Citation
Diary of a renovation

Material Information

Title:
Diary of a renovation
Creator:
Brodie, Robert T
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
30 leaves : plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Buildings -- Repair and reconstruction ( lcsh )
Buildings -- Remodeling for other use ( lcsh )
Buildings -- Remodeling for other use ( fast )
Buildings -- Repair and reconstruction ( fast )
Genre:
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Robt. T. Brodie.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
10965098 ( OCLC )
ocm10965098
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1978 B743 ( lcc )

Full Text


I
DIARY of a RENOVATION
1 Date
S
\ !
BY ROBT. T. BRODIE CANDIDATE
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO DECEMBER, 197B
i O
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COPYRIGHT 1978 BY ROBT. T. BRODIE
NO PORTION OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED IN ANY FORM
WITHOUT THE EXPRESS PERMISSION OF THE AUTHOR OR HIS AGENT.


CONTENTS
RESEARCH 1
PROCESS ia
DESIGN IB
APPENDIX sa


WITHOUT THE OLD, THE NEW CANNOT


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LC.

Driving within the Curtis Park area of Denver I glanced to the left while approaching Champa Street.
I had to stop.
It certainly wasn't in the best of shape. The various scars left by vandalism and fire, the frustrations of the owner in the tightly boarded-up doors and windows...
It was perfect.
EXISTING NORTHEAST ELEVATION


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Walking around I found myself in the alley sizing up the various levels.
What I was looking for was a building to suit my thesis: the renovation of an existing structure into a combined commercial/residential design.

EXISTING NORTHWEST ELEVATION ,


aUB-LEVEl-
-----------------------------.
Around back what the neighborhood dogs were looking for was a victim to bark at.
Everybody's laundry flapping in the breeze and the continuous canine seranade. It was chaos.
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What struck me on the last side was all the debris and soil that had accumulated along the bottom of the wall leaving the basement windows submerged in dirt. (Whoever had lived in the basement must have relished very damp environments with no natural light.)
But even with its deterioration, the building had character.
I just had to find out more.
EXISTING SOUTHEAST ELEVATION


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The property, it turned out, was owned by a developer-group at Larimer Square who had also wanted to implement a commercial /residential design. The B-8 zoning was going to be perfect for this.
The municipal code would require a maximum of 14 parking spaces with such a design so additional properties would need to be acquired for this purpose. The acquisition of lots 30, 31, and 32 could offer 400 S.F. per vehicle and lot 30 had already been purchased by the Larimer Square group.
The group was thrilled that I wanted to study their building
EXISTING SITE


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...so they put me inside it.
This place had been ravaged by fire all right. It was a mess. Some of the flooring had burnt all the way through so if you weren't careful youd find yourself immediately in the basement. Other than that, the structure seemed to be in tact.
Because of this level's easy access to grade, it was clear to me that it would best be put into a commercial use.
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EXISTING 1ST LEVEL


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Down in the basement (the proper way) there was everything from burnt-out refrigerators to charred underwear from Montgomery Wards. It also smelled like it hadn't been dried out since Noah's flood. (No wonder, with those windows submerged in dirt.)
Of particular concern to me, though, was the fact that the mortar in the basement's stone wall would crumble at touch. Lateral loads could be a problem on such a wall as this and would need to be considered.
But there was a about this 1evel. own private access outside. It would
nice thing It had its from the make a nice
low-rent residential area.
EXISTING SUB-LEVEL


Up on the second level the window openings had not been boarded-up. I put away my flashlight.
I felt this space would also best be commercial because of its connection to the proposed commercial space on the first level.
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EXISTING 2ND LEVEL .


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And finally at the top I fell in love.
The skylights over the staircases along with the arched windows on the northeast made me want to move in "as is". Possibilities abounded: skylights everywhere, exposed brick here and there, maybe even tapping the chimney chase for a cozy new fireplace.
Ko doubt residential. Maybe even f'CLAR residential...
...which led me out on the fire escape to get up to the roof.
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EXISTING 3RD LEVEL


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Using the rickety iron ladder to get on the roof, the neighborhood dogs and laundry started in again.
There wasn't much on the roof except a lot of dimensions and barking.
11
ROOF LEVEL PROPOSED SITE OF SOLAP COLLECTION


Later back at school I analysed the structure which brought out some interesting results.
The roof, I had first assumed, was some type of truss configuration. As it turned out, it could not be analysed as a truss but could only be viewed as a beam structure. The purpose of the diagonal bracing then seemed to be simply for the support of the primary structural walls against lateral wind forces. It was assumed then that the present beam action of the roof probably could not handle additional dead load-ing( i.e. solar collectors )unless replaced with trusses. A far cheaper approach would be to leave the roof alone and apply the collector loading axially on the primary structural walls.
It was assumed the existing floor joists could be analysed as Lodgepole Pine, Select Struc. #1 with an 80" reduction in stress capacity due to aging( which would closely approximate foothill timbers used circa 1888, the year,of construction). Joist capacity, computed to 58 PSF, would be inadequate for commercial and public use code requirements; therefore joists in these areas would need to be turned into double joists.
The basement's reinforcement wall was computed to need Douglas Fir-Larch, No.#l, 4x10's, 16" o.c. (SEE APPENDIX FOR METHOD.)
*12
EXISTING SECTION A-A see existing site


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Proposals really don't belong in research chapters.
Sorry.
Put energy calculations do. And in architecture (that merry-go-round of merry-go-rounds) you need to propose your materials before you can research the energy transmission which occurs because of those materials.
Because renovation, unlike new construction, deals with a mostly predetermined shell, energy calculations can be fairly accurately conducted in the beginning. The procedure is simplified if 100 occupancv is assumed the worse loading condition because the exterior building shell becomes the only energy transmitter.
Total winter heat loss was calculated to be 79850 Btuh.
Thus the present boiler, rated at 348,000 Btuh, could be reused for the heating mode.
Total summer heat gain was calculated to be 76573 Btuh. Thus, for cooling, a 6-ton capacity absorption cooler would be re-qui red.
(SEE APPENDIX p.25-25 FOR CALCULATION METHOD)
13
PROPOSED BUILDING MEMBRANE DETAILS


IMO ROAD WAS EVER TRAVELED THAT DIDN'T GET YOUR TIRES DIRTV!
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With research calculations and data compiled, the next step was to translate the old into an aesthetic and functional new.
I don't know how I ever do this. Except that it's like going into a coma during which little elves crawl inside and outside your brain showing you movies of their design ideas until you end up feeling excited about a movie which you feel makes the fewest people angry and the most people happy.
The next step is you awaken and find your tires dirty and a design in your hands.
15
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COMMERCIAL j RKStOStMTIAL SOLAR
Look around all you want.
And while Rachael helps Arnold on with his coat up in Apartment-B on the 3rd floor...
And while Myrtle, on the 2nd floor,takes dictation notes from Mr. No!an who awaits his client now arriving at the entry door..
And while Elizabeth escapes it all upon leaving her too floor dwelling by way of the glass-enclosed stairway in the rear...
You and I can take our own special tour.
(By the waysee those funny looking arrowheads to your right? Those are the razor-edged-1ittle-things that sliced through my building you see on your left.
You'll see 'em again in the pages to come. They'll tell you exactly where they did their slicing!)
This is the design that I woke up with.
T7
INTERIOR SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE


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This is the site.
I had all the automobiles clear out for our arrival so we could inspect the place better.
So walk around; take your time.
When you finally bump into the building's new addition on the site, you might flip to the back cover of this book fo^ a closer look.
Then come back here and we'll take a tour on the inside.
*1B
SITE PLAN


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The main floor. This is where the building meets the public.
There are only offices on this floor, and right now, a maximum of 3 tenants. And the design is flexible to the point that a single major tenant could tear away all the walls inside (except for 2 interior concrete columns) and still have a workable floor area to rent (SEE BELOW).
And as we use the main-entry staircase up to the next level, enjoy the sunny light-shaft which penetrates through the entire structure.
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19
COMMERCIAL 1ST LEVEL


Up here on the 2nd floor there are 4 more office tenants; but here again, the 2 interior concrete columns could allow the remaining walls to be removed
thus allowing larger rentable areas...
You're probably getting bored by some of this I am!
Let's go upstairs.
COMMERCIAL SND LEVEL


This is my favorite floor residential "penthouses".
Maybe apartments, maybe condominiums. But whatever, there are skylights, exposed brick, fireplacesjust like was promised on page 10!
My favorite little space is the Solarium/Study in the new addition. I meditate there sometimes in my mind. It's neat I get to be inside the womb of my addition, get to look out the window, water my plants even people using that stairway never know I exist. It's neat.
Nell, t?'-e your time. The people who live here won't be back for awhile.
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The final stop on our tour THE BASEMENTis a real comedown from the 3rd floor!
But in its own way it's BEAUTIFUL: it makes my design more flexible because it doesn't interact with the main building at all: since the basement can stand by itself, it can be built or omitted according to the dictates of the pocketbook.
Kudos from the client!
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And a good place for kudos, for this is the end...
...I suppose you should end a tour with some dramatic sight that leavesyou breathless.
Sorry. I know the plumbing & brick you see here just wouldn *t rate it.
But let me take this last moment to stand on my soap box of plumbing joints and concrete rebar to make my exit in a different wav:
in my year
somethi no a coma
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I've struggled education here to be more than someone in watching movies.
It hasn't been easyand still isn't.
And sometimes at night I wonder if there are hidden areas in my designs that are nothing more structural than celluloid.(I'm sure there are; it happens to even the best of dreamers.)
All I can ask of the creative spirit within me is that I have the maturity to recognize a coma when it's pointed out to me and the perseverance to keep adding the plumbing & brick needed to make it a reality.
Well there's my dramatic stroke! You can exit through the Appendix.
STRUCTURAL & PLUMBING DETAILS


FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO

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KNOW MORE .


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THE R. T. BRDDIE H5URE FIRE11 HEAT LOSS /GAIN COMPUTER
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Still confused about page 25? Well here you have nine examples: "computer" layouts for the nine zones I created back in page 12.
The totals for building heat loss and heat gain mentioned on page 13 are merely the totals of the computations in each of the nine zones.
It's all very quick, saves time in the kitchen, and allows you to come up with a good estimate for your mechanical creationseven when you've long forgotten what any of the McGuinness information ever meant!
Try it; you'll like it.


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DESIGN of REINFORCEMENT STUDS (for a decaying sub-grade wall)
The theory behind this 6-step procedure involves considering the decaying sub-grade wall as a 2-way slab consisting of vertical segments( of length 1 )
and of horizontal segments ( of length lp : the longest horizontal clear span of the sub-grade wall being reinforced ).
The various forces applied through the earth against these sub-grade wall segments are computed into shears and moments experienced by the segments and (with some razzle-dazzle modifications) experienced by the reinforcement studs.
If you dont unerstand all this, DON'T WORRY. The procedure which follows assumes that you don't understand ANYTHING.
After arriving at your stud size, lateral bracing with members the same dimensions as the stud must be supplied along the stud length 1 at spacings equal to 1/3 of 1^ to meet code.
27


CURTIS PARK COMPUTATIONS;
STEP T;
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CURTIS PARK COMPUTATIONS.,.
STEP #3:
R= 394.
Q= 183.
Z= 49.
N= 98.
G= 302.
STEP #4:
M]_= 69855 in-lbs.
K2= 96224 in-lbs. fv > 'Inax'
Vi- 533 lbs.
V 1996 lbs. (Vmax)
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STEP #5:
Minimum Section Modulus= 47 in.
2
Minimum Section Area= 29 in. Therefore 4x10 is O.K.
STEP #6:
= .03 inch.
= .05 inch.
Therefore 4x10 is still G.K.
fiuito :


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