Citation
Urban renewal plan in North Capitol Hill, Denver, Colorado

Material Information

Title:
Urban renewal plan in North Capitol Hill, Denver, Colorado
Creator:
Ishizaka, Mashashi
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
62 leaves : illustrations (including 1 color), maps, plans (some color) ; 22 x 36 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Urban renewal -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
City planning -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Neighborhoods -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
City planning ( fast )
Neighborhoods ( fast )
Urban renewal ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Urban and Regional Planning and Community Development, College of Environmental Design.
Statement of Responsibility:
prepared by Mashashi Ishizaka.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
28010840 ( OCLC )
ocm28010840
Classification:
LD1190.A78 1981 .I83 ( lcc )

Full Text
VC
ISHIzAK A
URBAN RENEWAL PLAN
NORTH CAPITOL HILL,
DENVER, COLORADO
PREPARED BY:
MASASHI ISHIZAKA
- a


URBAN RENEWAL PLAN IN NORTH CAPITOL HILL
DENVER, COLORADO
PREPARED BY MASASHI ISHIZAKA
PREPARED FOR PLANNING STUDIO 3 AS AN EXIT REQUIREMENT FOR A MASTERS DEGREE OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER,COLLEGE -OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
AUG. 1981


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
I. INTRODUCTION 1
- The Purpose 1
- The Planning Area & Limitation 2
of the Urban Renewal Plan
- The Goals . 2
II. THE DESIGN PROCESS FOR THE URBAN 6
RENEWAL PLAN
III. THE DATA AND SITE SURVEY ANALYSIS 10
- Population 10
- Crime 11
- Residences 12
- Land Use 12
- Transportation 13
- Existing Buildings 13
- Ownership 14
- Community Facilities 14
- Mountain View Ordinance & Zonings 14
Page
V. DEVELOPING THE URBAN RENEWAL PLAN 35
- Concept Plan 35
- Alternatives 1, 2, & 3 37
- Proposed Plan 37
VI. EVALUATION 47
- Evaluation of Proposed Plan 47
- Conclusion 50
BIBLIOGRAPHY 54
APPENDIX: DENVER STREET TREE PLANNING, GENERAL PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION OF ZONE DISTRICTS CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER, MOUNTAIN VIEW ORDINANCE FOR CITY PARK AND NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM
IV
THE PROBLEMS, THE OBJECTIVES AND THE ASSETS
33


LIST OF FIGS
PAGE
FIG. 1 THE DESIGN PROCESS 9
FIG. 2 POPULATION IN NORTH CAPITOL HILL 16
FIG. 3 POPULATION STATISTICS IN THE SUB AREA 1 16
FIG. 4 HOUSEHOLD PORJLATION ANALYSIS III THE SUB AREA 1 17
FIG. 5 MULTI-FAMILY HOUSE ANALYSIS IN THE SUB AREA 1 17
FIG. 6 LAND USE ANALYSIS BETWEEN 19U0 AND 18
1961
FIG. 7 OWNERSHIP ANALYSIS IN THE PLANNING AREA 19
FIG. 8 MOUNTAIN VIEW PICTURE 20
FIG. 9 THE COMPARISON TABLE FOR ALTERNATIVES 1, 2 AND 3. 39
FIG. 10 THE PROPOSED PLAN REDEVELOPMENT STATISTICS 52
FIG. 11 THE DESIGN ELEMENT 53
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The efforts of the following people were greatly helpful for the study of the Urban Renewal Plan in North Capitol Hill.
I would like to thank them for their kind suggestions and advice.
- H. H. Smith Director, Professor* University of
Colorado, Denver
- David Hill Professor, University of Colorado,
Denver
- Thomas Clarke Architect, Member of O.M.N.I.
(Organization for Midtown Neighborhood Improvement)
- Bob Horn Director, Northeast Denver Neighbor-
hood Development Center
Specially, I would like to pay my personal appreciation to Mr. David Hill who is my thesis advisor, and to Mr. Thomas Clarke for my thesis Urban Renewal Plan.


LIST OF D RAWINGS
NO. DWG. NAME OF DWG. PAGE NO. DWG. NAME OF DWG. PAGE
DWG. NO. 1 VICINITY MAP 4 DWG. NO. 10 1981 LAND USE MAP 30
DWG. NO. 1-A VICINITY AERIAL MAP 5 DWG. NO. 11 EXISTING BLDG CONDITION 31
DWG. NO. 2 / THE COMMUNITY FACILITY MAP 21 DWG. NO. 12 EXISTING AERIAL MAP 32
DWG. NO. 3 THE DISTRICT MAP "AROUND THE PLANNING AREA'* 22 DWG. NO. 13 STUDY OF REDEVELOPED AREAS ( 40
DWG. NO. 3-A IMPACT ANALYSIS 23 DWG. NO. 14 CONCEPT PLAN 41
DWG. NO. 4 1925 ZONING MAP 24 DWG. MO. 15 ALTERNATIVE 1 42
DWG. NO. 5 1956 ZONING MAP 25 DWG. NO. 16 ALTERNATIVE 2* 43
DWG. NO. 6 1981 ZONING MAP 26 DWG. NO. 17 ALTERNATIVE 3 44
DWG. NO. 7 TRANSPORTATION ANALYSIS 27 DWG. NO. 18 PROPOSED PLAN 45
DWG. NO. 8 PUBLIC PARKING MAP 28 DWG. NO. 19 PROPOSED AERIAL MAP 46
DWG. MO. 9 19UO LAND USE MAP 29


CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION
I
THE PURPOSE
The purpose of this report is to provide the following elements.
- To study Urban Renewal Plan techniques such as methodologies, design process, architectural design solution, etc.
- To achieve an adequate Urban Renewal Plan in N. C. H.
(North Capitol Hill) Denver.
It seems to me that it is time to design an adequate urban renewal plan in N. C. H. In terms of community development as well as urban concerns N. C. H. has been faced with urban problems such as physical and social issues; N. C. H. has one foot in the grave. I.really have intense feelings about it. Finally, I have attempted to deal with planning primarily concerned about the functional and visual relationships between people and their physical environment including social concerns, and the design philosophy in which those relationships must be improved consciously.


THE PLANNING AREA & LIMITATION OF THE URBAN RENEWAL PLAN
North Capitol Hill is situated to the east of the downtown Commercial Business District (CBD). The Urban Renewal Plan in the area is bounded on the west by Broadway, on the east by Pennsylvania St., on the south by l6th Ave. and on the north by 18th Ave., within sub-area 1 in the N. C. H. There are about A/C in total area.
N. C. H., basically, has two different characteristics in the planning area ( See Dwg. No. 1 &1-A)
- Commercial and business are as CBD located immediately to the east of downtown, from Broadway to Sherman St.
- Offices, residentials (Multi-Family) and retails are next to each other in the rest of the areafrom Sherman St. to Pennsylvania St.
I hereby would like to emphasize that in order to design an adequate urban renewal plan in the area, I have avoided using current ordinances ana other relevant regulations for the plan and have not paid attention to commericial considerations for the construction of buildings, facilities,
etc
THE GOALS
Basically, urban design should have four important elements as follows
- Transportation: public transportation, pedestrian ways, etc.
- Land use: building density, etc.
- The community facilities: open spaces, parks, public utilities, etc.
- Stimulating intensified economic activities
They must be integrated to create a more efficient urban renewal plan in cities or towns.
I have established the following items .as goals for an urban renewal plan in the area.
- To provide compatibility which expresses visual harmony between existing and redeveloped buildings including preservation buildings.
- To prepare diversity that designs mixed type build-
ing functions such as offices, hotels, apartments, retail , etc.
- To design sufficient environmental quality such as parks, open spaces, street improvement.


- To resolve the impacts caused by skyscraper buildings in the CBD.
- To provide effective transportation means as a network in the planning area such as pedestrian ways, bikeways, sufficient parking lots for both neighbors and visitors.
- To provide convenience such as work, home, shopping, public services.
- To provide social equity in education, recreation, employment, etc.
- To consider energy conservation such as passive solar energy as renewable resource.
- To provide people attractions such as plazas, amenity places.
- To design effective building density, gardens and recreation facilities on the roofs of redeveloped buildings.


4
LEGEND
Wk PLANNING AREA NORTH CAPITOL
500'

0 200 1000'
HI L L
2000'
13
-0, VtCtMtfY MKP




CHAPTER TWO
THE DESIGN PROCESS FOR THE URBAN RENEWAL PLAN
I
It seems to me that the design process for an urban renewal plan is one of the most significant factors. In other words, if we do not know about it, we will not carry out urban designs. Nowadays we have found out that complicated urban problems take place in cities and towns. I suppose the reason is that transportation, education, communication, professional fields, and living styles have been changing rapidly.
I have established the design process for the urban renewal plan (See Fig. 1 ). I have carried out the urban renewal plan in accordance with the design process and have achieved the proposed plan as an adequate solution.
DATA COLLECTION AND SITE SURVEY
Data collection consists of the following items.
- Population data (Census Tracts 26.01 and 26.02) Population in North Capitol Hill, Population statistics, etc.
- Crime report data (Monthly report of Denver Police Department).


Transportation data (Denver's Traffic Engineering Division).
Current ordinance dataZoning Ordinances, Mountain View Ordinance (Denver's Planning Office).
Public Facility data (Telephone directories, the Map of Denver, Public publications).
Real Estate Assessment Roll and Tax Warrant data a3 the Ownership study (Denver's Assessment Division as of 1980).
Relevant drawings related to North Capitol Hill and the downtown Denver
Relevant books and public publications related to North Capital Hill and downtown Denver.
Site survey consists of the following items
- Buildings and structures survey within the planning area'building by building.
- Parking lots survey
- Plantation surveytrees, grass, gardens.
- Street landscape survey.
- Taking pictures.
- Meeting neighbors who live in North Capitol Hill and visitors.
DATA AND SITE SURVEY ANALYSIS
After collecting necessary data and carrying out site survey, I analyzed them and I have made the drawings and figures such as land use, transportation, population trends, existing buildings condition in order to figure out the planning area as to what is going on.


DEFINE THE URBAN PROBLEMS AND THE OBJECTIVES
Based upon the drawings, the figures and data analysis I have found out the urban problems taking place in the planning area. Then I have established the objectives.
ESTABLISH THE GOALS
According to the objectives, I have established the goals for the urban renewal plan as suitable solutions.
DESIGN CONCEPT PLAN
I have designed the conoept plan for the planning area as per the goals. Based upon the concept plan I have designed three different ideas as alternatives.
I have chosen one alternative put of three according to comparison table (See Fig.9 ).
DESIGN PROPOSED PLAN
Based upon the one alternative selected, I have designed it more specifically. I have, finally, designed the proposed plan as a sketch design.
EVALUATE THE PROPOSED PLAN
I have evaluated the proposed plan in order to find out the result of the plan as a conclusion.


FIG. 1 THE
9
PROCESS


CHAPTER THREE
THE DATA AND SITE SURVEY ANALYSIS
I emphasize that people are the primary element for urban design as well as neighborhood community development. Depending upon the size of population, its composition and characteristics, urban designers should provide the overall dimensions of the physical environment and space needs for people.
Generally speaking, population trends in Denver metropol-tan area show population increasing yearly. On the other hand, population in North Capitol Hill tends to be decreasing rapidly. (See Fig. 2). I suppose people have been moving out to the suburbs because of unsuitable residential conditions in North Capitol Hill.
In terms of population concerns, I would say that North Capitol Hill is almost dead.
Population statistics in the Sub Area 1 between I960 and 1970 (See Fig. 3), tell us about the fact that the largest male group was the age of 25-3L in 1970 instead of the age of 55-6L as in I960. It is a very interesting fact. Over $0% of the whole population in Sub Area 1 are elderly people,


and elderly people tend to increase
Other population characteristics such as population breakdown, head of household are shown in Fig. 1*.
Crime is one of the serious urban problems occurring in North Capitol Hill. I have studied the monthly crime report for June 1981 published by the Denver Police department. As a result of the report, the following facts have been reported.
- In Denver, as of June 1981
Between 1980 & 1981
Class one offenses
**A serious crime** 20% increase
(especially Murder; an increase of 30%)
Class two offenses
"Misdemeanor" 1% increase
Total offenses 11$ increase
- In North Capitol Hill, (from Jan. 1981 to June 1981). North Capitol Hill occupies precincts 213 and 2ll* described in the crime report.. The Denver Police district is divided into 1* districts, and North Capitol Hill is sitxiated in #2 district.
Class One Offenses
No. of Precinct No. 213
211*
#2 District Average
(211-259)
Class Two Offenses No. of Precinct No. 213 211*
#2 District Average
(211~?59)
of Offenses
366
1*53
309
Major Offenses
Burglary (50$)
Grand Larceny (l6$)
Grand Larceny (32$) Burglary (31$)
Auto Theft (13$)
Burglary (51*$)
Grand Larceny (25$)
of Offenses
Major Offenses
1*75
Petty Larceny (67$)
31*6
223
Petty Larceny (63$) Malicious Mischief {11%)
Petty Larceny (55$) Malicious Mischief (26$)
One murder offense in North Capitol Hill has been reported since Jan. 1981.


Murder Offenses as of June 1961
No. of District No. of Murders %
#1 District 10 22%
#2 District (North Capitol Hill) 20 hh%
ft3 District 8 17%
8 17%
1|6 10b%~
Consequently, from Jan. 1981 to June 1981 crimes in Denver were on the rise. North Capital Hill has one of highest crime rates in Denver. Even though the population in North Capitol Hill is declining, the crime reported is increasing. Therefore, North Capitol Hiil will grow more and more worse.
RESIDENCE
There is no single residence in the planning. Single residences were, however, 12% of the whole land use in 19U0. As to Multi-Family residences, they tend to be decreasing; the facts are as follows (See Fig. 6).
12
In 19140 In 1981
33% of Whole Land Use 9% of Whole Land Use
The reason is that CBD impact has sacrificed the residential land uses gradually. In other words CBD attacks them causing them to have inadequate housing conditions to live in North Capitol Hill.
Multi-Family house analysis in the Sub Area 1, unit description and commercial and subsidized unit description are shown in Fig. £.
LAND USE
I have studied land use characteristics between 19U0 and 1981 (See Dwgs. 9 and 10, respectively). 19l*0 land use characteristics used to be a nice residential district because residential land use (single and multi-family) took up hS% whole land use in the planning area (See Fig. 6). On the contrary, current land use characteristics express the business district in the planning area.


In particular, parking lot land use in 1961 occupies about 32^ of whole land instead of ll£ in 19U0. In terms of business function, the business district is absolutely necessary to have sufficient parking lots. After the neighbors escape, parking lots hold. A lot of parking lot land use destroys natural environment in North Capitol Hill, especially on the weekends, North Capitol Hill looks as if there were a ruins because there are huge parking lots with no carsabout of the total land use in Sub Area 1 in
North Capitol Hill (See Dwg. No. 8).
TRANSPORTATION
In terms of network function, transportation analysis is one of the most important elements for the urban renewal plan. Because North Capitol Hill is next to the downtown CBD, there are high traffic volumes (see Dwg. No. ?) Most of the arterial streets in Sub Area 1 are one-way traffic. One-way traffic disturbs human beings' doings. In other words, each block itself seems to look like a desert island because of high traffic volume of one-way roads. The one-way raods are like the rivers.
EXISTING BUILDINGS
I have looked into the buildings to inspect their function and characteristics, building by building within the planning area according to the inspection sheet that I provided (see Appendix, The Inspection Sheet). The existing building condition and the existing aerial map are shown in Drawings No. 11 and No. 12, respectively. As you can see by Drawing 12, Existing Aerial Map, there are many high density


buildings in the west part which i3 next to downtownBroadway to Sherman St. On the contrary, in the rest of thb areathe east part from Sherman Street to Pennsylvania Streetthe most of all the buildings are low density buildings. Especially, the new U. B. Center Building, 52-storied, is a terribly high tower compared with other buildings within the planning area.
As a result of building inspection, the moat of old-style buildings have no primary structural problems. Some old-style buildings, however, are necessary to renovatepainting exterior walls of the buildings, improvement of front gardens and so on.
OWNERSHIP
I have studied the ownership characteristics according to the dataReal Estate Assessment Roll and Tax Warrant, 1980, published by the City and County of Denver. Consequently, about 2C# of the total owners directly occupy the property
in the planning area only. The ownership analysis in the planning area is shown in Fig. 7.
14
COMMUNITY FACILITIES
I have inspected the location of community facilities such as Fire stations, Post Offices, Police stations and so on around the planning area. People find it necessary to have community facilities in order to do their activities. There are many different community facilities available within one-mile range of the center of the planning area, (sae Dwg. No. 2). The planning area has the advantage of community facilities.
MOUNTAIN VIEW ORDINANCE AND ZONINGS
I have studied the mountain view ordinance for City Park and the Natural History Museum and have investigated it at the site. The fact is that viewing mountains from a point in


front of the Natural History Museum has already been disturbed by the high-rise buildings located in downtown (see Fig. 8).
I feel that the mountain view ordinance is of no use as an ordinance,
192$, 1956 and 1981 zoning maps are shown in Dwgs. Nos. h, $ and 6, respectively. As a result of the zoning maps, zoning itself has not basically been changing as to land use functions. Neighborhood shopping districts, however, have been going down since 1925.
There are many districts around the planning area. As jro* can see by Dwg. Na3&3iA.The District Map, the planning area is influenced by CBD, Governmental District, Medical District, Residential district as outside impacts.
15


POPULATION
FIG- 2
POPULATION IN NORTH CAPITOL HILL
HILL
1
16
FIG.3 POPULATION STATISTICS IN THE
1960 & 1970
SUB AREA 1
AGE
c= c > 15 =
15-19
CM l O CM
1

25-34
i 1

35-44
i l

r 45-54 1

55-64
I

65-74
l 1
<75
1

500 0 0 500
MALE FEMALE
1960 TOTAL 4800
AGE
[= c > 15
15-19
20-24
1 I
=
25-34
1

35-44
1

45-54
1
55-64
1 i

65-74
1 i

<75
1 i

500 0 0 500
MALE FEMALE
1970 TOTAL 3300
1980 1970
MALE GROUP 55-64 2534
FEMALE GROUP 55-64 6574
LARGEST
LARGEST


FIG.4 HOUSESHOLD POPULATION ANALYSIS
IN THE SUB AREA 1
POP.
breakdown
HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD
17
FIG.5
MULIT-FAMILY9 IN THE
HOUSE ANALYSIS SUB AREA 1
UNIT DESCRIPITION
TOTAL 2050 UNITS
C OHKE RCIAL & SUBSIDIZED UNIT DESCRIPTION
DATA : NORTH CAPITOL HILLHOUSE DEVE. STUDY REPORT AS OF NOV. 1980


sW-JiSfU£


*££1X1
Muwr.l' CHILIS'? Hof£U
£HUf?cR /t4C>H-
M----vacMK uahc? £ ft'XK
-4 \mc. uup£& G^uM^ueriOH &s


FIG. 7
THE
OWNERSHIP
ANALYSIS IN THE PLANNING
AREA
19




=fe LEGEND
21
- FIRE STATIOI0
TRANSIT
TRANSFERPO
POST OFFICE (jui) STATE JUDIC
7 BLDG
H (POL) POLICE OFFIC E(cut) CULTERAL
Ty CENTER
(SHF^ LARGE SUPER FIJLANNINC MARKETS ***** AREA
S A F E'W A Y
[DEF) DEPARTMENT PARKS
STORE
H09 HOSPITALS
^ SCHOOLS E:ELEMENTARY
J : J U N I O R S : S E N I A R
(lib) LIBRARY
0 DENVER ART MUSEUM
(htl) hotels
recration CITY HALL
FACILITY
500
0 200
1000
20I

NO.


*r\ f\ (PH
LEGEND
nnnr r** CBD
22
LOWER DENSITY s COM. RES.
GOVER. DISTRICT CONVE. CENTER
MEDICAL DISTRICT
RES. DISTRICT
5 PLANNING AREA
500'
d=t
200<

0 200 1000
met




OWAV itinflm
iiliiiit'XKiiimii
L|NCOL n
.VANIA

childrens
hospital
ftllHi
1 1 1
1 J

CL 11

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4>* 1 > s
n\


25
21 ST. AVE.
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28
jnmmniimiiij_
I I PLANNIG ARE,
TTmiiiimiiiiiir
PUBLIC PARKIN IN SUB AREA
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PENNSYLVANIA JST
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scow- wor eu*
BB APT. 9UX*
bb Horn- e*
cn church -pm
pakkih*
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17 TK AVE
16TH AVF
I
NO. 1 H URBAN RENEWAL PLAN [ %xi&flu* 6umt coi^^ctiOK r UCD COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN. DIV OF PLANNING/CD SPRING '981
r i ~


32
LEGEND
COSM. HOTEL BLDG U.B. CENTER BLDG AMOCO & COLU. BLDG COLO. STATE BANK @ YMCA BLDG @ DENVER CENTER BLDG @ U.B. PARKING GARAGE NEW U.B. CETER BLDG LINCON CENTER BLDG CAPITOL INSU. BLDG RADISON DENVER HOTEL (Q GROSUENORARMS APT.
1 2F
2 3 F
3 5 F 2 6F
7F 1 2F 7 P j 5 2F ] 30F j
iif :
12F ;
7 F !
50'
200'
r
1 j 1
1 1 < r T 1
1 | i ; i i 0 20' 100' 300*

\ aa
4 i* j
PLAN



CHAPTER FOUR
THE PROBLEMS, THE OBJECTIVES AND THE ASSETS
33
THE PROBLEMS
After studying data and site survey analyses, I have defined urban problems taking place in the planning area as follows.
- A lack of Natural Environment: street trees, lawn, parks.
- Inadequate Public Facilities: physically handicapped facilities, safe pedestrian ways, big supermarkets for elderly people especially, street lamps.
- A lot of parking lots that affect the natural environment.
- Disturbing traffic from one-way streets.
- Insufficient parking lots for big office buildings, qualitatively and quantitatively.
- Unsuitable RTD bus stops, no shelters, no benches.
- A lack of bike routes.
- Extremely unbalanced building density between the west part (from Broadway to Sherman Street) and the east part (from Sherman Street to Pennsylvania Street) (See Dwg. No. 12).


- A lack of suitable housing for families.
- Useless mountain view ordinance.
- Unreasonable boundary line of B-5 in the planning area (see Dwp. No. 6).
- High crime rate.
- Decreasing population trends
* A lack of human communication.
THE OBJECTIVES
Based upon the urban problems I have established the objectives are as follows.
- To create a good image for neighbors; a nice place to live, convenience, energy conservation, safety, health, amenity.
- To improve sti eet environment: street trees, street ramps for specially handicapped persons, trash cans, flower boxes, safe pedestrian ways away from oneway streets, bike routes.
- To provide suitable apartment buildings, both for middle- and low-income families.
- To provide adequate Mixed-Type Buildings: offices, retails, parking garages, hotels.
- To provide open spaces: plazas, parks.
- To provide an adequate neighborhood shopping center for neighbors.
- To resolve the impacts caused by high-rise buildings in CBD.
THE ASSETS
I have found out some assets in the planning area as follows.
- Near the transit transfer point.
- Many community facilities available around the planning area.
- Some nice historical wealthy buildings, churches, offices.
- As the planning area is next to the downtown there are a lot of job opportunities.


CHAPTER FIVE
DEVELOPING THE URBAN RENEWAL PLAN
35
CONCEPT PLAN
Study of Redeveloped Area
In this stage, the first of all, I have established categories of buildings such as conserved buildings, already developed buildings, under-construction buildings, renovated buildings and redeveloped buildings in accordance with the buildings' inspections. The study of redeveloped areas is shown in the Dwg. No. 13.
Concerning conserved buildings T have found seven historical wealthy buildings in the planning area and have decided upon them as conserved buildings. I believe that, in terms of urban enjoyment and attraction, people enjoy seeing them.
As to already developed buildings.as you can see, the most already developed buildings are situated in the west part just next to downtown.
As to under-construction buildings, I have found two construction buildings, namely, New United Bank Center Building, 52 stories, and United Bank Motor Bank II.


Concerning renovated buildings, I have established terms for renovated buildings as follows.
- Building condition is stable.
- Building belongs to use as public or semi-public purpose.
- Building has Multi-Family use.
I have decided to renovate the buildingssuch as seven apartment buildings, YMCA buildings and others.
As to redeveloped areas, I have decided to make nine redeveloped areas according to the conditions as follows.
- Parking lots or parking garages.
- The buildings that are not in a wealthy condition.
- The buildings that are already vacant.
- The wealthy buildings that, taking into account the urban renewal plan, I have decided to demolish.
36
CONCEPT PLAN
Based upon the goals, the objectives and the area that have been studied by the study of redeveloped areas, I have designed the concept plan for the planning area. The concept plan is shown in Dwg. No. lU.
I have designed three fundamental functions namely C B D, (the Central Business District), PUD (Planned Unit Development) and HUD (Housing Unit Development) together with safe pedestrian and bike routes throughout the redeveloped areas.
As to CBD, it is designed in the west part, where the area is from Broadway to Sherman Street. There are five tower buildings, namely, offices and banks in the area. The new United Bank Center Building, 52 storied building, is being constructed. The high-rise office buildings should be built in the CBD area.
As to PUD, it is designed in the middle part, where the area is between Sherman Street and Grant Street. There are four conserved buildings, one under-construction buildingUnited


Bank of Denver Motor Bank II, and two redeveloped areas. High-rise mixed type buildings such as offices, hotels, retails, apartments, neighborhood shopping center, garages, etc., should be built in the area.
A3 to HUD, it is designed in the east part, where the area is from Orant Street to Pennsylvania Street. There are three conserved buildings, seven renovated apartment buildings, and six redeveloped areas. Mid-rise mixed type buildings such as offices, apartment ana garages should be built an the area.
I have designed safe pedestrian ways and bike routes in order to recall human activities in the planning area. As I explained before, one-way traffic streets disturb human activities. On the other hand, automobile traffic is one of total function for the downtown (CBD) in terms of the network system. I b*ve understood that people can not da without an automobile in Denver. Therefore, I have provided 3afe pedestrian ways and bike routes without the disturbance of the current of automobile traffic system within the planning area.
ALTERNATIVES
I have designed three different plans as alternatives according to the concept plan. Alternatives 1, 2 and 3 are shown in Dwgs. Nos. l£, 16 and 17, respectively.
I have studied three alternatives carefully by. the comparison table (see Fig.9 The Comparison Table for alternatives 1, 2 and 3) and as a result of what I found by the Comparison Table, I have chosen one planAlternative 3 out of the three plans.
PROPOSED PLAN
I have designed the proposed plan according to the Alternative 3 selected. The Proposed Plan and the Proposed Aerial Map are shown in the Dwgs. Nos. 18 and 19, respectively.
The proposed plan has the following design characteristics. Resolving building density among CBD, PUD and HUD.
Please see Dwg. No. 19


Providing safe pedestrian ways connected with each
building. 2 F: Pedestrian ways with roofs 1 F: Bike ways
Improving natural environment: Four parks, street trees.
Providing adequate parking garages for offices and Neighborhood Shopping Center.
Providing Recreation Facilities for Neighbors: Swim-ing Rool, Basket Ball at Building Nos. 8 and 9.
Tennis courts Mil be provided on the roofs of Buildr
ings h, 6, 7, 8 and 9.
Providing public elevators for Pedestrians, especially for physically handicapped persons and elderly people.
Providing Neighborhood attraction John Denver Square; every weekend Folk Song events will be presented to the neighbors as well as visitors.
38


0"
FIG.9 COMPARISON TABLE FOR ALTERNATIVE 1,2&3
^^^ALTER NATIVE ITEMS ALT-1 ALT-2 ALT-3
CONCEPT PLAN POLICY C.B.D SATISFIED SATISFIED SATISFIED
P.U.D DO. DO. DO.
H.U.D DO. DO. i o o ; I i .
LOCATION OF NEIGH. SHOPPING CENTER NOT GOOD GOOD BETTER
LOCATION OF PARKING GARAGES FOR OFFICES AND SHOPPERS -OQD GOOD BETTER
PEDESTRIAN 'LAYS SATISFIED SATISFIED SAjfo^FI ED
HUDGC'IENT 3 2 1


V
& Adriu? 1
NVId 1VM3N3U NVaon
9VSW fJ34cn3M£32V {|
<&(Â¥& y ;
-^^Mcn >0Oho 034013*30- ^Jv^riY ;-j
<^*3*3^ £V^S*C72 r5~|
9^-V


41


BROADWAY
42


e\Kg ItoUffc*
50
200'
Fy
HZ]
0 20' 100'
300

BT> ^r
!&y^
rvicKImKi kYU -1
UCD COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN. DIV. OF PLANNING/CD
SPRING 1981


BROADWAY

oeooooi
D
=3S S >>
UTT ) CJ i rr : i > 1 1 t
i ; t
i 1

1 J

e-eo<
o
l^mimimiuv
Q. ..OS O -Q........Q
9
( !
rp o o
yLGCt-----


r
r 5X5vi

^ii)(iiiiiiijij|ji/^
S r__,
FtirillKIILV^
B HI CD
IT
" * a
if

! I
8-.?.
|TUr"\__r*vrx
IIIIIIHIilll^
^ Cv
PENN5YLVANIA Sj:
*Uc
u
go


0

0
D
D
D
-i.
30/___.../AV


45
(3) MIXED TYPE BLDG
w APT. RETAILS
LEGEND
(T)new u.b. center bldg
(2) OFFICE BLDG
(3) OFFICE BLDG
(5) MIXED TYPE BLDG
RETAILS HOTEL T>FFICES
@PARKING GARAGE BLDG
_ _____
@ PARKING GARAGE BLDG
KerO O O Q~
OtBANSIT TRAD
MIXED TYPE BLDG
APT. OFFICES
(Si) MIXED TYPE BLDG
APT. OFFICES
52 3 0 91 14F 3 Of 14F 6F 15F 7 F 1 2F
ELEVATORS
50 200
rfy

0 20' 100'
.30*
no.
s?
CD.
UCD COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGTT. DIV. OF PLANNING/CD
SPRING 1981


BROADWAY
46
URBA5M RENEWAL PL AM
LEGEND
NEW U.B. CENTER BLDG' g) OFFICE BLDG 3) OFFICE BLDG MIXED TYPE BLDG MIXED TYPE BLDG 6) PARKING GARAGE BLDG PARKING GARAGE BLDG MIXED TYPE BLDG S) MIXED TYPE BLDG APT. BLDG
'
5 2 F i 30F 9F ;
1 4F_ ; 3 0 F 14F !
6F[
15F |

7F I
12Fl
i
h
50'
200'

0 20' 10O
300
UCD COLLEGE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DEE.ON, DIV. OF PLANNING/CD
SPRING 1981


CHAPTER SIX
EVALUATION AND CONCLUSION
47
EVALUATION OF THE PROPOSED PLAN
I have evaluated the proposed plan according to the goals.
The results are made as follows.
- As to compatibility between the existing and new buildings, so far as I am concerned, they are satisfactory in compatibility in terms of visual harmony of the buildings such as building density, configurations.
- As to Diversity, it seems to me that mixed type buildings are the most appropriate to offer for the planning area because the area is situated between CBD and high density residential area. I have designed four mixed type buildingsoffices, retails, hotel, apartment, Buildings Nos. U, 5, 8 and 9 shown in the Dwg. No. 19.
Concerning social elements such as people and income-level family, I have designed apartment buildings for both middle- and low-income families with an appropriate governmental financial aidlow interest rates
and long-term loans


Of course, people who are of different racesblack, white, Hispanic, Asian and American Indians should live together with no discrimination.
As to Environmental Quality, I have designed street trees, four parks for the neighbors, plaza, recreational facilitiesa swimming pool, basket ball, gardens and tennis courts on the roofs of the buildings. I think Environmental elements are really improved. (See Dwg. No. 18) I don't doubt that the neighbors will enjoy living with the parks and the recreation facilities.
As to resolving the impacts caused by CBD high tower buildings, you can see this by the existing aerial map Dwg. No. 12, It recognizes that there is a very different building density between the west part and the east part.
Especially, the New U.B. Center Building, ?2 stories, is a terribly high skyscraper compared with other ones. I have designed the building density so that the buildings should be gradually declining in height from the west part
48
to the east in order to solve the high-rise building impact to the neighbors. Please see Dwg. No. 19
As to effective transportation, I have designed adequate parking garages next to office buildings and the neighborhood shopping centers. These parking garages will contrib*' ute not only to the planning area, but also for the downtown CBD. In addition I have designed saf* pedestrian ways.
As to convenience, I have found many conveniences such as neighborhood shopping center, parka, recreation facilities as well as other community facilities within the planning area and around the.area.
There are, however, no elementary and junior high schools for the neighbors' children.
- As to social equity, it includes social choice
involving basically human rights in the urban sense. Urban designers don't give attention to it for urban design because physical improvement on urban design


can be expressed in the drawings only. Social equity includes not only equal access to education, recreation and other services provided by tax funds for the general welfare, but also equal opportunity to be employed, to lease or acquire property, and to be served in business, such as restaurants, hotels, theaters, etc., without regard to race, religion, or social status, including the right to travel or to move into a community.
As to energy conservation, before the energy crisis, no one, including urban designers, paid attention to energy. It was easy to get and was cheap. After the energy crisis, everyone is concerned about it as energy cost is increasing year by year and the energy that is coming from nonrenewable sourcesoil, gas, coal, oil shale--are limited in the source. Recently, energy conservation is one of the important design criterias for urban design as well as architectural design. I have offered a passive solar system for all new buildings in order to have sufficient energy conservation. In addition to the above, the neighbors will
49
have one energy conservation advantage because they might have their jobs in the downtown area. They will not pay a lot of money to buy gasoline for automobiles.
As to neighborhood attraction, it includes aesthetic appearance, comfort and enjoyment offered in the planning area.
I have designed an amenity place named "John Denver Square* in front of the neighborhood shopping center (Buildings U and 5), see Dwg. No. 18. The neighbors as well as visitors will enjoy listening to folk songs at the John Denver Square every weekend as an attraction event.
As to the proposed plan redevelopment statistics, I have studied the redevelopment statistics according to the proposed plan (See Fig.io). The redevelopment statistics summary is as follows
- Office area 2,27h630 sq. ft.
293.560 sq. ft.
- Retail area


-New housing units and population
Units
Buffet One Bedroom Two Bedroom
U50 units 527 units 168 units
Total Population Persons/units Floor area
- Hotel
- Parking spaces
1,116 units 1,750
1.5
1,21^,1*00 sq. ft. 303,lUi sq. ft. 5,995
- Created job opportunities 1*,550 employed Offices, retails, hotels.
- Approx, redevelopment cost $700 million Finally, the proposed plan is alsmost satisfactory.
CONCLUSION
Generally speaking, urban renewal design should deal with the problems of environmental quality brought about by pressures of urban growth and decline. In the planning
area in North Capitol Hill, I have found out the major problems of environmental quality caused by the pressure of CBD growth and by one-way traffic streets. Therefore, the neighbors have been escaping from North Capitol Hill to the suburbs.
In order to, resolve the urban problems, urban renewal design
should improve the functional and visual relationships among people, their natural environment, housing, transportation, and public facilities. Of course, urban renewal design should also pay attention to economic and social goals that people are interested in and want.
After creating an adequate urban renewal plan, the next step is implementation. In order to' carry out implementation successfully, an urban renewal plan should consider the following elements.
- Citizen participation: to understand public awareness and support.
- Relevant public organizations support of transportation, housing, public works, etc.


- Financial aid provided by the government: Federal, State, city funds, (i.e., U.S. Government's share generally two-thirds of the project cost).
- Creating an ordinance for the urban renewal project which is enacted by the State Legislature.
- Stimulating private markets.
The implementation is the most difficult job for urban designers and takes a long time to perform. I think that urban designers must be very patient in the implementation stage.
As a result of the urban renewal plan, I have created my primary urban design philosophy, that is, I should design the urban renewal plan for people. In other words, I should give attention to people to provide happiness, enjoyment, comfort, attraction, convenience. The design element chart is shown in Fig. 11 People are always at the center and there are four major factors such as transportation, natural environment, public facilities and housing which should be integrated into each other as well as people.
People need transportation, live in houses, love natural environment and use public facilities to live.
Not to change the subject, but concerning humanity, I love the 32nd U.S. President's speech, Franklin D. Roosevelt, "Americanism is not a matter of race and color, but a matter of mind and heart.* I really agree with him in terms of humanity. Finally, urban designers have to have the development of people who live in an hrban area in mind.


FIG .10 T!!" PROPOSED PI Al !S pPpPPEL_,D!E'T
'ISTI!
ABLE
TO. RAMr 3F otpn STORY BLDG'S FUICTIO"! OFFICE RETAILS RESID. .TO. OF 0.1 ITS PARTITG RETARTS
- r- r~ SO. FT SO. FT BDFFEf l.Ril ; 2RM TOTAL SPACES
1. IE'! 11.3. CZ.'JTER BLDG 52 F 1-2F Retails 3-52F Offices 1,050,000 42,000 - . \ - - Being constru.
2. OFFICE BLOC 30F 3-30F Offices 640,800 46,000. - - ! -
3. OFFICE BLOC 9F iWfaHns 3-9F Offices 130,900 37,400 " -
4. MIXED TYPE BLOC 14F B2 Garane 3-9F APT. B1.1-2F Retails - 92,175 230 154 - 384 250 Garden on the roof
5. " 30F B2 Garane 3-14F Mote" B1.1-2F Retails 15*^0^ 378,930 s 75,785 - - 200 Hotel 303140 SQ.FT
6. PARKING OARAGE BLOG 14F B1-B2.1-14F Garane - - - ,2790 Garden on the roof
7.- ii n M 6F B1-B2, 1-6F Garage - - - - . - 1450 Ditto
8. MIXED TYPE BLDG 15F B1-C2 .naratie 1t;r nDT 1-2F Offices 1 * 40,000 - 150 100 250 150 11
9. ii ii n 7F B1-B2 Garane, 6-lY API. 1-2F Office 28,000 - 70 - _ 70 200 II
10. APT. BLDG 12F B1-1F Garane 2-12F APT. - - - 70 47 117 .70
11 II II - - - 70 47 117 70
12. II II - - - 40 38 78 50
13. I, II II - - - 55 - 55 * 30
14. n n II II - - - 38 36 74 45
TOTAL 2,274,630 293,560 450 527 168 |l, 145 5995
Note;AT 1 figures are aogroxinate.


FIG. 11 THE DESIGN ELEMENTS
53


Barnett, Jonathan. Urban Design as Public Policy. McGraw-Hill Inc., New YorkJ~T9Tfu~
Benedict, Glenda. A Citizen*3 Guide to Community Development. National University, Princeton, N.J., 1980.
Brambilla, Roberto and Longo, Gianni. For Pedestrians,
Design, and Management of Traffic-free Zones'^ Billboard Publications Inc., New York, 1977.
Cary, Lee. Community Development as a Process. University of Missouri Press, Missouri, 1976."
Chapin, F. Stuart Jr. Urban Land Use Planning. University of Illinois Press, Illinois, 1976.
Christeson, James and Robison, W. Jerry. Community Develop ment in America. The Iowa State University Press, Iowa, 1^80.
DeChiara, Joseph and Koppelman, Lee E. Site Planning Standards. McGraw-Hill Inc., New York, 1978.
Eisner, Callion. The Urban Pattern. Uth ed. D. Van Nostrand Co., New York, I960.
Erley, Duncan and Jaffe, Martin. Site Planning for Solar Access A Guidebook for Residential Development and Site Planners. American Planning Association, (Chicago Illinois, 1978.
Evenson, Norma. Le Corbusier; The Machine and the Grand Design. George Braziller, New York, 1969.
Goodman, William I. and Freund, Eric. Principles and Practice of Urban Planning. International City Managers' Association, Washington, D.C., 1968.
Gruen, Victor. The Heart of Our Cities. A Touchstone Book New York, 1961b.
Handler, Bruce. Caring for the Land Environmental Principles for Site Design and Review. American Society of Hanning, Maine, 1977.
Jacobs, Jane. The Death and Life of Great American Cities. Vintage Books, New York, l£6l.
Littrell, Donald. The Theory and Practice of Community Development! A Guide for Practitioner^ University of Missouri, Missouri, 1976.
MeHarg, Ian L. Design with Nature. Natural History Press, New York, 1971.
Mumford, Lewis. The City in History. Brace and World Inc., New York, 19SlI
National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering. Toward an Understanding of Metropolitan America. Canfield t*ress, San Francisco, 197lu
Regional Plan Association. Urban Design Manhattan.
The Viking Press, New York, 1969.
Smith, Herbert. The Citizens Guide to Planning. Planners Press, Chicago, 1979.
Space System Institute. Urban DesignPeople, Nature, Transit. Shokokusha, Tokyo, 1^79.
UU, Downtown Development Handbook.


GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS, PLANS AND POLICIES AND OTHERS
Denver Planning Office. "Planning Toward the Future." May 1978.
Denver Planning Office. "Downtown Denver." 1980.
Denver Planning Office. "1978 Construction Report." April 1979.
Denver Planning Office. "North Capitol Hill and City Park West Plan." July I960.
Denver Planning Office. "16th Street." November I960.
Northeast Denver Neighborhood Development Center, Bob Horn, Director. "North Capitol Hill Housing Workshop." June 1980.
Regional Transportation District. "Light Rail Transit" Oct. 1980.
Denver Urban Renewal Authority. "Skyline Urban Renewal Plan." February 1969.
Denver Urban Renewal Authority. "Housing Market Study for the Skyline Project." Denver, June 1978.
The Denver Housing Corporation. "North Capitol Hill, Economic Feasibility Analysis." May 1981
Denver Police Department. "Monthly Report in June 1981."


BASIC TRiT PLANTING INSTRUCTIONS
Bailed and Burlappcd
Plant and water the same as bare-root stock.
Cut twine tie from around trunk and top of ball.
mm
Do not burlap.
^remo^^j
Backfill 3/4 of hole with good top-soil.
Add water from bottom to work out air
pockets.

Add remaining backfill to desired grade and soak again.
Reapply water only when soil begins to feel dry at 4" to 6"
deep.
/
\ ' ,/J- as bare-root stock.
Remove the container
&V when planting being [# careful not to disturb
the root system.
V______J
SUMMARY
1. Handle plants carefully at all times.
2. Dig hole at least 6" wider than root system.
3. Plant at the same depth as the plant was previously growing.
4. Water plant properly.
5. Remove twine from trunk of balled and burlapped stock.
6. Carefully remove container from container
56
Prunin'; Transplanted Stock
Newly transplanted trees suffer a loss of roots resu..^ in a reduced ability to take up water and nutrients. Prune by:
1) Thinning out narrow crotches and interfering branches first. Then,
2) Cut back some outer perimeter branches l avoid overpruning.
' ------------------------s
Protection of young trees
Yc, j trees may be sun-
SCdi Jed the first year or two
. ;Ler transplanting.
1. Wrap at time of transplanting. (Wrap may be left on for two years or replaced each year.)
2. Start at bottom, overlapping as it is applied upward.
3. Secure at top with a small tack or staple.
___________________________J
For more information, call the City Forestry Permit
DENVER
STREET
TREE
PLANTING
1805 Bryant
Denver, Colorado 80204
575-3054
L


INFORMATION PERTAINING TO PL T. C TRr?:c ON P? ULIC STREET RIGHT-OF-WAYS
Almost all streets within the city have public .ights-of-way that extend back of the curb line. The width of this right of way varies considerably in different sections of town and is not always defined by a sidewalk.
No trees shall be planted in these areas.
T-ees must be centered between the sidewalk
and street.
Minimum spacing large trees
No tree will be planted closer than 5' to any driveway or alley.
Minimum spacing small trees


12/73
GENERAL PURPOSE AND DESf ",nN OF 'ONE DISTRICTS CITY AND COu.. '""R
I
RS-2
RS-4
RX
R-.
R-l
R-2
R-2-A
R-3
The follow! j paragraphs explain the purpose and general descrip*' a of the various zone districts contained within the Denver Zoning Ordinance. The regulations of these zone districts are changed from time to time, and a person desiring to learn the latest provisions of these regulations should contact the r partment of Zoning Administration.
Tills exp the Peuvi
land
D_usicy
-n J- h ATO
' been prepared by i 1 Ae" w Section of
cLLlKijS,
NGS. RURAL DEHSTTY. Minimum of one acre of pc- 2
------------ V.
ach housing unit. Home u uptioas are prohibited. 1 dwelling unit/acrc.
SINGLE UNIT ,-ETACHED DWELLINGS, S'JSURjAH N Minimum of 12,000 RS-4-
square feet of land required for each dv a unit. Home occupations
are prohibited. Density = 3.6 dwelling u...' ; ini.
ATTACHED OR CLUSTERED SINGLE UNIT DWELLI* jS, .. .in.SXTY. Development Plan must be approved by City Council. Arne occupations are prohibited. Minimum of 7.500 square feet of land .ea required for each dwelling unit. Density = 5.8 dwelling units..acre.
SINGLE UNIT DETACHED DWELLINGS. LOW DENSITY. Foster Family Care and Day R-o Care allowed as home occupations by permit. Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each dwelling unit. Density =7.3 dwelling units/acre.
SINGLE UNIT DETACHED DWELLINGS. LOW DENSITY. Same as R-0 except that £_ ( home occupations and room-renting to one or two persons are allowed upon application and issuance of a permit. Density =7.3 dwelling units/acre.
MULTI-UNIT DWELLINGS. LOW DENSITY. Typically duplexes and triplexes. Home occupations are allowed by permit only. Minimum of 6,000 square feet required for each duplex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required for every unit over 2. Density = 16.5 housing units/acre.
MULTI-UNIT DWELLINGS. MEDIUM DENSITY. 2,000 square feet of land required l?-2-A for each dwelling unit unless a unified site plan is submitted under the Planned Building Group (PBG) provisions. In which case, 1,500 square feet of land is required for each unit. Home occupations are allowed by permit. Density 21.8 housing units/acre (29 housing units/acre under PBG).
HIGH DENSITY APARTMENT DISTRICT. Building size is controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed 3 times the site area. This zone should not be used as a buffer zone. Maximum density is not specified and is determined by the size of the units and the factors mentioned above.
-1-
58
1 -X
w.wi
k-5
B-l
B-2
333
331
Td DENSITY APARTMENT DISTRICT. This district is intended to 3 %
encourage new residential development in older, developed areas.
Building size z controlled by bulk standards and open space require-a-nta. Building floor area cannot exceed 2 times the site area.
Maxlmuca lot coverage la 40%.
yy 'i1 Lit DENSITY APARTMENT'AND-OFFICE BIETBICT.^ The purpose of this (?-4-district is to provide a location for very-high density apartment and intensive office development. Building size is controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements. Allows hotel or motel uses and limited accessory-retail shopping. Building floor area cannot .tinea .Ch&
INSTITUTIONAL DISTRICT. Allows hospitals, colleges, schools, churches and other institutional uses. Maximum lot coverage is 60% of zone lot. Building size is controlled by bulk standards.
LIMITED OFFICE DISTRICT. This district is intended to serve as a trans- 0-1 itional zone between business and residential areas, and should be limited to relatively small tracts. It should be located near hospitals and established business centers, although it may be created as a freestanding zone. Building height controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed the site area.
NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS DISTRICT. This district is intended to be a loca- 0-2 tiu.; for convenience shopping, service and office establishments providing for the daily or weekly 'convenience* needs of residents from adjoining residential areas. Building height controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed the site a tea.
[jf__ CENTER DISTRICTJ This district is intended to serve as the 0-3
location for large unified community shopping centers permitting a wide variety of shopping, service and office activities with large parking areas. Building height is controlled by bulk standards and open space requirements. $vi]jUiig_J:lQar. are$. cannpt exceed the site area.
^GENERAT BUSINESS DISTRICT^ General retail, wholesale, service and office 0-4* activities, and certain industrial uses. Building floor area caaaot.


I
B-rt-1
B-A-2
B-A-3
B-A-A
B-7
B-8
ARTERIAL OF.rr^K AMD INSTITUTIONAL USE PTSTRICT. Allows banka, 'rlLea, g-A-l hospitals, cl s, institutions, churc >, apartments and office service uses. juires 100 feet of arte lal street frontage. Maximum
lot .co rage is Building floor arc cannot exceed ? "he
air, Bull i height is controllt bulk rand r .a.
resiil. \ dent is iinsperifir and nr 1 bv .ae size of
unlr- -- f mr 'Mr r* ,t. ... o.ens are
req
ARTET led as a tourist
ori FI) DWp* estaurants with auto-
mol i! arterial street frontage
Zone lo ight is controll.d by
bulk, star ai.ua. i-ro arc. required tor landscaping.
ARTERIAL C5? , ...... _ __...STRICT. This district is designed to ac- B-A-3
commodate .nose uses which are oriented toward the motorist and residents of nearby neighborhoods but which uses are not normally part of shoppi..*, centers. Included among such uses are bowling alleys, theaters, night clubs, drive-in restaurants and service stations. Setback areas are required for landscaping. Ground coverage by buildings cannot exceed 30% of the site. Building height.is controlled by bulk standards.
AUTO SALES AND SERVICE DISTRICT. Tht~ strict provides an area designed B'Ard. particularly for the special n'' a.i. icacteristics of auto sales and service activities. The Comprehensive n encourages the establishment of this district in concentrated centers .other than in a linear arrangement along arterials. Ground coverage by structures cannot exceed 60% of the site area. Building height is controlled by bulk standards.
kihNIKAE"ffUSrWESS"DISTRICT^, Permits all of the business, office and light industrial uses which are permitted in the more restricted 'B' zones along with residential and educational uses, ^ximum floor area cannot egceg4.1£L Eiffig3 the site area, plus floor area premiums for the development of plazas, arcades, atriums, etc.
BUSINESS RESTORATION ZONE. This district is intended to preserve and B"T improve older structures which are architecturally and/or historically significant. This district allows light Industrial, general retail, wholesale, services, offices and high density residential uses. Additional floor area is allowed with the development of residential units, underground parking or open space areas. Building floor areas cannot exceed 2 times the site area. However, with premiums the floor area can be increased to A times the site area.
INTENSIVE GENERAL BUSINESS/VERY-HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT. Permits 6 % all types of businesses, certain industrial uses, and high density residential and office uses. Intended for application in large business areas and around the Central Business District, Total floor space cannot exceed A times the area of the site.
-3-
59
1-0 .lit INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT. A transitional district between intensive 1-0
industrial and residential districts. Allows limited manufacturing, wholesale and retail activities, offices and motels. Building height is controlled by bulk plane standards and setback requirements for buildings. Floor area cannot exceed 50% of the site area.
1-1 GENERAL INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT. Allows many manufacturing, warehousing 1-2
and wholesaling activities, along with limited retail and service uses for the benefit of the area employees. Building floor area cannot exceed 2 times the site area. Generally no setback requirements.
1-2 HEAVY INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT. Allows all manufacturing, warehousing, 1- 3
wholesaling and mineral extraction activities. Limited retail and service uses for the benefit of area employees are permitted. No limitations on the size or location of buildings. This district should not be located adjacent to residential or business zones.
0-1 U j USE DISTRICT. Allows airports, recreational uses, parks, ceme- (J-l
teries, reservoirs, and other open uses including a limited number of public and semi-public activities housed in buildings. Setback requirements apply to the location of buildings.
U-* OPE. ACE DISTRICT. Allows large tracts of open land utilized primar- 0-1
ily igricultural or ranching activities.
P-1 0r_ ZT PARKING DISTRICT. Allows parking lots and structures. Bulk p_ |
and oack regulations apply to buildings. This zone Is intended to pj.o. ue needed business parking without the expansion of the business zsi i.e. a buffer between business and residential uses. Requires visual barriers adjacent to residential uses.
-A-


WHAT HAPPFVQ to YOURZON

APPLICATION FILFO K OF ZONING ADMINISTRATE
.EN.
Application is reviewed by the Zoning H Committee of City Council. Committee meetings are ""Id ei month.
n
The Zoning . requests '-he
City Attorn* otlice to draft a Council Bill.

EE
Reviewed at Mayor-Counci' "^eting.
>
Ihe tuning Administration refers application to:
1. Flanning Office
2. Design Engineering
' u""- ;.^^^Control
' t' Traffic Eng?terln
s Land Offi
j -c.anto.
Council Bill is introduced for first reading. The Public Hearing date is set by City Council. Applicant must post signs under the direction of the Zoning Administration. Applicant pays all outstanding fees including publication and sign costs.
T"
_3£_
Planning Ofr
1. Reviews'
2. Analyses
3. Requests further information
4. Formulates recommendation
Formal Public Hearing before City Council.
J II Lu. I ED Ei CITY COUNCIL 1 APPLICATION IS DEAD.
If passed by City Council and signed by the Mayor, Final Publication will be on the Friday following the Public Hearing.
T
Rezoning becomes effective in 30 days unless the Council Bill contains an Emergency Clause.
NOTE: If application is denied after a Public Hearing before City Council, a new
application may not be filed prior to one year from date of said denial for the same zone district on the same land area or part thereof.
All rezoning signs must be removed within 15 days after the Public Hearing or be held in violation of the Zoning Ordinance.
In case of a Legal Protest from the owners of 20% of the land area within the protest area, 10 affirmative votes will be required for passage.
The applicant must attend the Public Hearing and make a presentation to City Council for the rezonlng.
Sl~MMAKY OF ZONE REGULATIONS
3-15-77
Those e Regulations are amended from time to time by the City Council, and this summac iy not reflect the most recent regulations. For the latest details contact the Zou 4 Administration Department.
This :£w.-w4ary prepared by the Ordinance Review Section of the Denver Planning Office.
Required Lot Size in sq.ft. Min. Size Structure (1) Floor Minimum Setback Area at ground level Ratlo(2) Front Rear Side Minimum Acreage to Amend Zone Map
R -2 1 Ac. 600 20 5 20 Half of existing sites should be Interior to the
ha- 12.000 600 20 5 10 district
R-X 7.5CJ 1,000 22,500 sq.ft.
R-0 6,000 600 20 20 5 Half of existing sites
R-l 6,000 600 20 20 5 should be Interior to Che district
R-2 6,000 600 20 20 5 If abutting R-2-A.R-3.R-4, B-2,3,4,or 1-0, 1 acre; otherwise 8 acres.
R-2-A 6,000 600 20 20 5 If abutting R-3.R-4.B-2, 3,4,or 1-0 on one side and R-0,R-l or R-2 on 2nd side, 1 acre; otherwise 8 acres.
I 12,000 600 2:1 10 5 0 If abutcing R-3,R-4,B-3, B-4 or 1-0, I acre; otherwise 8 acres.
P fc.OOO 600 1:1 10 20 7.5 8 acres
B-1 'rTTod 0 oOZ l.c* 20 1:1 10 20 10 7.5 0 70,OOP sq.ft. If abutting B-2,3,4,5,3, I-0,I-l,or 1-2, no requirements otherwise 70,000 sq. ft.
B-A 1 20,000 600 2:1 15-30 20 10 If abutting R-4.B-2.B-3, B-4,1-0,1-1 or 1-2 and has not less than 100' of frontaga along an arterial street, 1 acre; otherwise 8 acres.
E-2 1:1 5 10 0 If abutting B-4, no requirement jothervise 70,000 sq.ft.
B-A-i 15. O'u .302 l.£- 10-20 20 10 To.606 sq.ft.
B-3 1:1 5 5 0 If abutting B-4, no requirement; otherwise 8 acres.
B-A-3 12,0013 30X l.c.10-20 20 0 If abutting B-4 and has not less than 100 ft. of frontage along an arterial street, 12,000 sq.ft.; otherwise 8 acres.
B-4 2:1 0 0 0 8 acres
B-A-i L 1 15 JO 601 l.c. 10-20 20 10 If abutting B-4 and has not less than 100 ft. of frontage along an arcsrlal street, 15,000 sq.ft.; otherwise 5 acres
6-7 400 + K&B 2:1 If abutting B-5 or B-6, 5 acres; otherwise 20 acres.
B-8 80 KiB 4:1 100 acres
1-0 .5:1 20 20 10 If abutting 1-1 or 1-2, no requirement;otherwlse 3 acres.
1-1 2:1 8 acres
1-2 8 acres
(1) Minimum size In sq.ft, of detached single-faally structure; multi-family units have no minimum size except as noted In the B-5.B-7 6 B-8 zones.
(2) Maximum ratio of total floor area to site size.
K&a Kitchen and bathroom. l.c.* lot coverage


IkuLuiNt: Rj-sti 'to Pkv;;-..,,. Mountain Views 615
.4-5. City Pm' >; -jl.
.1-5(1). Adoption of Man. The attached jp shall lie and hereby is approved am! adopted and the portion thereon {nth cd shf-%. hatching shall be and hereby is determined to he ,s as an
area necessary for the preservation of a ccrtai , . _ -rjc.
live provisions of this Article shall he in full force an ir-
tion of the attached map indicated by shading
.4-5(). huau-ttuiij on wonstre . -. hin
the area on the attached map yajj
exceed an elevation of 5.303.93 text abo.c mean sc.. I jQC/or
each ICO,teat that said part of a structure is horizon ~ ~ rom mc reference point. Wherever a structure lies partially £ce: i martially
inside of the area on the attached map indicated hy sha (in, _hing,
the provisions of this ordinance shall apply only to th p;u. cturc'
that lies within the area indicated on the map hy 1 ng or sshatching.
.4-5(3). Definitions of Terms Used.
.4-5(3)(a). Reference Point. A point having a -..ion of 5,303.93 feet above mean sea level and established as a point a, nately 2,700 feet north and 1.000 feet west of the southeast comer of Set. 36. Township 3 south. Range <>X west of the 6th Principal Meridian. City ul County of Denver, Stale nf Colorado, more particularly described as fou Vs: Said reference point is l>8 feet south and 69 feet west of the north....most west corner of the Museum of Natural History Kuilding. At the reference point is a standard brass disc set in a concrete walkway, and is 3.0 (ect cast of the west edge of said walkway. Said point is identified on the attached mat) (Ord. 238, Series 1975)
61
G-ir> Ki:vi:;m Municipal Com: ok tiik Chy and County ok Dknvk.ii
(Ord. 230. Series 1975)


Wo.__________
_____ _
The Ir.jetton cv for Blip** Tin etures
1. Name of Bldt,. : 'Vr-er: Private, Gov.
& Non-Profit Org.
2. Location : T^r.d -&*
3. Bldgs1 Funetj If Apartment _____Units
ll. Bldgs1 Chai-oteristic
Type of Structure: Brick, Steel, R.C. Wood, etc.
Tear Built :
No. of Stories : u.lUH basement Yes or No
Total Floor Ai oa :
$. Bldg's Circumstance^ E 11 Excellent, G a Good, B 3 Bad
Facade : E, G, B Exterior walls: E, C-, B
Interior : E, G, B Structure : E, G, B
Incidental Heatis,t
Facilities : (Plumbing A Elec) E, G> B Fecix-ties : E G, 3
A/C Equipment : E, G, B Garden : E, b
Parking Lots No Yes How many CaT3
7. Remarks if Any
62