Citation
Arts facility, University of California, Santa Cruz

Material Information

Title:
Arts facility, University of California, Santa Cruz
Creator:
Dickey, Judd
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
53 leaves : illustrations (some color), charts, maps, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Buildings ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 53).
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Judd Dickey.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
13755652 ( OCLC )
ocm13755652
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1983 .D524 ( lcc )

Full Text
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INTRODUCTION 1
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 3
PROGRAM 6
SITELocation 33 35
Analysis 36
Flora and Fauna Soil Analysis 37
CLIMATi;Analysis 40
Charts 41
Building Recommendations 43
CODE REQUIREMENTS 44
SOLUTION 48
BIBLIOGRAPHY 53


1


The proposed Arts Building is to provide a central campus environment for the study of diverse fields in Art on The University of California at Santa Cruz Campus. It will contain facilities for the study of Painting, Drawing, Dance, Photography, Ceramics, and Choral Music.
Until the completion of this building, these departments will have been located at numerous locations throughout the campus. This building will represent a major advance in the art program.
Because of the uniquely visual nature of the Arts, the proposed building should concentrate heavily on the use of natural daylight to fulfill its lighting requirements because of daylight's color spectrum qualities, and the ingenuity demanded in using it artistically.
The building budget allows for SI.8 million in construction costs or about $60 per sq. ft.
2


HISTORICAL
BACKGROUND
3


Santa Cruz is a coastal town of about 50,000 people and is located between San Francisco and Monterey. The site for UCSC was purchased in March 1961. Formally the Cowell Ranch, it consists of 2,000 acres of undeveloped land in the hills northwest of Santa Cruz.
The University is one of eight UC campuses spread from Davis (in the Sacramento area) to San Diego. Presently UCSC enrolls approximately 7,000 undergraduate and 600 graduate students.
UCSC is best described as seven colleges within a single campus. Each college has its own emphasis which is manifested by its individual graduation requirements. Individual courses are attended by students from all colleges, and are therefore scattered throughout the campus. The academic departments are located within the colleges themselves and represent the emphasis of those colleges. Also within the colleges are dormitories and support facilities.
The Science Building, Centra' Library, Gymnasium, Student Center, and Performing Arts Center are separate entities.
The new arts facility will be located next to the Performing Arts Center and will not have an individual college identification. Therefore, there is not an established architectural vocabulary to be used. However, the building should draw from and compliment the Performing Arts Center.
The ocean, naturally, has become a very important part of the students' experience at UCSC. The college appeals to people who are drawn to the ocean because it is only a short bus, bike, or car ride down the hill. It is both a privilege and a responsibility of any designer on this campus to take advantage of and capitalize on this inclination.
In addition to the proximity and visual presence of. the ocean, the campus is placed within a dense Redwood forest. The trees, reaching to a height of 125 feet, prevents almost all direct sunlight from reaching the forest floor. The forest has been carefully


trimmed and cut to allow a substantial amount of development within its limits without compromising its integrity. Lush vegetation surrounds and weaves through the various campuses and buildings, landscape cominates architecture and creates a very established look to a relatively young college. Winding paths, long span bridges over ravines, open fields, frequent ocean views, and temperate California climate combine to make UCSC a very spiritual environment.
Campus architecture varies from college .to college, and each college finds its own unique way to settle into the environment.
White stucco groupings, wood shingles, concrete and glass, and cut stone may be found from one end of campus to the other. Krescie College, at the north end of the campus, was designed by Charles Moore.
Student life on campus is very relaxed. With the natural environment so close at hand, health consciousness and fitness are a major concern for many students and organizations. UCSC employs a pass/fail grading system, w ich contributes to the easy outlook of the students.
Originally conceived as having a liberal arts emphasis, art facilities were spread throughout the campus to promote the arts among students of various orientations. As the curriculum has tightened up over the years, and programs have become defined, the need for a specific location for an arts facility has arisen. The facility will replace scattered nooks on five separate locations.
5


PROGRAM
6


PROGRAM BREAKDOWN
8 Academic Offices Secretary/Reception Room Art Gallery
Conference/Seminar Room
4 Classrooms
3 Drawing Studios
3 Painting Studios Photography Studio Darkroom
2 Dance Studios Ceramics Studio Film Studio
Control Rooms for Film Studio 2 Dressing Rooms for Film Studio
5 Film Processing Rooms Film Viewing Room
Film Equipment Cage Film Stock Storage 2 Music Choral Rooms
4 Piano Practice Rooms Arts Storage Room Mechanical
Audio Visual Storage Circulation 10%
Total
sq.ft
1000
180
2500 -5 ^
400 Z. c?
1800 * ^3
2400
3000 ffS
800 1 &
600
3000 <7 *5
2000 < 5"
3000 55'
150 1-2
300 1 &
500 Z "5
250 1 L
125 12
50 7 __
1950 4 4
400 2 o
500
1500 *> ^
150 rz.
2660
29210
7


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8


Space Title:
Square Footage:
Equipment/ Furnishing: Lighting Requirements:
8 Academic Offices
Total: 1,000 sq.ft. Each: 120 sq. ft.
Desks, file cabinets,
natural desirable
copy machine
Special Conditions:
South facing offices desirable


Space Title: Secretary/Reception room for academic offices.
Square Footage: 180 sq.ft.
Equipment/ Furnishing: Two desks for secretary, mail slots, seating for visitors.
Lighting Requirements: Artificial or natural.
Special Conditions: Will act as waiting area as well as Reception:
to




Space Title: Conference/Seminar Room
Square Footage: 400 sq. ft.
Equipment/ Furnishing: Conference table and chairs, standing presentation area with pin board, blackboard.
Lighting Requirements: Natural daylighting desirable. Must be able to eliminate all light for presentations.
Special Conditions: Good view recommended. Should be near administration away from noise.
12


Space Title: Classrooms (4)
Square Footage: 600 sq. ft. (?) 500 sq. ft. (2)
Equipment/ Furnishing: Desks for students Table for instructor
Lighting Requirements: Natural light desirable but not mandatory. Must be darkened for slide presentations.
Special Conditions: Located away from noise, accessable from any art division, could be located in semi-isolation. Very high use.
13


Space Title:
Drawing Studios
Square Footage: 800 sq.ft. (3)
Equipment/ Furnishing: Lamps, center table for model, storage, sink, drawing tables.
Lighting Requirements: North lighting and artificial lighting.
Special Conditions: Windows should be above eye level. High ceiling.
14


Space Title: Painting Studio
Square Footage: 1000 sq.ft. (3)
Equipment/ Furnishing: Lamps, center table for model, storage, sink, easels.
Lighting Requirements: North lighting and artificial lighting
Special Conditions: Windows should be above eye level ,
high ceiling, well ventilated.
15


Space Title: Photography Studio
Square Footage: soo sq. ft,
Equipment / Furnishing: Ten layout tables
Lighting Requirements Artificial, must bo able to darlcsu
room.
Special Conditions:


Space Title: Darkroom
Square Footage: .600 sq. ft.
Equipment / Furnishing: Three enlargers, tray tables, layout
tables, clothes line, chemical storage, sink.
Lighting Requirements: Artificial, no outside light.
Special Conditions: Vestibule to keep out light, well ventilated.
17


Space Title: Dance Studios
Square Footage: 1500 sq. ft. (2)
Equipment/ Furnishing: Mirrored wall, wood resilient flooring, bench and hooks for personal belongings, dance props, free standing bar.
Lighting Requirements: Well lit, artificial and natural.
Special Conditions: Well ventilated, high ceiling, create link to nature, accoustical problem, changing room and shower.
18


Space Title: Ceramics Studio
Square Footage: 2000 sq.ft, (inside) 2000 sq.ft, (outside)
Equipment/ Furnishing: Three kilns, tables, benches, trash bin, pottery wheels, clay storage, stools, three sinks, rag storage,
Lighting Requirements: lockers, pottery storage. Natural daylight desirable.
Special Conditions: Should be suitable to hold fairs. Courtyard should be secure, room to work necessary, accessable from service road, space should be dividable, well ventilated, classes up to 30 people.
19


Space Title:
Film Studio
Square Footage: 5000 sq.ft.
Equipment/ Furnishing: Curtains in front of some walls, large double doors, lighting equipment, camera equipment.
Lighting Requirements: Artificial, must be sealed from outside light.
Special Conditions: Curved corners, smooth and neutral background, doorway 12' wide, trap door, cat walks for lighting, flexible space, sound proof, good accoustics, close to loading dock, 25 ft. ceiling, well ventilated.
20


Space Title: Control Room for Film Studio
Square Footage: 150 sq.ft.
Equipment / Furnishing: rilmine control equipment panel. Lighting Requirements: Artificial light.
Special Conditions: Must view entire film studio, seating for 15 students, door should be close to studio door, viewing glass sloped for sound quality.
21


Space Title:
Square Footage:
Equipment/ Furnishing:
Lighting Requirements:
Special Conditions:
Dressing Rooms for Film Studio
150 sq. ft. (2)
Lockers, benches, makeup tables.
Artificial light.
22


Space Title:
Film Processing Rooms
Square Footage: 100 sq. ft. (5)
Equipment / Furnishing: Editing tables and equipment.
Lighting Requirements. Artificial light.
Special Conditions:
23


Space Title:
Square Footage:
Equipment / Furnishing: Lighting Requirements:
Special Conditions:
Film Viewing Room
250 sq. ft.
Projection Booth.
Artificial Light.
Stepped floor, seating for 30 people.
25


Space Title: Audio Visual Storage Room
Square Footage: 150 sq.ft.
Equipment/ Furnishing: Desk, stored A.V. equipment.
Lighting Requirements: Artificial light. Special Conditions Must be secure.
26



Space Title: Mechanical Equipment Room
Square Footage: 1500 sq.ft.
Equipment / Furnishing: HVAC equipment
Lighting Requirements: Natural or artificial light.
Special Conditions: Close to service road, high cielings.
57


Space Title:
Arts Storage
Square Footage: 500 sq.ft.
Equipment/ Furnishing: Secure lock systen
Lighting Requirements: None
Special Conditions: Used for storage of paintings, drawings, sculpture, and other artworks. Should be near Gallery, dark and cool, accessable to service road.



Space Title: Piano Practice Rooms (4)
Square Footage: 100 sq.ft. (4)
Equipment/ Furnishing: Piano and stool in each.
Lighting Requirements: Natural or artificial light.
Special Conditions: Must be isolated because of sound.

28


Space Title: Music Choral Facilities (2)
Square Footage: 750 sq.ft. (1) 1200 sq.ft. (1)
Equipment/ Furnishing: Seating for performers and audience lighting equipment
Lighting Requirements: artificial
Special Conditions: Isolated and soundproof walls, flexibility in seating arrangement, good accoustics for chamber music and choral.
29


Space Title:
Film Equipment Cage
Square Footage: 125 sq.ft.
Equipment/ Furnishing: Roll up window for equipment check out.
Lighting Requirements: Artificial light
Special Conditions: Must be very secure.
30


Space Title:
Film Stock Storage
Square Footage: 50 sq.ft.
Equipment/ Furnishing: 9x12 shelves Lighting Requirements: Artificial llght
Special Conditions: Must be removed from any edition
much video storage, dark and cool


SITE
32


SAN FRANCISCO
UNIVERSITY
SANTA CXCIZ
N<7NTEXEY
6UK mat
CMJFWUA.
l"- MILES
33




SITE ANALYSIS REPORT
Santa Cruz is located on the California coast, fifty five miles south of San Francisco. It lies on 122 longitude and 57 latitude and sits on the northern portion of Monterey Bay.
The University lies on the western slope of the Santa Cruz Mountain Range, a small coastal range which blocks the cool marine air from reaching the inland vallfeys. The campus entrance is three miles north of the shore of the Pacific Ocian and extends 2.7 miles up the slope of the mountain range. The campus is composed of 2,000 acres located within dense Redwood forest land to the north, and rolling grassland to the south. The terrain is_ uneven, incorporating many hills and several canyons.
The building site is located at the border between the forest and grassland, requiring integration of both into the building design. The University Performing Arts Center stands adjacent to the site on the west. To the South is an unobstructed 100 view of Monterey Bay, with the Monterey Peninsula the dominant feature on the far side.
The site lies 700 feet above sea level, and is above the fog that blankets the coastline throughout much of the year. Solar access is excellent.
Since the site sits atop the high point of a hill, drainage from the northern portion is to the northeast, while drainage from the southern portion is to the south. Water finds intermittent drainage ravines which flow only during and immediately following rain.
35


FLORA AND FAUNA
The University contains a wide variety of plant life including coastal redwood, Douglas fir, Ponderosa pine, tanbark oak, madrone,and broadleaf maple.
Many small carnivores also live there such as bobcats, occasional mountain lions, weasels, badgers, and skunks. Squirrels, chipmunks, insects, and birds are also abundant.
The northern half of the building site contains a dense redwood grove which includes Douglas fir, oak, and Ponderosa pine. The southern half is lined by an oak grove. Within the open space are native California grasses.
A detailed description of the campus flora and fauna is given on page 20 of the long range development plan.
36


SOIL ANALYSIS REPORT*
DISCUSSION
General Based on the results of field investigation, it is extremely unlikely that massive, cavernous limestone or marble is present above the depths explored in our borings. It is possible, of course, that massive limestone or marble may be present below the depths explored. Even if this should be the case, it is our opinion that the risk to the buildings is minimal, since a sufficient thickness of competent schist should be present to span possible cavities.
It is also possible that minor amounts of these soluble rocks may be present as isolated boulders or lenses in a matrix of schist within the depths explored by our borings. We would not anticipate solution cavities of any consequence in these isolated areas. In summary, it is our opinion that (l) massive soluble rocks do not underly the site within significant depths, and (2) there is little, if any, risk to the proposed construction from solution cavities.
The surface soils at this site, to depths of 2 feet below existing grade, are unsuitable for supporting foundations directly.
The underlying sedimentary sands and clays and highly weathered schist have moderate strengths, are low to moderate in compressibility, and will provide adequate foundation support. In order to minimize differential settlement between footings in there soils, it will be necessary to provide rigidity in the foundation and structural systems. All of the soils at the site are low in potential expansibility. The on-site soils, if free of deleterious materials, are suitable for use in fills.
If basement excavations extend below the free groundwater level, permanent subdrainage facilities will be required to prevent hydrostatic pressures on thewalls and beneath basement slabs. Dewatering during construction will also be required in this area. *
*Woodward-Clyde and Associates, San Francisco
37


Settlement If the recommendations in this report are followed, the total settlement beneath any building after construction should not exceed 1 inch; differential settlement between adjacent columns should be less than 3/8 inch.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Foundations It is recommended that the proposed buildings be supported on spread footing foundations. Footings may bear either on the natural undisturbed soils, below the surface layer, or on engineered fill. Footings bearing on natural soils should extend to a minimum depth of 2 feet below the lowest adjacent finished grade or 2 feet below the adjacent existing grade, whichever is deeper. Allowable bearing pressures for footings on natural soils will be a function of footing depth as summarized below:
Footing Depth Below Existing Grade, Feet
2
6
Allowable Soil Bearing; Pressures (psf) Due to Due to Dead Due to
Dead Load
2500
3500
Plus Live Loads Total Load* 3500 4500
5000 6500
*Including wind or seismic loads.
Footings bearing on fill should extend a minumum of 2 feet below the lowest adjacent finished grade, and there should be at least 2£ feet of engineered fill beneath the footings. In the cut-fill transition of building sites, overexcavation will be required in order to provide the recommended thickness of engineered fill beneath the footings. At the recommended depths, the allowable soil bearing pressures for footings on fill should not exceed 2000 psf due to dead load, 3000 psf due to combined dead and live loads, or 4000 psf due to all loads including wind or seismic.
38


CLIMATE
39


Santa Cruz enjoys a moderate climate with little change in mean temperature throughout the year. The temperature stays generally between 55 F and 68 F.
Fog is a major element in the climate of the city. Predominant in the summer months, fog and overcast tend to cover the city until noon or early afternoon.
November through June contain 80% of the annual rainfall, leaving the summers dry and mild.
40


I
COMPOSITE CLIMATIC CHART
SCIN5HINE
KAPIACnOH M J/m2 <^4
TEMPERATURE
C
RH' *
JAN raMK/WWJttiJULN]G;£POCrWVPEC
RAIMFALL
mrn/month
41


HOURLY.. TEMPERATURE CHAK.T

42


*
According to the Mahoney Tables, buildings in San Francisco Should be oriented on the East-West axis to maximise sun exposure.
This orientation also minimizes the direct wind exposure on the broad surface of the structure, thus reducing lateral stress.
Due to the high humidity, single banking of rooms is recommended. Air movement is easily facilitated due to a fairly constant sea breeze. Double banking is acceptable if provisions are made to enhance air flow.
Wall openings are recommended to be between 20 and 40% of wall area. This will allow adequate sun penetration to keep the structure well lit and warm naturally. Openings in East -and West walls are acceptable.
Low diurnal swing prompts the designer to use light construction with low thermal capacity for both internal and external walls. The mild temperatures also contribute to lack of necessity for massive walls.
Light, insulated roof structures are also recommended for the same reason as above. *
*Koenigsberger, Ingersoll, Szokolay, Mayhew. Manual of Tropical Housing and Building. (Londons Longman, 1978), p. 243
43


CODES
44


1. APPLICABLE BUILDING CODES 2. ZONE City County Gilpin Fire Marshall UBC X 5. FIRE ZONE 4. OCCUPANCY GROUP (Table 5-A) A-5

5. OTHER REGULATIONS State Board of Health X State Dept . of Ed. Sign Code Elevator Other

6. FLOOR AREA (Chapter 5 and Table 5-C) Construction type . F.R. II 1 HR III H.T. IV
Occupancy type A-5 A-5 A-5
Basic Allow. Area (505a) 79.000 15.500 15.500
Fire Zone 5 Increase (505b) 58.000 77,000 27.000
Added Stories Increase (505b) 79.000 15.500 15.500
Side(s) Separation Increase (506a) 116,000 54.000 54,000
Fire Exiting System Increase (508b&c) - -
Total Allowable Area 116.000 54.000 54,000
ACTUAL BUILDING AREA Existing Proposed Future Total
* 27.670

7. FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS (Table 17 Construction Typ# -a unless noted) 1 HR III H .T.TV
Exterior Bearing Walls 4 ~T~ A
Interior Bearing Walls 7 1 1
Ext. Non-Bearing Walls 4 4 T
Structural Frame 2 1 T or n.r.
Permanent Partitions 1 1 I or H.T.
Shaft Enclosures 1 1
Floors 2 1 1
Roofs ___ I 1 H.
-c*. Exterior Doors and Windows ~rn .75 . /5
Inner Court Walls (504c) - -
Parapets Required (1709a) 5ir 50" ^u"
Attic Draftstops Required (5705b) t'Art'JiTiui'i JfUit Aiiru UVEK }UUU Stl.JT. rr
Attic Ventilation Required (5705c) '/?uu Ait£iA OF SPACE 'VENTILATED



8. WALL & OPENING PROTECTION ('03 Sections Chapters 6-15), (Type I, II & III Const.
see Sections 1803, 1903 & 2003) & (Type IV & V Const, see Table 50A & Sections 2103 & 2203)
Fire Resistance of Exterior Walls SAME AS SECTION 7__________________________
Openings in Exterior Walls SAME AS SECTION 7_________________________________
9. BUILDING HEIGHT (Table 5D)
Allowable Stories 2______________________1 2
Fire Sprinkler Increase (507) ______PLUS 1_____________________
Total Allowable Stories 3________ Maximum Height _____________65'
10. OCCUPANT LOADS SEE INDIVIDUAL SPACES IN PROGRAMS
Story________________________________________________
Occupancy Group______________________________________
Area_________________________________________________
Sq. Ft. per Occupant (Table 33-a)
Total Persons p- r Floor_____________________________
Total Number of Persons in Building____________
11. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (Chapter 33)
Number Exits Required Each Floor (3302a) ______2__________________[
Number Exits Required Total Building (3302a)
Required Exit Width (3302b) TOTAL OCCUPANT LOAD DIVIDED BY 50 = FEET
Ramps Required (Table 330A) 1____________________________________
Corridor Widths (3304b)________44" _________________________________
Dead End Corridor Limit (5304f)
Corridor Construction (3304s) 1HR. ____________________________
Stairway Widths (3305b) 36" ______________________________
Stairway Landing Depths (3305f) 36"
Stairway to Roof (3305f) NONE_________________________________
Smoke Tower Required (3309') No __________________________________
Exit Signs Required (331 ) EACH EXIT ______________________________.
Exit sign separate Circuit (3312c) NO_______________________________


12. OCCUPANCY UNIT LOADS
(Chapter 23 Table 23-A)
100 LB./SQ,. FT. EXCEPT: DORMATORY 40. STORAGE 125 LABORATORY 75. OFFICES 30. AND CLASSHOQMS 40
13. OTHE REQUIREMENTS
Separations between occupancies Fire Ratings & Const. (Table 5-h),
Enclosure of Vertical Openings (1706) SEIE SECTION 7________________
Light ('05 Sections, C pt. 6-14) ___________"_____________________
Ventilation ____________________________"_____________________
Sanitation ___________________________ "_____________________
Fire Extingquishing System Required (3802) NO
Dry Standpipes Required (38O3) MORE THAN ONE STORY CLASS III STANDPIPE
Wet Standpipes Required (3805) _______"___________________________
Combination Standpipes Required (3802*) NO
Special Hazards & Requirements (see Group Occupancies) -
Exceptions & Deviations (see Group Occupancies) ___________-_____________


SOLUTION


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4 DflflUJinG /TUDIO
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8 RCCCPTIOfl
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11 venDinG/ Fourvmin/
12 JflfllTOR
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14 CHORAL /TUDIO
15 LOUflGC / /CmiflAR
16 Film COflTROL Room
17 FlimiAG /TUDIO
is AmmATion Room
19 GRAPIC/
20 VIDCO /TUDIO
21 VIDCO COflTROL ROOm
22 VIDCO 6DITIAG
23 /OUflD /TUDIO
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33 ART /TORAG6
34 PHOTOGRAPHV /TUDIO
35 DARKROOm
36 meCHAAICAL
37 FAD ROOm
38 /HOUU6R
39 VI6UUIDG ROOm
40 CHAAGIAG ROOm
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BIBLIOGRAPHY
52


Koenigsberger, Ingersoll, Szokolay, Mayhew. Manual of Tropical Housing and Building, Part One: Climatic Design. London:
Longman, 1978.
Kreider, J., P. Kreith. Solar Heating and Cooling, Second Edition.
New York: Hemisphere, 1987.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Local Climatological Data for 1981, San Francisco Airport. Ashville, N.C.: Noaa, 1981.
Szololay, S.V. Environmental Science Handbook for Architects and Builders. New York: Halstead Press, 1977.
Woodward-Clyde and Associates. San Francisco.
7
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53