Citation
Information to facilitate design

Material Information

Title:
Information to facilitate design a master's of architecture thesis preparation document on the Fox-Meyer corporate headquarters and warehouse operation
Creator:
Haas, Richard Miller
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
92 leaves, [4] plates : illustrations, charts (some color), maps, plans (some color) ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Warehouses -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Thornton ( lcsh )
Industrial buildings -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Thornton ( lcsh )
Industrial buildings ( fast )
Warehouses ( fast )
Colorado -- Thornton ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 91-92).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Richard Miller Haas.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
08838566 ( OCLC )
ocm08838566
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1981 .H32 ( lcc )

Full Text

INFORMATION TO FACILITATE DESIGN: a masters of architecture thesis preparation document on the
' V
FOX-MEYER CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS AND
WAREHOUSE OPERATION
ARCHIVES 1 LD 1190 A72 1981 H32


INFORMATION TO FACILITATE DESIGN: a master's of architecture thesis preparation document on the
FOX-MEYER CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS AND WAREHOUSE OPERATION
by
Richard Miller Haas College of Environmental Design University of Colorado at Denver 1100 14th Street Denver, Colorado 80202
December 16, 1981


DEDICATED TO Susan and Jason


1
PREFACE
From the beginning it should be stressed that this is an academic exercisei one which gives the student valuable experience in the pre-design phase of the architectural process.
The exercise is further strengthened by the fact that it is linked to the real world. This connection is achieved through the use of an actual corporation as the theoretical client. The corporation in this case is the Fox-Meyer Drug Company which graciously accepted the invitation to participate. The relationship that develops is of great merit in that the student has the opportunity to exchange ideas and
concepts with a "client" and the corporation has the chance to review and analyze the end product and its feasibility with respect to future plans. More importantly, the student and the firm benefit greatly from each obtaining a "hands-on" experience in the process of architectural design.
One should keep in mind that as an academic problem special emphasis will be placed on the innovative and experimental aspects of design resolution. This is not to say, however, that the clients needs, wants and desires will be ignored. On the


PROJECT PURPOSE
The purpose of the project is to design a facility for the Fox-Meyer Drug Company. This facility is to combine their corporate headquarters with their Denver warehouse operation. Currently these functions are seperated within the Denver metropolitan area by a distance of some fifteen to twenty miles. The corporation has expressed a desire to merge these two operations into one facility a corporate-owned property. Presently both the headquarters and warehouse lease space. Space which cannot adequately handle the rapidly expanding company. Therefore, the possibility of a new combined
facility becomes plausible given the projected growth and company's desire to centralize the Denver operation.
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES _________
The program as put forth in this document is intended to aid in the physical design of the facility. It should supply the information necessary to carry out the design phase of the thesis. It is not intended to render solutions. Rather, the program will define and delineate data into a form comprehensible and usable by the designer. It is the intent of this author that the format of this data shall be understandable to anyone in the design


field. The use of the program is like using a map. Two designers looking at the same information may take two entirely different routes to arrive at a destination/solution. Therefore, throughout this document care has been taken to exclude solutions but rather make recommendations, narrow possibilities and suggest relationships. Indeed, any design which attempts a solution without some form of program is an exercise in frivolity. Peter F. Smith expressed this sentiment so well in his Architecture and the Human Dimension when he said,
"a building can only be regarded as successful if it reconciles aesthetic aspiration with a thoroughly worked-
out performance agenda. Innovatory zeal should be tempered with a tyrannical sense of responsibility towards those who use and maintain it.
PROJECT SCOPE_______________________
The scope of this project will entail the programming and design of a facility to house the Fox-Meyer Drug Company. This facility is to house the corporate offices as well as the Denver warehouse operation. At present the company leases approximately
55.000 square feet. The new combined facility should contain a maximum of
100.000 square feet. This is tennatively


6
broken down into 20,000 square feet for office and corporate use and 80,000 square feet for the warehouse. The site selected is within the Washington Square Business Park located in Thornton, Colorado at an elevation of about 6,000 f eet.
The participants in this project
along with myself are:
Mike Harrell, President, Division Manager, Fox-Meyer Corporation
Karl Wagner, Vice-President Operations, Fox-Meyer Corporation
Joe Gschwendtner, Vice-President Administration, Fox-Meyer Corporation
Danny Wheeler, Manager of Customer Accounts, Fox-Meyer Corporation
Mary Acosta, Administrative
Assistant, Fox-Meyer Corporation
C. Gary Long, Director of Architecture, University of Colorado
Davis C. Holder, Professor, University of Colorado
Robert W. Kindig, AIA, Professor of Architecture, University of Colorado


7


9
was located in Wichita and the buyers were placed in Oklahoma City. The Fox-Vliet corporation now served a good portion of the west and midwest. Just as the corporation was expanding its sphere of influence the Denver warehouse was acquiring accounts in Colorado, New Mexico, Nebraska, Wyoming and Texas.
This year (1981) marked a milestone in the company's history. In July a merger between Fox-Vliet Drug Company and the Meyer Drug Company was completed.
The Fox Company was the surviving corporation but retained the Meyer name, thus creating the Fox-Meyer Drug Company.
This undertaking made the corporation the fifth largest drug distributors in the
nation with warehouses in Denver, Colorado} Wichita, Kansas; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; St. Louis, Missouri; Memphis, Tennessee; Little Rock, Arkansas; and New Orleans, Louisiana.
This expansion puts the corporate offices in the forefront of a nationally
i > (\ v~~
renown corporation one reason for creating a new space for the executives. The Denver warehouse operation which includes executives, salesmen and warehousemen is growing at a tremendous rate. It has already outgrown its present facilities and is predicting a conservative growth of 10 to 11$ within the next five years.


10
For security reasons the corporation does not wish to advertise the fact it is a wholesale drug distributor. As a result none of its trucks are marked and a desire to keep a low key public image is at the forefront of its design considerations. This should not be interpreted as Fox-Meyer not caring about its image. The corporation is very interested in portraying itself as a professional, full line, full service distributor, but it prefers that this image be conveyed to its customers as opposed to the general public. The executive offices should portray the progressive and dynamic nationally renown corporation that Fox-Meyer has become.


12
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16
THE REGION
The site selected lies within a region of the country that is rapidly absorbing a migration from the northeastern part of the nation. The region while not considered part of the prosperous Sun Belt has nevertheless attracted a large population influx.
The region is a vibrant, new and exciting area of the country. Colorado is a relatively young state that still reflects many of the values associated with the people who settled this region.
It is a diverse area both in its people and its climate and topography. The area is
home to many European nationalities as well as Hispanic, Black and Indian
cultures. This mix makes a very rich
n
on which to build. The region also hosts the majestic Rocky Mountain range to the West and the rolling bountiful plains to the East.
This region is also beginning to take an active part in the energy exploration field. As a result the support industries and businesses have begun flowing into the area and adding to the already steady growth associated with the region.
THE LOCALITY


17
Fox-Meyer is presently situated in the Denver locale. The corporation prefers to stay within this locality since it is the heart of the region and symbolizes the hub for business. The locality also serves as the center of government for the region. It also offers the opportunity for cultural exchanges through museums, galleries, concerts and theaters. The diversity of this locality becomes apparent through its support of recreational opportunities. These include professional football, basketball and hockey teams, skiing facilities as well as cycling, hang gliding, hiking and boating areas.
The Denver area also supports two
major universities and several smaller community colleges. It is also rich in historical content as exhibited in such areas as the Ninth Street Restoration District, Larimer Square and Capitol Hill.
THE COMMUNITY
The site is located on the fringe of Thornton, Colorado. Thornton, a suburb of Denver, is situated above Denver to the North along Interstate Twenty-Five. The city established as a result of the post World War Two housing boom has grown into a diversified Coloradan community. It is within easy access to Stapleton


18
International Airport as well as being near 1-25 and is also located on several major bus routes.
The community is now actively encouraging businesses and corporations to locate within their jurisdiction. Thornton is a community that does not grant "blank checks" to obtain growth.
It is deeply concerned with the quality of its environment. This is exhibited through its use of such civic devices as extensive master planning, bikeways planning, landscaping ordinances and building restrictions and guidelines.
THE VICINITY
The vicinity of the building site is defined on the South by 120th Avenue, on the West by Interstate 25, on the North by 12*4-th Avenue and on the East by Washington Street. This area is designated as the Washington Square Business Park. Several businesses have already located within the park. These include a day care center, Mountain Bell, Nabisco, Frostline Garments, Wyle Distribution Group, Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Gerico and I. N. A.
The business park is also near two major motels, the Northglenn City Hall, the Northglenn Recreation Center and Webster Lake Park. These existing


assets should be considered in the
design of the facility


/ -


LOCALITY
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23


CLIMATOLOGICAL OVERVIEW
Denver's climate is characterized by its relatively mild, sunny, semi-arid weather. Its 5*280 foot elevation contributes greatly to the pleasant atmosphere enjoyed in this region. Indeed, extremely warm or cold weather is short lived in the Denver area. The location at the base of the Rocky Mountains helps moderate the extremes associated with a high altitude. For example, clouds are backed up against the Rockies in the summer months helping shade the city; whereas, in the winter arctic cold fronts often slide off the higher Denver altitude to the lower altitudes of the Nebraska/Kansas plains. The mountain range to the west
also tempers the winter climate by moderating cold fronts coming from the west.
Air masses affecting the Denver weather system come from four different sources: Arctic air from Canada and
Alaska; warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico; warm dry air from Mexico and the southwest; and Pacific air coming over the coastal ranges and the continental divide. Chinook winds resulting from westerly flows during the winter months raise temperatures far above the norm for locations at the same latitude.
Polar air in the spring combines


25
with moist Gulf of Mexico air to produce the rainy season in Denver.
It does enjoy a low relative humidity since it is situated a long distance from any moisture source. This fact also contributes to Denver's abundance of sunshine. The large amount of sunshine helps allievate snowfall making winter months most pleasant. For more detailed analyses please refer to the following
sections.


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27
DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS
The building should be oriented on an east-west axis so it can take advantage of passive solar gain along the south and natural lighting from the north.
The roof and walls should have a medium time-lag and should have sufficient insulative resistance to retain the desired temperature within. Windows should be small in nature to avoid excessive heat loss/gain.
The west facade should be shaded during summer months but able to obtain solar access during the colder months.
Entries to the facility should be well-protected and sealed as should windows.
Volume should be maximized but
surface area minimized.
Moisture could be used during hotter months to reduce the over-heating.
Buffer areas could be placed on the north and west as protection against the cold winter storms. Evergreens could also serve as exterior protection on the north as well as earth berms.


120
to
CD
>
/


29
PAGE 0001
r
: VERSION 3
DATA INPUT : MANUAL OR DATAFILE (M/D)
M
1CLIMATIC DESIGN USING MAHONEY TABLES
O THIS IS A PROGRAM TO EXTRACT RELEVANT DESIGN RECOMENDATIONS FROM EXISTING CLIMATIC DATA.
THE INFORMATION REQUIRED FOR THE PROGRAM WILL BE :
1. NAME OF CITY AND LOCATION.
2. TEMPERATURE MONTHLY MEAN MAXIMA & MINIMA.
3. RELATIVE HUMIDITY MONTHLY MEAN MAXIMA S< MINIMA.
4. RAINFALL MONTHLY.
5. WIND PREVAILING & SECONDARY.
INFORMATION FOR 2, 3 AND 4. CAN BE FOUND IN "TABLES OF TEMPERATURE, RELATIVE HUMIDITY AND PRECIPITATIONS FOR THE WORLD", PUBLISHED BY H. M. S. O. ( LONDON, 1958 >. FOR LOCALITIES NOT LISTED. AND IF DATA CANNOT BE RELIABLY EXTRAPOLATED FROM LOCATIONS OF SIMILAR GEOGRAPHIC SPECIFICATION WHICH ARE PUBLISHED, THEN THE FORMAT OF THE CLIMATIC DATA AVAILABLE FROM THE LOCAL METEOROLOGICAL BUREAU IS SUITABLE FOR DIRECT INCLUSION IN THE PROGRAM.
(NOTE: TERMINATE LINES OF INPUT WITH A CARRIAGE RETURN CR>>
OTO EACH QUESTION REPLY WITH 12 MONTHS DATA ON ONE LINE SEPARATED BY COMMAS.
TYPE IN THE NAME OF THE CITY. AND LOCATION:
EDENVER, COLORADO LAT: 39 45 N LONG: 104 52 U
ODO YOU REQUIRE DETAILED INFORMATION LISTED ON THE TERMINAL ?(YES/NO) :
Y
OTEMPERATURE
NOW ENTER TEMPERATURES DEC) SEPERATE EACH VALUE(12 PER LINE) WITHR A COMMA .
AVERAGE MONTHLY MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE
43. 5, 46,. 2, 50. 1,61. 0,70. 3,80. 1,87. 4,85 8,77. 7,66. 8,53. 3,46. 2
AVERAGE MONTHLY MINIMUM TEMPERATURE
16. 2, 19. 4, 23. 8, 33. 9, 43. 6, 51. 9. 58. 6, 57. 4, 47. 8, 37. 2, 25. 4, 18. 9 TEMPERATURE SCALE(C OR F) :
F
OHUMIDITY


30
PAGE 0002
AVERAGE MONTHLY MAXIMUM HUMIDITY <9 A M. ).
63, 66, 67, 6B, 70, 71,70, 69, 69, 64, 68, 63 AVERAGE MONTHLY MINIMUM HUMIDITY (3 PM ).
48, 42, 40, 33. 36, 36, 33, 33, 35, 35, 49, 30 ORAINFALL
AVERAGE MONTHLY RAINFALL
O. 61, O. 67, 1. 21, 1. 93. 2. 64. 1. 93, 1. 78, 1. 29, 1. 13, 1. 13, O. 76, O. 43 ORAINFALL
AVERAGE MONTHLY RAINFALL
O. 61, O. 67, 1. 21. 1. 93. 2. 64, 1. 93. 1. 78, 1. 29, 1. 13, 1. 13, O. 76, O. 43 ORAINGUAGE SCALE (INCH OR MM) :
INCH
OIS INFORMATION AVAILABLE ON WINDS(YES/NO) :
Y
OUIND
PREVAILING AND SECONDARY
JAN: PREVAILING :
S SECONDARY :
N FEB: PREVAILING :
S SECONDARY :
NW MAR: PREVAILING :
S SECONDARY :
NW APR: PREVAILING :
S SECONDARY :
NW MAY: PREVAILING :
S


31
PAGE 0003
SE JUN: SECONDARY : PREVAILING :
S SECONDARY :
S JUL: PREVAILING :
S SECONDARY :
SW AUG: PREVAILING :
s SECONDARY :
N SEP: PREVAILING :
s SECONDARY :
NW OCT: PREVAILING :
S SECONDARY :
NW NOV: PREVAILING :
WS SECONDARY :
W DEC: PREVAILING :
S SECONDARY :
NE
CLIMATIC DATA FOR DENVER, COLORADO LAT: 39 43 N
LONG: 104 32 U


32 PAGE 0004
1 J JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
TEMPERATURE(DEGREES CELSIUS) T
AVERAGE DAILY MAX. 6. 4 7. 9 10. 1 16. 1 21. 3 26. 7 30. a 29. 9 23. 4 19. 3 11.8 7. 9
AVERAGE DAILY MIN. -a a -7. O -4. 6 1. 1 6. 4 11. 1 14. 8 14. 1 -8. 8 2. 9 -3. 7 -7. 3
HUMIDITY(RELATIVE X)
- AVERAGE AT 9A.M. (MAX) 63. 0 66. 0 67. 0 68. 0 70. 0 71. 0 70. 0 69. 0 69. 0 64. 0 68. 0 65. 0
AVERAGE AT 3P. M. (MIN) 48. 0 42. 0 40. 0 33. 0 36. 0 36. 0 33. Q 33. 0 33. 0 35. 0 49. 0 50. 0
RAINFALL (IN M. N. )
MONTHLY AVERAGE 13. 17. 31. 49. 67. 49. 43. 33. 29. 29. 19. 11.
OWIND
PREVAILING S S S S S S S S S S S S
SECONDARY N NW NW NW SE S SW N NW NW W NE
******** **- 1 * * * * * * * * * * * * * # * * * * * * * * * *
(_ 1 1 1 TABLE-1 AIR TEMPERATURE(DEGREES CELSIUS)
i i JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
AV DAILY MAX. 6. 4 7. 9 lO. 1 16. 1 21. 3 26. 7 30. 8 29. 9 25. 4 19. 3 11.8 7. 9
AV DAILY MIN. -8. 8 -7. 0 -4. 6 1. 1 6. 4 11. 1 14. 8 14. 1 8. 8 2. 9 -3. 7 -7. 3
DIURNAL RANGE 13. 2 14. 9 14. 6 15. 1 14. 8 13. 7 16. 0 15. 8 16. 6 16. 4 15. 5 15. 2
GREATEST AV. DAILY MAX - 30. 8 LEAST AV. DAILY MIN = -8. 8
AMT = 11.0 AMR = 39. 6
************** 1 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * # * * *

I .
V
TABLE-2 HUMIDITY,RAIN AND WIND


PAGE 0003
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
RELATIVE HUMIDITY(X)
4 MONTHLY MEAN MAX(A M. ) 63. 66. 67. 68. 70. 71. 70. 69. 69. 64. 68. 65.
* MONTHLY MEAN MIN(P. M. ) 48. 42. 40. 33. 36. 36. 35. 33. 35. 35. 49. 50.
u MONTHLY MEAN AVERAGE 36. 54. 34. 52. 33. 54. 53. 52. 52. 50. 59. 58.
HUMIDITY GROUP 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3
RAINFALL( IN M. M. ) 13. 17. 31. 49. 67. 49. 43. 33. 29. 29. 19. 11.
ANNUAL TOTAL RAINFALL 394.
WIND-PREVAILING S S S S S S S S S S S S
-SECONDARY N NU NW NW SE S SW N NW NW W NE
" ************** 1 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * tt * * *
L TABLE-3 DIAGNOSIS
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
r HUMIDITY GROUP 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 .-..3 2 3 3
r TEMPERATURE (DEGREES CELSIUS)
AV DAILY MAX. 6. 4 7. 9 lO. 1 16. 1 21. 3 26. 7 30. 8 29. 9 23. 4 19. 3 11.8 7. 9
DAY CO FORT:MAX 26. 0 26. O 26. O 26. O 26. O 26. O 26. O 26. O 26. O 27. 0 26. O 26. O
DAY COMFORT:MIN 19. 0 19. O 19. O 19. 0 19. O 19. O 19. O 19. O 19. O 20. O 19. O 19. O
AV DAILY MIN. -8. 8 -7. O -4. 6 1. 1 6. 4 11. 1 14. 8 14. 1 8. 8 2. 9 -3. 7 -7. 3
NIGHT COMFORT:MAX 19. O 19. O 19. O 19. O 19. O 19. O 19. O 19. O 19. O 20. 0 19. O 19. O
NIGHT COMFORT:MIN 12. O 12. O 12. O 12. O 12. O 12. O 12. O 12. O 12. O 12. O 12. O 12. O
OTHERMAL STRESS
DAY C C C C - H H H - C C C
| NIGHT C C C C C C C C C C
* ************** 1 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


34
PAGE 0006
HUMID:
ARID:
* *
1
1
TABLE-4 INDICATORS
TOTALS JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
HI: O
H2: O
H3: O
Al: 12 + + + + + + + + + + + +
A2: O
A3: 7 + + + + + + +
*********##*************#***###******#******
TABLE-3 SKETCH DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS
OLAYOUT
OBUILDINGS SHOULD BE ORIENTATED ON AN EAST WEST AXIS WITH THE LONG ELEVATIONS FACING NORTH AND SOUTH TO REDUCE EXPOSURE TO THE SUN. THE BUILDING MAY BE TURNED SLIGHTLY TO CATCH THE PREVAILING BREEZE OR TO ALLOW LIMITED SOLAR HEATING DURING THE COLD SEASON.
OSPAGING
OCOMPACT PLANNING IS ESSENTIAL.
OAIR MOVEMENT
OROOMS SHOULD BE DOUBLE BANKED.
OOPENINGS IN WALLS
OMEDIUM SIZE OPENINGS SHOULD BE USED (23 TO 40X).
OPENINGS IN THE EAST WALL ARE DESIRABLE ONLY IF THERE IS A LONG COLD SEASON. OPENINGS IN WEST WALLS ARE DESIRABLE IN COLD AND TEMPERATE CLIMATES BUT MUST BE AVOIDED IN THE TROPICS.
OWAl LS
OEXTERNAL AND INTERNAL WALLS SHOULD BE HEAVY WITH HIGH HEAT CAPACITY.
OROOFS
OA HEAVY ROOF WITH A LARGE HEAT CAPACITY (OVER 8 HOURS TIME LAG) SHOULD BE USED.
1
TABLE-6 ELEMENT DESIGN RECOMMEMDATIONS
OSIZE OF OPENINGS
OMEDIUM OPENINGS. BETWEEN 23 AND 40X OF THE WALL SHOULD BE USED, AND SHOULD ALLOW THE SUN TO PENETRATE DURING THE COOL MONTHS.
OPOSITION OF OPENINGS OPROTECTION OF OPENINGS
OEXTERNAL AND INTERNAL WALLS AND FLOORS OHEAVY. HIGH-HEAT CAPACITY WALLS WITH OVER 8 HOURS TIME LAG. SHOULD BE USED.


35
PAGE 0007
TO REDUCE THE HEATING EFFECT OF SOLAR RADIATION, THE WALLS SHOULD HAVE A LIGHT-COLOURED SURFACE. CARE MUST BE TAKEN TO PREVENT GLARE FROM BRIGHT REFLECTED SUNLIGHT.
' OROOFS
OA HEAVY ROOF WITH OVER 8 HOURS TIME LAG SHOULD BE USED. OEXTERNAL SURFACE TREATMENT
*** STOP
V





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36
LOCATION GRAND JUNCTION. COLO. LATITUDE 39 DEGREES 7 MINUTES
MONTH 1 HO 1978. TOO 27. TOT 29. KT .597 KD .179
ORIENTATION 4 5 6 7 a 9 HOURLY 10 11 SOLAR 12 RADIATION 13 19 15 16 17 18 19 20 DAILY TOTAL RADIATION SAG/DAYTIME satgs satgd sag/all day SATGS SATGD
SOUTH 0. 0. 0. 0. 71 . 190. 185. 211. 220. 211. 185. 190. 71. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1933. 190. 233. 70. 107.
SOUTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 22. 72. 123. 166. 1R5. 206. 188. 116. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1096. 119. 185. 59. ftft.
WEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 20. 28. 39. 36. 85. 123. 137. 99. 0. 0. 0. 0. 570. 72. 109. 92. 57.
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 20. 28. 39. 36. 39. 28. 20. 29. 0. 0. 0. 0. 237. 96. 61. 32. 38.
NORTH 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 20. 28. 39. 36. 39. 2ft. 20. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0. 217. 99. 58. 31. 37.
NORTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 29. 20. 28. 39. 36. 39. 28. 20. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0. 237. 96. 61. 32. 3ft.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 99. 137. 123. 85. 36. 39. 28. 20. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0. 570. 72. 109. 92. 57.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 116. IBS. 206. 195. 166. 123. 72. 22. 9. 0. 0. 0. o.. 1096. 119. 185. 59. 88.
HORIZ. 0. 0. 0. 0. 29. 77. 117. 193. 152. 193. 117. 77. 29. 0. 0. 0. 0. 883. 97. 159. 52. 75.
MONTH 2 HO 2039. TOO 35. Tot 32. KT .633 KD . 166
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR RAD I AT ION DAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTTMF SAG/ALL DAY
9 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 19 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATGD SATGS SATGD
SOUTH 0. 0. 0. 19. 92. 197. 187. 212. 220. 212. 187. 197. 92. 19. 0. 0. 0. 1537. 199. 233. 81. 122.
SOUTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 9. 16. 28. 66. 121. 169. 203. 220. 213. 172. 99. 0. 0. 0. 1262. 125. 198. 72. 106.
WEST 0. 0. 0. 9 . 16. 28. 37. 92. 99. 101. 196. 171 . 160. 52. 0. 0. 0. 801 . 92. 138. 5ft. 79.
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 9 . 16. 28. 37. 92. 99. 92. 37. 95. 69. 27. 0. 0. 0. 386. 62. 85. 44. 55.
NORTH 0. 0. 0. 9 . 16. 28. 37. 92. 99. 92. 37. 28.- 16. 9. 0. 0. 0. 299. 56. 73. 92. 49.
NORTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 27. 69. 95. 37. 92. 99. 92. 37. 28. 16. 9. 0. 0. 0. 386. 62. 85. 44. 55.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 52. 160. 171 . 196. 101. 99. 92. 37. 28. 16. 9. 0. 0. 0. 801. 92. 138. 5fl 79.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 99. 172. 213. 220. 203. 169. 121. 66. 28. 16. 9. 0. 0. 0. 1262. 125. 198. 72. 106.
HORIZ. 0. 0. 0. 10. 65. 119. 162. 189. 199. 189. 162. 119. 65. 10. 0 0. 0. 1290. 127. 201. 73. 107.
MONTH 3 HO 2655. TOD 95. TOT 91 . KT .69 3 KD . 163
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR RAD I AT I ON DAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
9 5 6 7 ft 9 10 1 1 12 13 19 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATGD SATGS SATGD
SOUTH 0. 0. 0. 33. 89 . 131. 167. 190. 19fl. 190. 167. 131. 89. 33. 0. 0. 0. 1906. 135. 208. ft6. 123.
SOUTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 12. 25. 36. 51 . 107. 155. 191 . 211 . 210. 183. 117. 0. 0. 0. 1298. 128. 195. 83. 117.
WEST 0. 0. 0. 12. 25. 36. 95. 50. 52. no. 158. 187. 190. 190. 0 . 0. 0. 1009. 109. 161. 73. 100.
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 12. 25. 36. 95. 50. 52. 50. 95. 76. 99. 87. 0. 0. 0. 577. 82. 112. 60. 75.
NORTH 0. 0. 0. 12. 25. 36. 95. 50. 52. 50. 95. 36. 25. 12. 0. 0. 0. 386. 69. 89. 54. 64 .
NORTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 87. 99. 76. 95. 50. 52. 50. 95. 36. 25. 12. 0. 0. 0. 577. 82. 112. 60. 75.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 190. 190. 187. 158. no. 52. 50. 95. 36. 25. 12. 0. 0. 0. 1009. 1 09. 161 . 73. 100.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0 . 0. 117. 183. 210. 211. 191. 155. 107. 51. 36. 25. 12. 0 . 0. 0. 1298. 128. 195. 83. 117.
HORIZ. 0. 0 . 0. 92. 103. 158. 201. 229. 238. 229. 201. 158. 103. 92. 0 . 0. 0. 1706. 159. 293. 96. 191 .


167
37
LOCATION
GRAND JUNCTION. COLO.
LATITUDE 39 DEGREES
7 MINUTES
month 9 HO 3253. TOD 56. TOT 52. KT .632 KD .166
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR RADIATION DAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 e 9 10 11 12 13 19 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SAT GS SATGO SATGS SATGO
SOUTH 0. 0. 7. 19. 60. 100. 133. 153. 160. 153. 133. 100 . 60. 19. 7. 0. 0. 1105. 120. 172. 87. 116.
southwest 0. 0. 7. 19. 32. 93. 51 . 85. 130. 164. 184. 185. 167. 129 . 46. 0. 0. 1239. 127. 186. 92. 129.
WEST 0. 0. 7. 19. 32. 43. 51. 57. 58. 113. 157. 187. 194. 168. 74. 0. 0. 1160. 123. 178. 89. 1 19.
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 7. 19. 32. 93. 51 . 57. 68. 57.' 69. 109. 127. 129. 62. 0. 0. 810. 103. 191 . 78. 99.
north 0. 0. la. 19. 32. 93. 51 . 57. 58. 57. 51. 43. 32. 19. 18. 0. 0. 498. 85. 108. 68. 81 .
NORTHEAST 0. 0. 62. 129. 127. 104. 69. 57. 58. 57. 51. 93. 32. 19. 7. 0. 0. 810. 103. 141 . 78. 99.
EAST 0. 0. 74. 168. 194. 187. 157. 113. 58. 57. 51. 43. 32. 19. 7. 0. 0. 1160. 123. 178. 89. 119.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 46. 129. 167. 185. 184. 169. 130. 85. 51. 43. 32. 19. 7. 0. 0. 1239. 127. 186. 9?. 129.
HORIZ. 0. 0. ia. 75. 135. 187. 228. 259. 263. 259. 228. 187. 135. 75. 18. 0. 0. 2057. 175. 272. 118. 172.
MONTH 5 HO 3626. TOO 66. TOT 62. KT .64 3 KD .163
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR RADIATION DAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 19 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATGO SATGS SATGO
SOUTH 0. 1 . 12. 24. 92. 79. 109. 128. 135. 128. 109. 79. 42. 24. 12. 1 0. 922. 119. 160. 94. 118.
SOUTHWEST 0. 1. 12. 24. 36. 47. 55. 69. 113. 197. 166. 169. 159. 120. 65. 1. 0 . 1180. 134. 186. 102. 133.
WEST 0. 1. 12. 29. 36. 47. 55. 60. 61 . 119. 158. 188. 198. 180. tie. 2. 0. 1259. 138. 193. 105. 1 38.
NORTHWEST 0. 1. 12. 29. 36. 97. 55. 60. 61 . 60. 90. 129. 197. 148. 109. 2. 0. 974. 122. 165. 95. 121.
NORTH 0. 1. 92. 99. 36. 97. 55. 60. 61 . 60. 55. 97. 36. 44. 92. 1. 0. 630. 102. 130. 84. too.
NORTHEAST 0. 2. 109. 198. 197. 124. 90. 60. 61. 60. 55. 47. 36. 24. 12. 1 . 0. 974. 122. 165. 9 . 121 .
EAST 0. 2. 118. 180. 198. 188. 158. 119. 61. 60. 55. 47. 36. 24. 12. 1. 0. 1259. 138. 193. 105. 138.
SOUTHEAST 0. 1 . 65. 120. 159. 169. 166. 197. 113. 69. 55. 97. 36. 29. 12. 1. 0. 1 180. 139. 186. 102. 133.
HORIZ. 0. 2. 40. 99. 157. 208. 297. 272. 281. 272. 297. 208. 157. 99. 40. 2. 0. 2331. 200. 302. 192. 203.
MONTH 6 HO 3759. TOO 76. TOT 71. KT .704 KD . 1U7
orientation HOURLY SOLAR RADIATION DAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 ft 9 10 1 1 12 13 19 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATGO SATGS SATGO
SOUTH 0. 3. 13. 25. 37. 72. 109. 125. 132. 125. 104. 72. 37. 25. 13. 3. 0 . 891. 125. 163. 102. 125.
SOUTHWEST 0. 3. 13. 25. 37. 47. 55. 62. 112. 150. 173. 178. 169. 129. 75. 7. 0. 1230. 191). 197. in. 196.
WEST 0. 3. 13. 25. 37. 97. 55. 60. 62. 122. 173. 208. 221 . 205. 195. 16. 0. 1390. 153. 212. 119. 155.
NORTHWEST 0. 3. 13. 25. 37. 97. 55. 60. 62. 60. 103. 143. 170. 175. 137. 17. 0. 1107. 137. 185. 1 09. 138.
NORTH 0. 10. 57. 57. 91. 97. 55. 60. 62. 60. 55. 47. 91. 57. 57. 10. 0. 717. 116. 146. 6 115.
NORTHEAST 0. 17. 137. 175. 170. 193. 103. 60. 62. 6Q 55. 97. 37. 25. 13. 3. 0. 1107. 187. 185. 109. 138.
EAST 0. 16. 195. 205. 221. 208. 173. 122. 62. 60. 55. 97. 37. 25. 13. 3. 0 . 1390. 153. 212. 119. 155.
SOUTHEAST 0. 7. 75. 129. 169 . 178. 173. 150. 112. 62. 55. 47. 37. 25. 13. 3. 0. 1230. 144 . 197. 113. 196.
HORIZ. 0. S. 52. 116. 179. 234. 277. 304. 313. 304. 277. 234. 179. 1 16. 52. 5. 0 . 2646. 223. 336. 162. 231 .


168
38
GRAND JUNCTION# COLO.
LATITUDE 39 DFGRFES
7 MINUTES
I
MONTH 7 HO 3622. TOO 82. TOT 78. KT .690 KD . 152
ORIENThTION HOURLY SOLAR RADIATION DAILY TOTAL SAG/OAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 a 9 10 11 12 13 10 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADI AT ION satgs SATGD SATGS SATGD
SOUTH 0. 1. ii. 24. 41. 81 . 114. 135. 143. 135. 110. 81. 01 . 24 . u. 1 . 0. 959. 137. 179. 111. 136.
southwest 0. i. ii. 20. 36. 46. 50. 70. 119. 156. 179. 183. 167. 130. 70. 1. 0 . 1247. 150. 208. 121 . 150 .
WEST 0. 1. u. 21. 36. 46. 50. 59. 61 . 121. 171. 200. 216. 196. 127. 2. 0. 1330. 159. 217. 124. 159.
NORTHWEST 0. 1. 11 . 24. 36. 46. 50. 59. 61 . 59. 90. 133. 159. 162. 117. 2. 0. 1019. 101. 185. 113. 100.
NORTH 0. 1. 15. 06. 36. 46. 54. 59. 61 . 59. 50. 06. 36. 46. 05. 1 . 0. 637. 119. 147. 100. 117.
NORTHEAST 0. 2. 117. 162. 159. 133. 94 . 59. 61 . 59. 54. 06. 36. 20 . 11. 1. 0. 1019. 101 . 185. 113. ion.
EAST 0. 2. 127. 196. 216. 200. 171 . 121. 61 . 59. 50. 06. 36. 20. 11. 1 . 0. 1330. 159. 217. 120. 159.
SOUTHEAST 0. 1 . 70. 130. 167. 183. 179. 156. 119. 70. 54. 06. 36. 24 . 11 . 1 . 0. 1207. 150. 208. 121. 150.
HORIZ. 0. 2. 42. 104 . 1 6fi. 223. 266. 293. 303. 293. 266. 223. 168. 104 . 02. 2. 0. 2500. 225. 335. 160. 229.
MONTH 8 HO 3229. TOD 80. TOT 76. KT .650 KD .162
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR RADI ATI ON OAIL.Y TOTAI SAG/DAYTIMF SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 a 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION satgs SATGD SATGS SATGD
south 0. 0. 6. 19. 60. 102. 135. 157. 164 . 157. 135. 102. 60. 19. 6. 0. 0. 1 120. 149. 202. 114. 103.
southwest 0. 0. 6. 19. 32. 42. 51 . 86. 133. 169. 189. 190. 170. 125. 03. 0. 0. 1255. 1S7. 216. 119. 151 .
WEST 0. 0. 6. 19. 32. 42. 61 . 56. 58. 115. 162. 192. 199. 169. 69. 0. 0. 1169. 152. 207. I 16. 106.
northwest 0. 0. 6. 19. 32. 02. 51 . 56. *8. 56. 70. 1 06. 129. 125. 58. 0. 0. 809. 129. 168. 103. 120.
north 0. 0. 17. 19. 32. 02. 51 . 56. 58. 56. 51 . 42. 32. 19. 17. 0. 0. 492. 110. 133. 92. 105.
northeast 0. 0. 58. 125. 129. 106. 70. 56. 58. 56. 51 . 42. 32. 19. 6. 0. 0 . 809. 1 29. 168. 103. 120.
EAST 0. 0. 69. 169. 199. 192. 162. 115. 98. 56. 51 . 02. 32. 19. 6. 0. 0 . 1169. 152. 207. 116. 106.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 43. 125. 170. 190. 189. 169. 133. 86. 51. 42. 32. 19. 6. 0. 0 . 1255. 157. 216. 119. 151 .
HORIZ. 0. 0. 18. 75. 137. 191 . 230 . 261 . 270. 261 . 234 . 191. 137. 75. 18. 0. 0. 2100. 209. 308. 107. 202.
MONTH 9 HO 2602. TOD 71. TOT 67. KT .705 KD . 147
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR : RAD IATION OAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 11 1 2 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATGD SATGS SATGD
south 0. 0. 0. 33. 90. 143. 184 . 211 . 220. 211. 184. 143. 90. 33. 0. 0. 0 . 1 500 . 176. 257. 120. 161.
southwest 0. 0. 0 . 11. 24. 35. 51 . 114. 170. 213. 236. 235. 203. 126. 0. 0. 0. 1018. 168. 242. 116. 153.
WEST 0. 0. 0 . 11 . 24. 35. 44 . 50. 51 . 119. 1 75. 209. 211 . 151. 0. 0. 0. 1080 . 105. 201 . 1 04 . 133.
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 0. n. 24 . 35. 44 . 50. 51. 50. 44. 82. 109. 94. 0. 0. 0. 590 . 112. 103. 88. 103.
NOR T H 0. 0. 0 . u. 24. 35. 44 . 50. si . 50. 44 . 35. 24. 11 . 0. 0. 0. 379. 97. 117. 80 . 90.
NORTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 90. 109. 82. 44 . 50. 51 . 50. 44. 35. 20. 11. 0. 0. n. 590 . 112. 103. 88. 103.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 151 . 211 . 209. 175. 119. 51 . 50. 44. 35. 20. 11. 0. 0. 0. 1080. 145. 201. 104 . 133.
southeast 0. 0. 0. 126. 203. 235. 236. 213. 170. 114. 51 . 35. 24. ii. 0. 0. 0. 1418. 168. 202. 116. 153.
HORIZ. 0. 0. o. 43. 111. 173. 221 . 252. 262. 252. 221 . 173. in. 03. 0. 0. 0. 1862. 198. 295. 131 . 180.


169
39
LOCATION GRAND junction# CrLO. LATITUDE 39 DFGRFES 7 MINUTES
MONTH 10 HO 2005. TOO 58. TOT 54. KT .684 KO .161
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR PAD TATION nA ILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 ft 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 RAOT AT ION SATGS SATon SATGS SATGO
south 0. 0. 0. 16. 94. 152. 195. 222. 231 . 222. 195. 152. 94. 16. 0. 0. 0. 1590. 172. 264. 105. 147.
southwest 0. 0. 0. 4 . 16. 27. 68. 126. 176. 213. 230. 221 . 174. 41 . 0. 0. 0. 1294. 150. 226. Q6 130.
WEST 0. 0. o. 4 . 16. 27. 36. 42. 44. 103. 151 . 1 76. 161. 43. 0. 0. 0. 803. 115. 162. 80. 101 .
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 4 . 16. 27. 36. 42. 44 . 42. 36. 44. 64. 23. 0. 0. o. 376. 85. 107. 66. 76.
NORTH 0. 0. 0. 4 . 16. 27. 36. 42. 44. 42. 36. 27. 16. 4 . 0. 0. 0. 292. 79. 96. 64. 71.
NORTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 23. 64. 44. 36. 42. 44 . 42. 36. 27. 16. 4. 0. 0. 0. 376. 5. 107. 66. 76.
last 0. 0. 0. *13. 161 . 176. 151. 103. 44 . 42. 36. 27. 16. 4. 0. 0. 0. 803. 115. 162. 80. 101 .
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 41 . 174. 221 . 2 30. 213. 176. 1 26. 68. 27. 16. 4. 0. 0. n. 1294 . 150. 226. 96. 130.
HORIZ. 0. 0. G. 9. 64. 121 . 166. 194 . 204 . 104. 166. 121 . 64. 9. 0. 0. n. 1311. 152. 228. 96. 1 31.
MONTH 11 HO 1466. TOO 42. TOT 39. KT .500 KD .178
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR RADI ATI ON DAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 ft 9 10 1 1 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATGO SATGS SATGO
south 0. 0. 0. 0. 67. 137. 181. 208. 216. 208. 181. 137. 67. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1402. 153. 244 . 84. 120.
SOUTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 22. 71 . 121. 163. 192. 202. 183. 110. n. 0. 0. 0. 1073. 127. 197. 73. 101.
WEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 19. 28. 34 . 35. 84 . 121. 134. 93. 0. 0. 0. 0. 557. 86. 122. 56. 71 .
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 0 . 9. 19. 28. 34. 35. 34. 28. 19. 27. 0. 0. 0. 0. 233. 61 . 76. 46. 52.
NORTH 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 19. 28. 34. 35. 34. 28. 19. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0. 215. 89. 73. 45. 51 .
NORTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 27. 19. 28. 34. 35. 34. 28. 19. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0. 233. 61 . 76. 46. 52.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 93. 134. 121. 84 . 35. 34. 28. 19. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0. 557. 86. 122. 56. 71.
southeast 0. 0. 0. 0. 110. 183. 202. 192. 163. 121. 71. 22. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1073. 127. 197. 73. 101 .
HORIZ. 0. 0. 0. 0. 27. 75. 115. 141 . 149. 141. 115. 75. 27. 0. 0. 0. 0. 866. 111. 167. 66. 89.
MONTH 12 HO 1263. TOO 31 . TOT 28. KT .621 KD .169
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR RADI AT ION DAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 ft 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATGO SATGS satgo
south 0. 0. 0. 0. 55. 146. 109. 229. 238. 229. 199. 146. 55. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1493. 156. 257. 76. 115.
southwest 0. 0. 0. Q. 6. 25. 78. 132. 178. 209. 217. 190. 86. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1121. 125. 201 . 64. 94 .
WEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 6. 16. 25. 30. 32. 84 . 123. 133. 71. 0. 0. 0. 0. 520. 75. 110. 45. 59.
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 6. 16. 25. 30. 32. 30. 25. 16. 17. 0. 0. 0. 0. 197. 48. 61. 35. 40.
north 0. 0. o. 0 . 6. 16. 25. 30. 32. .30. 25. 16. 6. 0. 0. 0. 0. 186. 47. 59. 34. 39.
NORTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 17. 16. 25. 30. 32. 30. 25. 16. 6. 0. 0. 0. 0. 197. 48. 61 . 38. 40.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 71 . 133. 123. 84. 32. 30. 25. 16. 6. 0. 0. 0. 0. 520. 75. 110. 45. 59.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 06 190. 217. 209. 178. 132. 78. 25. 6. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1121 . 125. 201 . 64. 9i.
HORIZ. 0. 0. 0. 0. 17. 65. 107. 133. 143. 1.33. 107. 65. 17. 0. 0. 0. 0. 786. 97. 150. 84. 74.


170
40
LOCATION GRAND JUNCTION. COLO. LATITUDE 30 OFGRFES 7 "INUTES
ANNUAL SUMMARY OF SOL-AIP, TEMPERATURF FOR GLASS. DAYTIME (SINGLE GLARING)
ANNUAL
ORIENTATION JAN FEB MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPT OCT NOV DEC AVERAGF
SOUTH mo. 144. 1 36. 120. 119. 125. 137. 14Q. 176. 172. 153. 156. 144.
SOUTHWEST 114. 125. 126. 127. 134. 144 . 154. 157. 168. 150. 127. 125. 138.
WEST 72. 92. 109. 123. 136. 153. 159. 152. 145. 115. 86. 75. IIP.
NORTHWEST 46. 62. 62. 103. 122. 137. 141. 120. 112. 85. 61. 48. 94.
NORTH 44 . 56. 69. 85. 102. 116. 119. 110. 97. 79. 59. 47. 82.
NORTHEAST 46. 62. 62. 103. 122. 137. 141. 129. 112. 85. 61. 4. 94.
EAST 72. 92. 109. 123. 138. 153. 159. 152. 145. 115. 86. 75. 118.
SOUTHEAST 114. 125. 128. 127. 134. 144 . 154. 157. 168. 150. 127. 125. 138.
HORIZ. 97. 127. 154. 175. 200. 223. 225. 20. 198. 152. 111. 97. 164 .
annual summary of SOL-A IR TEMPERATURF FOR GL ASS. DAYTIME 1 [DOUBLE GLAZING)
ANNUAL
ORIENTATION JAN FEB MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SFPT OCT NOV DEC AVERAGF
SOUTH 233. 233. 208. 172. 160. 163. 1 79. 202. 257. 264. 244 . 257. 214.
SOUTHWEST 105. 198. 195. 186. 186. 197. 208. 216. 242. 226 197. 201. 203.
WEST 109. 138. 161. 178. 193. 212. 217. 207. 201. 162. 122. 1 in. 168.
NORTHWEST 61. 05. 1 12. 141 . 165. 185. 185. 16 8 . 143. 107. 76. 61. 124 .
NORTH 58. 73. 69. 108. 130. 146. 147. 133. 1 17. 96. 73. 5q. 103.
NORTHEAST 61. 85. 112. 141 . 165. 185. 185. 168. 143. 107. 76. 61 . 124.
EAST 109. 138. 161 . 178. 193. 212. 217. 207. 201. 162. 122. 110. 168.
SOUTHEAST 185. 198. 195. 186. 186. 197. 208. 216. 242. 226. 197. 201 . 203.
HORIZ. 154. 201. 24 3. 272. 30?. 336. 335. 308. 295. 228. 167. 150. 249.
ANNUAL SUMMARY OF SOL-AIR TFMPERATURF FOR GLASS. ALL DAY (SINGLE 6LA7ING)
ANNUAL
ORIENTATION JAN FEB ^ARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPT OCT NOV DEC AVERAGF
SOUTH 70. 81 . 86. 87. 94 . 102. 111. 114. 120. 105. 84 . 76. 94 .
SOUTHWEST 59. 72. 83. 92. 102. 113. 121 . 119. 116. 96. 73. 64. 93.
WEST 42. 58. 73. 89. 105. 119. 124. 116. 104. 80. 56. 45. 84 .
NORTHWEST 32. 44 . 60. 78. 95. 109. 113. 103. 88. 66. 46. 35. 72.
NORTH 31 . 42. 54. 68. 84. 96. 100. 92. 80. 64. 45. 34. 66.
northeast 32. 44 . 60. 78. 95. 109. 113. 103. 86. 66. 46. 35. 72.
EAST 42. 58. 73. 89. 105. 119. 124. 116. 104. 80. 56. 45. 84 .
SOUTHEAST 59. 72. 83. 92 . 102. 113. 121. 1 19. 116. 96. 73. 64. 93.
HORIZ. 52. 73. 96. 118. 142. 162. 164 . 147. 131 . 96. 66. 54. 10P.
ANNUAL SUMMARY OF SOL- AIR TEMPERATURE FOR GL SS* ALL DAY 1 [DOUBLE GLAZING)
annual
ORIENTATION JAN FEB MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPT OCT NOV DEC AVERAGF
SOUTH 107. 122. 123. 116. 118. 125. 136. 143. 161. 147. 120. 115. 128.
SOUTHWEST 88. 106. 117. 124 . 133. 146. 154. 151 . 153. 130. 101. 94. 125.
WEST 57. 79. 100 . 119. 138, 155. 159. 146. 133. 101. 71 . 59. no.
NORTHWEST 38. 55. 75. 99. 121 . 138. 140. 124. 103. 76. 52. 40. 88
NORTH 37. 49. 64. ei. 100. 115. 117. 105. 90. 71. 51. 39. 77.
NORTHEAST 38. 55. 75. 99. 121 . 138. 140. 124 . 103. 76. 52. 40. 8R.
EAST 57. 79. 100. 119. 138. 155. 159. 146. 133. 101. 71. 59. no.
SOUTHEAST 88. 106. 117. 124. 133. 1 46. 154. 151 . 153. 130. mi. 94. 125.
HORIZ. 75. 107. 141 . 172. 207. 231 . 229. 202 , 180. 131 . 89. 74 . 153.


41


GENERAL
The site is located in the Washington Square Business Park in Thornton, Colorado. The Business Park is bounded by 120th Avenue on the south, Interstate 25 on the west, 124th Avenue on the north and Washington Street on the east. The site is described legally as block seven, lot three, Washington Square Subdivision, the southeast 1/4 and south 1/2 northeast 1/4 of section thirty-four, township one south, range sixty-eight west, sixth principal meridian, city of Thornton, county of Adams, state of Colorado.
GEOLOGY
The site is situated in what
geologists refer to as the High Plains. This region rises gently from an elevation of 4000 feet at the border with Kansas and Nebraska to an elevation of 5000 feet or more at its western edge. The rock in this area is typically composed of sand, gravel and clay that were washed off the mountains late in the Tertiary Period. Below this poorly consolidated rock (approximately 700 feet of it) lie the older layered sedimentary rocks. This includes the gray Pierre Shale (thousands of feet thick) deposited 70 to 80 million years ago in a shallow Cretaceous Sea.
During the Paleozoic Era and the


first part of the Mesozoic Era seas had covered the continent time and time again. The Ancestral Rockies were long since washed away. Then in a quiet shallow sea stretching from the Arctic to the Gulf of Mexico fine gray muds of the Pierre Formation began to accumulate.
On the gently sloping western shore a coastal plain such as the broad, featureless slope of the southern Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the nation today was formed. A line of beaches and lagoons and barrier bars seperated land from sea. Nothing resembling a mountain was closer than western Utah.
Then about 75 million years ago,
near the end of the Mesozoic Era, parts of Colorado began to rise very slowly. The sea with its muddy bottom, beaches, barrier bars and lagoons slowly withdrew to the east. The retreat left layers of beach and bar sand, lagoon mud and plant-filled swamps above the old Pierre Shale. Colorado was becoming part of a widening coastal plain. Then at 65 million years ago at the beginning of the Cenozoic Era the mountains began to rise in response to titanic forces on the mid-ocean ridges.
As the mountains rose land on either side "sagged". As the mountains grew higher the sags grew deeper as if to



counterbalance the uplift. As a result stream gradients steepened and streams and rivers became more active. They began carving into the rising hills carrying away heavier and heavier loads of sand, silt and gravel which was dumped into the sagging basins to the east and west.
Through the early part of the Genozoic Era the mountains continued to rise and the basins to sink. The mountains and basins seemingly stabilized about ^5 to 50 million years ago. Erosion, however, continued unchecked until 28 to 30 million years ago. By then the mountains were worn down until scattered ridges and peaks remained. They were half buried by
their own debris. This debris filled the basins and then overflowed a spread eastward into Kansas and Nebraska.
The sag east of the Rockies, commonly referred to as the Denver Basin is no longer basin-shaped on the surface The layered rocks that fill the basin show the oval-shaped area of subsidence. The deepest part of the basin, near Denver, is some 13,000 feet below the surface which is contrasted to its shallower depth of 6000 feet near the Nebraska border.
Then at about 28 million years ago the entire region began to rise into


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46
a broad dome extending from the middle of Kansas to the deserts of Utah. Near the mountains erosion slowly stripped several thousand feet of the upper sediments. This activity created a broad, gentle valley called the Colorado Piedmont located between the High Plains and the Rocky Mountains. Streams again increased in intensity and scoured the mountains to reveal the shape of the pediment carved in the hard and old mountain core. The streams also have stripped away the High Plains veneer and uncovered early Tertiary and Cretaceous rocks in the Piedmont.
The immediate area of the site is characterized by the Denver Formation,
a coarse gravelly Tertiary sandstone and conglomerate that fill the center of the Denver Basin. Below this there exists the Upper Cretaceous sandstone, Pierre Shale and the older sedimentary rocks of the Mesozoic and Palezoic Eras respectively. Thus the narrative completes a brief history and profile of the geology associated with the surrounding area.
SOILS
The soils within the site are composed of the Platner Loam and the Ulm Loam.
The Platner Loam located on the


uplands is irregular in shape and typically covers areas of 20 to 300 acres. Surface runoff is slow and the hazard of erosion is moderated to slight.
However, the hazard of wind erosion is severe if not protected by growing plants. The Platner Series soils which were formed in old alluvium are characterized by their slow water absorbtion, slow permability and their extreme suitability for plant roots. However, the shrink-swell potential for the low building foundations is moderate to severe and is broken down as follows:
From 0 inches to 9 inches --moderate shrink-swell capacity
From 9 inches to 23 inches --severe shrink-swell capacity
From 23 inches to 60 inches --moderate shrink-swell capacity For a more detailed breakdown please refer to the soil profiles of the Platner Series.
The Ulm Loam is typically characterized by a medium surface runoff with water erosion a severe hazard. Gullies tend to form rapidly. As with the Platner Series wind erosion is a severe hazard and should be considered in the design phase. This soil also has a slow rate of absorbance and permability, but the soil is excellent for root systems. Again the soil is considered to have a moderate to severe shrink-swell potential


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50
to a depth of 48 inches where one encounters shale bedrock below. This soil's shrink-swell is broken down as follows:
From 0 inches to 3 inches --severe
From 3 inches to 48 inches moderate
Shale below 48 inches
Please refer to the soil profile for a more detailed brakdown of the Ulm Series.
DRAINAGE ____ _______
Surface drainage as it exists now on the site runs from the north and south sides to the center. There appears to be a small gully into which the north and
south drainage empty. The gully then continues its drainage westward towards Interstate 25. This pattern could, in fact should, be altered to prevent further erosion of the site. One should note, however, that the Farmers High Line Canal flows from south to northeast across the eastern site boundary and should not be interfered with in any manner whatsoever.
WILDLIFE AND VEGETATION________________
The wildlife existing on the sight and in the immediate vicinity include an abundant supply of cotton-tailed rabbits, a few ground squirrels, two families of brown squirrels, bluejays,


51
woodpeckers, crows, and peculiar to the irrigation canal are ducks, geese, sandpipers and turtles.
The trees presently on the sight are growing along the canal. These include cottonwoods, willows and elm trees. However, trees recommended for this area are as follows:
Evergreens Ponderosa pine, Austrian pine, Pinyon pine, Umber pine, Bristlecone pine, Rocky Mountain juniper, Utah and Onseed juniper.
Deciduous -- Native cottonwood, Siberian elm, Honey locust, Russian olive, Boxelder, American elm, Silver poplar, Hackberry, Green ash, Tree of heaven and common lilac.
Tall shrubs (6-8 feet) -- Siberian
peashrub, Tamarisk, Bush honeysuckle, Russian olive, Sumac, Peking Cotoneaster, Privet, Persian and common lilac, Rose acacia, Forestierra, Skunkbush sumac, Chokecherry, Wild plum and Buckthorn.
Low shrubs (3-^ feet) Leadplant, Indigobush, Apirea, Cotoneaster, Currant, Matrimony vine, Dwarf peashrub, Wild rose, Yucca, Alpine currant, Flowering quince and Sqawbrush.
Grasses and groundcover on the site vary considerably. These are buffalo grass, wild wheat, prairie grass, dandelions, sunflowers, russian thistle, and mouse-eared chickweed. Some recommended lawn grasses are Kentucky bluegrass, white dutch clover, redtop, ryegrass and meadowgrass. Groundcovers


52
suggested for the area are broken into shady and sunny environments. Those prefering the shade include english ivy and Hall's honeysuckle. Those which enjoy the sun are engelmann ivy and once again Hall's honeysuckle.
UTILITIES-______________________________
The site currently has immediate access to water, sewer, electrical, telephone and gas connections and supplies.
The water is supplied by an eight inch line located in the center of Grant Street. The sanitary sewer is presently an eight inch line also located approximately six feel below Grant Street,
with the flow running south to 120th Avenue where it joins a sixteen inch main running west along 120th Avenue. These services are provided by the city of Thornton.
The six inch gas line and underground electrical service are located within the utility easement. This easement is an eight foot strip running along the west property line parallel and abutting Grant Street. These services are provided by the Public Service Company of Colorado.
Telephone service is underground and located primarily within the twenty foot communications easement which parallels the north side of 120th Avenue. The branch off this system


then parallels Grant Street on the west side and is located ten feet west of the Grant Street property lines of blocks one and six. This service is an underground cable and is supplied by the Mountain Bell System.
ACCESS
Access to the site via a vehicle is achieved in a number of ways.
Access to and from Interstate 25 is obtained one block west of the busines park on 120th Avenue. To the east of the business park is Washington Street a major arterial highway. Within the Washington Square Business Park itself is Grant Street, 124th Avenue and
Pennsylvania Street. These all have from curb to curbs a 10 ft. stationary lane, 12 ft. driving lane, 12 ft. driving lane, 12 ft. landscaped median,
12 ft. driving lane, 12 ft. driving lane and a 10 ft. stationary lane for a total street width of 80 feet. Traffic is controlled by a traffic light at 120th Avenue and Grant Street, 120th Avenue and Washington Street, and 120th Avenue and Interstate 25. It is controlled by a stop sign at 124th Avenue and Washington as well as Pennsylvania Street and Washington Street.
Public transportation is also available within the area. Major RTD bus routes run along 120th Avenue and




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57
Washington Street. Stops are located at 120th Avenue and Grant Street and also at Washington and 120th Avenue.
Pedestrian access is provided by six foot wide sidewalks along the streets within the business park.
There are sidewalks at the present facilities that lead from the parking areas to the entries of the facilities. It should be noted at this point that the city of Northglenn has several bicycle trails that come within a block of the business park.
EXISTING FACILITIES
Within the business park several companies have already established their
facilities. These include a day care center on Pennsylvania Street; Mountain Bell on the corner of Washington and 120th Avenue; Nabisco is located on 12^th Avenue as is the Wyle Distribution Group; Grant Drive has the Gerico Company at its termination; located on Grant Street is I.N.A. along with Frostline Garments and the Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association. Sketches of each of these facilities appear on the following pages.
Outside the business park many local amenities are available. Just across 120th Avenue are two major motels each with a restaurant. The city of Northglenn also maintains the Webster Lake Park located just south


58
of the business park. Northglenn also has the city recreational facility located just across from the park on Community Circle Drive and between the two motels. This facility has within it a swimming pool, several gyms, a weight room, handball and racketball courts and locker rooms and showers.
VIEWS _____________
The views are an important feature of this location. These views are as follows: to the north the plains drop
away revealing a draw; also to the north is the Frostline Garments facility; to the east is the Farmer's High Line Canal with its trees and wildlife; to the south
is the Webster Lake park with its tall elms; to the west the land slopes away to give an excellent unobstructed view of the Front Range and Long's Peak.


59
"ft "''HI III
i
FHE DAY CARE CENTER


MOUNTAIN BELL


61
NABISCO


62
THE WYLE DISTRIBUTION GROUP


ooiaao




65
FROSTLINE GARMENTS


66
TRI-STATE GENERATION AND TRANSMISSION ASSOCIATION


6?


68
LOCAL
The site is located within the 1-1 zone as designated by the city of Thornton. The requirements as set forth in the Zoning Ordinance number 325 follow:
Building Area: No square footage maximum or minimum
Site Coverage: 50% or less of building structure only
Maximum Building Height: U0 feet Front Yard: 50 foot setback with a minimum of 25 feet adjacent to the street right of way being used for no other purpose than landscaping, ingress and egress.
Side Yard: If a building is constructed of masonry or fireproof
materials no setback is required provided the walls are located on the property line.
In all other cases the side setback shall be a minimum of 3 feet is required (fireproof only).
In the event that rear access to the property is not available, then a 12 foot side setback will be required on one side.
If the building is not constructed of fireproof materials then a 15 foot side setback on each will be required.
Rear Yard: A rear setback of not less than 15 feet shall be required. This 15 feet may include one half the width of an alley.
Parking: The parking area must


69
be surfaced so that it is durable and dustless. This area must be within 600 feet of the principal use. When the area has five spaces or more then at least 5$ of the parking area must be landscaped. Lighting within the parking area must be directed away from the public right of way. Signs denoting entrance and exit to the area cannot be greater than 8 square feet. Wheel and bumper guards are required so that cars will not extend into other areas.
Parking Spaces Required: One space per two employees based on the number of combined employees of the two largest successive shifts. One space for each company vehicle. 10% of the spaces should be allotted to visitors.
Loading Area: Cannot extend into public right of way.
Fences: Solid fence no more than
8 feet high industrial chain link fence topped with 3 strands of barbed wire is alright.
Outside Storage: Materials stored outside shall be concealed within a solid fence of at least 6 feet high and no more than 8 feet high. Material stored within cannot be visible above the height of the fence. This storage may not be placed within the front setback.
Signage: The signs within the
business park are classified as a class 7 under the Thornton Ordinance number 325*


70
Structural characteristics; wall or free standing, single or double faced. Maximum size: 300 square feet. Maximum height (above grade): 40 feet. Maximum number: two, not to exceed the 300
square feet combined. Setback: Edge of sign cannot be closer than 25 feet to front property line. Miscellaneous: Sign may be illuminated.
Landscaping: Required within the landscaping setbacks abutting a public right of way is one tree (deciduous or evergreen) for every 10 feet of street frontage. This, however, does not mean the trees shall be planted every 10 feet on center. In addition to these trees one tree or other shrub is required for every 2,500 square feet of lot area.
A minimum of 75% of the required landscaping area shall have a ground cover of grass or other plant materials and an irrigation system to sustain it. The remaining 25% may be covered with rock, stone, brick, etc. and other impermiable features including sidewalks and points of ingress and egress. If the lot area used for parking is placed between the landscaped setback abutting the public right of way and the structure, then a screening of the parking area shall be established in the rear of the landscaped area.
This view-obsuring screen shall be at least 42 inches high and composed of live plantings.


71
UNIFORM BUILDING CODE. 1979____________
Basic occupancy is B-2 with a Type I fire-resistive contraction.
Allowable area: Unlimited.
Maximum height: Unlimited.
Structural framework: Steel, concrete or reinforced masonry.
Exterior bearing walls: 4 hours or 2 hours of fire-resistive noncombustible materials where openings are permitted.
Interior bearing walls: 3 hours fire-resistive.
Exterior non-bearing walls: 4 hours fire-resistive or 1 hour fire-resistive where unprotected openings are permitted or 2 hour fire-resistive where fire
protection of openings is required.
Structural frame: 3 hour fire-resistive .
Partitions permanent: 1 hour -fire retardant wood may be used.
Shaft enclosures: 2 hours Floors: 2 hours
Roofs: 2 hours if more than
25 feet above any floor it may be of unprotected non-combustible material Exterior doors and windows: j/k hour when located less than 20 feet from the property line.
Exits: Minimum of two exits.
Handicapped access required in office but not in warehouse.
Light: Natural light by exterior
glazing with an area equal to 1/10


72
of the total floor area or artifical lighting.
Ventilation: Natural air movement by
exterior openings with an area equal to at least 1/20 of the total floor area or artifically supplying a minimum of 5 cubic feet per minute of outside air with a total circulated of not less than 15 cubic feet per minute per occupant in all portions of the building. If the air velocity at the register exceeds 10 feet per second, the register shall be placed 8 feet above the floor.
Sanitation: One water closet for
each sex.
DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION REQUIREMENTS
To enclose and secure drugs listed on schedules I and II of the D.E.A. a vault constructed as follows:
A vault constructed after September 1, 1971s
The walls, floors, and ceilings of which vault are constructed of at least 8 inches of reinforced concrete or other substantial masonry, reinforced vertically and horizontally with 1/2 inch steel rods tied 6 inches on center, or the structural equivalent to such reinforced walls, floors, and ceilings.
The door and frame unit of which vault shall conform to the following specifications or the equivalent:
30 man-minutes against surreptitious entry, 10 man-minutes against forced


73
entry, 20 man-hours against lock manipulation, and 20 man-hours against radiological techniques.
Which vault, if operations require it to remain open for frequent access, is equipped with a "day-gate" which is self-closing and self-locking, or the equivalent, for use during the hours of operation in which the vault door is open.
The walls or perimeter of which vault are equipped with an alarm, which upon unauthorized entry shall transmit a signal directly to a central station protection company, or a local or State police agency which has a legal duty to respond, or a 24-hour control station operated by the registrant, or such
4
other protection as the Administrator may approve, and, if necessary, holdup buttons at strategic points of entry to the perimeter area of the vault.
The door of which vault is equipped with contact switches, and
Which vault has one of the following complete electrical lacing of the walls, floor and ceilings; sensitive ultrasonic equipment within the vault; a sensitive sound accumulator system; or such other device designed to detect illegal entry as may be approved by the Administration.
To enclose drugs listed on schedules III, IV and V of the D.E.A. the following enclosures are permitted:
A cage, located within a building


on the premises, meeting the following specifications:
Having walls constructed of not less than No. 10 gauge steel fabric mounted on steel posts, which posts are:
(a) At least one inch in diameter
(b) Set in concrete or installed with lay bolts that are pinned or brazed; and
(c) Which are placed no more than ten feet apart with horizontal one and one-half inch reinforcements every sixty inches.
Having a mesh construction with openings of not more than two and one-half inches across the square.
Having a ceiling constructed of
the same material, or in the alternative, a cage shall be erected which reaches and is securely attached to the structural ceiling of the building. A lighter gauge mesh may be used for the ceilings of large enclosed areas if walls are at least 1^- feet in height.
Is equipped with a door constructed of No. 10 gauge steel fabric on a metal door frame in a metal door flange, and in all other respects conforms to all the requirements of 21CFR 1301.?2(b)(3)(ii)
Is equipped with an alarm system which upon unauthorized entry shall transmit a signal directly to a central station protection agency or a local or state police agency, each having a legal duty to respond, or to a 2k-hour


75
control station operated by the registrant, or to such other source of protection as the Administrator may approve.


76


77
REQUIRED SPACES THE CORPORATE FUNCTIONS________________________________________________
SPACE___________________QUANTITY______SQUARE FEET______FURNITURE________SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
President 1 400
Vice-president 4 300
Executive secretary 1 200
Receptionist/secretary 1 200
Accounting Manager 1 250
Administrative Assistant 2 250
Accounting Clerk 1 200
Desk, chair, 2 chairs, couch, end tables, bar, cabinets View, natural lighting, outdoor access
Desk, chair, file cabinets, 2 chairs, table View, natural lighting
Desk, chair, file cabinets, typing table, 1 chair Storage space, direct lighting, open to flexibility
Desk,chair, cabinets, closets, typing table Direct light, easy visual access to entry, open to flexibility
Desk, chair, table, 1 chair
Desk, chair, files, table, 1 chair
Desk, chair, typing table, 1 chair, table CRT


78
SPACE____________________QUANTITY_______SQUARE FEET
Staff Accountant 1 200
Director of Purchasing 1 250
Buyers 6 200
Buyers' Secretary 5 150
Advertising Media and Production Manager 1 250
Assistant Adversiting Manager 1 200
Adversiting secretaries 2 150
Reception/waiting 1 400
Conference
1
500
FURNITURE
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
Desk, chair, table, 1 chair, files CRT
Desk, chair, table, 2 chairs CRT
Desk, chair, table, chair, cabinets Open to flexibility and change, CRT
Desk, chair, typing table Open area, direct lighting
Desk, chair, table, 2 chairs Pin-up areas
Desk, chair, table, 2 chairs Pin-up areas
Desk, chair, typing table
Couch, 2 chairs, table, lamps Easy visual access to entry, display
areas
Table, 20 chairs, Pin-up area, screen, bar view, variable
lighting, storage


79
SPACE____________________QUANTITY_______SQUARE FEET_______FURNITURE
Executive Kitchen 1 100 Micro-wave, dishwasher, coffee pot, sink
Executive toilets 2 150 Toilet accessories
Workroom 1 200 Copier
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
Storage


8o
REQUIRED SPACES WAREHOUSE FUNCTIONS
SPACE QUANTITY SQUARE FEET FURNITURE SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

Division President 1 300 Desk, chair, table, 2 chairs CRT, view
Vice-President 3 250 Desk, chair, table, 1 chair, files CRT
Executive/sales secretary 1 150 Desk, chair, typing table, files Direct lighting
Data Processing Manager 1 175 Desk, chair CRT, open area
Data Processing 1 1000 5 desks, 5 chairs, computer equipment A/C and heating specialized, open area within
Accounts Receivable Manager 1 175 Desk, 2 chairs Open area, CRT
Credit Manager and Cashier 1 350 2 desks, ^ chairs Open area, CRT
Customer Support 1 700 5 desks, 5 chairs Open area, CRT
Switchboard 1 150 Desk, chair Paging system
Manager, Wholesale Accounting 1 200 Desk, 2 chairs CRT


81
SPACE____________________QUANTITY_______SQUARE FEET
Accounts Payable 1 400
Assistant Bookeeper and Clerk 1 350
Salesman 3 300
Director of Operations 1 200
Manager, Operation Analysis 1 200
Warehouse secretary 1 175
Inventory Control 1 525
Toilets 4 200
Workroom 1 200
Dining facility/meeting 1 800
FURNITURE
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
3 desks, 6 chairs CRT, open area, files
2 desks, 4 chairs CRT, open area, files
3 desks, 3 chairs Open area
1 desk, 2 chairs Open area
1 desk, 2 chairs Open area
1 desk, 1 chair, typing table
3 desks, 6 chairs, files CRT, open area
Toilet accessories
Copier Storage
36 chairs, 4 tables, vending machines Pin-up areas, bulletin boards, view, natural
lighting


SPACE
QUANTITY
SQUARE FEET
Employee lockers 60 4
Warehouse 1 75,000
Vault 1 400
Cage 1 1,600
Refrigerator
1
600
FURNITURE
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
Shelving desks, 4
Shelving
Shelving
4 Fork lifts, custom
chairs conveyor equipment, trash conveyor, trash compactor, hand pallet jacks, loading docks, dock levelers, security cameras and alarms
As per D.E.A. regulations
As per D.E.A. requirements
Emergency
generator
Shelving


83


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87
THESIS
Many combinations of warehouse facilities coupled with their corporate headquarters form awkward junctions between the two. So often a typical union portrays a huge warehouse with a little office building attached to the front. With this project, I would propose that the warehouse and corporate offices should seem as one that, in fact, the warehouse should appear subservient to the corporate functions.
The fact that the corporate image should be maintained further strengthens this line of thought. The bottom line then is that a warehouse facility merged with its corporate counterpart should avoid
the awkward junctions and promote an appropriate image for both while expressing the individual qualities they each possess.


88


THESIS SCHEDULE FOR SPRING 1981
- Generation of Alternative Design Concepts 6 weeks January 25 to March 5
- Selection of Preferred Alternate -1 week March 8 to March 12
- Design and Development 5 weeks -March 15 to April 16
- Presentation Preparation 2 weeks -April 19 to April 30
- "Touch-up" Work on Presentation -May 3 t May 7
- Presentation May 10 to May 1^
89


90


91
REFERENCES
The A.I.A. Research Corporation, Regional Guidelines for Building Passive Energy Conserving Homes. U. S. Government Printing Office: Washington, D. C., No. HUD-PDR-355, November, 1978.
Balcomb, J. Douglas, Passive Solar Design Handbook. U. S. Department of Commerce: Springfield, VA.~ I98O.
Brockman, H. A. N., The British Architect in Industry 1841-1940. George Allen and Unwin Ltd.: London, England, 197^.
Chronic, Halka, Roadside Geology of Colorado. Mountain Press Publishing Co.: Missoula, Montana, 1980.
Egan, David M., Concepts in Thermal Comfort. Prentice Hall, Inc.: Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1975.
Goble, Emerson, ed., Buildings for Industry. Greenwood Press: Westport, Connecticut, 1972.
Grube, Oswald W., Industrial Buildings and Factories. Praeger Publishers:
New York, New York. 1971-
Hoyt, Charles King, Buildings for Commerce and Industry. McGraw-Hill Book Co.: New York, New York, 1978.
Kelly, George, Rocky Mountain Horticulture. Pruett Publishing Company:
Boulder, Colorado, 1967
Kiiller, Rikard, ed. Architectural Psychology. Dowden, Hutchinson and Ross, Inc., Stroudsburg, PA., 1973-


92
Kusuda, T. and K. Ishii, Hourly Solar Radiation Data for Vertical and Horizontal Surfaces on Average Days in the United States and Canada. U. S. Government Printing Office: Washington, D. C., April, 1977*
Olgay, Victor, Design for Climate. Princeton University Press: Princeton,
N. J., 1963.
Preston, Richard J., Jr., Rocky Mountain Trees. Dover Publications, Inc:
New York, New York, 19^8.
Rogers, John B. and John M. Elmore, The Johns-Manville World Headquarters Design Competition. Rogers-Nagel-Langhart, Inc: Denver, Co., 1973*
Smith, Peter F., Architecture and the Human Dimension. Eastview Editions, Inc.: Westfield, N. J., 1979-
Soil Conservation Service, USDA, Soil Survey of Adams County, Colorado. U. S. Government Printing Office: Washington, D. C., October, 197^-
Szokolay, S. V., Environmental Science Handbook. John Wilely and Sons: New York, New York, 19§0.
Szokolay, S. V., World Solar Architecture. The Architectural Press: London, England, I98O.
Wild, Friedemann, Centers for Storage and Distribution. Van Nostrand Reinhold Company: New York, New York, 1972.
Woolard, Dr. Don Stafford, Climate: Version Three (as used in the main/prime
computing facilities at the University of Colorado at Denver) Denver, Co., October 9. 1981-


THE FOX MEYER CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS
a master's of architecture thesis as designed by RICHARD M. HAAS
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER MAY 6. 1982
Warehouse
i n iQ
4 4 \



Vicinity






i8at jaddn


Framing Plan
Office Structure
Skylight Isometric
Warehouse Structure


Heat Exchange System
Mechanical Layout
Air Distribution Isometric