended by Columbine Systems. Also enclosed here is information concerning the equipment in use or planned to be in use by Columbine into their new facility.
Information on climatological data that is relevant to this project has been placed here for easy reference instead of in the Site division. Only fundamental climate data is included here. Additional information will be kept on the students personal file.
Note that room will be kept open in this division for additional information that is relevant to this project. Any and all information as amendment or addition will be included into the final draft of this
document.


GENERAL OVERVIEW: WHO IS COLUMBINE SYSTEMS?
The following information has been prepared by Columbine personnel and therefore reflects a manner of organization appropriate to those who wrote this and the information it includes. This information has not been changed in any manner from it's original form before being introduced in this document.
Enclosed in this division is information concerning Columbine's specific functional goals, corporate image and growth projections.
This information takes into account only that which is seen by Columbine personnel.


FUNCTION
COLUMBINE'S FUNCTIONAL GO^LS FL£XI61 LITY
'i Create flexible workstations that cam adapt to A VARIETY OF TASKS.
2. Allow for departmental expansion.
5* Accommodate frequent movement of teams within
OEPARTMEMTS.
WORK AREAS
AREAS. SHOULD 0 E OR G A N I ZED AND APPEAR ORDER
A S E QUIET AND P R I V AC Y IN ALL AREAS 3 U T ESP
Executive area
iViA R K E T I NO
and Word Processing.
5. Expedite shipping and storage requirements = y
PROVIDING EFFICIENT ACCESS TO A LOADING COCK.
CONFERENCING
Provide an executive meeting area that soth ACCOMMODATE WORKSHOP STYLE SESSIONS AND CONFIDENTIAL CONVERSATIONS.
2. Private offices should accommodate small conferences.
5. Conference rooms and class rooms should accommodate a variety of functions.
sales
1. Provide a meeting and entertaining facility for marketing that will enhance sales potential.

PROVIOE A CENTRAL COMPUTER ROOM THAT CAN 5E A SHOW PLACE FOP, HARO WARE SALES.
ELECTRICAL 01 SIR I BUTiON
1. Provide an electrical distribution system that
WILL SE FLEXIBLE AND ACCOMMODATE LONG TERM REQUIREMENTS.


COLUMBINE'S FUNCTIONAL GGaLS CONI.
ACCOUSTICS
"i. Provide appropriate screening. Consider frequent PHONE CONVERSATIONS AND PRINTER .NOISE.
LIGHTING
1. Reduce glare on terminal screens.
2. Utilize natural, light wherever possible
5. Avoid "cool" lighting.
HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING
'i Alot of emphasis SHOULD cE place on comfort
CONSIDERATIONS PARTICULARLY IN WORK AND CONFERENCING AREAS.
I


IMAGE
Columbine's Goals Related to Its' Corporate Image
Relationship to the industry
i. Froject Columbine's identification with the
BROADCAST INDUSTRY.
2. Communicate Columbine's workins knowledce of "state of the art" technology.
Who Columbine is
^. Em p h a siz e the Columbine is
IMPORTANCE OF PEOPLE AT COLUMBINE. S PEOPLE.
2. Communicate an open friendly i mage .
3 Communicate Columbine's youthful, energetic
S P I R I T .
A u. A C H 0 E P A R T fl £ N T SHOULD HAVE ITS* OWN IDENTITY TO SHOW THE DIVERSITY OF COLUMBINE.
ii r, _ n WUL'JKS 1 IU 16
Project Columbine' S
AND PLANNING A 3 1 L 1 T Y
Project the image CORPORATION. 0 F
s Provide remindsrs OF
it "r Columbine combines A
AND INTERNATIONAL OR
OMPREHENS I V E CRGANI Z A T I 0 NA L A SUCCESSFUL NATIONAL
Columbine's history.
STRONG .ROCKY' MOUNTAIN EMTAT I ON.
Columbine's Concern for Its' Clients
'l. Communicate willing ness to change to meet Client's
NEEDS .
2.. The spacial cesign should reinforce the strength
OF C 0 L U U£ 1 NE ' S C 0 M M 1 tme NT TO 1 T S ' CLIENTS.
- CONCERN FOR TH £ 1 R sue CES 3
- CONCERN FOR T H £ 1 P. 111 (J DS A N 0 CO v: f 0 r. T
The design S H 0 U L D R EF LE CT the 3 T n 0 N G EMPHASIS
Columsine PLACES 0 N CL 1 E N T ED UC A T 1 0 M .


Columbine's Goals Related to Its' Corporate Image cont.
Columsine's Concern for Its' Staff
*!. The design should reflect Columbine's concern
FOR STAFF COMFORT AMD WELL 6 E I MG 5 Y PROVIDING:
EQUAL ACCESS TO THE V I E V.'/n A T U R A L LIGHT
LOCAL CONTROL OF HEATING AMO COOLING REQUIREMENTS
"PERSONALIZED" WORK AREAS.


10.YEAR GROWTH
COLUMBINE'S EMPLOYEET GROWTH RECORD FROM 1974 1954
(The following figures are estimates from staff member's
RECOLLECTION. The ACTUAL RECORDS WERE NOT IMMEDIATELY
A V n I L c L w )
YEAR = EMPLOYEES
rr/i s
5/-
19 SC V.
( */
*; G %. 1 s w 1 />
1982 85
19S5 90
^.'c P ZL 1 o u\
Additional staff members
ARE LOCATED IN THE ATLANTA
and Sydney offices.


1
I
10 YEAR CLIENT RECORD
YEAR
1974
1Q7 =
'j07(3
'977
^ C -
C w/
CLIENT COUNT
70
61
219
Lit 1.
AVERAGE # CLIENTS TO EACH EMPLOYEE
6.4
5.3
E z
C..
6
i-C
I ^ w .
70S cl 7
- /j.
i


CLIENT/EMPLOYEE PROJECTION
CLIENT GROWTH PROJECTION CHART based on moderate growth
(Current Client Base = 517)
'iC.£= 1 ^£6 ' c7
'iST 2nd 3rd 4 1 T . ~ i T ^ 4 'T - T - 2 5 4 1 T --T .! T . 1 1 2 >.! t 3 4 T
7 5 ; 1£ 'l l i 27 i ?' CL I £ y, cL 2"'. 24 it C 24 7- ^ - c: / 27 "Z s 1 51 1 S ~ J 7" 17 40 / /"*, w 40 ZLQ 40 40 ti.c * 45 50 i 90 = +> C, -. ~ I I
4£ i 57 1 t 63 63 r-2 76 55 O- V 101 105 120 "'20 7 7 717 10 ^ ^ -
IOTAL i9c5 23" + 817 Total 1966 528 + 1045 IOTAL 195( 446 + 1376 IOTAL 1955 6C5 +1322
Following is an estimate of nu TO MAINTAIN THE CLIENT BASE LI estimates are based ON HISTORI at Columbine during the last 1( USERS OF EMPLOYEES REQUIRED STED ABOVE. THESE d client/employee RATIOS 0 years. .Average = 7-5/1
Total 1985 159 Total 1966 783 Total 1967 2427 Total 1988 322
Following is at during the per ON AN AVERAGE' estimate of square feet requir OD OUTLINED ABOVE. FIGURES ARE OF* 150 USABLE SQUARE "FEET PER P I ED BASED ERSON. >
Total 1985 20850 U.3.F. Total 1986 274-50 U.S.F TOTAL 1987 36300 U.S.F Total 1966 45300 U.S.F.


SPACE USE INVENTORY
|--- ------------ l ' |
SPACE INVENTORY SUMMARY
DEPARTMENT SQUARE FEET T25# CIRCULATldN i
e^eolfive- 460
ApMlUlffP^poO SCfZO $-C£d~(V'
cu&up 3240 4-50*, Z-
MAp-kSplOq 7-/£. Z-
JLAk1K)i£4/P£a/, /^? /
1 2340 . 3llZ> Z
i

u- ze^^oz-.q U-^.h £s?ivszt pee-r)


/
SPACE INVENTORY SUMMARY
F
1 OTHER SPACES SQUARE
FEET
25#
CIRCULATION
Reception i LOO i l
£ Class Rooms | 3200 i £>
Kitchen | 300 3gg
E:c at i or; Room *. r>n w O 3T 5-
L Small Conference Rooms *to. w ^ rng
n Large Conference Room 600 /D(o4-
Ks r* r Z. L i r\ 1 200 I *c
. A 1 L ri C 0 M *r:J -j -p-
Comp u ter R c o u : aoo JCtof tftfnA
Data Entry Ann
I
Excercise Room 1 1000 /33o
Storage 1600 2/Z6
LJ 3RARY ; 100 / 33
Cental Files 200
i TOTAL

Nof-E: pofOvwJlA pa*. ZJZ\o
|a>-rfC=i.35y/.35 X. **s.p. = + CifZcUL^po^. SU-S-ppL


INDIVIDUAL OR OFFICE
JOB TITLE POSITION . NO. PEOPLE TYPE SQUARE FT
I
!
EXECUTIVE OFFICE/C.E.O. Bill Cole i C.E.O. i 1 A i - 1 ISO
Joan i e Ae-el OFF 1CE/PRES. Ex. Ass 1 ST. i ICO
Dave Weioner i President 1 / 1 A ISO
- TOTAL S.F.
") U.)
ADMINISTRATION
Marilyn Foute D 1 RECTOR 5 I
ancy Ghana:a J I v. 1 f ( i G ~ Computer Products y\ 1 j D 120
Jill Bar net;* Team Mngr. Admin. Ser. 1 C ICO
Education Cor. 1 D /-*> i *
Project Leader A I D 50
Ed. Assist. i s\ 0 50
Reception 'I J Rec . 100
Word Processing 3 W.P. '15-0
Cl ient Info. D 50
David Chandler Team Mngr. Comp. Pro. 1 C 100
Supplies Consul. 2(1A) D 150
Billing Ass 1st. 1 D 50
Randy Cormack Adm1 N 1 s V.A.R. 1 C 100
Haroware install. 1 D 50
Bruce Kirkpatrick Div. IvIngr. I 4 I
Finance 1 1 B 120

i
Figures taken from: November 7, 19£^
Corporate Structure
' See NEEDS section Office Standards A Authorized position


I

INDIVIDUAL OR JOB TITLE POSITION NO. PEOPLE OFFICE TYPE SQUARE FT.
ADMIN. CONT.
Payables Clerk * ! 1 D 50
Payroll Acct. Billing Unit 1 D 50
P f. o j Leader i D >0
Sr. Acct. / i D 50
Accounting C. 2 D ".CO
Cont. Acct. J n \ c n A L L 1 0 r V f*iN G r. 1 N V Cz / 1 D 50
Credit Sy \ D "20
Purchasing Co. i D s'*
LATHY 3S07ZMAN Div. tngr. / ,> /-/*.
Human Res. Cor. C P E R A T 1 Cr.S /I I P R I V .
Human Res. Rep. . 2 PR I V . 200
Ralph Butler Team Mngr. 1 C "00
Shipping Spec. 1 SPEC. 50
Librarian : 1 SPEC . 50
Operations C. i SPEC. 50 |
Shipping C. 1 SPEC . 50
Proj. Leader (Librarians) 1 1 SPEC. i i 50
Sharlet Berentsen i Prou. Lead. i i
Facilities 1 c 100
Gen. Office j 1 D 50
Copy Clerk 2 1 D 100
Stock Clerk i i s 1 D 50 TOTAL S.F.
. : ) 1 ; _ 5050
Figures taken from:
November 7i '19S4
Corporate Structure
)


INDIVIDUAL OR JOB TITLE POSITION NO. PEOPLE OFFICE TYPE SQUARE FT.
CL 1 ENT SERVICES Nancy Burkland! Dl RECTOR 1 B 120
Proj. Cor. i D 50
r^Di' i r: # Ass i s 1
JUL 1 E KEYE URN Team Mngr. I I
Client Sup. l l c 100
Cl 1 ENT Sup FORT -
^ L Y S i ' iJ s
u 0 S P. iUPRORT Spec . 1 0 50
Client Support w f* i W D i W s_/
U E N 1 S E Stanford Team Mngr. Install S, 1 ^ i i UvJ
Install Sup. R. 14- D 700
Install Mon. 3 D 150
Install Cor. 1 D 50
Steve SZADOKIERSK1 Team Mngr. C . 100
Tech. Sup. Analyst Tech. Sup l I i i Special 300
Susie Cole Di v. Mngr.
Client Sr. | 1 B 120
Steve McMikle Team Mngr. i
Document a* 1 i C 100
Wr iter 5 D 250
W O R D Processor ' 1 i W.P. I 5 1
Figures taken from: November 7? "i964-
Corporate Structure


INDIVIDUAL OR OFFICE
JOB TITLE POSITION NO. PEOPLE TYPE SQUARE FT.
CLIENT SER. CONT.
Julie Seter
E C U C A T I 0 N Analyst
Broadcast Info
.7.ARKE* I NG Sue T h o m p s o n
.'.'ark Fine
Marketing Rep. Marketing Assi
PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT
I Team Mngr
Education
V.P.
Marketing
Division
ini* u n ^ A L l j
S K U N Y Sugu 1 RA
Director
SYSTEMS
Bob Lanier
Director
C 100
D 350
D cn
TOTAL S.F
r
w i CL'J
S'. ~
D I C-'U
D 250
D 50
TOTAL S.F
5^o
B 120
:y offic :s)
TOTAL S.F
120
120
Figures taken from: November 7> '1984-
Corporate Structure


>
!
i
I
INDIVIDUAL OFT JOB TITLE
SYSTEMS CONT.
OFFICE
POSITION ! NO. PEOPLE TYPE SQUARE FT.
!
Software Cor. Aide
Software Cor. Greg Cochran
Senior Staff An Len Ccyne
Q u a lity Con. A. Systems liig.
Jim Stanforo
P R O G R A M M E R / A N .
Contract Prog. Authorized
Programmer/An Staff An.
Bert Bates
programmer/An Contract Prog.
Dan Chilcoat
Programmer/An. Bill Grieb Programmer/An Staff An.
D 50
D ! 50
DlV. MiNGR. i .
S Y S T e v. s 1 . 5 1 y% D 50
1 E A M iV.N G R
Vt U A L 1 T Y w . *w w
2 1 D ;~0
f'.'iN G R . / r*
Account. . ^ sj
iL D s* r* '-* £Uw
2(C) 0 IOC
Team Mm gr.
Music/N. 1 C IOC
5 D 150
2 D 100
Mm g r. Sales
Tea m A. ' C 0 0 V
~ D 150
1(C) D ! 50
Team Mngr.
Traff I c 1 C 100
4 0 200
Team Mngr. 1 C 100
Core 3 D 150
1 D 50
TOTAL S.F.
25^-0
/


CORPORATE ADJACENCIES


EXECUTIVE OFFICES
DEPARTMENT ADJACENCIES
Easy access to all
OTHER DEPARTMENTS
2. Keep aw ay from
CLASS ROOMS AND NOISY GATHERING AREAS.


AREA RE^U I REMENTS
Major Divisions: Che if Executive Officer
Presio en t
Executive Assistant
OFFICES: 1 C.E.O. 130 S.F. type A 1 President 160 S.F. type A 1 Exec. Assis. 100 S.F. type special
OTHER AREAS: 1 large conference room 600 S.F.
(to be shared with Marketing)
CONFERENC I NG REQUIREMENTS :
Private offices should accommodate conferences of 8-10
PEOPLE and ALSO PROVIDE SPACE FOR LESS FORMAL CONVERSATION.
The Executive area should have direct access to a large,
HIGH QUALITY CONFERENCE AREA THAT WOULD SEAT 15-20 PEOPLE.
A SMALL WAITING AREA NEAR BY COULD SERVE BOTH THE CONFERENCE ANO EXECUTIVE AREA.
Closets and a kitchen should be within easy access.
For conference room equipment see: Marketing.
.3TQRAGE/FILING
Currently in Use: 1 2 drawer lateral file. This file
CONTAINS MATERIAL THAT MUST BE L0CATE0 IN THE EXECUTIVE AREA.
The need for additional filing capacity shoulo.be
ADDRESSED IN THE NEW DESIGN.
This department frequently uses corporate files. These must be within easy access.
There was discussion of the advantages of a central file location for files used frequently by the entire company.
See Administration section under "files" for the advantages
OF THIS SYSTEM.
Staff contact:
Joanie Abel
Date :
' s-CL
i i c-cv


Executive: Dept. Area Requirements Cont
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT WORK AREA:
JOS DOES NOT INCLUOE TYPING OOES NOT MEED A RETURN Hook-up for keyboardano terminal Creoenza would offer more storage Tack board
More visual and accoustical privacy
OTHER:
The entire executive area must have easy access to the
Vi H 0 L E COMPANY but AT THE SAME TIME BE SEPARATE FROM AND
quieter than the rest of the space.


ADMINISTRATION


AREA REQUIREMENTS
MAJOR DIVISIONS: Director
Computer Products
Fi NANCE
Investment and Credit Operations
OFFICES: 5 D1rector/D(VISION He ao TYPE 3 600 S.F
5 Manager - TYPE 0 500 S.F
20 Open Office - TYPE D 10C0 S.F
1 Recept ion desk S P EC 1 AL 100 S.F
3 Word Process - SPEC 1 AL 30 S.F
3 Personnel - S PEC 1 AL 100 S.F
OTHER AREAS
MAIL ROOM 400 S.F
STORAGE 1600 S. F
L1BRARY . 100 S.F
CENTRAL FILES 200 S.F
RECEPTION AREA 400 S.F
(100 S.F. R E C . desk)


ADMINISTRATION AREA REQUIREMENTS CCNT. AREA: COMPUTER
PRODUCTS
VAR/CPD
'/' O R K CLOSELY WITH MARKETING
Need access to storage computers are stored before they
ARE SOLD
It WOULD BE BEST IF COMPUTERS WERE MOVED AS LITTLE AS POSSIBLE. They should BE TESTED and then stored near
A LOADING OOCK.
VAR HAS MAJOR STORAGE REQUIREMENTS. I N A NOVEMBER DOCUMENT, THEY PROJECT AN IMMEDIATE NEED FOR 621 SQUARE FEET OF STORAGE. This PROJECTION INCLUDES TWO OFFICES.
RECEPTION
Reception is needed by only a fev; departments.
Most visitors go directly to the education area and do not need a waiting room.
The departments.which use the receptionist the most are: Education P e r s.o n n e l Purchasing '
Marketing Ma il Room
Receptionist's responsibilities shoulo incluoe:
greeting and directing visitors 3ringing coffee to visitors
The sense of hospitality ano concerns with the needs of
VISITORS IS AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE IMAGE COLUMBINE IS TRYING TO PROJECT.
Noise from the paging system is a persistent problem. Developing a quick access message sysem would help
TO "ELIMINATE THIS PROBLEM. LABELED MESSAGE SLOTS COULO.BE LOCATED NEAR THE ENTRY SO THAT STAFF MEMBERS COULD PICK UP MESSAGES AS THEY ENTERED OR AFTER THEY KAO BEEN AWAY FROM THEIR DESKS.
Staff Contacts:
Marilyn Foute 11-21-84, 11-28-84 Sharlet Serentson 'l'l-lyl-S4


ADMINISTRATION AREA REQUIREMENTS CONT.
COMPUTER PRODUCTS
A MORE EFFICIENT SYSTEM FOR LEAVING MESSAGES WITH ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS coulo improve the noise situation.
The reception area is a gooo place to reinforce Columbine's association with the sroaocast inoustry. A T.V. screen OR A V.C.R. COULD BE PLACED IN THE RECEPTION AREA. A VIEW OF THE SURROUNOING MESAS AND FOOTHILLS WOULD ALSO BE APPROPRIATE PROVOKING COLUMBINE'S CONNECTION WITH the Rocky Mountain environment.
OTHER:
Staff mail slots ano in/out identification must be located
IN THIS AREA.
The effectiveness of the current in/out system needs to
BE AOORESSEO.
WORD PROCESSING
1 PRINTER MUST BE LOCATED NEAR WORD PROCESSING.
lute O O j M T c p e u Q ill n a c
I l i f w I w w w w w
c r* \ rs r* ~
~ 1 nr-''
W w V O C. U
w L i W i i N 0 i S c
A JOINT USE AREA FOR SPREADING OUT LARGE JOBS ANO COLLATITC WOULD PROMOTE EFFICIENCY IN THIS AREA.
The current p.aper handling system neeos to be adoressed. One person is responsible for receiving ano prioritizing typing assignments. A separate counter top with labeled bins would facilitate this process.
Word Processing must be located near Corporate and Correspondence files.
XEROX
Locate near mailroom with pass through window or counter
This area could also provioe counter space for compiling booklets and packets.
Cons I OER 'SMALL xerox machines located in departments where
IMMEDIATE ACCESS IS IMPORTANT. MANY OROERS ARE DELAYED UNDER CURRENT "CENTRAL XEROX1' SYSTEM.
Marilyn Foute 1 'i-21-6L, 'll-25-54
Staff Contacts: Sharlet Be rent son 11-11-cL


ADMINISTRATION AREA REQUIREMENTS CONT. AREA:
FINANCE DIVISION
Locate near marketing. These departments work FILES:
Currently in use number type location
Gold Office
finance
INVESTMENT St CREDIT
CLOSELY.
INVESTMENT AND CREDIT FILES:
Currently in use
number
TYPE
LOCAT I ON


ADMINISTRATION AREA REQUIREMENTS CCNT. AREA: OPERATIONS
DATA PROCESSING OPERATIONS
EQUIPMENT Locat i on
1 IBM 33 Computer Room
1 IBM 36 Computer Room
2 Baby 36 1 Data entry center 1 Gold Office
1 IBM 32 2nd floor
2 IBM 34- 1 Computer Room
1 STOREAGE ROOM NEAR COMPUTER ROOM
PR INTERS
S' I IBM 5225 0 N 1 BM 38
/ I I BM 5224- 0 N IBM 33
s\ I IBM 5225 0 N IBM 36
s, IBM 5225 ON IBM baby 36
.1 IBM 5211 ON 1 BM 34
TERMINALS
(currently in use)
5251 (old)
5291
5291-2
3130
(The possibility op converting to all 3160s in the
FUTURE 1P BEING DISCUSSED)
OTHER
HONE Terminal, Keyboard and Printer connected with IBM used by Marketing ano VAR/CPO
Staff Contacts:
Marilyn Foute 11-21-S4-, Ralph Butler 11-9-34-
C/i


ADMINISTRATION AREA REQUIREMENTS CONT. AREA: OPERATIONS
Product Flow Chart
quality- documentation data proc. mail room out
ASSURANCE
WORK AREA:
Data processing must se centrally located.
It is heavily used sy most of the company especially:
A D yI N i s T R A T I ON Education Marketing Systems
The computer Room should be off limits to all staff except Data Processing personnel.
The working procedure demands, a long counter type space for material preparation.
Individuals need person work areas only as place to store
BELONGINGS AND USE A PHONE.
The problem of where staff members will pick up print-out needs to be adoressed in the new design. The design of this
AREA MUST BE GIVEN SPECIAL ATTENTION.
The work,area must include space for storage of manuals. Lineal Feet requireo .
Data processing must have convenient access to the Mail


ADMINISTRATION AREA REQUIREMENTS CONT. AREA: OPERATIONS
Room. Preparing large orders for shipping is a major
PART OF THEIR JOB.
The work area must also incluoe additional space to store
THESE ORDERS PRIOR TO SHIPPING.
The work area shoulo also include labeled bins for diskettes
STORAGE
520 Lineal Feet ofoiskette storage
160 Lineal Feet of active client oiskette storage
Aooitional storage should be addressed in the new design. Current space is used to the maximum.
Currently the disques are stored on open shelves. The the appropriateness of this arrangement must be aodressed
IN THE NEW DESIGN.


ADMINISTRATION AREA REQUIREMENTS CGNT
AREA: OPERATIONS
The following are design specifications for i-mstallat i on
OF IBM EQUIPMENT.
InCLUDEO ARE SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING:
Printers IBM 5225 I BM 5224-
Display Station (terminals)
I 3M -529":


ADMINISTRATION AREA REQUI REIviENTS CONT. AREA: OPERATIONS
MAIL ROOM EQUIPMENT
Pitney Bowes Mail Machine for stamping (Thismachine is being investigated for purchase..)
Scale
STORAGE
Store Jiffy Paks in-boxes '
Small and large envelopes 3oxes for mailing Large mailings prior to shipping OTHER
This area should be locateo near main xerox \
This area could also 3e used for compiling booklets and packets.
Staff Contact: Ralph Butler 11-9-64-


ADMINISTRATION "AREA REQUIREMENTS CONT. AREA: OTHER
FILES
COMPANY FILE INVENTORY
Number Type Current Location
s\ i 3ill Cole and Dave W E1D N E R S FILES. 1-2 drawer L Exec Area
2. Documentation 9 V Client Services
i. > (near Tech Support)
5. Call Sheets by
Team (Traffic, Music Etc .)
4-. Update and Muse.
5. Correspondence
6. Corporate Files
y. Invoices and
Master Forms 1.5 V
5. Finance Division
9. Investment and Credit
10. Marketing 1 V
11. VAR/CPD
L Lateral File
V 4 DRAWER VERT I CAL FILE
THE FOLLOWING FILES COULD BE
ROOM
1. Correspondence
2. Corporate Files 5. Invoices ano Master Forms
Systems
Near Data Process. Near word Process. Near 'word Process.
Near Word Process. Gold Off i ce Gold Office Gold Office Gold Office
4-. Original Licensing Agreements (copies .to be kept in Marketing)
3*- V 20 V 5 V 5 V
LOCATED IN A CENTRAL FILING
Staff- Contacts:
Marilyn Foute 11-21-34-Joan i e Abel 11-16-84-


ADMINISTRATION AREA REQUIREMENTS CONT. AREA.: OTHER
THE FOLLOWING FILES COULD BE COPIED AND KEPT IN A CENTRAL "FILE ROOM
Location of originals Documentation Client Services
Call Sheets by
Team Systems
Updates Data Operations^
CENTRAL FILING FLAN CONSIDERATIONS
All files could be stored in a "track style" floor to ceiling shelving system. (note: special considerations
FOR HEAVY LOADING MUST BE ADDRESSED IN THE 3 A S E BUILDING DESIGN.) MlCRO-FICHE STORAGE-IS ANOTHER OPTION THAT SHOULQx
Current policy demands that all files for active stations
BE KEPT ON SITE. THIS POLICY NECESSITATES GREATER ON-SITE FILING CAPACITY THAN IS CURRENTLY AVA i LABL&*
A CENTRAL ALL FILES MISPLACED
FILING LOCATION WITH A CHECK-OUT POLICY FOR WOULD ELIMINATE THE PROBLEM OF LOST OR FILES.
Central filing with a clerk over-seeing the check-out
PROCESS WOULO ALSO RESOLVE CONFIDENTIALITY AND SECURITY CONSIDERATIONS.
"Dead file" policy should be adoressed prior to determining
THE FILING PROCEDURE FOR THE NEW SPACE.
The file room could be combined with the library to economize
ON SPACE.
ORED .


AREA: OTHER
ADM IN I STRATTON AREA REQUIREMENTS CONT.
LIBRARY CURRENT USE Storage :
Procedures Manuals
Standards
Periodicals
All departments use the library equally. The use is limited because departments keep thei'r own records.
The library ooes not require a space of it's own. It
COULD BE GROUPED WITH FILING.
STORAGE AREA
CURRENT CORPORATE STORAGE INCLUDES 3A-0 S.F. Basement Jackson St.
2 RENTAL STORAGE UNITS
62'! S.F. VAR/CPQ November document projects immediate
REQUIREMENT
Total S.F. storage currently required
General office and VAR/CPD storage coulo be grouped in new office.
The question of 'the storage required in the new space must be adoresseo. It is important that after arriving
AT A FIGURE, SPACE FOR EXPANSION IS CONSIDERED.
The storage area must be near a loading dock to expedite
DELIVERIES.
Staff Contact: Sharlet Berentson
I


MARKETING
DEPARTMENT ADJACENCIES


AREA REQUIREMENTS
MAJOR DIVISIONS: Vice President Marketing
Sales
OFFICES: 2 Vice. .Pp.esioe.nt/ Division Head - TYPE B 2A-0
6 Open Office - TYPE D 500
OTHER AREAS: 1 Large Conference room_ 600 S.F.
(to be shared with the Executive -area)
CONFERENCING REQUIREMENTS:
One large, high quality conference room is^need for sales presentations to clients as well as Board meetings and inhouse management conferences.
This room should seat 15-20 people around a large
CONFERENCE TA3LE.
It should include a lounge area for entertaining and more
CASUAL CLIENT CONVERSATIONS IF POSSIBLE.
Demonstrations and presentations >c clients can 5;
QUITE ELABORATE SO A0EQUATE EQUIPMENT IS IMPORTANT.
EQUIPMENT
Large viewing screen
2 SLIDE PROJECTORS
IBM EQUIPMENT FOR ON-WALL PROJECTION
(This proouct ano its* specifications needs further investigation.)
VCR (Video Monitor)
Writing Board
1-2 TERMINALS W / V/ORK STANOS.
Note: All equipment should be concealed when not
J N USE.
KITCHEN
A SMALL KITCHEN AND/OR BAR WOULD BE AN ASSET IN THIS AREA.

_ Sue Thompson Staff Contacts: |_enny Lambert 1 'i -26-6L 6 entire Marketing staff


MARKETING AREA REQUIREMENTS CONT
WORK AREAS;
Marketing Representatives occasionally meet with clients
IN THEIR OFFICES. FOR THIS REASON IT WOULO BE USEFUL TO HAVE CONFERENCING AREAS IN THEIR OFFICES, IF SPACE IS AVAILABLE.
S I N S E MARKETING IS IN THE BUSINESS OF "SELLING11 COLUMBINE HEIR SPACE SHOULD PROJECT THE ENERGY AND CREATIVITY OF THE ENTIRE COMPANY.
Provide display area where marketing can show the
REST OF THE STAFF WHAT THEY ARE DOlNGi NEV/S ARTICLES AND 3ROCHURES COULD BE TACKED,UP FOR EXAMPLE.
COMPUTER ROOM
The computer room is an important sales tool for Marketing.
It SHOULD BE HIGHLY VISIBLE AND ATTRACTIVE IN THE NEW D ES I GN .
QThhR Full I Dr*FMT
v i w w w w I l Wi 1 i
One 'WORK area must include a station for THE HONE terminal. KEYBOARD ANO PRINTER CURRENTLY LOCATED IN THE PERSONNEL AREA.
STORAGE /FILING
1 VERTICAL A- DRAWER FILE
Licensing Agreements are kept, in this file. The question of where original Licensing Agreements should be kept
IN THE FUiURE NEEDS iO BE ADDRESSED. OCCASIONALLY THESE HAVE BEEN MISPLACED.


PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT
DEPARTMENT ADJACENCIES


AREA REQUIREMENTS
MAJOR DIVISIONS: Director
Atlanta Office Syoney Office
OFFICES: 1 Director type 3 120 S.F.
At the present time only the Director of Planning and Development has an office located ly Denver. His staff works in the Atlanta and Sydney offiqes.
It is possible that before Columbine moves to its new
SPACE HE W I LL HAVE AN AOM I N I STRAT I VE ASSISTANT AND AN
Analyst working with him in the Denver office.
The Planning and-'Development Department works most closely with the Executive area and Marketing.
CURRENT FILES:
Present
Quantity Type Location


CLIENT SERVICES
DEPARTMENT ADJACENCIES


AREA REQUIREMENTS
MAJOR DIVISIONS: Director
Client Support Team Installat i on Team Technical Support Team
Client Services Division
Documentation Team Education Team
OFFICES: 2 DI R EC T 0R/DI V IS
5 Team Manager
4-3 Open Office
6 Enclosed
t Woro Processor
OTHER AREAS:
2 Classrooms
Small Conference
ct a p ^ rH 4 t >*. w i r r u u u u p i i u in
Data Entry
on Manager type '3 24-0 S.F.
- TYPE C 500 S.F.
- TYPE D 2150 S.F.
- SPEC I AL 3CO S.F.
- special 50 S.F.
Jw
3200 130
400 800
CO CO (/) (/)


CLIENT SERVICES AREA REQUIREMENTS CONT.
WORK AREA
Technical Support and Client Support use phones as a
MAJOR PART OF THEIR JOB. ACCOUSTIC CONTROL WILL BE AN IMPORTANT CONSIDERATION IN THE DESIGN OF THESE SPACES.
The Education team has special storage needs (see drawing in Client Services Storage section)
Aside from the considerations listed above present work areas provide well for job functions.
Attention must be given to the addition of terminals
ANDKEYBOARDS TO ALL WORKSTATIONS IN THE FUTURE.
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Personnel may increase to 10 very soon.
Because of constant phone work* this area must be enclosed.
Work surfaces should include space for:
CRTs/KEYBOARDS
Phones
Writing
Storage of manuals
.Documentation Files should be located in the Technical Support Area of near by.
EQUIPMENT
Classrooms
Tables (10 at present S' long seat 4 each)
Overhead Projector Writing Boaro
Felt Board 3' 4-' (note: This board would be more attractive if it was built into the wall.)
Lecturn
Counter for coffee & Doughnuts
1 OR MORE- PHONES FOR CLIENT USE
Staff Contacts:
Marilyn Decker Boa Lanier
11 -14-84 -n-24-84


CLIENT SERVICES AREA REQUIREMENTS CONT
Staff Education Room
2 DRAWER VERTICAL FILE. (1)
LO LINEAL FEET OF DISKETTE STORAGE
1 PORTABLE VIDEO MONITOR 2' DEEP X S' HIGH X 2' 11" WIDE
Writing Board (present board 90 x LS"
Video Camera
Counter area with 3ins for wise, papers and packets 2-5 terminals u
Data Entry Center
Must accommodate 50-56 clients
Must accommodate 50-56 terminals
Clients need to sit in front cf the terminal with a teacher. Clients need room to write and spread out notebooks.
2 PRINTERS MUST BE LOCATED NEAR 5Y BUT SCREENED FOR NOISE CONTROL.
The Datatry function could be grouped with the Installation training function. Both coulo use the
SAME SPACE FOR TRAINING PURPOSES.
This area could also serve as "homebase" for clients
DURING THEIR STAY AT COLUMBINE. STORAGE FOR PERSONAL BELONGINGS AND PHONES SHOULD BE PROVIDED FOR CLIENTS.
CURRENT FILES..
Type Present Location
9 V Documentation Files Near Technical Support
V Central Files 1st floor
STORAGE
The storage facility (see drawing on following page) was
DESIGNED FOR THE EDUCATION TEAM AN0 WAS USED QUITE SUCCESSFULLY
Supplies Stored: 2L x 56" Illustration Board, felt pieces
MARKERS .


SYSTEMS
DEPARTMENT ADJACENCIES
-"7 * r


AREA REQUIREMENTS
MAJOR DIVISIONS.: Director
Systems Division
quality Control Team Accounting Team Music/News Team Sales Team Traffic Team Core Team >.
OFF ICES:
6 Manager's 50 Open Office
OTHER AREAS: Small Co.
CONFERENCING REQUIREMENTS:
on Head 2-LO* S.F. \*D -as:
600 0 r 1CC ^
1500 S.F.
O O l>vj S.F.
T 1:,
TEAMS *T -1 I PI R OWN
S 0 L V 1 1 N G S E S S 1 0 N S .
L E AS Vrf u r t r\ L Ill O
TABLE AMO GUEST SEATING FOR A SMALL CONFERENCE ROOM FOR MEETINGS OF 10-12 PEOPLE 13 ALSO IMPORTANT FOR LARGER STAFF SESSIONS.
Systems needs access to the Staff Education Room for internal Programmer Education meetings.
WORKSTATI ON REQUIREMENTS:
Worksurface
1 SHELF FOR MANUALS CHAIR
- All WORKSAT I ONS MUST ACCOMMODATE a terminal AMD keyboard
EQUIPMENT:
2 PRINTERS MUST BE CENTRAL TO ALL OF SYSTEMS
Staff Contact: 3ob Lanier 1'1i-2454-


SYSTEMS AREA REQUIREMENTS CONT.
FILING
Type Current Location
Call Sheets S-V Systems area
OTHER
IBM Manuals are now located on a long marrow table in
THE CENTER OF THE SYSTEM'S AREA. LSCATION OF THIS REFERENCE MATERIAL WILL HAVE TO 5E ADDRESSED IN NEW DESIGN.


PROPOSED AREAS
AREA REQUIREMENTS/ADVANTAGES
The importance of the following areas should ee
C C N S I 0 E R E D IN THE NE'.V DESIGN Cafeteria "1200 S.F.
This area could serve as a central meeting area for
STAFF AND CLIENTS. FOOD COULD EE PROVIDED VIA VENDING MACHINES AND CATERING IN SPECIAL SITUATIONS. TH E CAFETERIA WOULD PROVIDE A PLACE FOR SOCIALIZING AWAY FROM WORK AREAS. IT IS ALSO IMPORTANT TO PROVIOE FOOD
FOR E M P L 0 Y E ES AND CLIENTS C OM 1 N G 1 N EARLY OR WORKING
L AT E .
The CAFETER 1 A, IF HANDLED 1 N A N ATT R A C T 1 V E MANNER COULD
B E USED FOR EN TERTA1N1NG CL IEM TS AS A N alternative to
THE COCKTAIL PARTIES HELD IN PEOPLES HOMES.
Exercise Room 'lOOP S.F. + Restrooms w/ showers and lookers.
A NUM3ER OF EMPLOYEES HAVE EXPRESSED INTEREST IN AN EXCERCiSE FACILITY. SUCH AN AREA DOES NOT NEEO TO SE ELABORATE. IT MIGHT PROVIOE WEIGHTS. EXCERCISE MACHINES AND FLOOR SPACE FOR AEROBICS CLASSES.
Because of intensity of work at Columbine such a
FACILITY WOULD BE BENEFICIAL TO THE EMPLOYEES PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL HEALTH.


TYPICAL OFFICE STANDARDS
OFFICE TYPES
A EXECUTIVE
B DIRECTOR/
DIVISION MNGR.
C MANAGER
D GENERAL
WP WORD PROCESSOR
REC RECEPTIONIST
SPEC IAL
ISO S.F. (closed.)
i20 S.F. i00 S.F. 50 S.F. 50 S.F. 50 S.F.
(CLOSEO )
(closed) (open ) (open ) (open )
Special design appropriate J 0 3 FUflCTIO N
T 0