Citation
Stein Erickson Lodge and Condotel, Park City, Utah

Material Information

Title:
Stein Erickson Lodge and Condotel, Park City, Utah
Creator:
Hill, Erich
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
92, [9] leaves : illustrations, charts, maps, plans (some color) ; 22 x 29 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Hotels -- Designs and plans -- Utah -- Park City ( lcsh )
Resorts -- Designs and plans -- Utah -- Park City ( lcsh )
Hotels ( fast )
Resorts ( fast )
Utah -- Park City ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 10).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Erich Hill.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09198483 ( OCLC )
ocm09198483
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1982 .H54 ( lcc )

Full Text
THESIS
STEIN ERICKSON LODGE
ENVIRONMENIalulo.v-^
AURARIA LIBRARY
COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, DENVER
ERICH HILL FALL ISB2
A+P
LD
1190
A72
1982
H54
ENVIRONMENTAL DtbibiM
n AURARIA LIBRARY
N,


GENERAL
STEIN ERICKSON LODGE AND CONDOTEL PARK CTTY, UTAH
ARCHITECTURAL THESIS
PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF DESIGN & PUNNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE
BY ERICH HITT FALL 1982


CONTENTS
GENERAL CLIMATE
Advi sors 1 Descri ption SC?
Schedule 1 Solar Angles 52.
Introduction £ environmental design Data 53
Master Plan 2 v AURARIA LIBRARY
Design Guidelines y PROGRAM £>4
Stein's Lodge
Research to
BUILDING
SITE Design Guidelines 4P
Code 42.
Descri ption 24
Master Plan 2.7
DESIGN
Topography 24
Orientation 32.
REFERENCES
Solar 34 ..... .... , .
Views 55 < i f nph
Access 37
Ci rculation 34 ! z- //- £3~
Drainage 41
Vegetation 4a ' n. i
Utilities 44 i
Soils 43
"" ""MiaMn
Due
^
j


ADVISORS SCHEDULE INTRODUCTION MASTER PLAN DESIGN GUIDELINES STEINS LODGE RESEARCH
GENERAL


GENERAL
Design Advisors Schedule
G. K. Vetter UCD Faculty, Architecture Generation Of Alternative Concepts 2 Weeks
Robert Kindig UCD Faculty, Architecture
Don Woolard UCD Faculty, Architecture Schematic Design 4 Weeks
Gary Long UCD Faculty, Architecture
D.'C. Holder UCD Faculty, Architecture Design Development 4 Weeks
David Finholm UCD Faculty, Architecture
Robert Kamerle Deer Valley Resort, Planner Presentation 5 Weeks
Dick Farley Johnson-Hopson and Partners Architect


Introduction
The thesis project I have chosen is the Stein Erickson Lodge and Condotel. It is part of the Deer Valley Resort in Park City, Utah.
Park City, Utah is 40 miles east of Salt Lake City, Utah in the Wasatch Mountains. The site is at 8100 feet and approximately mid-mountain at Deer Valley Ski Resort. In this general section, I will explain the Deer Valley Master Plan, Deer Valley Design Guidelines, Stein Lodge Design Concepts, and research into Condo-tels and Resort Hotels.
Deer Valley Master Plan
Deer Valley is a private ski resort with limited general public day skiing. Although the major resort activity is winter skiing, summer time recreation activities such as hiking, horseback riding, and golf are planned.
At the completion of the 12-year development program, Deer Valley will have approximately 80 runs, 15 lifts, 660 acres of trails, and a comfortable capacity of 9,300 skiers on three mountains.
Deer Valley has three distinct building types, commercial, multi-family units, and single family units. They are organized into five separate communities. (See Master Plan Maps) Under the Park City Land Management Code, Deer Valley has been granted a maximum of 2000 total units. The present master plan includes 1371 multi-family units, 129 single family units, 3 ski lodges, sport facility center, day care center, mid-mountain Silver Lake Commercial Village, and a school parcel.
Most of the multi-family units will be operated as condotels. The owner will be able to use the unit whenever he or she wishs. When the owner is not using the unit, it is rented as a hotel room. All the bedrooms are lock-out units.
Deer Valley, from the beginning, was planned as a private high class resort. The Silver Lake Lodge was built for $120.00 per square foot in 1980-1981. I quote from the resort Brochure, "Resort Objectives: To keep lift lines at a comfortable level To maintain a high level of customer service, and


GENERAL
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provide a quality experience for every guest." This is an expensive resort.


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MASTER PLAN


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Deer Valley Design Guidelines
These guidelines were prepared for the resort by Mackensy, Holmsy, Dodge, and Davis of San Francisco, California. David Finholm of Aspen, Colorado was hired by the owner to head the design review of all progects under the design guidelines. The following is the prologue, site development goals, and exterior building design guideline goals of the Deer Valley Design Guidelines. Further details on the design guidelines are in the Building Section of this report.
Prologue
These guidelines are based on a simple premise: If everyone tries to get everyone else's attention, no one will get anyone's attention; if, on the other hand, the atmosphere is calmer and more pleasant, one has the leisure to notice everybody.
Deer Valley is an area of remarkable natural beauty. Its housing and facilities are intended to reinforce this quality. The basis for its attraction to prospective residents is this overall character. It is something that can easily be lost by unplanned development.
Each new development should reinforce and be reinforced by the development that has gone before, l/hat one purchases is Deer Valley, not the individual projects. If Deer Valley is overwhelmingly attractive, the projects will sell themselves.
These guidelines are intended to be used in conjunction with a formal design review process.
They are not a "building code," but recommendations for good design. They are meant to give the developer a good sense of what the Design Review Committee will be looking for. The suggestions contained here are the result of considerable research and experience, but the basic intent is to leave as much design free-, dom as possible to the developer.
In the braodest sense, the guidelines are meant to ensure that the "spirit" of Deer Valley isn't undermined by arbitrary, unthoughtful design. This "spirit" is absolutely critical to the success of the area and the individual developments, and for this reason alone it will behoove any developer to adhere to the design guidelines as much as possible.


Site Development Major Goals:
Preservation of the existing character of the building site;
visual and physical adaptation of the building to its site.
Exterior Building Design Guidelines Major Goals:
At Deer Valley, building massing, roofscape, walls and site relationships should emphasize: Human scale;
the avoidance of allusions to "alpine"and all other building forms foreign to the area;
the avoidance of allusions to "mineshaft" architecture and other industrial building forms, even if indigenous to the area;
proximity to the ground so that the buildings "hug" the ground, rather than dominate the site;
adaptation t the site in every possible way, including its severe climate, its terrain, its pattern of shade and sunlight, its trees and vegetation.
GENERAL


Stein Erickson Lodge
The site is a 10.86 acre saddle and ridge shoulder on Bald Mountain which is a magnificent combination of rock, evergreen and aspen.
It has a 360 panoramic view of Bald Peak, Flagstaff Mountain, Park City and valley, Deer Valley, and Silver Lake. It has great ski lift access being at mid-mountain. The site has been designated for a 65 unit hotel/lodge cluster under the Deer Valley Master Plan. The first phase of construction will be the lodge and 29 units. Phase two will involve the 36 remaining units.
My design project will involve planning all 65 units and the design of the lodge and 29 units.
Filling the role of client will be Boyd Blackner, Architect, who did the design for the Stein Erickson Lodge, due to be completed winter 1982, Bob Kamerle, Planner, employed by Deer Valley Resort from the beginning of the project, and David Finholm, Architect, employed by Deer Valley Resort as their design review architect.
I have talked and met with Boyd Blackner and David Finholm twice and have talked frequently with Bob Kamerle.
From these meetings, one major planning concept was indentified. The concept focuses on a European village cluster which emphasizes human scale and harmonious building forms with pedestrian and ski access. This will fit into the Deer Valley Design Guidelines. These guidelines provide a broad framework for design. Other important concepts include 1) separation of vehicles and pedestrian traffic, 2) underground parking and services, 3) the centralization of community service and management functions in the lodge. The lodge is the focal point of the development. The basic program for the lodge is a restaurant, bar, coffee shop, Stein Sports, Skate Shop, Variety Shop, Health Club, Hair Stylist, Game Room, Ski Lockers, Ski Shop, and Vending. The program for the units is 19 two bedroom units and 10 three bedroom units. These units have lock-out bedrooms with fireplaces, a kitchen, living room, and outside deck. Refer to the program section for details.
Since this is Stein Erickson's Lodge something should be said of him. He is the director of skiing at Deer Valley. He is one of the four developers of the project. From the advertising brochure, you get the idea he had alot to do with the design, however,
Boyd Blackner differs. Boyd Blackner said Stein prefers the "European look" and wants a "world class"


GENERAL
development. They want to spend the money for a good design and a high class development.


GENERAL
What Is A Condotel
This is a relatively new concept in resort hotels. Each unit is sold to a party. They may use it when they like. They pay service fees as part of the condominium ownership. But when it is not being used by the owner, it is rented as a hotel room. Each owner of a unit is a partner in the hotel rental. The cost of the units is from $450,000 to $600,000. This lodge and condotel was designed to be self-contained with all resort services in the lodge. It is much more of a hotel than a condominium.


What is The Hotel
A hotel can be thought of as a place to stay while traveling. They have existed since early times. The traditional inn or lodge provided food and bed for a weary traveler. Today there are hotels ranging from small roadside motels to resort lodges to mega downtown convention centers. How that came to be and the architectural style they exhibit is the subject of this paper.
Roadside inns and city center hotels provided what travelers basically needed up until the age of the industrial world. In addition, some grand luxury hotels were built in major cities to meet the traveling needs of the upper classes. With the industrial age came new modes of travel and the rapid industrialization of urban areas. The middle class expanded and more people began traveling for pleasure and business purposes.
From pioneer days through the era of the horse and buggy, the country inns changed little; railroads carried people from city to city and those
who traveled by wagon train camped at night. But in the city great hostel-eries rose, their location and their nature dictated in some part by mobility of their patrons. Thus, the Plaza Hotel could be built next to New York's Central Park, far from transportation, business or amusement centers, only because the automobile had come to stay. As paved roads and cars invaded the countryside, tourist cabins rose.
Once transient facilities, they have often become terminal resorts.
(Architectural Record: H.M.R.B.
P. 4)
The phenomenon of the resort hotel had begun. A lodge located on a site of natural beauty became common. With the advent of airplane travel, the resort hotel industry fourished world wide.
Not only did the industrial revolution allow people to travel for pleasure, but also for business. Business convention oriented hotels have been built in city business centers all over the world. The hotel business itself has become a multi-national corporation.
Hotel Types
Today there are several hotel types. Each


people and more business are neglected because of cost.
The cost of construction of city center hotels and increased automobile travel have caused the rapid growth of motels. The big hotel corporations have built motels because the larger, downtown hotels were not making the profit a motel could per investment dollar. This can partially explain why, in many downtown areas, it is difficult to get a room.
Resort hotels are more frequently being developed as condominiums because the developer has to put up less initial money for the hotel. When the owner does not use the condo, it is rented as a hotel room. This is done with lockout bedrooms in multi-bedroom condos.
Hotel building programs consider many service functions. Room service, daily cleaning, food service, arrival and departure of guests with luggage, and parking are functions that must be handled in an efficient manner. In some cases, the functional programs have totally designed the hotel.
Architectural Styles of Hotels
I have described what a hotel is and the how and why of its' functions. Cut the big question is why hotels look the way they do. I will use three general criteria. The architectural style of the day, the local context or vernacular, and the type of hotel, be it city center, resort hotel or motel, will serve as the criteria.
Architectural style changes through time. Styles are influenced by the ruling power and culture. For instance, when the Moslems invaded Spain and ruled it for several hundred years, they had a great influence on the style of that time. Many countries in the world have been influenced by other nations. In the United States, Europe has been our main influence, both architecturally and culturally.
The local context or vernacular, is generally responding to the immediate surroundings. The local style, materials, and/or climate influence indigenous architecture. For instance, the Greek and Aztec temples were quite different even though theri civilizations were comparable in many respects. The difference in Greek and Aztec styles


GENERAL
can be partly explained by the different indigenous conditions of each area.
Generally, before the industrial age, city center hotels and roadside inns were built in the vernacular style. Starting in the late 19th century in the United States, buildings such as the Plaza in New York and the St. Francis in San Francisco, were constructed in a European revival style. Architects were building larger hotels because of the new technologies and giving them classical facades.
In Europe, in the 1920's and 1930's, "modern architecture" was being developed. Here was a style that had a strong new philosophy. There were several architects and compounds experimenting with new materials, technologies, and social philosophies. They were dealing with "the Machine", the workers, and visions of a world community. This became the "International Style". Regardless of whether one likes or dislikes all or any part of the international style, it has had a tremendous impact upon all building types, including hotels.


GENERAL
"A guest's image of any hotel is created not only by what he sees but by what he never sees--the "back of the house" service areas which make it all happen.
Here Architect Alan H. Lapidus of "orris Lapidus Associates, Architects, offers some guidelines for theplanning of those very important areas."
(Architecural Record Hotel Book: )
The following is the article from Architectural Record Hotel Book by Alan H. Lapidus:
The resort hotel, like Janus, wears two faces. The paying customer sees only the "front of the house", and this must be all that he de-sires--a wish fulfillment, an ego builder, a status symbol, and the promise (and perhaps fulfillment) of great delight. The "front of the house" comprises every area that he will see: lobbies, dining spaces, rest rooms, bathers' passages, passenger elevators, hotel rooms, etc. These spaces must be handled and laid out with one thought in mind, the convenience and continued approbation of the guest.
But the "back of the house" is where all that makes this happen takes place. These are the areas of burnishing, butchering, baking; of boilers and
many other functions. The guest never sees this but these unseen spaces will precisely determine his degree of contentment. These are the areas that will ultimately dictate whether the hotel will run at a profit or a loss.
Let us presuppose a hotel located in a thriving but not overdeveloped resort area, an architecture suibably superbor suitably ghastly--to attract the clientele (either extreme will generally succeed; it is mediocrity that founders) and a competent top echelon management.
The "back of the house" must be laid out with two paramount objectives: control and efficiency. Control is crucial because pilfering is a real problem and improper design resulting in incomplete control can cripple or kill the operation. Take the case of a large chain that opened the first sizable hotel on a little Caribbean island several years ago. The building was finished, the employees had had several week of pre-opening training, but the hotel could not open on schedule there simply was not enough of the new silverware left. Several changes in service area layout were made, the local constabulary called on employees


at their homes and requested return of the "borrowed" flatware--and the situation was corrected. Liquor, meats, dry goods, linens and housekeeping supplies are all items that most people have need of in their homes; and maids, dishwashers, bus-boys, laundresses, etc. are not the best compensated people in the labor market. The pilferage problem in hotel operation should never be underestimated.
The second objective is efficiency. Inefficiency results in two people doing a job that could be done by one person, thereby increasing the operating overhead of the hotel by the yearly salary of that person. It also results in the delay of or detriment to service to a guest. An employee who has to travel a maze of passages to acomplish his job is being paid for spending a lot of time walking. A poor layout results in lost time, effort, tempers and customers.
What is the flow diagram for a typical "back of the house"? First, the service entrance is located out of the view of the main entrance to the hotel but with direct access onto a road
capable of handling truck traffic. It should have a loading dock--covered, to protect it from the weather. (Food, laundry and supplies will be off-loaded and stored on this dock and should not get rain-soaked while waiting to be checked in.)
All personnel will enter the hotel at this point. At least two small offices should be located here, for the steward (or receiving) and the timekeeper. Outside the steward's office is a floor scale to check the weights of the produce as it enters. If the food storage and preparation kitchens are located on a different level, a sidewalk lift or conveyor belts should be provided here. The timekeeper checks the employees in and out and makes certain that everyone stays honest. Immediately past the timekeeper, the employees should be separated into two different traffic flows one for food service personnel, the other for everyone else. (It is advisable to provide separate locker facilities for these two types of personnel.) Once food service personnel enter their traffic flow they have not contact (with the obvious exception of waiters) with either guests or other house personnel. The reason is simply security.
If there is any deep dark secret of successful ho-


GENERAL
tel service design, it is a built-in security system. Uniform issue is related to the housekeeper, the housekeeper to the laundry room, and the laundry room to the soiled linen room; the soiled linen room, connected by vertical linen chute, to a service room on every typical floor; and very typical floor connected by service elevator^) that open to the aforementioned service rooms and also to the service entrance, convenient to the scrutinizing gase of the steward and the timekeeper.
For convenience, the trash chute from the typical floor service area is located next to the linen chute. The trash room must therefore be located next to the soiled linen room and, for ease of pick-up, near the service entrance. Depending on the size of the hotel and the frequency of trash pick-up, this room may be equipped with a trash compactor or some other such implement of destruction. The garbage room should be located somewhere near the trash room (ideally, opening directly onto the loading dock). It should be refrigerated and either have space fo, or be in immediate proximity to, a can wash area with
floor drain and hose bib.
The boiler room usually has a direct escape to the outside and, for ease of maintenance and repair, should be located near the service entrance. The boiler flue, extending to the top of the hotel tower, is usually located in the main vertical circulation core and its location, therefore, is important at the earliest stages of design. If there is enough height in the service floor to breach the flue horizontally, the problem is somewhat mitigated, but ususally not without objections from the structural and mechanical engineers .
Telephone equipment, electrical and air-conditioning equipment rooms can be handled more flexibly than the other service areas, but their size and locations vary according to the size and location of the hotel.
The employees' cafeteria, generally, a steam table-grill operation, should be located near the kitchen and as close to the employees' locker room as possible. Access should preclude passing through


the food service area.
Before delving into the intricacies of the workings of the food service and laundry, let me comment on the services of the specialists who will actually lay out and design the equipment in these areas. They don't really need that much space. They will swear a mighty oath that they do, and will conjure up visions of irate chefs stalking off the premises and laundresses working overtime shifts, but they can really do with less. Believe me. However, before one can hope to cope with the specialist, it is necessary to understand how these spaces operate.
After comestibles have been weighted in, checked, and signed for, they are sent to either dry storage or liquor storage (a room with a big lock on it) or to one of the various cold holding rooms or boxes. If the hotel does its own butchering it is necessary to provide ceiling rails to transport them. Meats, fish, dairy, bakery products, frozen foods, etc. all require different cold facilities. Since these boxes require heavy insulation, slab sinkages will be required in
these areas. If these are not provided, the floor of the box will have to be ramped--but the person who has to push a heavy cart up this ramp will curse the architect for all the days of his life.
An alternate method, if the exact sizes will not be known until later, is to depress the entire slab and build up the rest of the floor with lightweight fill.
Any resort worthy of its credit cards will have one main restaurant, at least one speciality restaurant, a night club with a dinner show, and a bar where sandwiches and/or snacks will be available. It will aslo have that service--beloved of guest and hated by manager--room service. Most resort hotels these days also have convention facilities which entail feeding large numbers of people at the same meal at the same time. If that meal turns out to be semi-congealed chicken-a-la-king the hotel has lost that convention group forever.
From kitchen storage, food goes to the prep kitchen to be prepared for final cooking in the main kitchen. The main kitchen actually consists of several kitchens (and must have a flue extending to


the top of the buiding lest the guest get an odoriferous foretaste of his next meal). The speciality restaurant(s) and the main restaurant will have their own kitchens and their own chefs but these should all be located within the same general area. ("Kitchen" refers to a cooking line with its back storage tables, reach-in boxes, work areas, etc.) The "common" areas that all of the kitchens can use are the dishwash, pot wash, salad set-ups and dessert set-up (waiters usually set up desserts such as ice cream, cakes, etc.)
The dishwashing area should be located near the door of the kitchen so that the waiter or bus-boy can enter, drop off the dirty dishes, and get out again without walking through the cooking area. This is, however, a noisy area and it should be sound-baffled.
Cooking for banquets is usually done in the main kitchen and then brought to a banquet or "holding kitchen", equipped with banks of ovens where food is kept hot until served. Depending on the size of the operation, this kitchen may also have its own dishwashing equipment. Other facilities include reach-in boxes, set-up areas, and storage areas. Hot and cold carts are an-
other means of servicing a small banquet facility. Both methods require direct access between main kitchen and banquet area.
There is usually a service bar for alcoholic beverages in the general area of the kitchen. As the waiter leaves the kitchen he must pass a checker who verifies that what has been billed being served and that only food that has been billed is walking out of the kitchen. The checker's station is always located immediately inside the door between kitchen and dining area. The head chef should have his office in the main kitchen area, in an office with enough glass to permit visual control over the kitchen operation. In addition, silver storage and burnishing room must be under his visual control.
Room service should work from the main kitchen area, with direct access to the service elevator. It has its own checker and it may have its own "kitchen" usually consisting of a generous amount of grill. (Breakfast is the most popular room service meal.) Storage and setting up room service carts--these take up considerable spacemust be provided.
It is evident from this cursory survey that all


the food facilities of the hotel, from the coffee shop to Old Uatashi's Polynesian Luau Room, must feed directly from the main kitchen without going through tortuous service corridors or across public areas. With this flow line, food can be requisitioned from storage to the kitchen and go through just one control.
The laundry size will depend upon such diverse factors as the number of people who will use the pool or water facilities (beach towels); whether tablecloths are used for lunch and breakfast; whether there is a health club (towels again); and how many employees there are (uniforms). The main concerns in allocating space for this facility are the enormous amounts of ventilation required, the large headroom required over items such as a ten roll ironer, and the fact that circulation within the laundry is by means of large heavy carts. (No ramps here; avoid columns in the aisles).
The principal items in a laundry are the washers, extractors, dryers, ironers, sorting rooms and the folding areas. There must
There are other areas in the back of the house, repair shops, locksmith, administration, miscellaneous storage and so forth, but the items set forth above are the prime space determinants. They must be set up in a certain pattern and that pattern will set the plan for the front of the house.
When a guest enters the hotel lobby (and there should never be confusion as to where the entrance is), he should be overwhelmed by a feeling of se-renity--or enchantment, or revulsion--but never confusion. The registration desk and the elevators should be immediately apparent. The registration area should consist of the front desk, behind which is a clerk, behind whom is the key and mail rack, behind which are various administrative spaces. At one end of the desk (and partitioned off from the rest of it) is the cashier and next to this is the valuables room, a separate room where the guest is given a safe deposit box. After filling his box with jewelry, cash or other valuables, the guest hands the box to the cashier who locks it away.
The main administrative area ususally backs up


to the desk but they type and amount of space for this depends solely on the management. The telephone board is located here. The restaurants, bars and other divertissements should be either visible from or well indicated in the lobby area.
If the hotel has a casino, local regulations will determine how visible or accessible it may be. In Las Vegas the idea is to force all circulation through the casino whereas in Puerto Pxico the casino is only open during certain hours and there are strict regulations as to how obvious the gaming may be. Nonetheless, the ironclad relationship here is that the casino entrance should be immediately opposite the night club entrance. The psychology is simple. After being entertained by the stars of stage and screen, the patron walks out of the night club and practically falls into the casino. He thereupon sees the glitter of the wheel, hears the click of the dice, remembers how Bond did it in Casino P*oyale and immediately blows the egg money.
A bathers' passage should be provided from the elevators to the pool or beach. This is so that clothed dry guests do not have to associate
with half-naked, wet and oily guests. In designing the pool deck do not forget the little nicety of making sure that a large shadow does not fall across it. Host pool decks containing the shadow of the hotel at 2:00 P.M. have pools with the architect at the bottom. Since the main occupation at any pool deck is sunning rather than swimming, a generous area must be allocated for chaises. These are large and it is a good idea to overestimate space for them. If at all possible the pool should be oriented so that the diving board does not face the afternoon sun. A bar and snack bar for the pool deck should be provided and access to the coffee shop should be from the pool deck as well as from the public spaces of the hotel .
The typical floors of a hotel are strictly a matter of budget and esthetics. The module for the floor set up (and thus for the building) is based on the fact that a maid can make up 12-14 bedrooms per day. (It is inadvisable operationally to have a maid make up six rooms on one floor and five on another.) A normal double-loaded hotel tower is at least 50 feet wide (minimums are 17 feet clear living space from outside window to bathroom wall, 10 feet for bathroom and closets, 6 feet for a


hall). A typical floor should have a number of interconnecting rooms (soundproof connecting doors) and some rooms that by size, configuration and furniture can be combined into suites of various sizes. However, for the most efficient hotel design every room should have a fully equipped bathroom so it may be rented as a separate room. A room furnished as a living room should have convertible beds instead of couches. Thus every room is a "key". (In hotel parlance rentable rooms are called "keys" and a two-room suite where the rooms cannot be rented separately is only one "key".)
The service area on the typical floor is located near the vertical circulation core (service elevator, dirty linen and trash chutes). The service area also contains space for storage of the service carts (one per maid), a slop sink and storage for clean linens, towels and supplies. Walls of rooms that adjoint the elevator core should be soundproofed.
And now that I have lovingly laid out the principles of practical hotel layout, let me
stress that all generalizations, including this one, are false. Depending upon the terrain, the view the solar orientation and the size of the property many of these guidelines may have to be stretched.
At the Conquistador Hotel on the eastern tip of Puerto Rico, the program was to enlarge an existing 90-room hotel with minimal facilities by adding 300 more rooms and full public facilities, including convention ball rooms and a casion. The site was a steep mountain with no available flat areas but on incredible view. A high rise building was deemed inappropriate and the operation of the existing hotel could not be interrupted during construction. The solution was to break most of the rules. A large portion of the hotel, including the pool and pool deck, 70 hotel rooms, a bar, kitchen and outdoor dining was located in a fold of the terrain halfway down the mountain. The only way to reach this comples is by an aerial tram and a cable railway. This means that all foods, linens and supplies have to be brought down this way. The total number of employees per guest is high and operational problems are legion. However,


GENERAL
these considerations are secondary because of the unique layout which attracts guests at premium rates, thus insuring a successful operation.
Which is, after all, what it is all about.
Rules are for the ideal. If you can take advantage of a special situation or create spatial excitement by bending or breaking these rules, do so. Just be aware of the consequences, and be sure the owner concurs the results will be worth it.


DESCRIPTION
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Site Description
The site is a 10.86 acre saddle and ridge shoulder on Bald Mountain which is a magnificent combination of rock, evergreen, and aspen. It has a 360 panoramic view of Bald Peak, Flagstaff Mountain, Park City and valley, Deer Valley, and Silver Lake.
The site is part of Deer Valley Resort P.U.D in Park City, Utah. Park City is approximately 40 miles from Salt Lake City, Utah.
The site is accessible by car or shuttle bus It is at mid-mountain at 8100 feet. It has very good access to all ski lifts. It is within walking distance of Silver Lake Village, a commercial development and lodge at mid-mountain.
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SI
Soil tests were done by Dames and Moore, Salt Lake City, Utah on April 28, 1981. The following references are taken from their report.
Surface
The site area is situated along a north-south trending ridge to the west of the Silver Lake Meadow as shown on Plate 2. The topography within the general building area is moderately sloping with maximum slopes being on the order of 2.0 horizontal to 1.0 vertical. To the west, the ground surface slopes downward towards Guardsman Pass Road. Maximum slopes in the area are generally on the order of 1.5 horizontal to 1.0 vertical. On the east side of the site the ground surface slopes downward into the Silver Lake Meadow with an average grade of approximately 4.0 horizontal to 1.0 vertical. There was no indication of any past or imminent slope instability within the adjacent hillside areas.
At the time of our field investigation the site area was blanketed by approximately 2.0 feet of snow which prevented a detailed examination of the surficial soil conditions. The vegetation within the building area consists of
SOILS
a moderate growth of pines and some brush and weeds.
Subsurface
Due to the limited site accessibility, the field exploration program was limited to the excavation of three exploration test pits. The test pits were excavated with a track-mounted hydraulic backhoe to depths of three and three and one-half feet below existing grade. The locations of the test pits are referenced on Plate 2.
The field portion of our study was under the direct control and supervision of an experienced member of our geotechnical staff. During the excavation operations, a continuous log of the subsurface conditions encountered was maintained. In addition, disturbed samples of the soils were obtained for subsequent laboratory testing and examination. Soils were classified in the field based on visual and textural examination. These classifications were later supplemented by subsequent inspection and testing in our laboratory. Detailed graphical representation of the subsurface conditions encountered is presented on Plate 3, Log of Test Pits. The nomenclature utilized to describe the soil


SI
types is presented on Plate 4, Unified Soil Classification System.
Soil, Bedrock and Ground Mater Conditions
The subsurface soil conditions encountered in the three test pits were relatively consistent.
In general, the site area is blanketed with approximately one foot of dark brown silty fine and coarse gravel which was classified in the field as medium dense. The upper four to five inches generally contain the major root mat and have been classified as topsoil. Due to the relatively high organic content of these surficial soils, they are not recommended for support of the proposed foundation systems.
The underlying soils consist of dense to very dense, brown fine to coarse gravel with some silt.
At depths of approximately two feet the material graded with cobble-sized rocks. The test pits ranged in depth from three to three and one-half feet below existing grade. At those depths the hydraulic backhoe utilized for this study had difficulty in penetrating the materials due to their very dense nature and the presence of numerous cobble and boulder-sized rocks. It is anticipated
SOILS
that the bottom of the test pit excavations rerepresent the approximate location of the underlying bedrock. In this area the bedrock material consists of a hard and durable quartzite. It is our opinion that the dense to very dense gravelly soils will provide more than adequate support for the proposed foundations.
At the time of our field investigation, ground water was not encountered in any of the test pits.
Laboratory Testing
Due to the granular nature of the natural soils encountered during our exploration, samples suitable for the performance of significant laboratory tests could not be obtained. The geotechnical recommenda-. tions discussed in the subsequent sections of this report were based upon the observations made during our exploration program and our general experience with similar soil conditions within the Park City area.
Discussions And Recommendations
The supporting data upon which our recommendations are based have been presented in the previous sections of this report. The recommendations are


SI
governed by the physical properties of the soils and bedrock, the projected ground water conditions, and the layout and design data discussed in the PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION section. If subsurface conditions other than those described herein are encountered in conjunction with construction and/ or if design and layout changes are initiated,
Dames and Moore should be informed so that our recommendations can be reviewed.
The results of this investigation indicate that the site area is suitable for the construction of the proposed lodge facility. Bedrock is relatively shallow within the proposed building area. Thus, it is anticipated that extensive blasting will be required during the excavation of the subgrade parking area as currently proposed. Based upon the results of our field reconnaissance and our previous experience in the general site area, there is no indication of any past or imminent slope instability.
The structure can be supported on isolated spread or continuous wall foundations established upon either the underlying bedrock, suitable natural soils, or structural fill.
SOILS
As previously stated, ground water was not encountered in the test pits excavated for this study; however, to minimize the seepage potential resulting from the downward infiltration of rainwater and snow melt, it is recommended that the subgrade walls be protected with a perimeter drainage system.


S1IOS
X IS


SI TE
TEST PIT I
GM
GP-
GM


DARK BROWN SILTY FINE AND COARSE GRAVEL MEDIUM DENSE
BROWN FINE AND COARSE GRAVEL WITH SOME SILT DENSE
GRADING WITH SOME COBBLES TO I 12 DIAMETER- VERY DENSE
TEST PIT COMPLETED AT 3.5 FEET ON 4 8 81
VERY HARD DIGGING DUE TO COBBLE AND BOULDERS SIZED ROCKS GROUND WATER WAS NOT ENCOUNTERED
TEST PIT 3
GM
GP-j GM

DARK BROWN SILTY FINE AND COARSE GRAVEL. MAJOR ROOTS TO 5" (TOPSOIL) MEDIUM DENSE
BROWN FINE AND COARSE GRAVEL WITH SOME SILT DENSE
GRADING VERY DENSE WITH COBBLE TO 2' IN DIAMETER
TEST PIT COMPLETED AT 3.0 FEET ON 4 8 81
VERY HARD DIGGING DUE TO COBBLE AND BOULDER SIZED ROCKS GROUND WATER WAS NOT ENCOUNTERED
KEY
DEPTH AT WHICH DISTURBED SAMPLE WAS EXTRACTED
DEPTH IN FEET
SOILS
TEST PIT 2
GM
GP-
GM
DARK BROWN SILTY FINE AND COARSE GRAVEL. MAJOR ROOTS TO 4" CTOPSOIL) MEDIUM DENSE
BROWN FINE AND COARSE GRAVEL WITH SOME SILT DENSE
GRADING WITH SOME COBBLE SIZED ROCKS AND VERY OENSE
TEST PIT COMPLETED AT 3.0 FEET ON 4 8 81
VERY HARD DIGGING DUE TO COBBLE AND BOULDER SIZED ROCKS GROUND WATER WAS NOT ENCOUNTERED
NOTE
THE DISCUSSION IN THE TEXT UNDER THE SECTION TITLED, "SITE CONDITIONS. SUBSURFACE-. IS NECESSARY TO A PROPER UNDERSTANDING OF THE NATURE OF THE SUBSURFACE MATERIALS.


CLI
Existing climatic data in the vicinity of the development site is limited. The nearest National Weather Service monitor station with comparable elevation is at Silver Lake, Brighton, Utah. It is 5 miles away from the development area. This data is not published.
I called the state weather bureau and talked to Arlo Richardson. The state's nearest station was in Heber, Utah which is 25 miles away and only S5C0 feet in elevation. I obtained some general information from Deer Valley Development.
In General
The climate of the project is influenced by its proximity to the crest of the Wasatch mountains. The area is classified semi-arid, continental. Snowfall lias been monitored at Deer Valley since 1975. The area averages 150 inches of snow per year. Below 7C0C feet elevation, the average is 20 to 25 inches precipitation per year. Most of the precipitation is snow in the early winter months. The summer months average less than one inch per month.
Summer temperatures are moderate with highs approaching 70 F. to 75 F. Fluctuation between day and night summer temperatures can be as much as 35 F. The winter daytime temperature averages 25 F., with lows ranging from 0 F. to 18 F. Winter day-night fluctuation is approximately 20 F.
In general, winter breezes come from the northwest and summer breezes from the southeast. Wind patterns tend to follow the Deer Valley cold drainage passage through the valley. Predominant air movement is down-valley in the northwesterly direction in the evening and up-valley in a northerly or southerly direction during the day. Prevailing winds are from the south with storm winds occuring from the northwest.
Climatic Data
The following data was obtained from David Fin-holm, who is an architect working for Deer Valley Development. It was taken by a "Solarometer" on the Stein's Lodge site. It gives Max. Temperature (F. ), Min. Temperature (F. ), Max. Solar (Langleys), Total Solar (Langleys), and Degree Days. Data spanning only one year can not be considered to be representative of averages for the area. The data


DESCRIPTION SOLAR ANGLES DATA
CLIMATE


was from 11-8-80 to 9-30-81. In general, the data is within the averages.
The data says there is plenty of solar radiation for passive heating and active hot water. Temperatures indicate an average of 8500 degree days. Engineers are designing heating systems for 8500 degree days. Summer time cooling is not a problem with highs of 70 F. to 75 F. I have no data on humidity. This area is classified semi-arid. There is less than one inch per month precipitation during a typical summer. Having grown up in Utah 25 miles from Deer Valley, I know that the climate is dry. Humidity is not a building/ design problem at Deer Valley.
Included in the data is the 40 North Latitude solar angle chart.
CLIMATE


CLIMATE
altitude angles


DATE
1 1/8
TIME TEMP (F) SOLAR
MAX.TEMP: 43.7 MAX SOLAR: 6.6
MIN.TEMP: 36.5 TOTAL SOLAR: 6
11/9 MAX.TEMP: 44.6 MAX SOLAR: 139
MIN.TEMP: 33.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 1436 DEGREE DAYS = 25
11/10 MAX.TEMP: 41 MAX SOLAR: 152.3
MIN.TEMP: 27.5 TOTAL SOLAR: 1668 DEGREE DAYS = 30
11/11 MAX.TEMP: 38.3 MAX SOLAR: 152.3
MIN.TEMP: 25.7 TOTAL SOLAR: 1542 DEGREE DAYS = 33
11/12 MAX.TEMP: 41 MAX SOLAR: 152.3
MIN.TEMP: 30.2 TOTAL SOLAR: 1575 DEGREE DAYS = 29
11/13 MAX.TEMP: 41.9 MAX SOLAR: 158.9
MIN. TEMP: 26.6 TOTAL SOLAR: 1423-DEGREE DAYS = 30
11/14 MAX.TEMP: 32 MAX SOLAR: 152.3
MIN.TEMP: 22.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 1396 DEGREE DAYS = 37
11/15 MAX.TEMP: 42.8 MAX SOLAR: 125.3
MIN.TEMP: 23 TOTAL SOLAR: 1138 DEGREE DAYS = 32
11/16 MAX.TEMP: 40.1 MAX SOLAR: 53
MIN.TEMP: 31.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 562 DEGREE DAYS = 29
11/17 MAX.TEMP: 45.5 MAX SOLAR: 139
MIN.TEMP: 29.3 TOTAL SOLAR: 1615 DEGREE DAYS = 27
11/18 MAX.TEMP: 50 MAX SOLAR: 119.2
MIN.TEMP: 35.6 TOTAL SOLAR: 1370
DEGREE DAYS = 22
11/19 MAX.TEMP: 41 MAX SOLAR: 152.3
MIN.TEMP: 26.6 TOTAL SOLAR: 1343
DEGREE DAYS = 31
11/20 MAX.TEMP: 42.8 MAX SOLAR: 152.3
MIN.TEMP: 25.7 TOTAL SOLAR: 1721
DEGREE DAYS = : 30
11/21 MAX.TEMP: 48.2 MAX SOLAR: 152. 3
MIN.TEMP: 33.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 1714
DEGREE DAYS = 24
11/22 MAX.TEMP: 50.9 MAX SOLAR: 152. 3
MIN.TEMP: 32 TOTAL SOLAR: 1734
DEGREE DAYS = : '> ~r
11/23 MAX.TEMP: 48.2 MAX SOLAR: 1 cr 'n 1 U .a m ->
MIN.TEMP: 33.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 1655
DEGREE DAYS = 24
11/24 MAX.TEMP: 44.6 MAX SOLAR: 152.3
MIN.TEMP: 30.2 TOTAL SOLAR: 1701
DEGREE DAYS = 27
11/25 MAX.TEMP: 41 MAX SOLAR: 139
MIN.TEMP: 28.4 TOTAL SOLAR: 1072
DEGREE DAYS = 30
11/26 MAX.TEMP: 32.9 MAX SOLAR: 79. 4
MIN.TEMP: 17.6 TOTAL. SOLAR: ~.r isr -r U /
DEGREE DAYS = 39
11/27 MAX.TEMP: 22.1 MAX SOLAR: 79.4
MIN.TEMP: 13.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 582
DEGREE DAYS = 47
11/28 MAX.TEMP: 36.5 MAX SOLAR: 139
MIN.TEMP: 12.2 TOTAL SOLAR: 1615
DEGREE DAYS = 40
11/29
MAX.TEMP: 50.9 MAX.SOLAR: 158.9
MIN.TEMP: 12.2 MAX.TOTAL SOLAR: 1734


DATE TIME
12/17 MAX.TEMP: MIN.TEMP:
TEMP (F) SOLAR
43.7 MAX SOLAR: .6.6
37.4 TOTAL SOLAR: 6
12/18 MAX.TEMP: 44.6 MAX SOLAR: 139
MIN.TEMP: 33.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 1436 DEGREE DAYS = 25
12/19 MAX.TEMP: 41 MAX SOLAR: 152.3
MIN.TEMP: 27.5 TOTAL SOLAR: 1668 DEGREE DAYS = 30
12/20 MAX.TEMP: 38.3 MAX SOLAR: 152.3
MIN.TEMP: 25.7 TOTAL SOLAR: 1542 DEGREE DAYS = 33
12/21 MAX.TEMP: 41 MAX SOLAR: 152.3
MIN.TEMP: 30.2 TOTAL SOLAR: 1575 DEGREE DAYS = 29
12/22 MAX.TEMP: 41.9 MAX SOLAR: 158.9
MIN.TEMP: 28.4 TOTAL SOLAR: 1423 DEGREE DAYS = 29
12/23 MAX.TEMP: 32 MAX SOLAR: 152.3
MIN.TEMP: 22.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 1396 DEGREE DAYS = 37
12/24 MAX.TEMP: 42.8 MAX SOLAR: 125.8
MIN.TEMP: 23 TOTAL SOLAR: 1138 DEGREE DAYS = 32
12/25 MAX.TEMP: 40.1 MAX SOLAR: 53
MIN.TEMP: 31.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 562 DEGREE DAYS = 29
12/26 MAX.TEMP: 45.5 MAX SOLAR: 139
MIN.TEMP: 29.3 TOTAL SOLAR: 1615 DEGREE DAYS = 27
12/27 MAX.TEMP: 50 MAX SOLAR: 119.2
MIN.TEMP: 35.6 TOTAL SOLAR: 1370
DEGREE DAYS = 22
12/28 MAX.TEMP: 41 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 27.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 30 152.3 1343
12/29 MAX.TEMP: 42.8 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 25.7 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 30 152. 3 1721
12/30 MAX.TEMP: 48.2 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 33.8 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 24 152.3 1714
12/31 MAX.TEMP: 50.9 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 32 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 23 152.3 1734
1/1 MAX.TEMP: 48.2 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 33.8 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 24 152.3 1655
1/2 MAX.TEMP: 44.6 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 30.2 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 27 152. 3 1701
1/3 MAX.TEMP: 41 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 28.4 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 30 139 1072
1/4 MAX.TEMP: 32.9 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 17.6 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 39 79.4 357
1/5 MAX.TEMP: 22.1 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 13.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 47 79. 4 582
1/6 MAX.TEMP: 36.5 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 12.2 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 40 139 1615
1/7
MAX.TEMP: 50.9 MAX.SOLAR: 158.9
MTu tfmp MAX. TOTAL SOLAR: 1734


DATE TIME TEMP (F) SOLAR
3/5 MAX.TEMP: 35.6 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 24.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 192 1568
3/6 MAX.TEMP: 35.6 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 20.3 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 37 251.6 2575
3/7 MAX.TEMP: 36.5 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 21.2 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 36 251.6 3263
3/8 MAX.TEMP: 35.6 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 20.3 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 37 271.4 2892
3/9 MAX.TEMP: 34.7 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 20.3 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 37 225. 1 2045
3/10 MAX.TEMP: 33.8 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 20.3 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 37 244.9 1727
3/11 MAX.TEMP: 33.8 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 19.4 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 38 158.9 1674
3/12 MAX.TEMP: 36.5 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 23 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 35 297.9 2674
3/13 MAX. MIN. TEMP: 36.5 MAX.SOLAR: TEMP: 19.4 MAX.TOTAL SOLAR: 297. 9 3263
MIN.TOTAL SOLAR: 1674 TOTAL DEGREE DAYS: 259
CLIMATE


DATE
4/2
TIME TEMP (F> SOLAR
MAX.TEMP: 46.4 MAX SOLAR: 297.9
MIN.TEMP: 27.5 TOTAL SOLAR: 1780
4/3 MAX.TEMP: 26.6 MAX SOLAR: 244.9
MIN.TEMP: 18.5 TOTAL SOLAR: 2945 DEGREE DAYS = 42
4/4 MAX.TEMP: 26.6 MAX SOLAR: 278
MIN.TEMP: 14.9 TOTAL SOLAR: 3025 DEGREE DAYS = 44
4/5 MAX. TEMP: 43.7 MAX SOLAR: 284.7
MIN.TEMP: 16.7 TOTAL SOLAR: 4283 DEGREE DAYS = 34
4/6 MAX.TEMP: 42.8 MAX SOLAR: 291.3
MIN.TEMP: 29.3 TOTAL SOLAR: 3018 DEGREE DAYS = 28
4/7 MAX.TEMP: 37.4 MAX SOLAR: 278
MIN.TEMP: 23 TOTAL SOLAR: 3085 DEGREE DAYS = 34
4/8 MAX.TEMP: 40.1 MAX SOLAR: 297.9
MIN.TEMP: 20.3 TOTAL SOLAR: 3614 DEGREE DAYS = 34
4/9 MAX.TEMP: 50.9 MAX SOLAR: 297.9
MIN.TEMP: 33.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 4508 DEGREE DAYS = 22
4/10 MAX.TEMP: 50.9 MAX SOLAR: 297.9
MIN.TEMP: 33.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 4018 DEGREE DAYS = 22
4/11 MAX.TEMP: 49.1 MAX SOLAR: 291.3
MIN.TEMP: 32' TOTAL SOLAR: 3760 DEGREE DAYS = 24
4/12 MAX.TEMP: 50 MAX SOLAR: 297.9
MIN.TEMP: 33.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 4163
DEGREE DAYS = 23
4/13 MAX.TEMP: 48.2 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 29.3 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 26 291.3 4594
4/14 MAX.TEMP: 58.1 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 30.2 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 20 297.9 4534
4/15 MAX.TEMP: 47.3 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 33.8 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 24 205.2 1615
4/16 MAX.TEMP: 56.3 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 40.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 16 304.5 4170
4/17 MAX.TEMP: 58.1 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 40.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 15 291.3 4243
4/18 MAX.TEMP: 58.1 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 36.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 17 258.2 2753
4/19 MAX.TEMP: 42.8 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 27.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 29 198.6 1873
4/20 MAX.TEMP: 45.5 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 27.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 28 304.5 4336
4/21 MAX.TEMP: 43.7 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 31.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 27 271.4 1959
4/22
MAX.TEMP: 58.1 MAX.SOLAR: 304.5
MIN.TEMP: 14.9 MAX.TOTAL SOLAR; 4594
MIN.TOTAL SOLAR: 1615


CLI
DATE 5/1 TIME TEMP (F) SOLAR MAX.TEMP: 69.8 MAX SOLAR: 331 MIN.TEMP: 50 TOTAL SOLAR: 4534
5/2 MAX.TEMP: 58.1 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 40.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 15 185. 4 1833
5/3 MAX.TEMP: 41.9 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 29.3 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 29 23e. 3 2071
5/4 MAX.TEMP: 56.3 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 28.4 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 22 364. 1 4925
5/5 MAX.TEMP: 57.2 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 34.7 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 19 291.3 3250
5/6 MAX.TEMP: 46.4 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 25.7 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 28 317.8 2859
5/7 MAX.TEMP: 41.9 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 23 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 32 317.8 4779
5/8 MAX.TEMP: 36.5 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 24.8 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 34 317.8 3561
5/9 MAX.TEMP: 50.9 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 26.6 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 26 324.4 4998
5/10 MAX.TEMP: 57.2 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 32.9 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 19 337.6 4951
5/11 MAX.TEMP: 44.6 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 28.4 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 28 311.1* 4455
5/12 MAX.TEMP: 41.9 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 26.6 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 30 297. 9 3938
5/13 MAX.TEMP: 53.6 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 24.8 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 25 311.1 4984
5/14 MAX.TEMP: 61.7 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 37.4 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 15 264.8 3879
5/15 MAX.TEMP: 39.2 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 31.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 29 125. 8 953
5/16 MAX.TEMP: 37.4 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 29.3 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 31 258. 2 1754
5/17 MAX.TEMP: 41.9 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 31.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 28 251.6 2144
5/18 MAX.TEMP: 55.4 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 31.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 21 278 4210
5/19 MAX.TEMP: 58.1 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 36.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 17 284.7 3707
5/20 MAX.TEMP: 45.5 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 31.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 26 192 2191
5/21
MAX.TEMP: 69.8 MAX.SOLAR: 364.1
MIN.TEMP: 23 MAX.TOTAL SOLAR: 4998
MIN.TOTAL SOLAR: 953


DATE TIME TEMP (F) SOLAR
5/21 MAX.TEMP: 44.6 MAX SOLAR: 211.8
MIN.TEMP: 33.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 1747
5/22 MAX.TEMP: 47.3 MAX SOLAR: 238.3
MIN.TEMP: 35.6 TOTAL SOLAR: 2350 DEGREE DAYS = 23
5/23 MAX.TEMP: 53.6 MAX SOLAR: 158.9
MIN.TEMP: 34.7 TOTAL SOLAR: 1986 DEGREE DAYS = 20
5/24 MAX.TEMP: 59.9 MAX SOLAR: 258.2
MIN.TEMP: 39.2 TOTAL SOLAR: 3210 DEGREE DAYS = 15
5/25 MAX.TEMP: 60.8 MAX SOLAR: 271.4
MIN.TEMP: 43.7 TOTAL SOLAR: 2892 DEGREE DAYS = 12
5/26 MAX.TEMP: 53.6 MAX SOLAR: 192
MIN.TEMP: 43.7 TOTAL SOLAR: 2157 DEGREE DAYS = 16
5/27 MAX.TEMP: 54.5 MAX SOLAR: 198.6
MIN.TEMP: 41 TOTAL SOLAR: 2277 DEGREE DAYS = 17
5/28 MAX.TEMP: 57.2 MAX SOLAR: 304.5
MIN.TEMP: 41 TOTAL SOLAR: 2866 DEGREE DAYS = 15
5/29 MAX.TEMP: 63.5 MAX SOLAR: 331
MIN.TEMP: 42.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 3872 DEGREE DAYS = 11
5/30 MAX.TEMP: 65.3 MAX SOLAR: 344.2
MIN.TEMP: 44.6 TOTAL SOLAR: 3369
DEGREE DAYS = 10
1ATE
5/31 MAX.TEMP: 60.
MIN.TEMP: 41.<
DEGREE DAYS =
6/1 MAX.TEMP: 64. -
MIN.TEMP: 42.
DEGREE DAYS =
6/2 MAX.TEMP: 62.
MIN.TEMP: 40.
DEGREE DAYS =
6/3 MAX.TEMP: 50.1
MIN.TEMP: 38.
DEGREE DAYS =
6/4 MAX.TEMP: 62.
MIN.TEMP: 38.:
DEGREE DAYS =
6/5 MAX. TEMP: 67.1 MAX
MIN. TEMP: 33.8 MAX
9 MAX SOLAR:
3 TOTAL SOLAR: 20
i TOTAL SOLAR: 14
MIN.TOTAL SOLAR:
311.1
5084
311.1
4825
238. 3 2283
178.7
1827
311.1
5216
344. 2
5216
1827


DATE
6/5
6/6
6/7
6/8
6/9
6/10
6/11
6/12
6/13
6/14
6/15
TIME TEMP (F) SOLAR
MAX.TEMP: 70.7 MAX SOLAR: 205.2
MIN.TEMP: 52.7 TOTAL SOLAR: 1145
MAX.TEMP: 73.4 MAX SOLAR: 304.5
MIN.TEMP: 53.6 TOTAL SOLAR: 4276 DEGREE DAYS = 1
MAX.TEMP: 73.4 MAX SOLAR: 311.1
MIN.TEMP: 51.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 4706 DEGREE DAYS = 2
MAX.TEMP: 74.3 MAX SOLAR: 331
MIN.TEMP: 50.9 TOTAL SOLAR: 4878 DEGREE DAYS = 2
MAX.TEMP: 66.2 MAX SOLAR: 278
MIN.TEMP: 48.2 TOTAL SOLAR: 3740 DEGREE DAYS = 7
MAX.TEMP: 69.8 MAX SOLAR: 357.5
MIN.TEMP: 47.3 TOTAL SOLAR: 4395 DEGREE DAYS = 6
/MAX.TEMP: 74.3 MAX SOLAR: 317.8
MIN.TEMP: 45.5 TOTAL SOLAR: 5461 DEGREE DAYS = 5
MAX.TEMP: 68.9 MAX SOLAR: 311.1
MIN.TEMP: 39.2 TOTAL SOLAR: 4455 DEGREE DAYS = 10
MAX.TEMP: 47.3 MAX SOLAR: 297.9
MIN.TEMP: 28.4 TOTAL SOLAR: 3713 DEGREE DAYS = 27
MAX.TEMP: 42.8 MAX SOLAR: 337.6
MIN.TEMP: 24.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 4223 DEGREE DAYS =31
MAX.TEMP: 57.2 MAX SOLAR: 331
MIN.TEMP: 28.4 TOTAL SOLAR: 5441
DEGREE DAYS = 22
6/16 MAX.TEMP: 68.9 MAX SOLAR: 317.8
MIN.TEMP: 39.2 TOTAL SOLAR: 5395 DEGREE DAYS = 10
6/17 MAX.TEMP: 59.9 MAX SOLAR: 311.1
MIN.TEMP: 40.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 5322 DEGREE DAYS = 15
6/18 MAX.TEMP: 67.1 MAX SOLAR: 311.1
MIN.TEMP: 41.9 TOTAL SOLAR: 4871 DEGREE DAYS = 10
6/19 MAX.TEMP: 70.7 MAX SOLAR: 311.1
MIN.TEMP: 49.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 5500 DEGREE DAYS = 5
6/20 MAX.TEMP: 76.1 MAX SOLAR: 317.8
MIN.TEMP: 52.7 TOTAL SOLAR: 5382 DEGREE DAYS = 0
6/21 MAX.TEMP: 70.7 MAX SOLAR: 311.1
MIN.TEMP: 50 TOTAL SOLAR: 5441 DEGREE DAYS = 4
6/22 MAX.TEMP: 80.6 MAX SOLAR: 317.8
MIN.TEMP: 50 TOTAL SOLAR: 5540 DEGREE DAYS = -1
6/23 MAX.TEMP: 77 MAX SOLAR: 311.1
MIN.TEMP: 56.3 TOTAL SOLAR: 5249 DEGREE DAYS = -2
6/24 MAX.TEMP: 78.8 MAX SOLAR: 317.8
MIN.TEMP: 51.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 5487 DEGREE DAYS = -1
6/25
MAX.TEMP: 83.3 MAX.SOLAR: 357.5
MIN.TEMP: 24.8 MAX.TOTAL SOLAR: 5540
MIN.TOTAL SOLAR: 3713


DATE 6/25 TIME TEMP (F) SOLAR MAX.TEMP: 83.3 MAX SOLAR: 99.3 MIN.TEMP: 64.4 TOTAL SOLAR: 350
6/26 MAX.TEMP: 82.4 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 61.7 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -8 291.3 3905
6/27 MAX.TEMP: 75.2 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 57.2 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -2 244.9 2548
6/28 MAX.TEMP: 71.6 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 52.7 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 2 324.4 4852
6/29 MAX.TEMP: 77.9 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 52.7 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -1 344.2 4706
6/30 MAX.TEMP: 78.8 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 54.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -2 384 5017
7/1 MAX.TEMP: 71.6 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 52.7 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 2 311. 1 2462
7/2 MAX.TEMP: 68 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 46.4 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 7 317.8 2819
7/3 MAX.TEMP: 73.4 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 51.8 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 2 317.8 4985
7/4 MAX.TEMP: 77.9 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 52.7 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -1 317.8 5507
7/5 MAX.TEMP: 83.3 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 56.3 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -5 311.1 4944
7/6 MAX.TEMP: 79.7 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 63.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -7
7/7 MAX.TEMP: 76.1 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 50 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 1
7/8 MAX.TEMP: 77.9 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 41 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 5
7/9 MAX.TEMP: 76.1 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 57.2 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -2
7/10 MAX.TEMP: 77 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 54.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -1
7/11 MAX.TEMP: 77.9 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 56.3 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -3
7/12 MAX.TEMP: 73.4 MAX-SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 58.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -1
7/13 MAX.TEMP: 77.9 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 56.3 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -3
7/14 MAX.TEMP: 77 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 50 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 1
7/15 MAX.TEMP: 77.9 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 50 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 1
7/16
MAX.TEMP: 83.3 MAX.SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 41 MAX.TOTAL SOLAR:
324.4
4395
317.8
5051
311.1
5156
344.2
3131
350. 9 4369
284.7
4726
311.1
3336
331
4951
304.5 4395
317.8
4819
384
5507


DATE 7/16 TIME TEMP (F) SOLAR MAX.TEMP: 61.7 MAX SOLAR: 79.4 MIN. TEMP: 54.5 TOTAL SOLAR: 172'
7/17 MAX.TEMP: 75.2 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 51.8 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 1 324.4 4355
7/18 MAX.TEMP: 77 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 54.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -1 311.1 4276
7/19 MAX.TEMP: 82.4 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 51.8 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -3 317.8 5388
7/20 MAX.TEMP: 82.4 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 59 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -6 311.1 5275
7/21 MAX.TEMP: 82.4 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 54.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -4 304.5 5262
7/22 MAX.TEMP: 79.7 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 54.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -3 317.8 4872
7/23 MAX.TEMP: 83.3 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 59 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -7 331 5057
7/24 MAX.TEMP: 76.1 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 57.2 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -2 284.7 2952
7/25 MAX.TEMP: 76.1 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 53.6 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 0 317.8 4740
7/26 MAX.TEMP: 66.2 MAX SOLAR: MIN.TEMP: 43.7 TOTAL SOLAR: 264.8 2786
DEGREE DAYS = 10
7/27 MAX.TEMP: 72.5 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 44.6 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 6
7/28 MAX.TEMP: 78.8 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 51.8 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -1
7/29 MAX.TEMP: 80.6 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 60.8 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -6
7/30 MAX.TEMP: 78.8 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 59 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -4
7/31 MAX.TEMP: 81.5 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 59.9 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -6
8/1 MAX.TEMP: ,81.5 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 58.1 TOTAL SOLAR; DEGREE DAYS = -5
8/2 MAX.TEMP: 81.5 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 59 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -6
8/3 MAX.TEMP: 82.4 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 60.8 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -7
8/4 MAX.TEMP: 81.5 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 59 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -6
8/5 MAX.TEMP: 82.4 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 58.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -6
8/6
MAX.TEMP: 83.3 MAX.SOLAR:
M1IM.TFMP: 43.7 MAX-TOTAI RDI flR:
311.1
5189
311.1
5236
311.1
4865
317.8
4634
304.5
5156
317.8
4912
304.5
5097
311.1
5150
304.5
5137
311.1
5203
331
=;3nn


DATE TIME TEMP (F) SOLAR
8/6 MAX.TEMP: 82.4 MAX SOLAR: 304.5
MIN.TEMP: 59.9 TOTAL SOLAR: 3813
8/7 MAX.TEMP: 81.5 MAX SOLAR: 304.5
MIN.TEMP: 48.2 DEGREE DAYS = TOTAL SOLAR: 0 5044
8/8 MAX.TEMP: 82;4 MAX SOLAR: 317.8
MIN.TEMP: 56.3 TOTAL SOLAR: 4746
DEGREE DAYS = 5
8/9 MAX.TEMP: 79.7 MAX SOLAR: 297. 9
MIN.TEMP: 45.5 TOTAL SOLAR: 4845
DEGREE DAYS = : n
8/10 MAX.TEMP: 64.4 MAX SOLAR: 172. 1
MIN.TEMP: 48.2 TOTAL SOLAR: 1495
DEGREE DAYS = 8
8/11 MAX.TEMP: 63.5 MAX SOLAR: 211.8
MIN.TEMP: 45.5 TOTAL SOLAR: 2032
DEGREE DAYS = 10
8/12 MAX.TEMP: 70.7 MAX SOLAR: 258. 2
MIN.TEMP: 49.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 2357
DEGREE DAYS = 5
8/13 MAX.TEMP: 65.3 MAX SOLAR: 205.2
MIN.TEMP: 49.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 1972
DEGREE DAYS = 7
8/14 MAX.TEMP: 73.4 MAX SOLAR: 297.9
MIN.TEMP: 49.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 4051
DEGREE DAYS = -T
8/15 MAX. TEMP: 76.1 MAX SOLAR: 311.1
MIN.TEMP: 50.9 TOTAL SOLAR: 4150
DEGREE DAYS = 1
8/16 MAX.TEMP: 77 MAX SOLAR: 311.1
MIN.TEMP: 54.5 TOTAL SOLAR: 4369
DEGREE DAYS = -1
8/17 MAX.TEMP: 78.8 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 53.6 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -2
8/18 MAX.TEMP: 79.7 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 55.4 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -3
8/19 MAX.TEMP: 74.3 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 53.6 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 1
8/20 MAX.TEMP: 77 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 55.4 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -2
8/21 MAX.TEMP: 76.1 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 49.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 2
8/22 MAX.TEMP: 77.9 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 50.9 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 0
8/23 MAX.TEMP: 78.8 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 55.4 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS =.-3
8/24 MAX.TEMP: 77 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 48.2 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = 2
8/25 MAX.TEMP: 87.8 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 58.1 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -8
8/26 MAX.TEMP: 96.8 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 56.3 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -12
8/27
MAX.TEMP: 96.8 MAX.SOLAR:
MTKI TCMP . =; MAY TDTAI CHI AO.
304.5
4567
311.1
4025
304.5 4574
350. 9 3918
284.7
3409
231.7 2998
231.7
2700
291.3
4415
317.8
3138
350.9


DATE TIME TEMP (F) SOLAR
9/1 MAX.TEMPs 87.8 MAX SOLAR: 211.8
MIN.TEMP: 49.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 880
9/2 MAX.TEMP: 86 MAX SOLAR: 225.1
MIN.TEMP: 42.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 2760 DEGREE DAYS = 0
9/3 MAX.TEMP: 107.6MAX SOLAR: 291.3
MIN.TEMP: 41.9 TOTAL SOLAR: 4137
DEGREE DAYS = -10
9/4 MAX.TEMP: 104.9MAX SOLAR: 278
MIN.TEMP: 44.6 TOTAL SOLAR: 4150
DEGREE DAYS = -10
9/5 MAX.TEMP: 57.2 MAX SOLAR: 39.7
MIN.TEMP: 40.1 TOTAL SOLAR: 403 DEGREE DAYS =16
9/6 MAX.TEMP: 51.8 MAX SOLAR: 66.2
MIN.TEMP:-39.2 TOTAL SOLAR: 688 DEGREE DAYS = 19
9/7 MAX.TEMP: 67.1 MAX SOLAR: 192
MIN.TEMP: 45.5 TOTAL SOLAR: 1694 DEGREE DAYS = 8
9/8 MAX.TEMP: 77.9 MAX SOLAR: 211.8
MIN.TEMP: 42.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 2429 DEGREE DAYS = 4
9/9 MAX.TEMP: 93.2 MAX SOLAR: 297.9
MIN.TEMP: 42.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 2621 DEGREE DAYS = -3
9/10 MAX.TEMP: 81.5 MAX SOLAR: 231.7
MIN.TEMP: 42.8 TOTAL SOLAR: 2661 DEGREE DAYS = 2
9/11 MAX.TEMP: 97.7 MAX SOLAR: 297.9
MIN.TEMP: 41 TOTAL SOLAR: 3329
DEGREE DAYS = -5
9/12 MAX.TEMP: 98.6 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 41.9 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -6
9/13 MAX.TEMP: 97.7 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 41 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -5
9/14 MAX.TEMP: 95 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 39.2 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -3
9/15 MAX.TEMP: 99.5 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 37.4 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -4
9/16 MAX.TEMP: 98.6 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 37.4 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -3
9/17 MAX.TEMP: 101.3MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 41.9 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -7
9/18 MAX.TEMP: 101.3MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 39.2 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -6
9/19 MAX.TEMP: 98.6 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 41.9 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -6
9/20 MAX.TEMP: 97.7 MAX SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 36.5 TOTAL SOLAR: DEGREE DAYS = -3
9/21
MAX.TEMP: 107.6 MAX.SOLAR:
MIN.TEMP: 36.5 MAX.TOTAL SOLAR:
MIN.TOTAL SOLAR:
284.7
3455
284.7
2879
264.8
3846
271.4
3574
264.8
3813
258.2
3766
258.2
3760
264.8
3462
251.6
3508
297. 9
4150
403


PROGRAM
The program is organized into the lodge facilities, unit facilities, and parking.
Lodge
Food Service Bar, Dining, Coffee Shop, Kitchen, Fast Food
Retail Stein Sport, Skate Shop, Variety Store, Health Club, Hair Stylist, Game Room, Ski Lockers and Shop, Vending
Hotel Operation Front Desk/Administrati on, Housekeeping/Dock/Garage/
Storage, Employees Lockers, Conference Room/Storage, Bell Captain/Luggage/Lobbies, Stairs/ Toilets/Lounges, Halls/Vestibules Corridors.
Units
Two bedroom units
Three Bedroom units
Parking
Underground


SPACE TYPE ^4_Lxe>- bafl
UNIT FUNCTION uqu&r. SEfLs/ic-E. NO. UNITS <2-
SQ. FOOTAGE m-isoos,-. "i-eoc**-
USERS quests 4 pay -ski&pls USER ACTIVITIES PR-is4Kii^^4-eAT-i^6*
MANAGEMENT f%?o seflv^ SERI VICES ppE.fAR>ric?Kj of pR-injks,
5ER.VI^ PR.I M<-5> AMP
ENVIRONMENT ISC>6> ^> F iKJsiPE.NAie.M, £06.Y,
Mrr^ iiFe vie m
gOO 3.F. OUT^ipE- -IhYElDE, vieiaJ. 3LJ-N,
MATERIALS is^oPo, -Hu-E ,
/^PET'/ ISfc-AiiS*,
CODES oc^jpf^cx uoap - ie>^>
E.XHITS MAIM >IC5E. B'ALP'aNY £ PAKJI^ H-UvJ.
PROGRAM
ADJACENCIES
OBJECTIVES
- MAKE UTAH U£ZLU>fL LAM N^T
SEEM 50 STfLAH^iE.


PROGRAM
SPACE TYPE ADJACENCIES
UNIT FUNCTION piMiMta ^eatin^ NO. UNITS 1
SQ. FOOTAGE 2.2^
USERS £ne-sns. 4. pay ^skiei^ USER ACTIVITIES SAT*N6
MANAGEMENT fzops> z_e
SERI VICES PRJ= PAfcATIpiS AMD
4 SE-B~'V lC. E2. Of= F^op
ENVIRONMENT CL&AAsnr THtpe OBJECTIVES
MgAL piKUM^j. VIE.IM riCR-£ Pfc-lVATT- -E^cEPTI
/ G2JJ.IET, PEJ£--^N4AU
MATERIALS lA^op y sros4&^Tii_e t ^ARJ>ETT, &R-A^5>
CODES piUiPAH^v lp^d -
EXHIT> MAIM, 6lPE,&AU^NV 4-PAJslIC- H.Psl.


PROGRAM
SPACE TYPE ^)FEE SHOP
UNIT FUNCTION FOOD SEKW|^.E
NO. UNITS 'I
SQ. FOOTAGE
USERS ^juesrns. t PAY ^KIFP-S>
USER ACTIVITIES e*u=A4-n AMP7 -£M Al_l_^.Fe_ t?HVIEfc5
MANAGEMENT SERIVICES fcypc? SEftV £_E.
ENVIRONMENT &cOO SEXVIZ1E . ie^i_^vc^Q 3 m&au 6PEM ,V/|E1I^
MATERIALS h^o t^oNE/ T'L-e.,
CODES <^^u_u=v\n-4£_.y \L>o
£*HrTi> MA.IN4 t>lOE. rv\u?Mc,v
PAM 16-
ADJACENCIES
view
T
OBJECTIVES
- 6JOOO ^EV(6£/ g.EUAoc^C?y 65F>£M NAC5T' H6>Ufc^,


PROGRAM
SPACE TYPE Fast R£p UNIT FUNCTION Raop (T^ePAi^TiOH NO. UNITS 1
SQ. FOOTAGE
USERS i pay skiers
USER ACTIVITIES
MANAGEMENT fwd >e(avi^-E SERI VICES *=c?oc>
ENVIRONMENT Fast ,^nyieh&mt AEAN
MATERIALS i^oc?c>J tiiE., pr.v pvjauu
ADJACENCIES
Krrc-MeH
OBJECTIVES
- FAi>T ^ERVI^r-
CODES £V£*-U=ANd>/ UCAD \-7
gXMlTt, P4AJ


PROGRAM
SPACE TYPE kitten UNIT FUNCTION f-Oc?v> pr-EParaTion NO. UNITS l
SQ. FOOTAGE ^3^
USERS EMPu^yees
USER ACTIVITIES feed pREPARATicn
MANAGEMENT -^eR-vi^e.
SERIVICES
ENVIRONMENT
KU?P-K
MATERIALS metal AeUE.
ADJACENCIES
U7AP lKX<£i OO^K
T

OBJECTIVES
- EFFI6J EMTUAVDUT C>^RJ s-lfci
Apj AxC-Ei^l I
- PaP-T^ PI pl-taWUl/V^-flA &Ev/ERA6iE, "STOf^A^E OFFICE HWt SERVICE UXKEf^
CODES h^c> FiR-e EXTHrrs MAjtS R-E/AP-


PROGRAM
SPACE TYPE SR9RTS SHOP UNIT FUNCTION RjeTAiU
NO. UNITS 1
SQ. FOOTAGE "\ODo
USERS <^l_lF--SfPS t PAY -S>KIBPS USER ACTIVITIES P-etttmu. purchase
MANAGEMENT PP-iv>srE SERI VICES ^>aue<. Rrr^>
E^LWPrl^-hJT-
ADJACENCIES
L-£>APfW
ENVIRONMENT s>aues 4 service
OBJECTIVES p/Merr r^ttai i , /
MATERIALS i^joOo Tii_e x oR-x- ujal-v-.,
^E-PET
CODES (Pcxxi.pa
e*HIT5> M/Mrs


PROGRAM
SPACE TYPE :sk>AT"£ shop UNIT FUNCTION klehwil-NO. UNITS 1
SQ. FOOTAGE 575
USERS AR.EA 6UESTS
USER ACTIVITIES r,et>vii_ pllp^H^-se
MANAGEMENT PRJvs SERIVICES
ADJACENCIES

ENVIRONMENT 4 OBJECTIVES
-PAK.T<, - :b>TDfL>VLqE-, PFH-LE
MATERIALS kiwp,
CODES m?aq -
^XKlT^ MAJNJl ^ (LEAR.


PROGRAM
SPACE TYPE VARIETY >H£>R UNIT FUNCTION Rjsn-^i*
NO. UNITS 1
SQ. FOOTAGE 333
USERS ^liE.'J^Ts USER ACTIVITIES P-ETTAIl_
MANAGEMENT pR-iVACm. SERIVICES
ADJACENCIES
UCV4>lMt7
Z>&CK
EL.

ENVIRONMENT OBJECTIVES
- parts R-ETTAI l, / tt>Rj\£*e. / MATERIALS \^\ooo,T|L-E PR.T WAU-
^LAp_PC£n~
CODES o^lxPan^-V i_r^c> i£> E*HIT- Maih


PROGRAM
SPACE TYPE HEAL-Tm ^lu&
ADJACENCIES
UNIT FUNCTION Evcer^is>e annlp RJ=ULfEEATl£>Nl
NO. UNITS -i
SQ. FOOTAGE 2J2&0
USERS ^jUE^-T^>
USER ACTIVITIES fis.KpsiOLrs>&
MANAGEMENT HCTEu SERI VICES
LQ^PlM^
c?\xrr-^* T>E
ENVIRONMENT healthv, per^omal
&E-R-VIL-E*
MATERIALS Usi£7£>c> T*ile-, t>-V l*ja.lL-
OBJECTIVES
-C*OOZ> E>Ef^s/IL_6:
-PACTS- LT>£J E.HZTU4LKT5 ^AiONA tsP/K, MULTI -PLLR-P<5EE, R~M .
R.M. MASA^iE., ^aou- Coi_rrf>ioE^
CODES l-p/^p 1^*
ExHirs Maim , cPurr-^ipe_


PROGRAM
SPACE TYPE hWIR- STYLIST
UNIT FUNCTION NO. UNITS 1
SQ. FOOTAGE
USERS £=ju.&-srr"
USER ACTIVITIES
MANAGEMENT private SERIVICES
ADJACENCIES

ENVIRONMENT
MATERIALS til-e., csR-Y p4>**u__
OBJECTIVES
-Partts^- :sAL£*?rvjy
CODES (PlSPANt,'< - iD
P

PROGRAM
SPACE TYPE iz-oow
UNIT FUNCTION [2m^ rllm i NO. UNITS 1
SQ. FOOTAGE
USERS ^iLLE-tSTS. 4- PAY skiEK^ USER ACTIVITIES
MANAGEMENT h^tel SERI VICES MA.ii->rr/A.NAiS^&
ADJACENCIES
ENVIRONMENT fun ^-ity
OBJECTIVES
-P/ARmS - , i5Tr^fc_>v^=,E_/ £?FFt - OUR-ABUE
MATERIALS uJE?c?p-y T'u_e:/ p>fly WAU
CODES Ot^UPAH^V UjC>a.i> 2.0
^HITS MAvl


PROGRAM
SPACE TYPE s>Kl £
AU.E.'STrs => UNIT FUNCTION *s^Al_e ^ A4Ho
S&R-VI^£ .
NO. UNITS *1 SQ. FOOTAGE 15 USERS ^ujb^ts £ p*n.y ^kiek.^ USER ACTIVITIES Retail,
AKID SKI fTRDR^AAE
MANAGEMENT h^s.l SERI VICES m>^imt>sP-4>a.ivj^.e.
ADJACENCIES
ENVIRONMENT SKI AT||2_& ^>hajsa£-
OBJECTIVES
EFF|(LJ£NT F-U^tJ
- PARTS \~OCJ£EJtJ=> 5>|-nri SPA^
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BUILDING
DESIGN GUIDELINES CODE


In this section the Deer Valley Design Guide lines will be outlined. Stein's Lodge will be bu under the Uniform Building Code (1979) and the Park City Land Management Code (P.C.L.MC.).
Deer Valley Design Guidelines
This report was prepared for Deer Valley Resort by Mackensy, Holmsy, Dodge, and Davis Architects of San Fransisco, California. In the general section, I described the major concept of the guidelines. These guidelines are an indepth 68 page graphically illustrated comprehensive document. This is the table of contents.
SITE DEVELOPMENT: CONSIDERATION OF EXISTING
LAND FORM
Site Evaluation
Preservation of Existing Land Forms Preservation of Existing Site Vegetation Preservation of Significant Views
SITE DEVELOPMENT: GROUPING OF BUILDINGS
Location of Construction Predominant Roof Shape Roof Ridge Alignment Screening Service Areas Sunlit Exterior Spaces Night Lighting
BUILDING
EXTERIOR BUILDING DESIGN: MASSING
Building Follows Contours
Continuing the Lower Wall to the Ground
Scale of Buildings
EXTERIOR BUILDING DESIGN: ROOFS
Roof Slopes
Roof Shape
Roof Overhangs
Roof Assembly
Roof Surfacing Material
Roof Appurtenances
EXTERIOR BUILDING DESIGN: WALLS
Protected Lower Wall
Upper Wall Materials
Number of Wall Materials
Wall Openings
Color Palette
Windows
Door Openings
Arcades
Wall Appurtenances
ACOUSTICS
Acoustics: Prologue Building Layouts Airborne Sound Control Impact Isolation Plumbing Noise
Forced-Air Heating and Cooling Systems


BUILDING
Appliance Noise Trash Chutes
Acoustical Environment in Corridors and Public Places Construction
LANDSCAPE: PLANTING
General Site Character
Revegetation
Massi ng
Solar Orientation and Preservation of View Corridors Wildfire Management Irri gation
LANDSCAPE: CONSTRUCTION
Grading
Drainage
Paving: Roads, Paths, and Other Surfaces Walls and Fences Landscape Structures Site Furnishings
APPENDIX
Trees, Shrubs, Wildflowers/Forbs, and Grasses Common to the Deer Valley Resort Area
I have used it through out this report and it will be a valuable design tool.


BUILDING
CODE
APPLICABLE BUILDING CODE UNIFORM BUILDING CODE 1979
USE OCCUPANCY DIVISION SO. FT. SQ. FT./ OCCUPANT LOAD
GROUP OCCUPANT
1. Hotel Rooms
2 B.R. R 1 1800 200 9
3 B.R. R 1 2200 200 9
2. Club A 3 1200 15 80
. Bar A 3 2300 15 153
Dining A 3 2400 15 160
Kitchen 2300 200 12
Fast Food B 2 250
3. Retail
Sport Shop B 2 1000 30 34
Skate Shop B 2 600 30 20
Variety Shop B 2 300 30 10
Health Club B 2 2000 15 134
Hair Stylist B 2 300 30 10
Game Room B 2 600 30 20
Ski Lockers B 2 1300 30 44
And Shop
Vending B 2 250 30 9
4. Hotel R 1
Operations
Front Desk R 1 2000 100 20
Administration
Housekeeping R 1 2900 100 29
Dock, Garage
Storage
Employees R 1 600 50 12
Locker
Conference, A 3 2500 15 167
Board Room, Storage


BUILDING
APPLICABLE BUILDING CODE UNIFORM BUILDING CODE 1979
USE OCCUPANCY DIVISION
GROUP
Bell Captain, R 1
Luggage
Lobbies, Stairs Toilets, Lounges,
Halls, Vestibules,
Corridors
5. Underground Parking
CODE
SQ. FT. SQ. FT./ OCCUPANT LOAD OCCUPANT
300 100 3
8000 2500
50000
200
250


BUILDING
APPLICABLE BUILDING CODE UNIFORM BUILDING CODE 1979
TOPIC CODE LOCATION
Occupance Group Table 5-A
Building Type Construction Section 2106
Floor Area Table 5C 505 b
506 a.2 506 c
Building Height Table 5D 4.7.6 P.C.L.C.
Wall And Opening Protection Table 5 A
Table 5 A
Table 5 A
CODE
REQUIREMENTS
Group R Division 1 Group A Division 3 Group B Division 2
Type IV, Heavy Timber
13.500 S.F.
27.000 S.F.
13.500 S.F.
27.000 S.F.
81.000 S.F.
Four Stories
No Structure shall be erected to a height greater than 28 FT.
Basic Allowable Area Area of Building Over One Story
Separation on Three Sides Automatic Sprinkler System Total Allowable Area
Group R-l
Fire Resistance of Exterior Walls.
One hour less than 5 FT. of property line. Openings in Exterior Walls. Not Permitted less than 5 FT. of property line.
Group A-3
Fire Resistance of Exterior Wall. Two hours less than 5 FT., one hour elsewhere. Openings in Exterior Wall.
Not permitted less than 5 FT., protected less than 10 FT.
Group B-2
Fire Resistance of Exterior Wall One hour less than 20 FT. Openings in Exterior Walls. Not permitted less than 5 FT., protected 1 than 10 FT.