Citation
Church of Saint Mary's at Rifle, Rifle, Colorado

Material Information

Title:
Church of Saint Mary's at Rifle, Rifle, Colorado
Alternate title:
St. Mary's Church
Creator:
Gasbarro, Anna
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
45 unnumbered leaves : charts, maps, plans (some color) ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Church architecture -- Colorado -- Rifle ( lcsh )
Church architecture ( fast )
Church buildings ( fast )
Churches -- Rifle (Colo.) ( lcsh )
Colorado -- Rifle ( fast )
Genre:
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
On cover: St. Mary's Church.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Anna Gasbarro.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09187345 ( OCLC )
ocm09187345
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1982 .G38 ( lcc )

Full Text

ST MARY'S CHURCH
Pre-Thesis Report
-hue.*! s
ANNA GASBARRO
archives
LD 1190 A72 1982 G38
Fall 1982


CHURCH OF
SAINT MARY'S AT RIFLE RIFLE, COLORADO
AN ARCHITECTURAL THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENT FOR THE DEGREE
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE
ANNA GASBARRO FALL 1982


TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
Background Project Description Objectives Interviews
ROOM LIST
Church Area Classroom Area Community Area Office Area
SITE
Location
Access
Analysis
Climate
Soils
CODE REVIEW
Building
Handicapped
Energy
ZONING
UTILITIES
BIBLIOGRAPHY


INTRODUCTION
The area of Rifle, Colorado is one which has resisted change voluntarily and involuntarily throughout its history.
Change was halted when the oil shale projects were stopped. Rifle continues undisturbed.
Rifle is a community steeped in tradition living in a modern changing world.
As an established community it lacks a "church building." Itsexixting churches are as modest as the town itself; they are discovered camouflaged among single family houses.
The need for a new Catholic church is based primarily on the inadequate space provided by the existing church. It is not based upon the previously expected growth, although larger funding was expected from that and perhaps a larger space. The actual projects has now been halted.
Along with a "church building" a community center is also needed. The new building serving as church and gathering place for the community will fulfill the teachings of the modern Catholic Church.
The new building will itself be like Rifle steeped in tradition but reaching to a modern world.
This reports presents the necessary information in order to approach the design of this new building.


BACKGROUND
(Also refer to conversation with Father Jim.)
HISTORICAL
Since first settled in the 1880's Rifle and its surrounding areas have been an agricultural community* Growth has been steady, with the economy based primarily on agriculture and livestock. The town and its environs present a very pleasant surrounding. This area was threatened with dramatic change with oil shale development. With the halting of these projects Rifle continues in its agricultural pace.
SOCIAL CONTEXT
Throughout the history of this area its people have been self-reliant with strong family ties and a sense of community pride. They are a people of modest incomes and a high school education or less. They represent a traditional society not affected by those modern social changes that have affected life in the cities.
ARCHITECTURAL CONTEXT
The existing churches within the town of Rifle are quite modest with the present Catholic church being a converted house. Other churches blend in equally well into their residential neighborhoods. Their character comes from their residential appearance.
Other non-residential buildings in Rifle are two-story brick structures from the early 1900!s. The masonry detail ranges from elaborately corbeled cornices and old window arches to decorated store front piers.
At the site itself there is very little existing architecture.
There are dispersed farmhouses with wood siding. It is however.surrounded with some dramatic landforms.


PROJECT DESCRIPTION
A new Catholic Church is needed in Rifle for two primary reasons. One is that the present church has insufficient space to properly serve the existing community. Its capacity is of about 100 when capacity for over 350 is needed. The need of a new church is not based upon the expected growth that was predicted for the oil shale production that was to have taken place.
The existing Catholic Church is a converted house.
The second reason upon which the need of a new church was based is that of having the church fulfill its role as stated in Vatican II; that i3, as a gathering center for the community.
The present church lacks any facilities that would support this.
Because funding for this project is low it important to consider materials that require low maintainance, and any design features that minimize energy consumption.
The site for this project was donated by a family in the parish. It is surrounded by farm lands and is located approximately six miles outside of Rifle.
(It is important to consider all the possible elements and functions that would invite the people of Rifle to come to a church six miles out of town.)
The approximate total square footage will be 30,000sf4
OBJECTIVES
The primary objective is to create a new church building which will inspire a communal and religious spirit.
To design the building of durable materials that immerse themselves into the natural landscape.
To utilize all possible aspects of energy conservation.
To Create a church building that represents is history and fullfills its modern role.


PHILOSOPHY
The people are the Church.
The new liturgy suggests that the Church should simoultaneously serve as a religious and communal center. It should support and encourage,in its architecture, the community spirit of it parishoners as well as augment the psychological religious experience.
Because there are also those who prefer the traditional Church, it is important that,in its architecture,the new building represent both the traditional and the new. Particularly the transient parishoners can feel the sense of belonging no matter their preference.
If the past is seen as having been formed of small communities with sharing and intimacy necessary to survival, then the dhurch building needed to a much lesser extent contribute to a community spirit. It would instead serve by being the prime element of the spiritual community.
Today when people are much more transient and concentrations of population are large the support of the spiritual community has extended to the social community. The function now is to provide a social/spiritual base.
The mysticism of the old Church has given way to a new openess.
So the building.itself rooted in tradition, must convey a new openess.


NOTES FROM CONVERSATION WITH FATHER JIM FOX (July 24, 1982)
(Father Jim is the pastor at St. Mary's Catholic Church in Rifle, Colorado and will be the pastor at the new church.)
Regarding the Church:
The people are the Church.
Shift in philosophical attitude from religion as function to the people are the church.
Regarding the church building:
In Rifle people need a church building .... so the building should look like a church psychologically.
The building should express the faith of the people.
It should accomodate the people's needs.
The church of Holy Family theme should be conveyed as people cotne in.
Regarding the interior needs:
Three visual centers The Baptistry
The Altar The Lectern
Moveable Altar/ small liturgy/ teaching.
The Baptistry as fountain where people can go by and bless themselves with baptismal water. Possibility of baptismal immersion. Two notions of water: still water of death
living water.
Now the Eucharistic Tabernacle is focus.
A eucharistic chapel should not be the visual center.
Moveable chairs instead of pew3.
Now to seat 300-350 with potential of seating 650.
Alternatives to cry-room: Quaker services one hour
of silence. At one half hour older children come in progressively to little children.


NOTES FROM CONVERSATION WITH FATHER JIM (Contd.)
Regarding priorities:
Worship area (top priority)
Feel as they've been to church Sense of gathered community Carpet, natural woods
Would sacrifice flexibility of space for feeling Would sacrifice moveable altar, screens
Regarding the people of Rifle:
Construction, blue, collar, 6 day work week.
High School education and below.
Self-sufficient, family centered.
50" of parish mobilized every year.
(Transients should be made to feel part of the church.)
Immediate thoughts upon interview.
Church in the round
Church as community center, pastoral center, pilgrimage. What happened to mysticism? What happened to incense?


NOTES FROM CONVERSATION WITH FATHER JIM (Contd.)
Alternatives to cry-rooms (contd.)
Simoultaneous liturgy for children then come in when bread and wine are brought up to the altar.
Sacristy in back so that priest can welcome people in.
(Approx. 15 x 30 with cabinets, sink, refrigerator.)
Large entrance area for fellowship/ sometimes even coffee and doughnut3.
Church to foster community feeling.
People to look at each other and not the backs of each others heads.
Education rooms, cry rooms attached to worhip area so that can be combined with each other and with nave.
Sunday mass then religion classes, space should accomodate people all coming at once at both functions.
Regarding classrooms:
Classrooms to accomodate 20 people.
For 200 adults weekdays plus children.
Weekend retreats 25-30 people or 50-75 people, (showers need to be provided, lined up as in a gym.)
Regarding offices:
Teachers' meetings.
Some access to public including conference space. Library work area / storage.
Printing press eventually.
Maybe combine receptionist/secretary with library. Accounting to be separate.
To have views.


ROOM LIST
CHURCH AREA
Worship area Eaptistry Sanctuary/Altar Chapel Tabernacle Sacristy Cry room
Reconciliation Rooms Entrance
Restrooms
CLASSROOM AREA
Classrooms Daycare room
OFFICE AREA
Offices
Bookeeping
Library
Secretary
COMMUNITY AREA
Community Hall
Kitchen
Restrooms
Bridal Room
Storage
Janitor


CHURCH AREA


CHURCH AREA
THE ENTRANCE/NARTHEX
The entrance/narthex is a place where people meet other people to discuss the liturgy of the day. It should be so designed as to encourage gatherings.
Points to consider
1. The design should be such as to discourage people from remaining there during the celebration of the liturgy.
(2sf of floor area for every seat in the nave to be provided.)
2. It should be accessible to the handicapped.
3. Noise reducing ceiling and walls are needed.
4. Room for hanging coats (lsf per 15 persons) should be provided.
5. Rest rooms should be reacheable from here.
6. Door should be a minimum 5 1/2" wide.
THE SACRISTY/VESTING ROOM
The sacristy is a storage room for the liturgical materials and
vestments. It can also serve as a preparation room for the priest.
Points to Consider
1. The location should be near the main entrance to facilitate meetings between the priest and the people.
2. It could also be used as a reconciliation room if it has adequate space.
3. Storage cabinets for vestments and robes are required as well as a sink.


WORSHIP AREA/NAVE
The nave is the area where the congregation comes together and is seated. People here should be able to hear and see all.
Points to consider:
1. Seating should be such that people are able to see one another and be relatively close to the altar.
2. Consider moveable chairs so that space can be rearranged.
3. The nave sould accomodate 300-350 people presently to 650 in the future.
4. No center aisle is necessary but one can be provided when needed. (main aisle 5min others 4' min)
ALTAR/SANCTUARY
The altar should be simple, strong and table like. It should
not be a barrier between the people and the priest.
Points to consider:
1. It should be moveable and the center of focus along with the baptistry and the podium.
2. It should give a sense of being among the people.
3. It should be distinguished from the nave in some way.
4. Space for the altar should be provided for choir and musicians.
5. The lectern/podium should appear permanent.
6. The Chair used during the liturge of "The Word" should be celebrated so that the celebrant remains visible without appearing dominant. It should be simple and strong in design.
THE TABERNACLE
The tabernacle is a sacred receptacle for the Eucharist. It should be solid and inviolable.


TABERNACLE (Contd)
Points to consider:
1. It may be located in the Eucharistic Chapel.
2. It location should be easily identifiable upon entering the church and from the main body of the church.
3. An arrangement that would result in two focal points for the church must be avoided.
4. It may be located in the santuary but not on the altar.
BLESSED SACRAMENT AREA/CHAPEL
The Chapel is an area where one can engage in private worship/prayer. Points to consider:
1. It could be placed in worhip area if expenses so dictate.
2. It should be as accessible as the main santuary.
3. It is preferred that the tabernacle be located in the chapel.
THE BAPTISTRY
The Baptistry is that place within the church where the font is located and where the third stage of the sacrament of baptism normally takes place.
Points to consider:
1. It should be allocated a separate place within the church, but be open to the body of the church.
2. The baptistry area needs to be large enough to accomodate those present at the font at one time.
3. The design of the font may take several forms, it may be fixed or portable; with still or running water.
Since immersion of the person is being encouraged the font should be large enough for this.


RECONCILIATION ROOMS
A warm and open setting where people may choose the manner of
confessing.
Points to consider:
1. The rooms should be sound proof.
2. They should have direct and easy access from the main entrance and from the nave.
3. The entrance should not only be easily identifiable but should also be so situated that there is seating for those waiting.
4. The furnishings will include chairs for the priest and penitent, a grill or screen and a table to serve as a place for the bible and small crucifix. The table should also serve as a focal point to gather around.
CRY ROOM
(Refer to interview with Father Jim)
The cry room, if provided, could be the second function of the chapel or an attached classroom.


CLASSROOM AREA


RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AREA
The Religious Education Area will ideally function as an extension of the worship area. Some of the rooms of this area could be used to extend the nave space. If possible this area should be on the same level as the worhip area. (Refer to notes from interview with Father Jim).
CLASSROOMS
Both adult and children education will occur simoultaneously. Consideration should be given to proper space separation.
Points to consider:
1. The furniture in the rooms may be a large table with chairs. A classroom should generously seat 20 people.
2. Two rooms should be able to be combined so as to create one large room to be used as youth room for high school grades.
3. Each room should hold a blackboard.
BABYSITTING ROOM
This room will be used during services so that it should be removed enough from the worship area.
It should meet all state and county regulations for a daycare center.


OFFICE AREA


OFFICE AREA
OFFICES
The offices should be somewhat accessible to the public. They are to be primarily used by the pastor and teachers.
Points to consider:
1. The bookkeeper should be in an office which is removed from public access.
2. A conference space should be provided.
3. A printing machine, duplicating machine and computer terminals will eventually be acquired.
LIBRARY
The library is also to be a work area with storage.
Points to consider:
1. The secretary/receptionist working In the office area
can also be a control point for the library.
2. Storage is needed for audio-visual supplies as well as books.


COMMUNITY AREA


COMMUNITY GATHERING AREA
FELLOWSHIP HALL
The fellowship hall can be used for meetings or any large gatherings. Could also be the area where coffee and doughnuts are served.
Points to consider:
1. The hall should be able to accomodate 500-600 people at tables and chairs.
2. Floor should be tiled for dancing and other kinds of activities.
KITCHEN
The kitchen should enable serving large dinners quickly.
Points to consider:
1. It is possible to use a cafeteria style kitchen.
2. Storage should be provided for food and supplies.
STORAGE
Storage should be provided for clothing and food for emergency distribution.
A space for janitorial work and storage is also needed.
BRIDAL ROOM
The bridal room should be attached to the womens restroom and should hold dressing mirror, table, chairs, closet.
3ABYSITTING OR DAY CARE CENTER
The day care center can be a part of community area.


GENERAL DESCRIPTION
UNIT Church Area
ROOM TYPE SacrisCy
AREA PER ROOM 150 NSF
NUMBER REQUIRED 1
TOTAL AREA 150
OCCUPANTS MECHANICAL 1-5
LIGHTING Dimmer; track lighting
HVAC No special requirements
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS May have double function see General Proeram
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
UNIT Church Area
ROOM TYPE Entrance
AREA PER ROOM 800NSF
NUMBER REQUIRED 1
TOTAL AREA 800
OCCUPANTS 100
MECHANICAL LIGHTING HVAC Special lighting to call attention to main entrance. No special requirements
HVAC


Entrance (Contd.)
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS Sufficient doors to permit easy access for up to 300 users per hour: at peak.
Acoustics: noisy area. Surface finishes must keep noise to a minimum
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
UNIT Church Area
ROOM TYPE The nave
AREA PER ROOM 4550 7,000
NUMBER REQUIRED 1
TOTAL AREA 4550 7,000
OCCUPANTS up to 650
MECHANICAL LIGHTING HVAC Dimmer control; lighting for special effects,; daylighting. Quiet system.
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS Room configuration should approach a square rather than a rectangle. Good sight lines are important. Flexible space.
GENERAL DESCRIPTION UNIT Church Area
ROOM TYPE Cry room
AREA PER ROOM 150 NSF


Cry room (Contd.)
NUMBER REQUIRED 1
TOTAL AREA 150
OCCUPANTS up to 10 mothers with children
MECHANICAL LIGHTING Dimmer system
HVAC Quiet system.
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS The room needs to be visually and acoustically connected to the nave and be itself somewhat sound proof.
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
UNIT Church Area
ROOM TYPE Reconciliation Room
AREA PER ROOM 80 +
NUMBER REQUIRED 3
TOTAL AREA 240 +
OCCUPANTS 2
MECHANICAL LIGHTING Dimmer system
HVAC No special requirements
SPECIAL REOUIREMENTS Room should be somewhat soundoroof


GENERAL DESCRIPTION
UNIT Education Area
ROOM TYPE Classroom
AREA PER ROOM 400 SF +
NUMBER REQUIRED 12
TOTAL AREA 4,800 +
OCCUPANTS MECHANICAL 20
LIGHTING HVAC 70 fc. at surface/adjustable light intensity. No special requirements
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS Two classrooms to be larger to accomodate tables and chairs and play for preschool and kindergarten. Two classrooms connected to nave with accordion wall to allow for space expansion.
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
UNIT Education Area
ROOM TYPE Babysitting Room
AREA PER ROOM 500 SF +
NUMBER REQUIRED 1
TOTAL AREA 500
OCCUPANTS up to 10 Children


Babysitting Room (Contd.)
MECHANICAL
LIGHTING Dimmer system
HVAC No special requirements
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS Needs to accomodate cribs as well as cables and chair3.


GENERAL DESCRIPTION
UNIT Office Area
ROOM TYPE Office
AREA PER ROOM 200 NSF
NUMBER REQUIRED 5
TOTAL AREA 1000
OCCUPANTS 1-5
MECHANICAL LIGHTING 70 fc.at surface
HYAC SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS No special requirements
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
UNIT Office Area
ROOM TYPE Library
AREA PER ROOM 300 sf +
NUMBER REQUIRED 1
TOTAL AREA 300
OCCUPANT
6 stations


Library (Contd.) MECHANICAL
LIGHTING HVAC 70 fc. at work station daylight; ing
70 winter 40-50% humidity
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS Sufficient storage space.


GENERAL DESCRIPTION
UNIT Community Area
ROOM TYPE Fellowship Hall
AREA PER ROOM 4000 sf
NUMBER REQUIRED 1
TOTAL AREA 4000
OCCUPANTS up to 600
MECHANICAL LIGHTING Dimmer;daylight
HVAC No special requirements
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS Noise reducing materials floor appropriate for dancing.
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
UNIT Community Area
ROOM TYPE Kitchen
AREA PER ROOM 300 +
NUMBER REQUIRED 1
TOTAL AREA 300
OCCUPANTS 4
MECHANICAL LIGHTING 70 fc at surface
HVAC SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS Adequate for heat load and cooling.


LOCATION
The site is located approximately six and one-half miles Northeast of Rifle and approximately an equal distance Northwest of Silt, Colorado. It is enclosed to the North by County Road 233, to the East by County Road 277, to the West by County Road 225, and to the South by Highway 6. Its exact location is in the Northeast comer of the rectangle formed by these roads.




Lit
c
Colorado State !hy. 15
It i r' 1 e
Location of Proposed St. Mary's Church (See Fig. 2)
Interstate
Colorado
River
N
\
ichute
SOP
VICINITY 'UP


ACCESS MAP


i' ,
5.197]
5J79


t?!STAN77 YIE-Ut
MAfcsHY ARE/
iso
z-co.
RFTELNTIAL l
£\Cj£J£.^z> FrOK a^UNTY Z.P. 2.2^
lanpfopuy


CLIMATE
Source:
Colorado Climate Center of Colorado State University
Temperature and precipitation has been recorded in Rifle for over thirty years. Wind direction and speed was recorded between 1959-1963.
From the climate data some general data can be extracted
Prevailing daytime valley breezes are to the N.E. generelly between 2-6 mph. (summer).
Secondary winds are to the west 8-16 mph.
Storms generally are from the N.W.
(The data on the following pages has been interpolated from data collected at stations in Eagle and Grand Junction.)
(Although the microclimate of the site might be very slightly different from that of Rifle this 3ame data is assumed to be correct for the site six miles out of Rifle, Colorado.)


SUMMER SUN SLOPE
True
North
MORNING
MID-DAY
EVENING


WINTER SUN SLOPE
True
North
EVENING MID-DAY MORNING


RELATIVE HUMIDITY TEMP. (F) RADIATION(BTU/SF) SUNSHINE (H/DAY)
R1I %
CLIMATE DATA


Climatic Data
I
Elevation: 5,345 Latitude: 3932"
Longitude: 10748'
DAYLY SOL. HORIZONTAL . g o
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Mean Tot
791 119 1553 1986 2380 2598 2465 2182 1834 1345 918 731 1659 :
DAYLY SOL VERTICAL 1334 1515 1569 1345 1256 1212 1206 1339 1602 1645 1457 1303 1402 16830 > H M
Z SUNSHINE 5 64 64 67 71 79 78 76 79 74 63 60 70 z
DD HEAT 65F 1319 996 841 549 284 81 3 16 176 494 859 1253 6880
MEAN MAX. 36.2 43.3 53.0 64.2 74.4 83.9 90.5 87.8 79.9 68.5 51.8 39.4 64.3 H m 9 w a
MEAN 22.4 29.3 38.1 47.5 56.3 64.1 70.7 68.6 60.1 49.4 36.2 25.6 47.3
MEAN MIN. 8.5 15.2 23.i: i ,30.8*38.1 44.3 50.9 49.4 40.2 30.2 20.4 11.7 30.3
NEUTRALITY i i i i
DAYS PRECIP 4.5 3.3 4.0 3.7 3.5 2.9 3.1 4.5 3.5 3.6 3.2 4.2 45.3
MAX RAIN IN. .91 .78 .89 .91 .83 .76 .87 1.13 1.0 1.1 .79 .97 ii. o: 73
MEAN RAIN IN 2.75 2.21 2.33 2.76 3.22 2.52 2.54 4.18 3.15 3.63 2.03 4.06 22.2(
MIN RAIN IN. .01 .05 .12 .16 o 0 .02 .10 0 0 0 .02 6.9: n "3
TH. STORMS * * H M o
MAX SNOW IN. 24 25 10 2 0 0 0 0 5 5 10 20
RH MAX 5:00 78 71 61 54 51 43 47 49 50 55 63 76 59
RH MIN 17:00 65 46 34 27 24 19 21 22 24 32 46 60 35
DIRECTION NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE
PREVAIL SPEED 3.1 4.2 5.8 7.1 1 7.1 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.5 5.4 4.2 3.3 4.6 s3 1-4 z o
SECOND SPEED NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA
Z CALM .L3>9 |
\


SOILS
(Soil Tests were performed by Chen and Associates, inc. the source for the following information.)
The site is undeveloped and used as pasture. Vegetative cover consists primarily of grasses, weeds and small deciduous trees near the northwest corner of the lot. An irrigation drainage ditch presently disects the central portion of the lot. A gradual slope exixts down to the south with an elevation difference of approximately 10 to 12 feet exixting across the proposed building envelope. Thirty-five to 40 feet of elevation differential exists across the lot.
SUBSOIL CONDITIONS
Test holes revealed that in general the subsoil profile is variable and consisted of veneer topsoil overlying natural clays.
Claystone was encountered from a minimum of 5 feet to a maximum of 16 feet below the ground surface.
Water was also measured at 8 to 18 feet below ground surface.
FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS
Most suitable system is straight-shaft piers drilled into the underlying bedrock. The having the advantage of a single high load with low settlement potential.
Foundation Alternative
Spread footings founded on the upper finegrained soils or claystone bedrock. This has higher risk of movement due to expansive bedrock and compressible clays.
Floor slabs constructed above a well ventilated crawl space. The floors should be supported by grade beams and piers.
Slab on ground is an alternative if increased risk of distress due to floor slab movement is recognized.




Elevation Feet
200
Hole 1 El. 105'
Hole 2 El. 197'
Hole 3 El. 187'
Hole 4 El. 190'
200
195
190
185
ISO
175
170
MU-
t
/
4/6, 13/12 WC = 18.0 DD =108.1 -200 = 95 LL = 29 PI = 11
100/2.5
116/12
150/12
195
Lower Floor Elevation
,110/4 DVC = 6.6
DD =126.9
20
20,
23/0
/


/
20
5/12 I]wC = 26.3
]wc =
190
10/12
DD
97.4
H.O
DD = 109. 7 16b_ 200 = SI LL = 23 PI = 11
:&h 29/12 ~
; 180
130/3, 90/6
175
170
100/
1.5
165
165
"23,501
LOGS (JF EXPLORATORY HOLES
*
Elevation Feet


LEGEND:
Topsoil
Clay (CL), sandy, silty, medium stiff to stiff, moist, brown.
Sand (SP) medium dense, fine to medium grained, moist, light brown. y| Weathered Cl aystone, stiff, moist, light brown.
Undisturbed Drive Sample: The symbol 13/12 indicates that 13 blows of a 140 lb. hammer falling 30 inches were required to drive the sampler 12 inches.
20 Depth at which free water was encountered and number of days after drilling ~ measurement was taken.
Depth at which hole caved.
NOTES :
1) Holes were drilled on February 26, 1982 with a 4-inch diameter flight power auger. continuous
2) Elevations are approximate and were estimated from contours on provided by client, (see Fig. 2) plan
3) No free water was encountered at the time of drilling.
4) WC = Water Content (%) DD = Dry Density (pcf)
200 = Percent Passing No. 200 Sieve LL = Liquid Limit (i) PI = Plasticity Index (%)
Jj Claystone Bedrock, hard to very hard, moist, light brown to gray.
#23,501
LEGEND 1, NOTES
( i g. 4


CODE CHECKLIST
Project GWueCH C^O HPUEX
Date \
i
1. APPLICABLE BUILDING CODES 2. OCCUPANCY GROUP
City ____ County _____ A-Z. E-- \
Fire Marshall ____
UBC \s'
3.FLOOR AREA (Chapter 5 and table
Construction type Occupancy type Allow. Area (505a)
Added Stories increase (505b)
Total Allow. Area Non-sprink
5-C)
Av-z IFiL fe-2. IT 1 lu
2-Q, Z j "3. SO 7l nnn 4rQft..QQ
4. FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS
Construction type Exterior Bearing Walls Interior Bearing Walls Ext. Non-Bearing Walls Structural Frame Permanent Partitions Shaft Enclosures Floors Roofs
Ext. Door & Windows Inner Court &Walls (504c) Parapet Required (1709a)
(table ]7-a, unless noted)
g: iU
\
1
1
J__
5. WALL 4 OPENING PROTECTION (03 sections Ch. 6-15)
Fire Resistance of Exterior WJalls A -2. 2. k*.. p * E>- 2. | (^ £- ~ I
Openings in Exterior Walls pgp ^-5___________________________
BUILDING HEIGHT (Table 5-D) rp 1 J
Allowable Stories A-2- 2- 0 2. -f £-1 2. A 2. 2- R Z. 3
Maximum Height 6 O £5 QS ... 50 . 50


CODE CHECKLIST
Project CH-UEX-B-CoH P
Date j1 £
1. APPLICABLE BUILDING CODES 2. OCCUPANCY GROUP
City _____ County _____ A. E. l -
Fire Marshall _____
UBC t/
3.FLOOR AREA (Chapter 5 and table 5-C)
Construction type V...\ L.
Occupancy type kik-. £ I^ESl.
Allow. Area (505a) -WJLG?. 1 Si- CO H-gC
Added Stories increase (505b) _Lk2£j'29 1 Total Allow. Area zi.p& xi 400 ^.po.
Nan-sprink /
4. FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS
Construction type Exterior Bearing Walls Interior Bearing Walls Ext. Non-Bearing Walls Structural Frame Permanent Partitions Shaft Enclosures Floors Roofs
Ext. Door & Windows Inner Court AWalls (504c) Parapet Required (1709a)
(table ]7-a, unless noted)
________________V t ^______
______________!____________
______________1____________
______________1____________

5. WALL & OPENING PROTECTION
Fire Resistance of Exterior Walls Openings in Exterior Walls _______
6. BUILDING HEIGHT (Table 5-D)
Allowable Stories ________________
Maximum Height ___________________


CODE CHECKLIST
7. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (Ch. 33)
No. Exits Required Each Floor (3302a) ____________Z_ _____________
No. Exits Required Total (3302a) _________________£____j_3 Z. £~i (13 0
Required Width (3302b) _________ A 2. | 3 1 r-u U ^
Ramps Required (Table 330A) ___________YES________________________
Corridor Widths (3304b) 4*4 11
Dead End Corridor Limit (3304f) ______Z. O ft Ax,_________________
Corridor Construction (3304g) ____________ j A., ___________
Stairway Widths (3305b) _____ 4 4 'Z cSo 34'* /-SO
Stairway Landing Depths (3305f)________44 ________________________
Exit Signs Required ( 3312b) YS.S ~
Exit Signs Separate Circuit (3312c) Ho ?cR. A -2._________________
8. OCCUPANCY UNIT LIVE LOADS (Ch. 23 Table 23-A)
A-2 )ao; g-z so;, £-1 _______
9. OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Separations betw. occupancies Fire ratings & Const.
(Table 5-b) _____A-Z &2 1 AZ-BZ M Sa. \] g-2-AaH
Enclosure of Vert. Openings (1706/ S S Yger J
Light (05 Sections Ch. 6-14) A-1. *f?_Q 6iPa J 3-2. )ln GFA'
_____>/2 a Z -A________________________
Fire Extinguishing System Required (3802) ii3£> STfsCJA-L
Dry Standpipes Required (3803) 3= TAIL'S. ____________
Wet Standpipes Required (3805) _____n.______u_____3 v-A,___________
A-2- 5CFH KIH. outsi DC A|^_ TY
fc-l £>aT!^oor\^ E>OYS l ^ tCO GH2.Ls l ^ ^
\ -p £ T* ITS A oT V-HsS. y-21 OIA 6MA-C A^AET"
I r u^Lsgl nct rio'E.fe 45


HANDICAPPED CODE REVIEW
ENTRANCES At least one primary entrance to each building shall be usable by those in wheelchairs.
PUBLIC WALKS 48" minimum width, 52 maximum slope, 5x5 level platform, extend 1* beyond each side door.
PARKING SPACES 12* minimum width.
RAMPS Maximum slope of 1 in 12, level platform at 30' intervals minimum.
TOILET STALLS One handicapped stall in each toilet room
LAVATORIES Useable by individuals in wheelchairs.
MIRRORS Not over 40" above floor.
URINALS Mounted 19" above floor.
TOWEL RACKS AND DISPOSERS Mounted no more than 40" above floor.
WATER FOUNTAINS Accessible to the handicapped.
TELEPHONES Accessible to the handicapped
DOORS Minimum clear opening of 32" level floor 5' each side.
GRAPHICS Between 4'-6' and 5'-o' above floor. Minimum height of 7 when suspended from ceiling.


ENERGY CODE REVIEW
Colorado Energy Code for non-residential buildings.
Design Temperatures
Exterior Design Conditions
Winter: 3 F D.B.
Summer: 90F D.B.
Heating Degree Days: 6016
Latitude: 39 45*
Interior Design Conditions
72F for Heating 783F for Cooling
Mechanical Ventilation
Minimum of 15CFM of outdoor air per person based on 10 people per 1000s.f.
Building Envelope Requirements
Exterior joints around windows and door frames; opening between walls and foundations, between walls and roof/ ceilings and between wall panels; openings at penetrations of utility service through walls, floors and roofs, and all such other openings in the building envelope shall be caulked, gasketed, or otherwise sealed in an approved manner.
Design of Mechanical System
Energy Recovery:
Consideration shall be given to the use of recovery systems which will conserve energy.
Temperature Control:
Each HVAC system shall be provided with at least one the thermostat for the regulation of temperature.
Each thermostat shall be limited as follows: where used to control both heating and cooling, it shall have a maximum of high temperature setting of 85F and a


ENERGY CODE REVIEW (Contd.)
minimum of low temperature setting of 55F and shall be capable of operating the system heating and cooling in sequence.
Zoning for Temperature Control in Nonresidential Buildings:
Each separate HVAC system
Each separate zone. As a minimum each floor of a building shall be considered as a separate zone.
Each HVAC will be equipped with means of shut-off or reducing during periods of non-use.
Hot Water
(For this project solar hot water has been requested.)


ZONING
The site and area immediately surrounding it are zoned A (Agricultural), R (residential) and RD (Rural Density) with Church building/conditional use.
It setbacks are fifty feet from center line or twenty five feet from property line whichever is greater.
Ten feet from each side. Twenty-five feet from rear.
Parking on site 128 spaces. No on street parking.


UTILITIES
Water for the new building will be furnished by an already existing well. According to a report by Knoll Engineering Associates for large churches
5 to 7 gallons per day per person per sanctuary seat.
total needed for water and sewage is 5000 gallons per day.
(This would be maximum use. Since the church is not always in use.)
Gas and electricity can be easily brought on to the site as they run along road 233 adjacent to the site.




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