Citation
Samaritan House

Material Information

Title:
Samaritan House a shelter for the homeless
Creator:
Kahn, Diane Weiss
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
vii, 163 pages : illustrations, charts, maps, plans (some color) ; 22 x 28 cm

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of architecture)
Degree Grantor:
University of Colorado Denver
Degree Divisions:
College of Architecture and Planning, CU Denver
Degree Disciplines:
Architecture

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Social service -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Homelessness -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Homelessness ( fast )
Social service ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (page 41).
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Diane Weiss Kahn.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
12258140 ( OCLC )
ocm12258140
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1985 .K336 ( lcc )

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Full Text
KAMA/
SAMARITAN
HOUSE
A
SHELTER FOR THE HOMELESS
MASTER'S THESIS DIANE WEISS KAHN
environmental DESIGN
nauraria library


U1A7DD 4DA7711


Your structure tells people what you think of them -how you value them - as much as how you treat them.
Sister Mary Ann Gleason


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An Architectural Thesis presented to The College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture.
DIANE WEISS KAHN Spring, 1985 ^


EM D£S
~ k&l iS Afit In i Us'
Li>
1190
The thesis of DIANE WEISS KAHN is approved.
University of Colorado at Denver
May, 1985


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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I must acknowledge a debt of gratitude to the many people who contributed their time and thoughts to this thesis study. In particular I am grateful to Father Bill Kraus and Terry Sharp, of Samaritan Shelter, for their valuable information and insightful observations; to Joe Levi and Paul Heath, my advisors, for their stimulating and nurturing encouragement; and finally, I would like to thank my family for their expressions of love, help, and patience throughout the course of this project.


CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
I THESIS STATEMENT 5 STUDY PROCESS
BACKGROUND
7 HOMELESSNESS
PROGRAM
9 HISTORY
9 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 10 POLICIES
10 RULES
11 STAFF
11 VOLUNTEERS 13 ORGANIZATIONAL FLOW CHART 15 STAFF INTERACTION MATRIX
17 RESIDENTS
18 RESIDENT ACTIVITY FLOW CHART
19 SERVICES PROVIDED 23 A TYPICAL DAY
25 DONATIONS FLOW CHART
26 DESIGN ISSUES AND GUIDELINES
29 ADJACENCIES AND RELATIONSHIPS
30 LEVELS OF PENETRATION OF THE BUILDING BY ACTIVITY
31 LEVELS OF PENETRATION OF THE BUILDING BY POPULATION
SITE
33 LOCATION 35 ANALYSIS
CONSTRAINTS
37 ZONING REQUIREMENTS ‘ 38 BUILDING CODE REQUIREMENTS
BIBLIOGRAPHY
41 BIBLIOGRAPHY 41 INTERVIEWS
SPACE REQUIREMENTS
43 SPACE SHEETS DESIGN
139 DESCRIPTION 143 DRAWINGS 155 MODEL
163 CONCLUSION
APPENDIX
i OTHER ALTERNATIVES FOR SHELTER
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INTRODUCTION
THESIS STATEMENT
Nobody knows precisely how many homeless there are in Denver. Experts' estimates range from 500 to well over 5,000. However, the fact that there are people sleeping in alleys, doorways, and under bridges, and whole families living out of their cars is never disputed. Denver has a few alternatives for temporary shelter to keep people from dying on the street, but Samaritan House is unique in this country In at" least two ways. It not only provides short term residence for some of the city's homeless population, feeds and clothes them, it also provides the kind of encouragement and support which offers people who are at the end of their resources, the opportunity to take time out to consider how to improve their situations. Unlike some similar facilities which also offer more than just bed and board, it carries out its program without the use of a referral system to prescreen residents.
The structure which the shelter occupies was originally built as a high school. It has been refitted to attempt to meet its present use. In some ways It works quite well, but in other ways its purposes are impeded. Bishop Evans of the Catholic Archdiocese of Denver, under whose auspices the shelter exists, proposed that my thesis study focus on developing an architectural program for the shelter at a new location. I accepted his suggestion and the following architectural program and design are the result. My design places the new shelter, to be called, “Samaritan House” at the site chosen by the Archdiocese.
It is the block bounded by 23rd , 24th, Larimer and Lawrence Streets and Broadway, in Denver, Colorado. The building will house 250 men, women and children within 75,000 square feet.
Homeless people assume their own privacy by staying out of the statistics.
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Certain issues need to be kept in mind throughout the process of planning this facility. One concerns the need to support an esprit de corps. Terry Sharp, who was Director of Operations for two years after the inception of the shelter has said, "People mey come in with a chip on their shoulder, but once they're here for a few days they realize they’re part of it (the shelter)." Tips on jobs are exchanged and peer pressure to continue to look for a job or deal with the social service burocracy helps to combat depression and a sense of defeat. The following is a description of feelings set down by Mitch Snyder (Community for Creative Nonviolence, Washington, D.C.), who voluntarily became homeless for a month in order to better understand the people for whom he was advocating.
"It was a frightening and amazing experience -the discovery of just how quickly one's sense of substance and self-worth melts away under these conditions. It is as though two separate, parallel, and unequal realities exist. For those who are homeless, the rest of the world is alien and irrelevant The 'housed' ones shared none of our concerns or priorities; their frustrations bore little or no resemblance to our own."
In the absense of a sense of kinship to those who have the basic need for housing satisfied, it is essential that a sense of group membership be fostered among the shelter's residents. Human beings are highly social creatures. We depend on the acceptance of others for our sense of well-being and self-worth. As long as someone has viable social tiess/he will be less likely to feel, "lost", "forgotten", "psssed by", or "surplus". The inclusion of women and children is also very important to producing an experience of community and a relationship to the other world of the “housed". It helps to preserve oroar and creates a family setting. Violence and foul language is reduced by their presence, but it does create some problems. Without
The self-image of homeless people is so damaged.
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adequate accomodation for children, they are apt to be underfoot and likely to be unnecessarily exposed to some harsh realities.
Opportunities for socializing should be made available. Places where residents can interact in small numbers, (i.e. 2 to 6) can help to promote communication and sustain the support system. The design ought to provide as much privacy as is possible without interfering with necessary observation to maintain order. The more exposed a person feels, the greater Is his/her need to create psychological barriers - if physical ones are Impossible. Spaces where one has the feeling that s/he is being herded must be avoided, no matter how much it may expedite the task of carrying out basic functions of the operation.
The second issue is the idea of control over one’s environment and life. To feel that one is not in charge of his/her own life is to have no hope of affecting changes in its course. It is critical that the trap of "victimism" is avoided. According to William Raspberry, the syndicated columnist for the Washington Post,
“Victimism is a disease that blights our best intended social programs, because it attacks the ability and inclination of people to look after themselves. To attack victism is not to deny that people get dumped on - horribly, illogically, repeatedly. Nor is it to suggest that victims of discrimination and disadvantage should be left to their own devices, with no assistance from the rest of society. The distinction is between being concerned about people and feeling pity for them.
Victimism is impotent. It's focus is on the hole you're in....The effective focus, which victimism obscures is, How do I get out?


Sonaritan extends a lifeline for residents to pull themselves up on. A siQn on the wall behind the intake desk reads, "Welcome, we're happy to help you help yourself".
It Is important to support this philosophy in the desion by providing an environment which fortifies the sense of autonomy and potency of the individuals lodged there. The layout must not preclude choices which the resident can make. For instance, In the order of activities, one should not be funneled from shower-to dinner-to TV. An effort has to be made to break down the impression that one's space is everyone elses space as well.
A third issue underlies decisions on quantity and quality of space and involves questions of comfort and time. Shelter policy limits a resident's stay to 90 days. If the temporay sanctuary is too comfortable, it will become more difficult to think about leaving.
Time can go very quickly when one has to prepare for being out on the street again. Enough, but not too much - space, time, and comfort -is not a concept employed to punish people who are already subject to considerable emotional stress and disarray. It is used to make sure that they understand that they have only a short time to get It together.
If you herd people together you mey es well be dealing with
Careful selection of materials and furnishings can be useful In adjusting the comfort level. Trying to find the elusive line between crowded, uncomfortable conditions and an efficient, motivating layout will be a significant task. For example, it may be that the right amout of shower space is different from that which is recommended for the same number of people under other circumstances. Work hours and the shelter schedule make it necessary for the large majority of the residents to shower within a two hour period. The provision of too many showers may encourage dawdling, but too few can lead to a long line of tired, impatient people, a source of tension, frustration and anger waiting to errupt.
Some of the people who come to the shelter will improve their conditions no matter what the design of the facility, because they have a strong sense of self and the drive to be self-supporting. They are temporarily in crisis. Others will do just the opposite. They will continue to make the rounds of shelter facilities In the city, or manage to get themselves included in the welfare system. But, it is the group which remains for which the design and philosophy of the shelter is most important. It may be possible to keep at leek some from falling into the syndrome of longterm poverty and chronic homelessness by providing a setting in which they can pull their lives together and climb back on the turntoble of general society.
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STUDY PROCESS MEETING - SEPTEMBER 18
with Bishop George Evans, Catholic Archdiocese of Denver.
We discussed the broad range of my thesis project in terms of the school time frame and my research objectives. Bishop Evans gave an overview of the Samaritan Shelter's program and facilitated my acceptance at the shelter for a meeting with its Executive Director.
1st visit to the shelter - September 21
meeting with Father William Kraus, Executive Director, Samaritan Shelter.
We discussed my thesis objectives snd the general goals and objectives of the shelter, as well as some details of its operation. I toured some of the facility and observed the daytime activities of the shelter, meeting with Gene Thomas, Cook, Samaritan Shelter.
We discussed the kitchen, food acquisition, storage and overall proceedures and needs.
2nd visit to the shelter - October 4
meeting with Terry Sharp, Director of Operations, Samaritan Shelter.
We discussed the shelter's program in more detail and I toured parts of the building which I had not previously seen. I again observed daytime operations.
3rd visit to the shelter - October 10
spent the entire day and night at the shelter
I observed the 24 hour operation of the shelter, spoke at length with: lien's supervisor, Joe Sharp; Women's supervisors, Patty Johnson and Sister Cathy Hanisits; Police officer, Reed; and Residents. Gabrfela, Dale and Charles.
Meeting - October 15
with Sister Mary Ann Gleason, Administrative Director, Coalition of Shelters for the Homeless.
We discussed Denver's citywide needs, facilities and possible approaches and solutions to the problem of homelessness.
Meeting - October 22
with Father Kraus.
We reviewed my thesis statement and the accuracy of the data I had collected to that point. We also discussed the public announcement of the new multimillion dollar shelter to be called ‘Samaritan House".
Meeting - October 26
with Joe Levi, Project Architect, Me Og. for a new shelter at 38th St. and York Ave., Denver.
We discussed possible design guidelines and issues which are important to both new shelters.
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4th visit to the shelter - October 29
I helped to serve dinner and make lunches for the following day.
I observed the kitchen proceedures for preparation, serving and cleanup. I also discussed ideas for improvements in layout and equipment with the kitchen staff.
Meeting - November 8
with Dr. Richard Wright, Director of Medical Services, Eastside Health Center, City and County of Denver, Department of Health and Hospitals.
We discussed some possible means of providing medical assessment and treatment for residents of the shelter and for indigent people of the community. Dr. Wright explained the spaces and equipment which might be required.
Meeting - November 13
with Mark McCormack, Project Architect, Barker, Rinker, Seacat, for the Samaritan House.
We discussed design issues, compared ideas about square foot allocations for each area and worked out some possible spacial relationships.
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BACKGROUND
HOMELESSNESS
While It was once assumed that homelessness was confined to a small subculture of skid row bums, today it is acknowledged that a broad cross-section of the population: minorities, women, the urban poor wanderers, the old, sick, mentally 111, and unemployed - in other words the displaced and the disenfranchized - make up the ranks of the homeless. It will come as no surprise that minority groups suffer more than their share of poverty. Ken Auletta, author of Hie Underclass, fixes it at 70* and maintains that 50* of the poor live in female-headed households. Single women with children is the group hardest hit by the current economic situation and social services program cuts. Minority women with children are disproportionately affected. Unemployed men, who leave home so their families con get welfare assistance; those on fixed incomes, which can’t cover the cost of rampant inflation and rising rents; the physically ill, whose resources have been exhaused (physical disabilities ore very common among the homeless) often turn out into the streets. Rapid deinstitutionali2ation of mentally ill people over the last decade has been accomplished without adequate transitional housing. They therefore account for a large proportion of the homeless.
Current trends in education and the high dropout rate are responsible for the lack of preparation of many members of our society for the work which is available. 59* of employment today is in the white collar area, 22* (and dropping) is in blue collar jobs and 19* is in the service fields.' Cleaner, day laborer, sailor, peacetime soldier, miner, logger, hobo, hired man, and musician are occupations often associated with the homeless.
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1982), p. 31.
An insufficient supply of low and very low income housing options and the disappearance of rooming houses, units which rent by the week and cheap hotels (flophouses or cubicle hotels) is a prime contributor to the rise of homelessness. These lodgings have fallen prey to unmanageable operating expenses, restrictions imposed by building ordinances, and Urban Renewal.
The exact number of homeless in Denver is not known, but the following figures, supplied by Sister Mary Ann Gleason, Administrative Director of the Coalition of Shelters for the Homeless in Denver, may cast some light on the subject.
15.000 evictions per year
2.000 foreclosures in 1983
4.000 mentally ill who are unprovided for
Denver draws people from all over because of its reputation for low unemployment, pleasant climate, and the beauty of its nearby mountains. Many get here with the last of their money in the hope of getting a job and making a new start. Often they come with factory skills, useful before new technology and International economic pressures reduced or eliminated the need for them. Some are totally unskilled, fit only for a category of job opportunities which is rapidly disappearing.
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PROGRAM
HISTORY
On February 3, 1981, Holy Ghost Church opened its doors to the people of Denver who needed a warm place to sleep. 200 people came that night and continued to come all that winter. They slept on the basement floor and ate meals provided by parishioners. The critical need for a permanent shelter had become obvious and the search for an appropriate facility began. Central Catholic High School, at 1836 Logan Street, which had been closed because of declining enrollment, was selected. The project was sponsored by two churches, Basilica of the Immaculate Conception and Holy Ghost. With a $50,000 grant from the Archdiocese of Denver and donations of clothing, linens, personal items and food, the Samaritan Shelter opened on November 8, 1982. The property on which the shelter sits has greatly escalated in value due to downtown development and consideration is being given to finding a use for the property which is more in line with its present value. A new site for the shelter will offer the opportunity for a facility which is designed to suit the special needs of Samaritan House's program.
You've got to go some for yourself.
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
The basic goal of the shelter is to put itself out of business; to aid in the battle against homelessness in Denver until there is no longer a need for it to exist. It is the objective of the shelter for its guests to find themselves in better shape, in terms of money, health and/or spirit, when they leave than when they come In. Volunteers and donations are vital to the concept that this is a ministry of the whole city, not just that of the shelter itself or only of the Archdioces. Samaritan seeks to provide an atmosphere condusive to spiritual reflection for its residents. Rest and nutritious food are indispensible to fitness for employment which in turn is important for self-respect. A noninstitutional, family setting, not a place where one feels incarcerated, is productive in making residents feel part of the normal life of our society. It is interesting to note that here, locked doors are for keeping people out- not in. Safe, clean, bright surroundings help guide people's behavior in a socially acceptable direction. The staff hopes that during their stay, people will feel safe in its community and elevated in appreciation of their self-worth and their motivation to be self-supporting. They want to help people to help themselves.
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POLICIES
Admission for free room and board is on a first-come-first-served basis for anyone who can take care of him/herself and children. No referral is required. Everyone is treated with courtesy and respect, which attacks the low self-esteem common to the homeless. Samaritan doesn’t want to change anyone’s lifestyle (people must do that for themselves snyway) but no alcohal or drugs may be used during the period of a resident's stay, because these tend to create disturbances In the shelter and Interfere with work outside. Asking men to wait on line all day before the initial intake gives some a chance to sober up and deters those who aren't serious about complying with the shelter policies. It also gives the staff a chance to see if they would fit into the program. Once someone leaves, it is shelter policy that they cannot return for at least 90 days, even if s/he has only been there for one day. When requesting re-entry to the facility, one must go through the entire initial intake process. People are responsible for following up on referrals for jobs or health and social services, although help will be given if necessary. The simplicity of its operation is what makes Samaritan work. A minimum set of rules is essential to maintain order and eviction from the shelter results when they are broken, however, exceptions are occasionally made. Compassion is mixed with toughness.
RULES
1. Return: 6 P.M. to 7 P.M. No later. Departure: 8 A.M. Take whatever you need for the day. Anyone coming back before 6 P.M. or after 7 P.M. will lose bed.
2. There will be no loitering outside the shelter at any time, (no one in area until 6 P.M.).
3. No drugs, alcohol, paint, glue, etc. will be permitted inside or outside this shelter.
4. No weapons are allowed. People found with weapons will be expelled. All weapons to be turned In when arriving at shelter.
5. Smoking and eating will be allowed only in assigned area.
6. Single men are not permitted In the women's and family sections.
7. Everyone In this shelter will be treated courteously and with respect.
8. Anyone creating a disturbance will be removed Immediately.
9. No food or drink of any kind is to be brought into shelter.
10. Each person staying at shelter will be responsible for their own children.
They feel that people outside are against them and people on the inside are against them because they don't like the rules.
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STAFF
Executive Director, Father William Kraus
Associate Director, Father Didacus Dunn
Program Director
Building Manager
Men's Supervisor, 1 AM. to 9 AM.
Women's Supervisor, I AM. to 9 AM.
Men's Supervisor, 5 P.M. to 1 AM.
Women's Supervisor, 5 P.M. to 1 AM.
Guidance Counselor
Employment Counselor
Food Manager/Cook
Assistant Cook
Dishwasher
Maintenance Men - 2
Off-duty Police Officers - 4 part time
Receptionist/Secretary, weekdays
Receptionist/Secretary, weekends
Clothing Manager
Volunteers
VOLUNTEERS
Because of the desire to include the entire community in its program, Samaritan enlists the aid of volunteers to serve dinner to the residents, sort and size donated clothing and fill requisitions, transport goods and help with laundry. The use of in-house
volunteers is discouraged because It detracts from the aim of independant life outside the shelter. Cook and dishwasher, however, share a small room and get some payment for their services. They are allowed to stay longer than 90 days. Mothers who spend the day at the shelter are asked to help with the laundry when necessary.
We can't take care of them forever. Most people end up here because of lack of order in their lives.


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ORGANIZATIONAL FLOW CHART
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR
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STAFF INTERACTION MATRIX
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« 4 1 »# o o o o Assoc. Dir.
o oc 3# 4 4 4 4 4 4 Pr 'og. Dir. Mgr.
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4 o 0 o 4 Men's Sup'r.
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4 Guid. Counselor
y.. ;!y/X Err ipl. Counselor ing Mgr.
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$ 4 4 Food Mgr. jsist. Cook
4 4 A; >
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4 ft < 4 Rec./Sec'y LIGHT
ici othing Volunteers 1( . „ MODERATE Volunteers
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OPEN 5:30 VM. to" 7 P.M.: t ^ nr 5:Mrm ♦ Cti* T* >
Report Ready To Work 665 KALAMATH 534-1316
!A! help
WANTED
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MEN — WOMEN _
Laborers — Maids % ,
Dock Workers — Collators Warehouse Men — Assemblers Furniture Movers — Food Handlers Trade Show Crews — Production Line Construction Laborers
Day & Night Shifts $3.50 Per Hr.
CASH PAID DAILY
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RESIDENTS
People of all ages can be found at the shelter. A minimum age limit is imposed because it is felt that babies younger than 6 months should not be exposed to diseases which may be present. As long as one can care for him/herself there is no upper limit. The turnover rate is about 5 or 6 men each day and 2 or 3 women. The number varies for families, but there is usually some change each day. Presently at Samaritan Shelter there are beds for 96 single men, 47 family members, and 20 single women. 15 more can be added in an emergency situation. The new Samaritan House will be designed for an expanded capacity of 250 beds with the addition to the program of space for 20 homeless youth. The number of beds for single men, women and families will increase to 120, 40 and 70 respectively. There will be cot or floor space for 100 other homeless people in times of extreme weather conditions.
School aged children are encouraged to attend school while their families are at Samaritan. Individual arrangements are made with the Board of Education to select the school. Sometimes children can be picked up by school bus, but transportation is the responsibliity of the parents.
Some of the residents are the new poor - still looking for permanent jobs. Others depend on labor pools for temporary work. Labor pools
contract with factories and others for workers. It Is to the advantage of the employer to hire workers by the day because of savings in fringe benefits and wages. Samaritan's rapport with labor pools is good because Its men and women are well fed, sober, and reasonably well rested. Labor pools often send vans to the shelter early in the morning to pick up workers. Minimum wage is generally the rule for these jobs. For a good worker, a labor pool job can lead to a steady job.
Half of the residents are helped for the short-term. That is, they can manage to keep it together for a period of time after leaving, but they return. A group of long-term poor, who are still motivated to succeed but, because they are unskilled and often victims of systemic Injustice, barely get by and never get ahead. Alcohol, the lack of self-management skills, and life patterns which include giving up when things get tough, are reasons for the chronic homeless condition of some. Not all adults sleeping at the shelter find or even look for work. These are generally the long-term poor who are not likely to change. About 1 person out of 20 becomes really stabilized and self-supporting for the long-term. A few have managed to save as much as $700 by the time their stay was over. The new poor is the group most likely to benefit permanently from Samaritan's program.
Sometimes tne only way you can
tell the homeless Is when they're
walking the street carrin' their rolls.
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RESIDENT ACTIVITY FLOW CHART
For whet it is its fantastic, but i don't want to stay any longer than i have to.
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PUSHED


This place is better than where some guests usually stay Its
BEDS
New residents are assigned beds and issued clean linen and blankets at the initial intake. The bed number becomes an important identifying factor for such things as laundry and wakeup lists or clothing requisitions. Once each week guests are 8sked to strip their beds. Bedding is then laundered by volunteers at the shelter and the clean, folded linen is put back on the beds before people return in the evening. Residents must make their beds every day before leaving
FOOD
About 13,500 meals are served at the shelter each month Most of the food is donated by supermarkets, hotels, farmer's markets, and the government clearing house. The shelter also has an account with a whole sale food supplier. A great deal of the donated food is on the verge of spoiling and must be used immediately. Because there is no way of knowing what will becoming in, storage and meal planning are complex problems. The cooks prepare a hot breakfast (6:30 to 8:00) and dinner (6:00 to 7:30) every day for the residents and staff. No second servings of food are offered, but a second cup of coffee can be taken after everyone has had a first cup. Brown bag lunches are prepared for residents to take along to work and lunch is served to anyone who is in the shelter at noon - including the new men. Volunteers help the kitchen staff to serve the dinner. Any food which leaves the kitchen must be eaten or thrown away. Health regulations prohibit its retun after serving. No food or drink may be brought into the shelter by the residents because of potential problems with insects and rodents, but pop from a coin operated machine is available.
clean, orderly and safe.
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SHOWERS
A dally shower Is required for everyone. Residents are handed a clean towel at the intake desk each evening. It is returned after bathing. Some residents have indicated a preference for keeping the towel until after the morning washup. Razors (men) and toothbrushes are issued at the initial intake. Shampoo, toothpaste, deodorant, powder, etc. are kept at the control area and dispensed a helping at a time to avoid waste. Soap is kept in the shower room. Except for late workers, all showers must be completed by 8:30. Residents have the choice of bathing before or after dinner.
COUNSELING
Counseling will be provided by a Guidance Counselor, who evaluates residents' needs for medical, legal, and psychological help, vocational training, and self-management skills. When it is indicated, the counselor will make referrals to the appropriate agency or facility, (Social Services, DGH, etc.). An employment counselor will make job referrals, keep track of residents work progress, and offer counsel when work related problems develop. Father Dunn leads
‘dlologue-scripture-preyer" services, which are in effect group rap sessions. Spiritual counseling is provided by Father Dunn with assistance at times from Father Kraus. Members of the staff in general make it a point to talk with residents about how things are going and offer encouragement. Social workers and others occassionally see their clients at the shelter.
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MESSAGES
Mail is distributed during daily intake. Telephone messages are taken and relayed to residents and change is made for use of the pay phones at the shelter.
We want to fan a spark of Pope - they're hurting people who've lost hope.
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CLOTHING
An average of 5 or 6 30 gallon plastic bags full of clothing and other items are given to Samaritan each day. Once or twice during the month a resident can submit a requisition slip listing: bed number, the desired items and sizes. Slips are collected on Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. The clothing Manager and volunteers sort and si2e the donated clothes and on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. They fill the orders if they can and place the requested items on the beds.
LAUNDRY
Wednesday is "house laundry day" at the shelter. All the bed linen must be washed, dried, folded and redistributed by the staff and volunteers. Towels are washed and dried by the Men's and Women's Supervisors every night. Residents can do their personal laundry in the evening. At present, only 8 or 10 loads a night can be completed in each dormitory because of an insufficient number of machines. Laborer's jobs often mean heavy dirt and with few changes of clothes an adequate laundry facility is a necessity. A signup sheet for laundry makes it a system of first-come-first-served. When his/her load is done, the resident calls the next bed number on the list. An iron and ironing board are kept in the office for anyone who needs them.
RECREATION
Indoors, an area for viewing a large screen TV and tables for people to play cards and board games, enjoy soft drinks, and talk in small groups is to be set aside for adults. Space for a ping pong table and a small paperback library will also be provided. It will be possible to sit outside when the weather permits. Children's indoor facilities will include a TV, shelves for toys, puzzles and books, spaces for group play and storytelling. Because parents are responsible for their own children, accomodation must be made for them in this area also. At times volunteer daycare may be provided for children. Outdoor space will consist of children's play ground equipment and sand box, grassy areas, and picnic tables.
Thu is tne Hilton of the Shelters. I've been in a tot of shelters and / rate this place *f
21


STORAGE
At the moment, guests keep their belongings in large cardboard boxes which are placed at the foot of each bed during the day and on the floor at night. The limited strorege space discourages people from bringing more than a minimum number of items to the shelter. Valuables can be stored in a safe vault In the office. Medicines and weapons are held in the office until residents leave the shelter. They can be reclaimed daily. Daytime parking space is provided for the autos of workers who are picked up and dropped off by labor pool van.
MEDICAL
The Robert Woods Johnson Foundation is establishing a network of medical clinics for the Indegent at various sites 8round the city. Samaritan House will be one of those sites. The clinic will open for residents two nights a week. Examinations and treatment for minor complaints will be handled at the shelter; more serious problems will be referred to Denver General Hospital (DGH). Ambulance or other transportation assistance to DGH will be provided when necessary. Two days a week the medical clinic will be open for Indigent people In the outside community. An infirmary will also be provided for people who must be issolated and for minor problems which arise when the clinic is closed.
COMMUNITY
Toilet, shower, clothing exchange, and medical facilities for the indigent population outside the shelter will be provided.
We're not just another handout. 22


A TVPICAL DAY
12:30 A.M. 1:00 A.M.
5:00 A.M.
6:00 A.M.
until 6:30 A.M. 6:30 A.M. until 8:00 A M.
8:00 A.M. 9:00 A.M.
12:00 A.M.
Men's and Women's Supervisors make bed checks
Men's and Women's Supervisors change shift and exchange information.
coffee and doughnuts set out for earl g workers. Workers pick up medications, weapons and sack lunches, leave for work.
new men ask for admission, wait in line (all day).
Supervisors wake up early workers.
everyone is woken up by P.A. system.
hot breakfast is served, work passes (for late return) are issued, residents pick up medicines, weapons and 3ack lunches.
everyone leaves (except mothers and children, the sick, and night workers).
Receptionist/Seccretary arrives, Men's and Women's Supervisors exchange information and leave.
lunch is served to those in the shelter (including new residents).
Simplicity makes Samaritan Shelter work.
until 5:(J0 P.M. mothers and staff do house laundry, cook and helpers prepare meals, maintenance men make repairs, new men are invited in to help with chores.
5:00 P.M. Men's and Women's Supervisors arrive and exchange information. Receptionist/Secretary leaves, women enter, give names, get mail, are issued towel, hand in medicines and weapons, shower, do laundry, sit in hall or on beds, read, talk.
5:15 P.M. new men enter, give names, are told rules, are issued towel, r82or and toothbrush, are asked for weapons and medicines, are assigned beds, shower, talk, read, etc.
6:00 P.M. Police Officer arrives, Men line up to enter, give names, get mail, are issued towel, hand in medicines, shower, do laundry. Dinner is served.
7:00 P.M. mu3t be in or lose bed (except for those with work passes).
7:00 P.M. hot dinner is over, sandwiches are served to late workers. Children must leave the cafeteria area.
23


5:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. the office is busy... making change, giving medicine, answering the door and phone, locking up valuables.
8:30 P.M. no more showers except for late workers.
9:00 P.M. children go to bed.
until 10:00 P.M. people watch TV, talk, read, playcard3, nap, do laundry.
10:00 P.M. no more laundry is allowed. Women must leave cafeteria are8 (which i3 presently also the men'3 dorm). Lights out (people can talk quietly in the hall).
11:00 P.M. Police Officer leaves.
until 11:30 P.M. people can sign wake-up sheet.
throught the night Supervisors do paperwork, make bed checks, do house laundry, and wake up workers with a flashlight.
24
I
I


25


DESIGN ISSUES
Allow the residents to have as much choice as possible.
Provide as much privacy as possible without compromising control and security.
Encourage social interaction.
Avoid creating demeaning situations.
DESIGN GUIDELINES
Residents should be able to move freely between activities.
Residents should have easy access to outdoor recreation in good weather.
Use half-height walls and storage units as visual barriors.
Men's and women's dorms and dressing areas should not be observable by staff of the opposite sex.
Provide smaller, quiet areas for solitary reading, thinking or talking in small groups.
Provide alcoves off the large recreation/dining area for more inti mate socializi ng.
Allow enough space to provide many small (4 person) tables in the Recreation/dining area.
Don't isolate the handicapped.
Standing on line is tiresome arid demeaning, therefore avoid the necessity whenever possible.
Vary the colors and patterns of floor and wall treatments to create more identifiable, personal spaces.
Break large dorm rooms into many smaller sections. Provide separate youth and children's recreation areas.


I
B Different populations have varying needs.
I
Mental illness and antisocial behavior create the need for strong security measures.
Some people should have only minimal cantact with others.
Provide a variety of socializing opportunities (i.e., larger areas for TV, small tables for card arid board games, and space for ping pong or pool).
Locate handicapped beds, toilets and showers on the first floor. Provide barrior - free access to all communal activities.
Complete privacy limits security and presents opportunities for problems to arise, therefore allow no completely private spaces for residents except in bathroom stalls.
Residents- belongings must be in observable areas.
Provide safe storage for residents- valuables in administrative area.
The medical clinic need3 limited access and safe storage for drugs.
Controlled access is needed for storage of maintenance and kitchen supplies.
Staff and volunteers' belongings need to be kept in an area which is inaccessible to the residents.
Separate access to men's and wo men'3 areas.
Locate women'3, family arid youth sections deeper in the building than the men's section.
Keep limited services which are provided to other indigents near the entry and control access to resident areas.
27


ADJACENCIES AND RELATIONSHIPS


LEVELS OF PENETRATION OF THE BUILDING BY ACTIVITY
30
I
I


I
I
I
LEVELS OF PENETRATION OF THE BUILDING BY POPULATION GROUP
31




SITE ANALYSIS
in
ro


CONSTRAINTS
CUtlATE
"We were constantly preoccupied with the weather. Would it rain or snow? Would it be windy, or would the temperature drop tonight?
At a minimum, our well-being would depend on the answers to those questions: at the extremes, our lives might hang in the balance."
Mitch Snyder
Denver has a mild, sunny semi-arid climate. Extremely warm or cold weather is usually of short duration.
Spring is the wettest, cloudiest and windiest season. Much of the 37% of the annual total precipation that occurs in spring falls as snow during the colder, earlier part of the season. Stormy periods are often interspersed by stretches of mild sunny weather that remove previous snow cover.
In Autumn there is les3 cloudiness and a greater percent of possible sunshine than any other time of year. Precipitation is about 20% of the annual total.
Winter has least precipitation accumulation (11% of the annual total) arid almost all of it is snow. Weather can be quite severe, but as a rule the severity doesn't last long.
ZONING
B- 8
Sec. 59 - 392 (1) Uses by right
dd. Clinic, dental or medical; qqq. Institution, excluding adult community corrections facility; gggg. Public baths;
Sec. 59 - 394 (1) Basic maximum floor area
The sum total of the gross floor area of all structures on a 2one lot shall not be greater than four (4) times the area of the 2one lot on which the structures are located.
Off-street parking requirements Class 2
One parking space is required for each 600 square feet of gross floor area.
Off-street loading requirements
One loading space is required for 25,001 to 250,000 square feet of gross floor area.
37


THE DENVER BUILDING CODE
GROUP H - DIVISION 2
Apartments, garden apartments, dormitories, convents, monasteries, rooming houses, foster homes, senior citizens homes.
ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA
I II III IV V
1 - hr N 1 - hr - N 1 - hr N
unlimited 24,000 or H.T. 10,000 6,900 10,200 6,900 7,500
MAXIMUM HEIGHT OF BUILDINGS IN STORIES
1 II III IV V
1 - hr N 1 - hr N 1 - hr N
unlimited 6 or H.T. 5 1 4 1 3 np
38
FIRE RESISTANCE
A building of more than one story in height must be of at least 1 - hr fire resistive construction.
LIGHT
Required vindovs mu3t open on a court yard or street, directly through a porch at least T high and not more than 7' deep, with at least 2 sides 50% open. The width of the court or ysrd must be at least 3’ when the buildi ng is not more than 2 stories high.
CEILING HEIGHTS
A minimum of 7' is required os'er at least 50% of the room's ares and the remainder must not be les3 than 5‘ in height.
OCCUPANCY LOAD Egress facilities Available square
2 or more exits are required when occupancy load exceeds foot per occupant
dormitory 20 20
children's daycare facility 5 50


EXITS (GROUP HOCCUPANCY)
MAXIMUM TRAVEL DISTANCE
Exits must be arranged so that the total length of the individual living unit does not exceed 50' or traverse more than one flight of stairs. The entrance door must be within 100'of the unit exit. Where there is an automatic sprinkler system, the distance may be increased to 150'.
EXIT DOORS
They must swing open in the direction of exit travel when the occupancy load is 30 or more. They must swing open 90 degrees. Doors must not swing into the public way.
HEIGHT AND WIDTH
They must be at least 6' - 8“ high and 3' wide (34" clear). Door leaf width must not be more than 4'.
PUBLIC WAYS (GROUP H OCCUPANCY)
CORRIDORS
They must be at least 44" wide. Dead ends must not be more than 20' long.
STAIRWAYS (GROUP H OCCUPANCY)
WIDTH AND HEIGHT
They must be at least 44' wide for an occupancy load of 50 or more. Headroom clearance must be at least 7‘.
RISE AND RUN
Rise must be less than 71/2" and run must be at least 10".
LANDINGS
They must be equal to the width of the stairway in the direction of travel. They need not be more than 5'. The vertical distance between landings must not be more than 12' - 6".
PLUMBING FIXTURES
Water Ur1nal3 Lavatories Showers Automatic Drinking
closets machines fountains
Men 1:10 1:25* 1:12 1:8 laundry 1:75**
plus 1:50 1:50
over 150
Women 1:8 1:12 1:8 laundry 1:75**
1:50
Kitchen 1 1 dish washer
or
3 compartment sink
* when urinals are provided, the number of water closets may be reduced 1 for each but not less than 1/2 the minimum number required.
**1 each floor.
39


HANDICAPPED REQUIREMENTS
TOILET FACILITIES
At least one for each sex must be provided. They must be on the ground floor if the building is not equipped with an elevator. The toilet rooms mu3t have a clear floor 3pace of 4' x 4'.
WATER CLOSETS
There mu3t be at least 32’ unb3tructed in front of the water closet with grab bars, at least 24" long and 31“ parallel to the floor, on each side of the water closet.
LAVATORIES
There must be a 26" wide, 12" deep, 29" high clear space beneath the lavatory.
MIRRORS AND HAND DRYING FACILITIES
There must be at least one, not more than 40" above the floor to the bottom of the mi rror or fixture.
RAMPS
The slope must not be greater than 1 In 12.
40
I
I


BIBLIOGRAPHY
Auletta, Ken. The underclass. N.Y.: Random House, 1982.
Cook, Tim, ed. Vagrancy: Some Nev Perspectives. London: Academic Press, Inc. Ltd., 1979.
Haring, Margery. Out of Community. N.Y.: Quaker Project on Community Conflict, 1967.
Harrington, Michael. The Other America. N.Y.: Mac Millan, 1969.
Homhs, Mary Ellen, and Snyder, Mitch. Homelessness in America: A Forced March to Nowhere. Washington, D.C.: The Community for Creative Nonviolence, 1982.
Me Sheeny, William. Skid Rov. Chicago: Schenkrnan Publishing Co., Inc., 1979.
Miller, Ronald J. The Demolition of Skid Rov. U.S.A.: D.C. Heath and Co., 1982.
Otto, Shirley, and Ortord, Jim. Not Quite Like Home. Chichester, England: John Wiley and Sons, Ltd., 1978.
Social Engineering Technology. Social Architectural Prog ramming for Design of Skid Rov Single-room Occupancy Housing. Los Angeles: Community Redevelopment Agency, 1976.
INTERVIEWS
Bishop George Evans, Catholic Archdioces of Denver
Gabriel, Dale and Charles, Residents, Samaritan Shelter
Gene, Felix, Rick and A1, Resident Kitchen Staff, Samaritan Shelter
Sister Mary Ann Gleason, Administrative Director, Coalition for the Homeless
Father William Kraus, Executive Director, Samaritan Shelter
Joe Levi, Project Architect, Me Og, New Shelter at 38th St. arid York Ave.
Mark McCormack, Project Architect, Barker, Rinker, Seacat, Samaritan Shelter
Joe Sharp, Patty Johnson and Sister Cathy Hanisits, Supervisors, Samaritan Shelter
Terry Sharp, Director of Operations, Samaritan Shelter
Dr. Richard Wright, Director of Medical Services, Eastside Health Center, City and County of Denver, Department of Health and Hospitals
41




SPACE
WAITING WOMEN & FAMILY
USERS
up TO no TINGLE
WOMEN ^
FAM l or
' K x>/ NT N0N' IDcTNJ AHp ^HSlpEKt^ iNhC AFE. WAITING T>
IN- THE. rrr-DlEA<
NO. RQD.
1
SQ. FT.
6oO
SPECIAL NEEDS
TOl LEE 4 TACJ U IT!
AcCLSSieUE PPoM
WAIT1MZ, A/KEA

DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
THl S IE HOT" A >
-spAOE - TD X*SCoOfiUj
KAN4 ifOA - ooT

.RE-
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
ADJ ACENCIES
WAT TOO INTAKE-
iterate p\ehET"K/tp TKEnFK ViTITOFnS PTEKABNEX PLEEPIiN^i in t=ftEE_-2.ilSA WEATHER
iV&'&PlT* C fTf SPACC. TOP,
2X-tO T^^eE-Wt A^C-P
TB'txcXc Ojni
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
TUN Ch £C
VIHXL “T\CB PCAOWIK^
[IKTAKpJ /TXPtT>
CpoW H ip£>rrs» ^
45


47


SPACE
CONTROL
USERS
r'EPM i ^
T&u eg. <3PPi£E-
â– ptP tion^
NO. ROD.
I (^4^0rS
SQ. FT.
2£>o
SPECIAL NEEDS
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
^+iAHTtO ~TZ30~TH "PASTE.
^M/WIW^C, An,HTC
Af^a.
, ^TC-APE- <; i \/eM ot"
â– siAnJ- UP S.-H-E.E-TS. Al/AllF^CE. NTtf>f\MATIOf4;-ApVl'iE 4 iHVTRucrr/osft APe- A l N/JEtA
tueonpots * c ^uRue-i l/-4vde-
itotAEE>
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
M^nz*ei
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
fOK “^>Orp 49


SPACE
men's dorm
users
I zo
le, vnsiM_
NO. ROD.
SQ. FT.
7^0
SPECIAL NEEDS
KioiSE OOTgoL
hi
Pg-\74cr
°e&^t/Ar5C£-
^>TAff=
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
TO I
.'P^w/Aof
i££lT&> ^£oo AQ.D / fO
UN>fr^ cp /2^ of, moo^Ps
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
XJ2ESSM4
s ♦- TA , I > . ^ '
i
IT&WiS
"TAOQrt
£5®£±€\$- ^TQ&S^/K
SPECIAL EQU I PM ENT
^A/cL oT> ot^b lb DbY ^‘0\T]lLL~
T\CtT\ bib Zf\\Z) k)TTS>
ADJ ACENCIES
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
,'i io,'L the. TLcatiAJ^
'DFF’tLaEUT iC_
oe- rA7rf334 ^
EA CA v
51


SPACE
WOMEN'S DORM
USERS
NO. ROD.
SQ. FT.
5,ooO
SPECIAL NEEDS
Ho(SO OOKTP^PL.
nr CcuiroL.
T^lVACY
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
STORE'S. ^AfelNet^, (PA-H. -& E. 0=b>EP
TO I MC^n^tS£E_ T75.1VAC.V
^Eets ^poore-P iNi
L)Mn==. OF- 1-2-
OEL R&jOEJ^
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
3La&T
ok;e^s i mo,
T^tpAv'O l M ^
~T7^i-V0lK\O,
ITEM^
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
ADJACENCI ES
~BAJ0 CH '"feOD X> VRY ~TOW &L
â– JL.
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
^lUY<_ TILE. TLCDkIK^j
DlFFEPeU-T L2LOK
OR TPvTTTiRKi. \>4
SAOK â– JOL.ir-
53


SPACE
NO. RQD.
SQ. FT.
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
FAMILY ROOMS
/2-

USERS
SPECIAL NEEDS
Meh
)S£>lE>G_ <^OK rPoL UMrr (2^Pcl. PRIVACY ^rOr\
1-EE-* i
^KiOKlN Kl DHEE^
^AT-Wip PtEM^llpS
TteSfBOf 2.TAMIU&
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
'T7AL Orye^s^
"rLAsp i ^ <£h i
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
"IZMt&L. ^BiEoS

FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
N//KIVE TILE. FL^
ADJ ACENCI ES
55


SPACE
NO. ROD.
SQ.
FT.
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
GIRLS DORM
USERS
0> <^l rAE? C16-/7
) 600
PECIAL NEEDS
W£>lSC_ oOKTr^L
^ -rf^iVA^Y
TOILET' FACILITIES
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
S
PEC
IA L
Access i but ccl^
EQUIPM ENT
ADJACENCI ES
'a.LEE-flW.4 â– Q?SESS I Nl.^ â– PrEADlNi^
1-bMEWoP'^ TAC^l Nl<^
“SI
iTjrt^s
Fevti U£,
—~*£>AA OA
-EEPH AC
FI N ISHES &
FURNISHINGS
"ViC^U TILT ri-CQK CoVtSrMlT^
57


SPACE
BOY’S DORM
USERS
£> (i£-o Yfts)
NO. ROD.
SO. FT.
too
SPECIAL NEEDS
to (4~r ctosrntoc
trwacy
TO\L£r 'FACILITIES
AX&'Ssible. oauy
FtAto Tfc^ryv)
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
-^CEBFIN^
I N^i
fenCWi^l^.
^&=,TiKi^
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
TOu^CC-l^AiS OrC
ADJ ACENCI ES
Li.
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
ViK^C T1US PLCOf\
59


: :
SPACE RESIDENT STAFF ROOM NO. ROD. 2. SQ. FT. SOD DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OXW&rS â– RE^iOEHTS.
USERS -f 'PP^Demr ^>TAFF SPECIAL NEEDS >4 o (C^»'EL toHTpv oC_ nrr <^c>Kn^pc THlWVOY
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS 'TAuKi N) ^ "SSTCRA^E. Or- fE^SOvy ITBH'S "Rbstih^ W/\t^Hi>44 TV SPECIAL EQUIPMENT TrxO'PL. OK ~eeps OOfBoATfk-p SMALL- “TV -L ADJ ACENCI ES
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS TlL.e fLCOKs

61



SPACE APARTMENT NO. RQD. 1 ox -z_ SQ. FT. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS <^MT=C>Rrr At=SLE_
USERS W-Ho >\ ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS ‘SUE-er/Nl^, PR^SS (MX, "Bath i ts- ^ ^(50^11^ tv rN&Apirs£, SPECIAL EQUIPMENT LX_ COT" ADJ ACENCI ES
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
63


SPACE SHOWER & TOILET
men
USERS
l <2O MEH
NO. ROD.
SQ. FT.
12DO
SPECIAL NEEDS
101TU FACILITIES 'TTOKihA CJjOTHiKiC, oOVUUE INS TH E-
/ «-?
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
l>saS-(HS St-ou LD """££, A/£
TO -KEEP AN B^EL £nJ
OAlUE.
\ K ‘THE-
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
(p ilatea close rs
L>
j E LAVAT'O AiE. rc TriOuLCAE
ADJ ACENCI ES
—}
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
65


SPACE SHOWER & TOILET
women
USERS
NO. ROD.
1
SQ. FT.
Bco
SPECIAL NEEDS
A/v^A
t^rrvr T=AOU IT l Es T£*\ "STOAiaA^ CL&TH-ilA', coRica. 1,0 TR£L-
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
's,Ti<2JUu> ti£n
TO -KBXLP A;fO £>T^ v>^ ^blcvO aJJh'S
uO-H I LTL I Ki
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
loATH. K CCO'SCTS
(p L/\\JpctoA\b^
Cp ^HC>u31=A^
ADJ ACENCI ES
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
67


space ShoweR & TOILET
family men
USERS
(_>P to 3 O H£H ^
CH1
NO. ROD.
1
SQ. FT.
SPECIAL NEEDS
i me, o loth i U>MiLE, |N> TK^. ^HcOtOG^
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
<==HOoL-C> BE- AEJ-E-~TO KHJ&P ArO> cm s&cenM WHILE^ IN, TWEE
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
ADJ ACENCI ES
3 u)AT&a
2. ORijOQc'^
5 L-Av/ATO^IH^
cfiAN^ i|N6t TAtbUl
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
69


SPACE SHOWER & TOILET family women NO. ROD. 1 SQ. FT. &>3 DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OSBAS SHOULD *Bu=. TZD PSSP AM
USERS op TO 'UOHS.H 4 OHiOD^BK SPECIAL NEEDS jApSti-A orw TAcuuriH-S <^LOTH il'Op /M TUS. DM TSu uDv*\A i UVliJD Its 'WH-
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS SPECIAL EQU 1 PM ENT (o O^TB-K ClOOBTS Co LAVATOK^O 0 FINISHES & FURNISHINGS c-pA \.TOi(£^/7^ "A
71


SPACE NO. RQD. SO. FT. TO
LAUNDRY -f +F- OF- h^ACH iLAt~S HEJBOHXX
USERS SPECIAL NEEDS
‘STAFF
r^ssice-HTS
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
DEM~r -po THEIR, FBR3o»\Mu ■feETlOEilM ^
TM,
-HCOSiE- LAJ^'tXY '-IDioELS* *
UsjvLM ^ siRHH KBt -CT-^CCiy' ^OtS'E A
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
- SVJ) ip T>
WCMEH '
EAMiL^ -^OTH -J2vsy^-p
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
ViHTL TILE- Pt^OR,
CoVTRi,^
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
73


75


I
SPACE
CHAPEL
USERS
50 PEOa
NO. ROD.
SQ. FT.
600
SPECIAL NEEDS
ALTE-B
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
Flh/sI EUl
access i'bul ^or
“IIRaPFiC. C&nATKOU,E.D 'SEABHE. /ATT^SHFPSE PATHOL iC.
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
AD J ACENCI ES
AouP PAKS S
QoieeT MFD 1 TAB]oH
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
L^otOFh
SO
OAK'PtB-TTi
77


SPACE
CLOTHING DISPENSARY
USERS
Cloth i m h VoCOMTEErVS*
RH^l'PENTS
MAY H £>H —“KBS i PGM
^bhts.
NO. ROD.
SQ. FT.
( OoO
SPECIAL NEEDS
T~
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS
LLoTH inAi ^ VoLU^T&t.
S»TCOK OfTH
GLOTHlNU^ K/H‘CH lH>
Most- IM
PEATS. E^CHAMHE-'PEPoi SPECIAL EQUIPMENT
KS
RALKh FOfH H CLoTVt^
ADJACENCIES
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS
SUBSEA Te*L dEAMS^ftoES SiO>E/\fTEKLJ Lot^\
Lo'/K>/ 'pATA.^As1.
<^OMTElL
Y* MY1— ~n UA T UOhC GoVT-PsIMO,
79


1
SPACE MEDICAL CLINIC NO. ROD. 1 SQ. FT. 300 DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS hxam <=>TACT=- T&fk VFAY 1^/K^Y TATI lSt\T^ 'P&fbK. ARuA - SoFTHH ATMp^SfH
USERS HEALTH- -TfOFBaoUALS, T/VnEKTS SPECIAL NEEDS E£\\l t-v^ea Tt>Hei_msreK<2e?v tecoRe eokktl. reRPRy^ £U*TAIH TO ‘SS^BATE-EV^MT?TJi£L.r-rCH OGCff, Ti/'CEOEior u^T-rr/iS-', MIH' LYU& £ r^iCROEXFE. 4y GSKT^FUIb')
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS TAWE-moDi_>E hl-STOKy ^HECIC. H-E^pcr-gj&AT M5AS0F& "EiicPTKESuR FAA£>fA 'FFn^ATT^ ITJ^_ TOfE- E^n TE<_V«0 E./v-TT SPECIAL EQU 1 PMENT OTCeCC3f£. im tp ay TAAOP FRSSSUAS- <^OFF CCAVnuL^ MoOiHTTlD) iNFrKUFtRT T^AT l^Aa>T *SCAUE-FA^Vac-C- M>oF‘".‘ tC*\L LMf FINISHES & FURNISHINGS FO OBAJk koWVk -oTCOL F/ AM\ 1 KwVrfOk \ AB(£-TRV^A ak „ . <^OOFt12-A ADJACENCIES /M M / S*Howo4 y ByAMlHATlC^si/^ [ jl^AyioR f~ .—/■ s—m (WAITIH^ F (^HTKT )
81



SPACE COUNSELING NO. ROD. SQ. FT. -7 S' DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ‘ScA'A'E- W^'A'T i MEO P/'U USERS V/Srrisi^ CojMS&lQKS "PvED^ t 0> SPECIAL NEEDS “p/AvVAC^
ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS Qo i Err IP i S.ol) M TtHKWAFS* special equipment ADJACENCI ES
FINISHES & FURNISHINGS TA£LUE_

83



SPACE CLASSROOM NO. ROD. 3 SQ. FT. <£>0O DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
USERS ^ESIOEHTS SPECIAL NEEDS
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85






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T>ESiC 4
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USERS
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107



SPACE YOUTH RECREATION NO. ROD. SQ. FT. <$>oo DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS 4 <^ms£atui—- )
USERS TEEMA4ED 4 YoO^Vr -STAFF SPECIAL NEEDS
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109






I
SPACE
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USERS
2(90 MeN,WcH£U
4 C9UILCWEH
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I 15


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117


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121


123





SPACELOADING DOCK & SORTING AREA NO. ROD. 1 SQ. FT. ^(OO DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
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127


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I
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133


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135


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FINISHES & FURNISHINGS / \

137


DESIGN
THE SITE
Although the parcel includes the entire block bounded by 23rd, 24th, Larimer and Lawrence Streets and Broadway, I propose using only the part of the site to the southeast of the alley for the building; leaving one of the existing buildings (which is actually quite a nice little structure) and locating the parking on the other side of the alley. This would preserve the option of selling the northwestern part of the site if 8nd when real estate values in the 8rea climb. It would be necessary to negotiate an arrangement with the purchaser to include shelter parking in a new structure built on the property.
The site lies in a sea of traffic. The combination of wide streets and the triangular islands created by the thrust of Broadway through the street grid create large, open, desolate spaces. The huge parking lot required added to the problem. Quite a lot of time was spent trying to find a way to strengthen the urban fabric of the area - or at least to avoid making things worse. The Larimer Street side was chosen as the appropriate placs to locate the parking because of the strength of the existing street facade and the main entry was positioned In front of the largest triangle park (where it is common to see men stretched out on nice days to catch a nap in the sun. The entry court includes planters at seat height, to allow people to wait outside on the sunny side of the building, but well within the property line in order to diminish their impact on the neighborhood.
THE BUILDING IMAGE
Brick colored tile was chosen to set the structure into the existing context. It seemed appropriate to create an Institutional tone but It was important to keep it from becoming forbidding and unpleasant. The terraces, visible from the front of the building, along with the bright blue color of the metal roofs help to soften the image. The curved blue wall on the Lawrence Street facade marks the children's garden.
THE BUILDING
The ground floor Is the most public part of the building. The administrative area is arranged around the staff lounge which has facilities for sleeping in case staff members have to spend the night at the shelter. A back hallway gives privacy to counseling and
classrooms.
The large waiting rooms on the alley side of the lobby are used in a variety of ways. They provide daytime protection in harsh weather without interfering with activities which must be undertaken by the staff when the residents are not supposed to be in the shelter, e g. maintenance and meal preparation. It is not intended to be an inviting or comfortable space. This is to discourage Its use as a permanent hangout. One would also serve as a waiting area for the medical clinic, which will be open a few nights a week for residents and a few days a week for other Indigent people who are not shelter residents. The small rooms in each are for teenagers who need sleeping space. The system allows up to 24 hours before the stringent codes and restrictions on the facilities for housing them are enforced. Since it is well known that youth 8re responsible for much of the criminal and anti-social activity in our society, these spaces are Isolated from the rest of the shelter population. After 24 hours some may be moved to the dorms on the third floor, some may plug in to another part of the system 8nd some will probably run again.
139


Clothing was located near the waiting area so that if a clothing exchange program was made available to street people who are not residents, it would keep the activity remote from the function of the residential program.
The intake desk is the check-in point for residents who can then choose to go to the dining room, the chapel, the courtyard, or upstairs to shower, do laundry, nap, watch TV or engage in some other form of recreation. The stairway next to the intake desk becomes a control point on each floor. People must pass in front of each control desk before continuing up the stairs.
The dining area is also intended to function as a recreation space open to the total population. Small tables seating no more than six were selected in order to encourage social interaction. In warm weather food can be brought out to the courtyard. There is a game room for pool or ping pong and a small lounge area near the bank of telephones.
Childcare, with its own outdoor space is located on the southeast because that is the only outdoor space used during the day by residents. The childcare activities would probably not be certified but I believe they could meet the qualifications In this arrangement.
The chapel was placed in a way which allows the use of the lobby for congregation space before and after services and to symbolically bridge the space between the shelter and the community at large.
140
The area of the second floor nearest to the control desk is where single men, who are in the first phase of the Samaritan Program, are housed. They are allowed to stay for 30 days. If it appears that they will benefit from staying longer, the/would be moved into the rooms reserved for men in the second phase of the program, who can stay up to 60 additional days. Phase two men participate in training and other programs designed to help them become self-supporting. A sense of uniqueness and identification for individual bed spaces in the huge dormitory room is enhansed by 5 foot partitions which divide the space into units of 8 or fewer beds, but permit observation by the staff and other residents for purposes of control. Vinyl floor tiles in varying colors apd patterns would be used in each section. Storage units are placed at the pillow end of each bed to increase the sense of privacy.
The laundry facilities for men are adjacent to the men's lounge but on the other side of the wall for sound dampening.
Families occupy the remainder of the second floor.. It was important to provide private rooms. Under the stress of homelessness and povertry, relationships are strained and the need is great for a place for families to be alone together.
As in the men's area, all other lounges are combined with laundry facilities. This provides another opportunity for socializing.
The terraces overlook the courtyard space below.


I
I
I
I
On the top, and least accessible floor, teenagers occupy the area near the control desk. Because many of these children have been sexually abused the bathrooms have been placed so that they are accessible only from each youth dormitory. Regulations me/ require resident youth supervision , therefore space has been allocated for it.
An efficiency apartment separates the boys and girls dormitories. It provides another place for staff to spend the night in case of an emergency situation. It might also be used to temporarily house visiting church officials.
The single women's quarters, which are on the third floor, have been handled in the same way as the single men's.
141


I
I
I
SAMARITAN HOUSE
A SHELTER FOR THE HOMELESS
MAY 1985 MASTER'S THESIS DIANE WEISS KAHN
11
LARIMER STREET
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SITE PLAN
10 20


NORTHWEST ELEVATION


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SUPERVISORS A SECURITY
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Full Text

PAGE 1

I I KAHN ARCHIVES LD 1190 A\2 1985 K336 SAMARITAN HOUSE A SHElTER FOR THE HOMElESS MASTER'S THESIS DIANE WEISS KAHN ENViRONMENTAL DESIGN AURARIA LIBRARY

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U18700 4087711 I I I

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I I I I ' I Your structure tells people what you th1nl< of them -how you value them -as much as how you treat them. S1ster Mary Ann Gleason

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I I I I An Architectural Thesis presented to The College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture . DIANE WEISS KAHN Spring, 1985

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EN DES I i'fi.S: L/) I 1190 /<3'3b . . The thests or DIANE WEISS KAHN ts approved. I Un1vers1ty of Colorado at Denver May, 1985

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I I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I must acknowledge a debt of gratitude to the many people who contributed their time and thoughts to this thesis study . In particular I am grateful to Father 8111 Kraus and Terry Sharp, of Samaritan Shelter, for their valuable information and insightful observations; to Joe Levi and Paul Heath, my for their stimulating and nurturing encouragement ; and finally, I would like to thank my family for their expressions of love , help, and patience throughout the course of this project.

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I CONTENTS I INTRODUCTION SITE I THESIS STATEMENT 33 LOCATION I 5 STUDY PROCESS 35 ANALYSIS BACKGROUND CONSTRAINTS 7 001ELESSNESS 37 ZONING REQUIREMENTS . 38 BUILDING CODE REQUIREMENTS PROGRAt1 9 HISTORY BIBLIOGRAPHY 9 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 41 Bl BL IOGRAPHY 10 POLICIES 41 INTERVIEWS 10 RULES I I STAfF SPACE REQUIREMENTS I I VOLUNTEERS 43 SPACE SHEETS 13 ORGANIZATIONAL FLOW CHART IS STAfF INTERACTION MATRIX DESIGN 17 RESIDENTS 18 RESIDENT ACTIVITY FLOW CHART. 139 DESCRIPTION 19 SERVICES PROVIDED 143 DRAWINGS 23 A TYPICAL DAY 155 t'K>DEL 25 OONA TIONS FLOW CHART CONCLUSION 26 DESIGN ISSUES AND GUIDELINES 163 29 ADJACENCIES AND RELATIONSHIPS 30 LEVELS OF PENETRATION OF THE BUILDING BY ACTIVITY APPENDIX 31 LEVELS OF PENETRATION OF THE BUILDING BY POPULATION OTHER ALTERNATIVES FOR SHELTER vii

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I I I INTRODUCTION THESIS STATEMENT N obcxty knows prtisely how many homeless there are in Denver. Experts' estimates range from 500 to well over 5,000. However, the fact that there are people sleeping in alleys, OX>rweys, end under and whole families living out of their cars Is never disputOO. Denver has o few olternotives for temporory shelter to poople from on the street, but Samaritan House is unique in this country In ar least two Wflt/S. It not only provioos short term resioonce for some of the city' s homeless populotion, feeds ond clothes them, it also provides the kind of 8lld support which offers people who are at the end of their resources, the opportunity to take time out to consioor how to improve their situatioos. Unlike some similar focilities which also offer more than just bed and board, it carries out its pr()Jr6ffi without the use of a referral system to prescreen residents. The structure which the shelter occupies was originally built cs e high school. It has been refitted to attempt to meet its present use. In some wcrys It works qutte well, but In other Wflt/S Its purposes are impeOOd. Bishop Evans of the Catholic Archdiocese of Denver, under whose auspices the shelter exists, proposed that my thesis stuay focus on ooveloping en architectural pri)Jram for the. shelter at e new location. I la:epted his suwestion and the following architectural prQJram and design are the result. My design ploces the new shelter, to be called, "Samaritan HouseM at the site chosen by the Archdiocese. It is the block bounded by 23rd , 24th, Larimer and Lawrence and Brooowcry, in Denver, Colortm. The building will twse 250 men, women 8tld children within 75,000 square feet. Homei8SS fJ80ple assume their own privacy by staying out of tho statistics.

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Certain issues need to be kept in mind throughout the process of planning this fa::lllty. One concerns the neoo to support an esprit re cxrps. Terry Sharp, who was Director of Operations for two years after the toceptioo of the shelter has said, "People mBY come in w1th a chip on their shoulder, but once they're here for a few d!sys they realize thsy' re part of it (the shelter)." Tips on jobs are exchanged ana peer pressure to continue to looK for a job or lbJl with the social service burocra::y helps to combat depression and a sense of ref eat. The following is a OOscl'iption of feelings set mwn by Mitch Snyoor (Community for Creatlve Nonviolence, Washington, D.C.), who voluntarily bocame homeless for a month in oroor to better understaOO the peep le for whom he was &jvocat ing. u was a frightening and amazing experience the discovery of just how qutckly one's sense of substonce and self-worth melts tiNt/If under these conditions. It is as though two separate, parallel, and real1t1es exist. For those who are homeless, the rest of the world is alien and irrelevMl The 'housaf ones shared none of our coocerns or priorities; their frustrations bore little or no resemblance to our ow_ n . • In the 8bsense of a sense of kinship to those who have the b8sic neoo fer housing satisfied, it is essential that a sense of woup membership be fostered among the shelter's resicimts. Human beings are highly social creetures. We OOpend on the tneptance or others for our sense otwell-being and self-worth. As long os someone hos vioble social has slhe will be less likely to feel, "lost". "passed by". or surplus". The inclusion of women and chtldren is also very important to producing an experience of community and a relahooship to the other world of the "housOO". It helps to preserve or
PAGE 10

I I I I ;' &maritan extends a lifeline for residents to pull themselves up on. A oo the wall behind the intaKe OOsk reflis, "Welcome, we're happy to help you help yourseW. It ts Important to support this phllosophy In the design by providing Wl environment which fortifies the sense of outonomy ond potency of the individuals there. The layout must not precll.IOO choices which the resl
PAGE 11

I I I

PAGE 12

I I I STUDY PROCESS MEETING SEPTEMBER 18 with Bishop Goorge Evans, Catholic Archdiocese of DenVer. We discussed the range of my thesis project in terms of the school time frame and my research object1ves. B lshop Evans Q6Ve an overview or the SomaritM Shelter's progrGin 60d my at the shelter for a meeting with its Executtve Director. 1st visit to the shelter September 21 meeting with father Will1am Kraus, Executive Director, Samr itan Shelter. We discussed my thesis objecUves and the general pis 60d objectives of the shelter, as well as some details of its operation. I toured some of the facility and observed the d6ytime or the shelter. meeting with Gene Thomas, Cook, Samaritan Shelter. We discussOO the kitchen, foo:t storage and overall prcx:eedures and needs. 2nd vtstt to the shelter4 meeting with Terry Sharp, Director of Operations, Samaritan Shelter. We discussed the shelter's pro;ram tn more detat 1 and I toured parts of the building which I hoo not previously seen. I 1V3in observed daytime operations. 3rd visit to the shelter I 0 spent the entire day Gild et the shelter I observed the 24 hour operatloo of the shelter, spoke at length wtth: Men's supervlsu-, Joe Sharp; Women's supervisors, Patty Johnson and Sister Cathy Hanis1ts: Pol1ce officer. Reed; and Resilirlts. Gabriela, Dale Md ctwles. Meeting
PAGE 13

4th visit to the shelter
PAGE 14

I I I BACKGROUND HOMELESS NESS While 1t was ooce .umld that hoolelessness was ronf1ned to a small subculture or sktd row bUms, tt ts that a brooo cross -section of the population: minorities, women, the urb81l poor warm-ers. the old, sick, mentally 111, and unemployedIn other wa-ds the displlllld and the dlsenfranchized make up the ranks of the hooleless. It wm come as no surprise that minority groups suffer rrure than their share of poverty. Ken Auletta, author of I.ha UrxU'ClA5S, fixes it at 701 and maintains that 501 of the poor live in female-heaald households. Single women with children is the harOOst hit by the current economic situation and social services Pro;T8lll cuts. Minority women with children are dispropcrtiooately affectoo. Unemplwoo men, who leave home so . their families can get welfse assistance; those on fixed incomes, which a:Ner the cost of rampant inflation and rising rents; the physically iII, whose resources have been exhaused (physical disabilities are very common among the homeless) often turn out into the streets. Rapid deinstltutlon8lizatlon of mentally ill pmple rHer the last has been wtthoUt transitional housing. They therefore for a large proportion of the toneless. Current trends in a:iucation and the high li'opout rate are responsible flr tne Ita of preparation of many members of our society for the work which is ovciloble. 59J of employment todoy is in the white mllar area, 22J rapping) is in blue mllar jobs and 191 is in the service fields. Cleaner. d6y laborer, sailor, soldier, miner, lower, hobo, hired man, and musici81l are occupations often associated with the toneless . I . . KenAulett.D,TbelJM:'rclags (N.Y. , 1982), p. 31. An Insufficient supply of low and very low il'lCOOle housing opttoos fWld the disappearance of roomlnQ houses, units which rent by the week and cheap hotels (flophouses or cubicle hotels) Is a prime contributor to the rise of homelessness. These lcd;J1ngs haw fallen prey to unmMageable operating expenses, restrlctloos Imposed by building ordinances, and Urbon Renewal. The number of homeless In Denver ts not known, but the following figures , supplied by Sister Mary Ann Gleeson, Administrative of the Coalition of Shelters flr the toneless in Denver, moy cost some light on the subjEd. 15,000 evtcttons per year 2,000 foreclosures in 1983 4,000 mentally i 11 who are unprrHided flr Denver draws people from all rHer because of its reputation fer low unemployment. pleasant climate. and the be6uty of tts nearby mountains. Many get here with the last of their money in the hope of gettinQ a job and malclnQ 8 new start. Often they come with sk111s, useful before new and tnterll8tiooal ew'lOOltc pressures reduced or eliminated the need for them. Some are totolly unskilled, fit only for 8 of job opportunities which is rapidly dtsoppeartrlQ. 7

PAGE 15

I I 8

PAGE 16

I I I PROGRAM HISTORY On February 3, 1981, Holy Ghost Church opened its mws to the peJple of Denver who f'lEI8(Bj a warm plt to sleep. 200 people came that and conttnua1 to come all that winter. They slept on the basement floor and ate meals proviOOd by parishioners. The critical neoo fer a permanent shelter ru.t b8mle obvious and the search for an appropriate ffK:ility began. Central Catholic High School, at 1836 LOJaO Street, which twi been closed because of enrollment, wes selected. The project was sponsoroo by two churches, Basilica of the Immaculate Conception and Holy Ghost. With a $50,000 grant from the Aretldlocese of Denver and oonatlons of clothing, 11nens, personal items and fw1, the Samaritan Shelter opened on November 8 • . 1982. The property on which the shelter slts h6S greatly escalated In value due to oowntown oovetopment and conslooratlon Is being given to finding a usa for the property which Is more In line with tts present value. A new site for the shelter will offer the op!)(rtunity for a flJ;ility which is 005igned to suit the special ne00s of Samaritan House's You've {PI to fP soma for yourself. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The basic pi of the shelter ts to put itself out of business; to aid in the battle against homelessness tn Denver until there is no IOO(Jr' a need for it to exist. It Is the objective of the shelter fer Us to find themselves tn better shape, in terms of money, heolth 80d/cr spir1t, when they leave than when they come ln. Volunteers and donations are vital to the concept that this is a ministry of the whole city, not just that of the shelter Itself or only of the Archdioc:es. Samar1tan seeks to prov1oo an atmosphere conduslve to spiritual reflection for Its residents. Rest and nutritious fooj are indispensible to fitness for emplwment which in turn is important for self-respect. A noninstitutional, family setting, not a pl&::e where one feels incarceratoo, is prOOUctive in m6King resi0011ts feel part of the normal life of our society. It Is Interesting to note that here, locked
PAGE 17

POLICIES Mnission for free room and board is on a first-come-first-served basis frr 8flY008 who C80 toke care of him/herself and children. No referral is nllUir-81. Everyone is treeted with courtesy 800 which attus the low self-esteem common to the homeless. Sermriten ooesn't went to ch8nQe enymes ltfestyle (people must oo thet frr themselves tn(Wft./) but no alcoh81 rr i'ugs mft./ be used during the pertoo of e resiOOr\t's st8'{, be3Jse these tend to creete dtsturbaoces in the shelter and with wrrk outsioo. Asking men to weit on ltne an d8y before the initial lntal
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I I , I STAFF Executive Director, Father William Kraus Associate Father Dunn Director Men's SUpervisor, 1 AM. to 9 AM. Women's SUpervisor, 1 A.M. to 9 A.M. Men's SUpervisor, 5 P.M. to 1 A.M. Wanen's SUperviD', 5 P.M. to I AM. Ouidlwlal Counsekr Emplo,tment Counselor Fcm Manager /Cook kssisW!t Cook Dtshwasller Maintsnn:e Men -2 Off-ci.lty Police Officers4 part time RapUoolst/Secretary. weekd6vs RscepUooisVSecretary, WeeKends Manager Volunteers VOLUNTEERS Because of the mslre to Include the entire community In Its Pro.J111l, Slwnerltan en11sts the aid of volunteers to serve dinner to the residents, srt and size OOnllted clothing a00 fUJ requis1Uoos, tr81lSp0f"t pm and help with laurKiy The use of In-house volunteers Is dtsrouraaoo because tt frOOl the aim of tndependDnt ltfe out5tde the shelter . Cook and dlshwGSher, however, share a smaJJ room and get soo.e payment for their servims. They ere aJJowed to stav longer than 90 Oiys. Mothers who spend the dlry at the shelter ere asked to help with the laurxiy when n&C8SS81y. C41J't IBie CBre of them forever.ttost people end up here becBuse of loci of order in their lives. I I

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12 I I

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I I I ORGANIZATIONAL FLOW CHART ARCHDIOCESE OF DENVER POLICE CLOTHING 13

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I STAff INTERACTION MATRIX I I Ill s... Q) Ill Q) s... Ill ....., s... s... Q) s... c 0 0 . Q) Q) ::I . rr-s... ....., Q) r-s... Q) Q) -. . c ....., 0 0 01 Ill Ill 0.. s. s... . ::I c > >, s... 0 :::E c c ::I -. s... . r-::I -Q) u . ::I ::I V') 0.. s... 0.. . ..... s... 0 r-Ol u s... Ol 0 0 ::I Ol ::I Cl ...... > 0 c Q) Ill . Ol c u u Ill V') :::E V') Cl > ...... V') Q) . tO ....., :::E ...... -. s... ......... u ....., 3: Ill . c Ill . . u . Q) "C ....., . ...... c . ..... "C ....., r-"C Q) Ol Ol 0 u 0 0 u r-.,.... Ill Ill 0 0 0.. .,.... E c "C 0 Ill Q) ....., 0 rQ) 0 tO .,.... Ill 0 rE ::I 0 Q) r-s... .Ill >< 0 1.1... u 0::: 0... :::E Cl <( 1.1... u LU Ul 3 :::E al 0... <( LU 0 0 0 • 0 0 0 0::::::::: . . . :(f.: 0 O • e e ti{ j Exec. Dir. • • • ::}: 0 0 0 0 ={: Assoc. Dir. 0 0 0 e • • • • e tf Prog. Dir. ::.:..::. • ,;;, . .-• < ::. ::::::::: Bldg Mgr .......... iW' ::::::::: • • 8 0 0 0 • iiiti Men • s Sup • r. :!/!f: e 0 OP tt= Women's Sup'r. () • Guid. Counselor (::: Emp 1 . Counse 1 or • Clothing Mgr. • • • iiiiit Food Mgr. • • if:i:i Assist. Cook Dishwasher :i:i:i:i Ma i n t. t--+--t--t-........ iiiiiii: Po 1 ice e • • f:k: Rec. /Sec • y itiiii Clothing Volunteers .................... iiiiri Food Vo 1 u nteers .............. Other Volunteers LIGHT 0 MODERATE \\\\\\\! HEAVY -IS

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16 I I

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I I I RESIDENTS People of all ages can be found at the shelter. A minimum age 11m1t Is imPQSOO bEuse it is felt that babies youn(J3r than 6 months should not be expo500 to diseases which may be present. As long as one con care for him/herself there is no upper limit. The turnover rate Is aboUt 5 or 6 men eoch d6y and 2 or 3 women. The number varies for fomihes, but there is usually some change eoch day. Presently ot Samaritan Shelter there are beds for 96 single men, 47 family members, and 20 single women. 15 more can be tn an emergenc:,y situation. The new Samaritan House will be designed for an exparm:l capocity of 250 bros with the trlJition to the pr()Jram of spoce for 20 homeless youth. The number of beds for single men, women and families will increase to 120, 40 and 70 respoctively. There will be cot or floor spoce for I 00 other homeless people tn times of extreme weather conditions. School children are to attend school while their families are at Samaritan. Individual arrangements are with the Board of Education to select the school. Sometimes children can be pickoo up by school bus, but transportation is the responsibliity of the parents. Some of the residents ore the new poor stm looking for permanent jobs. Others OOpend on labor pools for temporary work. Labor pools controct wHh foctories and others for workers. It ts to the of the employer to hire workers by the dey because of savings in benef1ts and wages. Samaritan's rapport with lalxr pools ts bEause its men and women m-e well foo, sober, and reasmably well rested. Labor pools often send vans to the shelter 88rly in the morning to pick up workers. Minimum wage ts the rule for these jobs. worker, o labor pool job can lead to job. Half of the residents are helped for the short-term . That is, they can manage to keep it tCQ3ther for a perioo of time after leavinQ, but they return. A group of long-term poor, woo are still motivatOO to succeed but, because they are unskilled and often victims of systemic Injustice, barely get by and never get aheln Alcoool, the la of self-management sk11ls, and l1fe patterns which glvlrv;J up when things get tough, are reesons for the chronic homeless condition of some. Not all tl1ults sleeping at the shelter find or even look for work. These are generally the long-term poor who are not liKely to change. About I person out of 20 bocomes really stabilizoo and self-supporting for the long-term. A few hove to save as much as $700 by the time their stay was over. The new par is the group most likely to benefit permanently from Samaritan's program. Someumes me only wey you con tell the homeless Is when they're wetting the str88t cerrfn' their rolls. 17

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RESIDENT ACTIVITY FLOW CHART f'lC-K uf' LUl\lCl-l For what it is its fantastic, but I don't want to stay any longer than I have to. 18 I I

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I I I SERVICES PROVIDED BEDS New residents ore assigned beds ond issued cleon linen ond blonkets ot the initial intake. The bed number becomes an important ioontifying factor for such things as laundry and wakeup lists or clothing requisitions . Once week guests are asked to strip their beds . BErt1ing is then Jaunoored by volunteers at the s helter and the clean. foiOOd linen is put on the bOOs before people return in the evening. Resioonts must make their beds every day before leaving. FOOD About 1 3,500 meals are served at the shelte r eoch month. Most ol the fooo I s ltlnated by supermarkets . hotels, farmer's markets. and the government clearing house. The shelter also has an eox>unt with a whole sale fcro supplier . A great ooal of the OOilated fcro is oo the verge of spoil1ng and must be u500 immediately. Because there is no way ofknowing what will be coming in, and meal planning are complex problems. The cooKs prepare a hot breakfast ( 6:30 to 8:00) and dinner ( 6:00 to 7 : 30) every d6y for the resiOOrlts and staff . No socond servings of fcro are offered, but a socond cup of coffee can be taken after everyone has hoo a f1rst cup. Brown bEYJ lunches are prepared for resioonts to take along to work and lunch is served to anyone who is in the shelter at noon -includino the new men. Volunteers help the kitchen staff to serve the dinner. Arry fcxxj which leaves the kitchen must be eaten or thrown away. Health regulations proh1b1t its retun after serving. No fcro or drink may be brought into the shelter by the residents because of potential problems with insects and roomts, but pop from a coin operated midline is available. This pi1JC8 Is /Jolter thbn where some guests usublly stby. /Is c/ebn, orderly bnd saf8. 19

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SHOWERS A dally shower 1s required for everyone. Res1oonts are hanOOd a clean towel at the intake OOsk eoch evening. It is returned after bathing. Some resioonts have indicated a preference for keeping the towel until after the morning wash up. Razors (men) and toothbrushes are issued at the initial intake. Shampoo, toothpaste, deOOerant, powder, etc. are Kept at the control area and dispensed a helping at a t1me to avo1d waste. So6p Is kept in the shower room. Except for late workers, all showers must be completed by 8:30 . Resioonts have the choice of bathing before or after dinner. COUNSELING Counseling will be provided by a Guidance Counselor, who evaluates resioonts' neOOs for medical, legal, and psychoi()Jical help, vocational training , and sKills . When it is indicated, the counselor will make referrals to the appropriate t93ncy or (Social Services, OOH, etc.). An employment counselor wlll make job referrals, keep treck of resiOOnts work progress, end offer counsel when work related problems !Evelop. Father Dunn IEBis d1ologue-scripture-prsyer services, which 81"8 In effect group rap sessions. Spirituel counsellng ls provided by Father Dunn with asslstsu et times from Father Kraus. Members of the staff In general make it a point to talk residents about how things are end offer encoor(IJOOlent. Social workers end others occssstooelly see their clients at the shelter. MESSAGES . Ha11 Is d1str1buted during Intake. Telephone messages are tmcen and relavad to residents and change Is made for use of the pay phones at the shelter. tt'll wMI to f6n 6 sp6rt of hope they're hurting people who've lost hope. 2 0 I I

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I I I I : . \ . .,., .. CLOTHING An of 5 or 6 30 gallon plastic bags full of clothing and other Items are given to Samaritan Bfh day. Once or twice during the month a resioont can submit a requisition slip listing : bed number, the 005ired items and sizes. Slips are collected on Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. The clothing Man
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STORAGE At the moment, guests keep their belongings in large cardboard boxes which are ploca:l at the foot of eoch bed during the day and on the floor ot night. The limited stror6(Je spoce discour6(Je5 people from bringing more than a minimum number of items to the shelter . Valuables can be stored in a safe vault in the office. Med1c1nes and weapons are held in the office until residents leave the shelter. They can be reclaimed daily. Daytime parking spoce is proviOOd for the autos of workers who are picked up and dropped off by lobar pool von. MEDICAL The Robert Wocm Johnson Foundation is establishing a network of moolcal clinics for the at various sites around the city. Samaritm House wll1 be one of those sites . The clinic will open. for residents two nights a week. Examinations and treatment for minor complaints will be handloo at the shelter; more serious prob I ems will be referred to Denver General Hospital ( DGH). Ambulance or other transportation assistance to DGH will be proviOOd when necessary. Two d6ys a week the medical cl1n1c wm be open for 1nd1gent people in the outside community. An Infirmary w111also be provided for people who must be issolatoo and for minor problems which arise when the clinic is closed. Coti1UNITY Toilet, shower, clothing exchange, md moolcel for the Indigent popuhrtion outside the shelter wll1 be provided. Jfe 're not just tJnotller lltJndout 22 I I

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I I I A TYPICAL DAY 12 :30i..M. 1 : 00 A .M. 5 :00A. M. 6 :00A.M. until 6:30A. M . 6 :30A. M . until 8 : 00A.M . 8 :00A. M . 9 : 00A.M. 12:00 A . M . Men's and Women's Supervisors make bed Men's and Women' s Supervisors change shift and exchange information. coffee and doughnuts set out for early w-orkers. Workers pick up medications, w-eapons and sack 1 unches, leave for 'w'ork:. ne'w' men ask for admission, 'w'&it in 1i ne (all day). Supervisors 'w'ak:e up early 'w'Ork:ers. everyone is 'w'olen up by P . A . system. hot breakfast is served, 'w'ork passe s (for late return) are issued, residents pick up medicines, 'Weapons and sack 1 unches. everyone leaves (except mothers and children, the sick:, and night 'w'Orkers). Receptionis t/Seccretary arrives, Men's and Women's Supervis ors e xchange information and leave. 1 unch is served to those in the shelter ( i ncl udi ng ne'w' residents). Simplicity makos Samaritan S!Joltor work. until 5 : 00P.M . 5 :00P. M . 5 :15P.M. 6 :00P.M. 7 :00P. M . 7 :00P.M. mothers and staff do hotUse laundry, cook and helpers prepare meals, maintenance men make repairs, ne'w' men are i nvHed in to help 'w'ith chores. Men's and Women' s Supervisors arrive and exchanQe i nformatlon, Receptionist/Secretary 'W'Omen enter, give name3, get meil, ere issued to'w'el, hand in medicines and 'w'eapons, sho'w'er, do laundry, sit in hall or on beds, read, talk. ne'w' men enter, give names, are told rules, are issued to'w'el, razor and toothbrush, are asked for 'Weapons and medicines, are assiQned beds, sho'W'er, tcsl k, read, etc. Police Officer arrives, Men 1i ne up to enter , give names, get mail, are issued to'W'el, hand in medicines, sho'w'er, do laundry. Dinner is served. must be in or lose bed (except for those 'w'1th 'w'O r k passes) . hot dinner is over, sand'w'iches are served to late '"l)rkers . Children must leave the cafeteria area. 23

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5 :00P. M . to the office i3 bU3y... mski ng change, g1v1 ng I 8 :00P.M. medicine, ans'w'eri nq the door and phone, locking up valuables. I 8 : 30P.M . no more sho'w'ers except for late 'w'orkers. 9 :00P. M . children go to bed. until 10 : 00 P . M . people 'w'&tch TV, talk, read, play cards, nap, do laundry . 10: 00 P . M . no more laundry i3 sllo'w'ed. Women must leave cafeteria ares ('w'hich is presently also the men' s dorm). Lights out (people can talk quietly in the hell). 11: 00 P . M . Police Officer leaves. unt11 11 : 30 P.M. people can s 1on 'w'81ceup sheet. throught the Supervisors do paper'w'ork, make bed checks, do night house laundry, and 'w'ake up 'Workers 'w'1th a flashlight . 24

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I I I DONATIONS FLOW CHART 25

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DESIGN ISSUES Allo'w' the residents to have es much choic e as possible. Provide as much privacy as possible 'w'lthout compromising control and security . Encourage social interaction . Avoid creating demeaning situations . 26 DESIGN GUIDEliNES Residents should be able to move freely bet\v'een activities . Residenb should have easy access to outdoor recreation in good 'w'&isther. U s e half-heigtlt 'w'&lls and storage units as visual barriors. !"len' s and women's dorms and dressing areas should not be observable by staff of the opposite sex. Provide s maller, quiet areas for solitary reading, thinKing or talKing in small groups. Provide alcoves off the large recreation/dining area for more inti mate soci a 1i zi ng. Allow enough spac e to provide many small ( 4 person) tables in the Recreation/dining area. Don' t isolate the handicapped. Standing on line is tiresome and demeaning, therefore avoid the necessity 'w'henever possible. Vary the colors and patterns of tloor and -wall treatments to cre11te more identifiable, personal spaces. Break large dorm rooms into many smaller sections . Provide separate youth and children' s recreation areas. I I

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I I I Different populations have varyif!9 needs. Mental and antisocial behavior create the need for strong security measures. Some people should have only minimal cantact 'With ottters. Provide a variety of socializing opportunities (i.e . , larger areas for TV, small tables for card and board games, and space for ping poOQ or pool). Locate handicapped beds, toilets and sho'Wers on the first floor. Provide barrior free access to all communal activities. Complete privacy limits security and presents opportunities for problems to arise, therefore allo'w' no completely private spaces for residents except in bathroom stalls . Residents belonoi ngs must be in observable areas. Provide safe storage for residents' valuables in administrative area. The medical clinic needs limited access and safe storage for drugs. Controlled access is needed for storage of maintenance and kitchen supplies. Staff and volunteers' belongings need to be kept in an area 'Which is inaccessible to the residents. Separate access to men's and 'Women's areas. Locate 'w'omens, family and youth sections deeper in the building than the men's section. Keep limited services 'Wttich are provided to other indigents near the entry and control access to resident areas. 27

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I ADJACENCIES AND RELATIONSHIPS I I av• tt 29

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LEVELS OF PENETRATION OF THE BUILDING BY ACTIVITY 30 I I

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I I I LEVELS OF PENETRATION OF THE BUILDING BY POPULATION GROUP street people men staff families women 31

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I I I SITE LOCATION !U 2 t .R :i a! ........... _. 17-nt ... •• !:11!_ N EB • 33

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NO 35

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I I I CONSTRAINTS CLIMATE "We 'Were constantly preoccupied 'w'lth ttle "Weather. Would it rain or sno'w'? Would it be 'Windy, or 'Would the temperature drop tonight? At o mini mum, our 'w'ellbeing 'w'ould depend on the ans'w'ers to those questions: at the extremes, our 1ives might hang in the balance." Mitch Snyder Denver has a mild, sunny semi-arid climate. Extremely 'w'arm or cold 'w'eather is usually of short duration. Spring i3 the -wette3t, cloudiest and 'w'indiest season. Much of the 37% of the annual total preci pation that occurs in spring falls as sno'w' durinQ the colder, earlier part of the season. Stormy periods are often by 3tretche3 of mild 3unny 'Weather that remove previous sno'w' rover. In Autumn there is less cloudiness and a greater percent of possible sunshine than anu other time of uear. Precipitation is about 20% of the onnU81 total. Winter has least preci pitahon accumulation ( 11 % of the annual total) and almost all of it i3 sno'w'. Weather can be quite severe, but as a rule the severity doesn't last long. ZONING B-8 Sec. 59 392 ( 1) by right dd. Clinic, dental or medical; qqq. Institution, excl udi nq adult community corrections facility; owo. Pub1ic baths; Sec. 59-394 ( 1) Basic maximum floor area The sum total of the gross floor area of all structures on a zone lot shall not be greater than four ( 4) times the area of the zone lot on "Which the structures are located. Off-street requirements Class 2 One parking space is required for each 600 feet of gross floor area. Off-street 1 oadi ng req ui re me nts One loading is required for 25,001 to 250,000 square feet of gross floor area. 37

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THE DENVER BUILDING CODE GROUP H DIVISION 2 Apartments, garden apartments, convents, monasteries, rooming foster homes, senior citizens homes. ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA II II I IV v 1 -hr N 1 -hr -N 1 -hr N or H.T. unlimited 24,000 10,000 6,900 10,200 6,900 7,800 MAXI MUM HEIGHT Of BUILDINGS IN STORIES II Ill IV v 1 hr N 1 hr N 1 hr or H . T . unlimited 6 5 4 1 3 38 N np FIRE RESISTANCE A building of more than one in height be of at 1 hr fire resistive construction . LIGHT Required wi ndo\y'S must open on a court yard or street, di recti y through a porch at least 7' high and not more than 7' deep, 'With at least 2 sides 50% open. The \v'idth of the court or yard must be at 3' when the building is not more than 2 stories high. CEI Ll NG HEIGHTS A mini mum of 7' is required over at leas t 50% of the room's area and the remainder must not be le3s than 5' in height. OCCUPANCY LOAD Egress facilities .... . Avallable square 2 or more are foot per occupant required when occu-pa nc y 1 oad exceeds dormitory 20 20 daiJcare facility 5 50 I I

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I I I EXITS (GROUP H OCCUPANCY) MAXIMUM TRAVEL DISTANCE Exit:! be arranged that the totollength of the i ndividuallivi ng unit doe3 oot exceed 50' or traverse more than one tlight of stairs. The entrance door must be 'w'ithi n 1 oo of the unit exit. Where there is en automatic sprinkler system, the distance may be i ncre&sed to 150' . EXIT DOORS They must S'w'ing open in the direction of exit travel 'w'hen the occuJ){Incy load is 30 or more. They must s'w'i ng open 90 degrees. Doors must not s'w'ing into the pubhc 'w'ay. HEIGHT AND WIDTH .. They must be at least 6'8u high and 3' 'w'ide (34" clear). Door leaf 'Width must not be more than 4'. PUBLIC WAYS (GROUP H OCCUPANCY) CORRIDORS They must be at ledst 44" 'w'ide. Dead ends must not be more than 20' long. STAIR'WAYS (GROUP H OCCUPANCY) WIDTH AND HEIGHT They mus t be at least 44' 'w'ide for an occupancy load of so or more. Headroom clearance must be at least 7 ' . RISE AND RUN Rise must be less than 71/2" and run must be at least 1 0". LANDINGS They must be equal to the 'w'idth of the stai r'w'ay in the direction of travel. They need not be more than 5' . Ttte vertical distance bet'ween Iandi ngs must not be more th11n 12' -6 ". PLUMBING FIXTURES Water Urt nals Lavatortes StiO'w'ers Automauc Drt nKt no closets mac fountai 1"13 Men 1 : 1 0 1 :25* 1 : 12 1 : 8 laundry 1 :50 1 :75** plus 1 : 50 over 150 Women 1 :8 1 :12 1 : 8 laundry 1:50 1 :75** Kitchen 1 dish 'w'asher or 3 compartment sinK * 'w'hen uri nels are provided, the number of 'w'ater closets may be reduced 1 for each but not thGn 1/2 the mini mum. number required. **1 each floor. 39

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HANDICAPPED REQUIREMENTS TOILET fACILITIES At le83t one for e8Ch sex must be provided. They must be on the ground floor if the building is not equipped 'With an elevator. The toilet rooms must have a clear floor space of 4' x 4'. WATER CLOSETS There must be at least 32 unbstructed in front of the 'w'ater closet greb bers, et leest 24" long and 31" parallel to the floor, on each side of the 'w'ater closet. LAVATORIES There must be a 26" 'w'ide, 12" deep, 29" high clear space beneath the levetory. MIRRORS AND HAND DRYING FACILITIES There must be at least one, not more then 40" above the floor to the bottom of the mirror or fixture . RAMPS The slope must not be greater than 11n 12. I I

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I I I BIBLIOGRAPHY Auletta, Ken. The underclass. N . Y . : Random House, 1982 . Coole, Tim, ed. Vagranc y : S ome Ne'w' PersQective s . London: Academic Press, Inc. ltd . , 1979. Haring, Margery. Out of Community. N . Y.: Quaker Project on Community Conflict, 196 7 . Harrington, Michael. The Other Americ a . N . Y . : Mac 11illan, 1969 . Hombs, Mary Ellen, and Snyder, Mitch. Home lessnes s in A m eric a : A forced March to No'w''w'here. Washington, D.C.: The Community for Creative Nonviolence, 1982 . Me Sheeny, Wilham. Skid Row. Ctticago: Schenkman Publishing Co. , loc., 1979 . M111er, Ronald J . Ttte Demo lition of Skid Ro'w'. U . S . A . : D . C . Heath and Co. , 1982 . Otto, Shirley, and Orford, Jim . Not Quite Like H o me. Chiches ter, England: John Wiley and Sons, Ltd. , 1978 . Social Engineering Technology. Social Architectur a l Pr o gram ming for Design of Skid Row S i n gleroom OccUP.ilflc y Hous i n g . Los Angeles: Community Redevelopment Agency, 1978. INTERVIEWS Bishop George Evans, Catholic Archdioces of Denver Gabriel, Dale and Charles, Residents, Samaritan Shelter Gene, felix, Rick and Al, Re:sident Kitchen Staff, Samaritan Shelter Sister t1ary Ann Gleason, Admi ni:strative Director, Coalthon for the Horfieless father W11liam Kraus, Executive Director, Samaritan St.elter Joe Levi, Project Architect, l"lc Og, Ne'w' Shelter at 38th St. and Yo ric Ave. Mark McCormack, Project Architec t, Bar leer, Ri nicer, Seacat, Samaritan Shelter Joe Sharp, Patty Johnson and Sister Cathy Hanisits, Supervisors, S amaritan Shelter Terry Sharp, Director of Operations, Samaritan Shelter Dr. Richard Wright, Director of t1edical Services, Eastside Health Center, City and County of Denver, Department of Health and Hospital3 41

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I I I I I SPACE WAITING NO. ROD. sa. FT. MEN USERS SPECIAL NEEDS uPIO IDOME 'M \OtU:..T ""::FAC:..I 1-l TI"E..'S f 1-..1\ W A.. I G1 ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT wA' r t 'N.T A I :c. 'RES Mt:.C...T w TH NE:W WAlT I N -D " F I N ISH E S & FURNISHINGS 13EN..C++E.S VI N '(L Tll.F-Nf. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS 11-tl c:::, IS N.OT A C 01\ Af:>LE--s f-K..E. TO D i <::CO \...)f2../::.... ( l c.. . , I lhL&;-OUT'' ADJACENCIES WAJIIN4 43 I

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I I I' I SPACE WAITING WOMEN & FAMILY USERS up 10 70 WoME}-.\ FAMILY INPtC-t.E.NT t\ES ki+i 1D 131::.Tl--\ 1"-\ D .... ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS \r-.iA..lT FOR INtAKL r<:E-slDE.NTS VI'S.ilO E.l-'\e E.N C'( SLE .. ffi <:1 IN i=-ALE-"2..1 NL, Nt.A-Tb toS?IIAL '\"-( 'SFA<:.t, ro NO. ROD. 50. FT. D ESIGN CHARACTERISTICS --n-\1 IS NO\ A WY\"FoRr. Lf_ -spAcE. -o UscovR SPECIAL NEEDS TOtLE..-t-FA.UL-I'n ACCFS.S\8LE.. WA-rn i'0L c " . -f-\1 OUI SPECIAL EQUIPMENT ADJACENCIES 2.EW Cf-T:A\S "FoR FINISHES & FURNISHINGS CUNIC GH t-S Y l 'N. '\' L T \ LE. FLO:> ? ,J C1 4 5

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I I I I I SPACE INTAKE USERS ' I MEN'S '1 WOMEN S SUP""E:.-R VI SbRS P1?a-Tc:>f2... a= NO. ROD. sa. FT. SPECIAL NEEDS lS-LECIP-ON \C-ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT "PA\L\ ISSIJE.. \ONE:LS c;,lf'E_ IVE:. ME-l)\ C,JNE...S 1---J'El\ -po'N. s 1=X t N FO, I 'DEN it .
PAGE 47

I I I I SPACE NO. ROD. SO. FT. CONTROL [ @ 200 USERS SPECIAL NEEDS l -s ce. OFf=" \CE... ""P { p.._-e:c.,-ro-p... cr ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT \DOTH ?k$1E 'E,\C.-\leN OJl "514N-UP S+tE..E..--r'S AVAl l..L IN"FOf\MAT\0 '"'\T-<..IXT /0 -. F I N I sHE s & F u R N I sHIN G s Vi='.1'4 1::-LE.C....--rP-G'N I DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS "( AGCE.SS "-0 -:.=_:t-,e;w-E' I_ A s TOSS ... riC-AL-Husr ADJACENCIES 49

PAGE 48

I I I I SPACE MEN'S DORM USERS 120 V lTV CHARACTERISTICS NO. ROD. SPECIAL NEEDS SQ. FT. 7200 { SPECIAL EQUIPMENT :sNL o D o':;,-10 D f-1 WEL S FINISHES & FURNISHINGS , ' 1 IV " l 11 lE A.k:; ({)L,ore..._ \ SAO\-UNrr-DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS t.):;; t=.0 (0 I . ?e\ \J Acy 4 f2.ouPE..O 1 t'Z., f=C_(j._) e:.P\ ADJACENCIES 51

PAGE 49

I I I I I I I I I I : i l SPACE WOMEN'S DORM USERS 4 b LE-L.cc)wrs "-1. ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS SLa::..-p'l NL, *.t:A PI 1\.l. TALKt ""'".:;) o.=NO. ROD. sa. FT. \ SPECIAL NEEDS No ( S C.:ON \'Pi:)L t-Ic; H\ Cc N L .. SPECIAL EQUIPMENT :DR'f !OWE.L "E:... t;.: FINISHES & FURNISHINGS YIN'(L 11LC. bn=-rE.-12VJ.. T c:::R ?A \ N "Ef-..-l"T v \ DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS IO "FRIVAC..\ "BE "D'S I N Of-\-2,.. OR ADJACENCIES 53

PAGE 50

I I I I SPACE FAMILY ROOMS USERS ACT IV lTV CHARACTERISTICS c., ""VP-CSS \ t, a C): \"""fS.M NO. ROD. sa. FT. /2SPECIAL NEEDS Mb(Sl=.. CONL Ut:;+t--r ?f=<\\ Y-AC \ SPECIAL EQUIPMENT IDwE:L ct"t-"BGDS FINISHES & FURNISHINGS DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS i="LE'/.. 1 BLE-VNK}JONN OF\ L'f V\ ADJACENCIES 55 I

PAGE 51

I I I I SPACE GIRlS DORM USERS '0 t:;t"?(.? ({;-J ( ACT IV lTV CHARACTERISTICS TALt(l 4 lTF-M<::> RE..s\1 NO. ROD. SQ. FT. SPECIAL NEEDS Nbt'SF C.:ON-\r'GL T Co n L \ lbiLE.I :PAC..\ LlTI C: '::> BLE "R:>fo\M SPECIAL EQUIPMENT rr;..t_ -f;,A."F; c: D E wt>r-OJ.•J.;.t.;p::; FINISHES & FURNISHINGS v, 11 L..S t=L. tc)R Cov-c..f2--l N DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADJACENCIES 57

PAGE 52

I I SPACE BOY'S DORM USERS NO. ROD. sa. FT. SPECIAL NEEDS NOic::::E.. L l H-T \01 LE:r f
PAGE 53

I I I I SPAC E RESIDENT STAFF ROOM USERS 1 OOSTArF CHARACTERISTICS -ot\"E..CS.S I Nl-t NO. ROD. S O . FT. 2-300 SPECIAL N EEDS t-tl SPECIAL EQUIPMENT TDu5CL "13CP5 P .1-N' A TZ..-41 N 4 --rY FINISHES & FURNISHINGS VlN\L rUZ::CR D ESIGN CHARACTERISTICS r=R \ '1. AC-"t ot"14-t:.F\ l
PAGE 54

I I I I SPACE NO. ROD. SQ. FT. APARTMENT USERS SPECIAL NEEDS W+b ML.F.:> T "":>TAY -p LATE-YISITINtl OFFlC..lALS ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS. t:>Rt=S>S 0A-T1-\ I H 'i TV SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADJACENCIES 63

PAGE 55

I I I I SPACE SHOWER & TOILET men USERS ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS NO. ROD. sa. FT. SPECIAL NEEDS Wrn-t FAC-ll-IT/.:::..-S; () I " Cl..OTH I N c., L...C.... IN e:,_ SPECIAL EQUIPMENT (o CLD 'SS-TS (o JZ, LAIJA -\6 I E -I"Z.. ot.JE FINISHES & FURNISHINGS DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS TO E.:E' .,A\ l.O Ct I WM1 ADJACENCIES M E N1S 65

PAGE 56

I SPACE SHOWER & TOILET women I USERS I 1-b I ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS' I NO. RQD. sa. FT. \ SCC) SPECIAL NEEDS DRF-SS.It-.J L; Af{E.A t..U l-n+ t=A.-Gl L-Ill E.'S. Wf.fj e.. I r0 ""11-{c_ SPECIAL EQUIPMENT t.uA-rE-8-CLo-sE-rs f.Q LAvA \0{).._ fo s FINISHES & FUR,..ISHINGS DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS :sa _\"?) -KEX:...P e'f: :c \J 1kJc;s L;J+ll I N ADJACENCIES 67

PAGE 57

ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS' NO. ROD. sa. FT. SPECIAL NEEDS -:s 0 C.LOr SPECIAL EQUIPMENT 3 w CLO'Sl:. 2. u A !'-) 5 LA\JATO l .... 5 FINISHES & FURNISHINGS DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS lD f E\-0\-.\ WHil-E-I N ADJACENCIES 69

PAGE 58

I I I I SPACE SHOWER & TOILET family women USERS ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS NO. ROD. SQ. FT. : I SPECIAL NEEDS Wn--/4-"S>IZ:>A IN Lj N4 IN TH 5:.. SPECIAL EQUIPMENT (; WA--re..R C.lo E t.o (r.; v..SE.. FINISHES & FURNISHINGS DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS S HDU . TO AN E--yE. ON 1Se k>i• I . U:,.. ADJACENCIES 71

PAGE 59

I I I I SPACE LAUNDRY USERS YO'-VH -n:: -ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS VE.NI l=:O 11-tE..\P-_ ; (.p t( :SO ?CV\ I --;e.. ' , IOv..:> LS A " f L.l L.t..)'E;.; NO. ROD. SQ. FT. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS keD 10 SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT Mt::.:N s w 1 &; P 2W -=$D ) FAt4 L\-YouTl-\ -2.W 3P ) FINISHES & FURNISHINGS V\N'(L T\L.E-fE \ t, ADJACENCIES 73

PAGE 60

I I I I SPACE PHONES USERS ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS ...I 11=-Rc::oN.A'-NO. ROD. sa. FT. SPECIAL NEEDS WA \-rl -Pt-\oNES SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADJACENCIES --75

PAGE 61

SPACE CHAPEL I USERS I so PEofLE ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS f-\-OL,D M"E.EnNi, MEDt TAlloN NO. ROD. SO. FT. I CoO<:) SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS l_c_,T\.)f<.N SD GAF\ A.s . :rrl c; I DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS FLEY,.I BLE .. c:::E.A Tl Ac.c..E.S S I . B l:E... TP--o Ut:...D 'SEREl'-l.E.. AT'H-OL\C.. ADJACENCIES 77

PAGE 62

I I I I SPACE NO. ROD. CLOTHING DISPENSARY USERS NEEDS C.lOTH!NC, N A VoLU N Sl'P TS 'ND'NI t::> I C:., E. 'NTS SQ. FT. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS IDOO CHARACTERISTICS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT ADJACENCIES J--..14K --:p-,oot-\ Utlt+ R.AcKs FOP--. CLoT1-+ ( r-J +t 1 c..t+ t <;. C...l.o T\-tie-Mos-r IN Rl:-S.\ P>ENTS NCI F rr: FINISHES & FURNISHINGS _., Fc:>Fl-. ) , Ct Lo\(E....'"S> I . '/fN\L TlLt:-rlbo-._ eov 79

PAGE 63

I I I I SPACE MEDICAL CLINIC USERS $Al:T1+ "PA-T NO. ROD. SPECIAL NEEDS LA\J SO. FT. 10\AJELJAsn S}:G07:e-F -----ro r) , 1=--'tA:H 11 -. .-' . -t;:r L.\ \ , -j ,. \ ( V ITY CHARACTERISTICS SPEC lA L E QUI PM ENT M " R\ DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS E)
PAGE 64

I I I I SPACE COUNSELING USERS Cbu t--J
PAGE 65

I I I SPACE CLASSROOM USERS l"E-AC#F-.R "RE..SlbE'H.TS ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS 'WA\Wl C, "EMPLoYt--'tlE-NT L \\) lt-.1 Gt LL'S. NO. ROD. sa. FT. 3 (ooo SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS -cE.-<; KS C: CH-A t VINYL TlL.E. ... 1Nt1 DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADJACENCIES 85

PAGE 66

I I I I SPACE OFFICE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR USERS NO. ROD. SPECIAL NEEDS PR\VAC\ SO. FT. ISO ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT "SrAF'F-4AC.K..'NOW-l..-D41 N'-. / FISCA'-RA I (., 0\/T::.R "N..LouN TI Nt.., KE(oP ""lTH tNDIVI DlJA CSIA.r P-M M S "'PU"&L.tC. IT AC.I\ VI Tl Sc;.. s fE.RV l 'SE. -t-{ I G t=" I ?E ) I "5>\A"Ft=-(N IT\-\ . 0 FINISHES & FURNISHINGS 1:>E =I c A.t T'(PcVJR f'NQI I V<-./6 TABLE_ f-iLe:=> I DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS 87

PAGE 67

I I I SPACE OFFICE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR USERS lTV CHARACTERISTICS 1MASS1 SeR'Jlc..E..S1 i::.\C.., woF--J<.. t; 1V IT\ s.s "DoNATIO S VDL..UNltt 1 S TAFF .. .J NO. ROD. sa. F T . SPECIAL N EEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS K. t C+1A p..,_ I E.XT ")A. c HA 1 LE_ f-U .. E..::.. Tr1 c, I D ESIGN CHARACTERISTICS 89

PAGE 68

I I I I SPACE OF.FICE RECEPTIONIST -SECRETARY USERS 4 'STA'Ft: \10 'f\E..<; (t)E 1 (A rE.LU liMe') ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS (, C.A.LLS 1<\t:.CE.\ VI . f.\ E.tP \ItS \IDF'. N-A l10N c; ASSIST IN t; -ntE.. E. )(EC. P(K_, ... K E:'i--r-s<,'NAL CoMMUNI CATIONS ASS1S15 0 ll t, Pk TAKE.. c:; M "E.-E:. S . s-rA-r=q= Aes1 Dt=..Nis f4-A( :'DLE S 1-PR. I NO. ROD. SQ. FT. \ /00 SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT "PL> I.... I '-t.;:.;: FINISHES & FURNISHINGS cc., CH 1'\ pe n '1=" \ LE.S tY-."'"i""KA C.i4A I C ITI it -DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS AccF:-s 1 BL.t--ro 1:=.\/E:.R'}' ONE... TSJr k/IIH fRo l "R:>F--. 'SE.C .LU"Dc 0 flAC ': 91 I

PAGE 69

I I I I SPACE OFFICE PROGRAM DIRECTOR USERS S'l-A"FF Mt.:..M13E ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS ':::.il1F1 \Ol..ICC ) uu::..s H 1 A""D"P t T l ON AI-1-ABo rt-AN."D u:;..<:::. \ -r-au.. INTAKE. tbu._jiNCi f=EE..-1)1 4 c..Lomt 1\..l NO. ROO. sa. FT. /au SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS C-1-lAIR.. rt\:::::N E_ 1 rl I t=:rC WeAK. TA .:_.L..t:.., C-A 1----TTl C.., I DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS 93

PAGE 70

I I I I SPACE OFFICE BUILDING MANAGER USERS M EMB"E..RS. ACT IV lTV CHARACTERISTICS Pf'OCUPE-'S t'N.\) E:."NTo A I .... SuPP L..l E".::. MAll'iTE.'N ANC.. E E.iC.. ) \ I • CLc;RENO. ROD. 50. FT. \00 SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS C:HA.! I -s.x Tf-A c. -=f>HoNF1 'F 1 LE..-S 1 -s:rc_ T 4 R:.CE.. CARPE:: 1 N t, I DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADJACENCIES 95

PAGE 71

I I SPACE OFFICE BUILDING MANAGER USERS M F-MBE.!RS ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS SuPPL-lE.S MAlli-TE.N A NC..E E.TC..) \ I • e:, l..LsRE -NO. ROD. SO. FT. \00 SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EOU I PMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS I / J I A. .; u., I t "S-X C H A \ -:rHoNFI "'F I LE-s I "E-TC v-.1 o P--K T A P.::..CE... GAR"Pe:n-1 ' N '-t I DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADJACENCIES 9 5

PAGE 72

I I I I SPACE OFFICE GUIDANCE COUNSELOR USERS L;UlPANG.E. CHARACTERISTICS \JAL \JP... Tl oN CCXJ N NO. ROD. SO. FT. 100 SPECIAL NEEDS yR\\/AC.\ SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS C4-\AI'f<--. Ct-lAtf\":::. M-fol'\E F\LES eTC \ I I DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS \ C l I I :"1 D.j.:..-r-1 • I / . . -t 97

PAGE 73

I I I I SPACE OFFICE EMPLOYMENT COUNSELOR USERS ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS PEVE.L.cf'MENT AL T"PAC.f.'..l 'N c; "E-1"'\ "PLo \MEl-fi C.0 'SE..L I N C., NO. ROD. sa. FT. t o o SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS C-H.A t ""' F-'/... Tf2.A c.. I-rA..\'?-\:. -Ml'-\ ::::..) Fl t=..TC.. ' ' DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS -NOI I I 99 I

PAGE 74

I I I I I SPACE MAINTENANCE USERS \tsUIL"DI'Nt:; '2.. MA IN\f=-__r.\ }J.C t=_ MEN. CHARACTERISTICS OF Gl.:b N tE_ C>fPL-1 E.cs. Mo -1 • c_ -r -=rAt t!EM , ' NO. ROD. SO. FT. 250 SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT N of<. K-""B>E..N c...t+ GLI:.ANi '9-S.v jJLI F-FIN I SHES & FURNISHINGS llLE-I DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADJACENCIES 101

PAGE 75

I I I I I SPACE STAFF ROOM NO. ROD. 50. FT. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS If 'SQFT'' In "S ""1"A 'f I 1-o l.K...-H-'A/ I Tit USERS CHARACTERISTICS A-rt-u P Cf)A--r=::, -r "PRINK uFFU::.. ETC.... I TALK SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS Lcuf'..JCtr:.-S 4 C H A )'\
PAGE 76

I I I I SPACE INDOOR NO. ROD. sa. FT. CHILDREN'S RECREATION USERS S\ArF CHARACTERISTICS Tt::U-11'-.J Lj -p u z.:z..L"E-1 IV SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FoR -oy TV -==ouNb <::, "rS ( FINISHES & FURNISHINGS v , YL \1 CE... rL.Cc:::l< DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS TLE..A N\, P.::::f
PAGE 77

I I I I SPACE OUTDOOR NO. ROD. sa. FT. CHI LOREN'S RECREATION 1200 USERS SPECIAL NEEDS A"'DUL.IS CHARACTERISTICS lht=..D "PUR \ l1f.. l)A( fAcn v c ""'PLA-\ -s \T \1 SPECIAL EQUIPMENT Do)(. CUM13 1['-1L, FINISHES & FURNISHINGS DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS Cf$N Wl'ttt ?;oC>D. L r \ -...L....I.J .... AP:._ c.;Ac:---=> ADJACENCIES 107 r

PAGE 78

I I I , I SPACE YOUTH RECREATION USERS ""20\5 ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS l\i 10 MliSf<:_ CAP-..."D J, 4f:.H::: NO. ROD. SO. FT. 8CD SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT IV CSCuND S'('Sfe.t-'\ fvp FINISHES & FURNISHINGS -..../t N\ l-11 LE..-ri,W... T;ASt_E._; 4 C-1-i-AlR S DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS 109

PAGE 79

I I I I SPACE OUTDOOR NO. ROD. so. FT. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADULT RECREATION S: 000 A '"PlEASAtJr)$SI F U USERS SPECIAL NEEDS STAFF ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS -rACK I t-.l GAA'D SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS 4 <"'::. 4 C.-HA l '--TREES ADJACENCIES J J J

PAGE 80

I I I SPAC E NO. ROD. sa. F T . ADULT RECREATION 3,ooo USERS SPECIAL NEEDS 2CO I <;-t-\-A'N"DI CHARACTERISTICS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT -=ftA '1 """PLA"(lN" -t-'V -fL6,.'{t \'-...1 t, "PfN4 -pDN4 -pC<':X--=foP 1---1 IN 'E.... ""ft N:1 ?oN <1 6f<_. [DOL TV FINISHES & FURNISHINGS YIN 'i' L (11..E.\ & LOUN E-I DESIGN CHARAC T ERISTICS QUI"E:r Neit4-ADJACENCIES 113

PAGE 81

I I I I SPACE DINING USERS 200 MeN WoMEhl.. I cUI CHARACTERISTICS LIN-E. lJP 10 <::QL)}-t--rE.fZ... <::>W NO. ROD. SQ. FT. SPECIAL NEEDS I SPECIAL EQUIPMENT 11-+E.t\ A N_I_S_H_E_S_&_F_U_R_N_I_S_H -1 N_G_S __ '1 ( IJI '-/1 !'J. '-( t_ /1 lE. APU L I .-.:.. ll S (.p TA.LE SE?-. vICE\ \F-..M s I DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS As ... ',..._ FACt L IIA -st-\C;C) 11-+ 'f=coD LINE--To \D PiS f1 C: l'-J4 ADJACENCIES 115

PAGE 82

I I I I SPACE KITCHEN USERS S fS -r-;-Cc::c;;K ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTIcs '"BA.Kl NC1 ME.N0 -=f>LANM N NO. ROD. 50. FT. SPECIAL NEEDS LAVA-TDf<.\ -::pc:cO IV\4R'S L)lHA0<3.1 FAN FINISHES & FURNISHINGS .Z. 5' >< 3 ' ,_._h...-.J CP\ -s"Ft
PAGE 83

I I I I SPACE DISH ROOM ACT IV lTV CHARACTERISTICS
PAGE 84

I I J , SPACE PANTRY USERS 'l=CoD I lTV CHARACTERISTICS I NO. ROD. SO. FT. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS SPECIAL NEEDS FINISHES & FURNISHINGS

PAGE 85

I I I I SPACE DRY FOOD STORAGE USERS A
PAGE 86

I SPACE REFRIDGERATOR & FREEZER STORAGE USERS t=r::::;;c>P Mt1 R I A,<;;CSICST1 ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS NO. ROD. SQ. FT. SPECIAL NEEDS G;oV 1-r )SSUE. MA\J NL. SPECIAL EQUIPMENT IHP{J<._-I N FINISHES & FURNISHINGS I DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADJACENCIES 125

PAGE 87

I I I I I I I I I I I SPACELOADING DOCK & SORTING AREA USERS VoLu'f'-..\.\tE'RS> STAFFM4f\. ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS t=EofLE.. ""'DP-c>P -coN A-liON .APE.. ANO 'f-\0"-./E:.-D TO --r?ASt-t lT"E-1-P UN11L fHE..Y c:At'-1.. NO. ROD. SO. FT. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS \ .?\DO SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT ADJACENCI E FINISHES & FURNISHINGS sLE-c:::uRFH--F 127

PAGE 88

I I I I I SPACE STORAGE donated clothing USERS C<._on+INC1 ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTIcs CLo71+tNC, Zc VoUJN C.LDn+tt.JC, AP-.J;:A NC, Sl Zl OF 111211 V IN(., N<=i 61\j O'N "' 10 t:xs:'f NO. ROD. sa. FT. 3,000 SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EOU I PMENT F I N I"S HE S & F U R N ISH IN G S LAP?.E-WOAt<.. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADJACENCIES 129

PAGE 89

I I I SPACE STORAGE beds & bedding ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICs NO. ROD. P:.. ... T SPECIAL NEEDS sa. FT. 2oo SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FINISHES & FURNISHINGS 9tLVF.-S f1 L.l N E. t-.q -p.A Nf.J:...TS DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADJACENCIES 131

PAGE 90

I I I I I I I SPACE SAFE STORAGE resident valuables CHARACTERISTICS S--rvPAt;s. cr t
PAGE 91

I I I SPACE STORAGE abSent resident belongings USERS SIA-FF ACTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS NO. ROD. SQ. FT. SPECIAL NEEDS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT OF ,\i I 01= P\ES\DEN.TS NHO l.-Osr l3E c.A.uS"E-ThE\ Dl D 'I 10 1+\E:. w lO ETC4) I FINISHES & FURNISHINGS Fef2... . ?LA-s.T1C-C>F-;• \ "' (' <:::.-d I I DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS ADJACENCIES 135

PAGE 92

I NO. ROD. sa. FT. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS SPECIAL NEEDS -4 cAPt"".)..0 CHARACTERISTICS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT ADJACENCIES '30ME 1 OF= --y:l+E_( f3E.-LDNGtt N4S IN TH-t:A. AUT-oS. ' FINISHES & FURNISHINGS 137

PAGE 93

I I I DESIGN THE SITE Although the parcel incluOOs the entire block bounded by 23rd, 24th, Larimer and Lawrence Streets and Broooway, I propose using only the port of the site to the southeost of the alley for the building; leaving one of the existing buildings (which is !dually quite a nice little structure) and locating the parking on the other sloo of the alley. This would preserve the option of selling the northwestern part of the site if and when real estate values in the area climb . It would be necessmy to negJtiate on orrml(Jmlent with the purchaser to incluoo shelter parking in a new structure built on the property . The site lies in a sea of traffic . The combination of wioo streets and the triangular islands created by the thrust of Br0Cl1way through the street grid create open, 00501ate spoces. The parking lot to the problem. Quite a lot of time was spent trying to find a Wf!.l to strengthen the urban fabric of the area or at least to ovoid mm:ing things worse. The Lorimer Street sioo wrJS chosen rJS the appropriate place to locate the parking because of the strength of the existing street and the main entry was positioned ln front of the lorgest triongle pork (where it is common to see men stretched out on nice days to catch a nap in the sun. The entry court includes planters at seat height, to allow people to wait outsioo on the sunny sioo of the building, but well within the property line in oroor to diminish their impoct on the neighborhlXX1. THE BUILDING IMAGE Brick colored tile was chosen to set the s tructure into the existing context. It seemed appropriate to create an Institutional tone but It was importont to keep it from becoming forbi
PAGE 94

Clothino was locatoo near the waitino area so that if a clothing pr()Jram was milE available to street peop Je who are not resiOOrlts, it would keep the octivity remote from the function of the resirential pr()Jram. The int&e OOsk is the cnecx-in point for resiLimts who can then choose to (J) to the dining room, the chapel, the courtyard, or upstairs to shower, oo laundry, nap, watch TV or in some other form of rocreation. The stairway next to the Intake OOsk bocomes a control point on ea:h floor. Poople must pass in front control OOsk continuing up the stairs . The dining creo is olso intended to function os o recreation spea open to the total population. Small tables seating no more than six were seloctro in ortBto social lnteroction. In warm weather fwi call be out to the courtyard. Thera is a game room for pool or piOQ POllQ and a small area near the bank of telephones. Chilocare, with its own outtixlr spa Is Jocatoo on the southeast bta2use that is the only ouumr spoce used during the day by resiOOnts. The chilocare octivities would probably not be certifioo out I believe they could meet the quallflcatlons In this arrangement. The chapel was plocoo in a way which allows the use of the lobby for spoce before and after services and to symbolically the spa between the shelter and the community at large. 140 The area of the second floor nearest to the control OOsk is where sinole men, who are in the first phase of the Samoritan PrCXJram, are housed. They are allowed to stay for 30 days. If it appears that they will benefit from staying they would be moved into the rooms reserved for men in the second phase of the pr()Jram, who rNI stay up to 60 001itional days. Phase two men participate in training and other pr()Jrams designed to help them bocome self-supporting . A sense of uniqueness and identification for individual bed spoces in the huge oormitory room is enhansed by 5 foot partitions which divire the into units of 8 or fewer beds, but permit ooservotion by the staff and other residents for purposes of control. Vinyl floor ti las in varying colors tVJd patterns would be used In W1 St?tion. units are ot the pillow end bOO to incre6Se the sense of privocy. The laundry focilities for man are adjocent to the men's lounc}l but on the other sioo of the wall for sound dampening. Families occupy the remalnoor of the St?ond flea. . It was lmpoc-tant to provide private rooms. Under the stress of homelessness ond povertry, relationships are strained and the need is great for a place for families to oe alone t()Jether. As in the men's area, all other are combined with laundry focilities. This proviOOs another opportu.nity for socializing. The terraces overlook the courtyard space below. I I

PAGE 95

I I I On the top, and least ll:CeSSible f1oor, occupy the area near the control desK. Bocause many of these children have bean sexually 8bused the bathrooms have been plocro so that they are lWXeSStOie onfy from eoch youth oormitory. Regulatioos mfty' resident youth supervision , therefore spoce has been allocated for it. An efficiency apartment separates the bays and girls OOI"mitories. It provires another p loce for staff to spend the night in case of an situation. It might also be used to temporarily house visiting church officials. The single women's quarters, which are on the third floor, hBve been handled in the same Wft./ as the single men's. 141

PAGE 96

I I SAMARITAN HOUSE A SHELTER FOR THE HOMELESS ll I I / / MAY, 1985 I I / MASTER' S THESIS ' -., I DIANE WEISS KAHN ! / 1 I / / / / _ __/ --L ARIMER STREET LAWRENCE STREET --------------// I -1 0 10 so 100 SIT EPLAN

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I I I NORTHEAST ELEVATION NORTHWEST ELEVATION SOUTHEAST ELEVATION SOUTHWEST ELEVATION

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I I I BASEMENT PLAN r IWI E3 A D D D D D D CJ D D A .c:J D D . D w " c:::J D 000 gO••< <:> CJ D 0 '""" c:::J CJ <:> 0

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I I I OPtN 10 IUOW 0 SECOND FLCDR PLAN B

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I I I I 'fOVht leuHCt D L D I 0 TH 1 RD FLCDR PLAN

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I I STEEL TRUSS-----2 WAY CONCRETE SLAB -;7 ":",CONCRETE COLU M N '"" -,__ " . -1- •• • STRUCTURAL FRAME j [) CORN ICE DETAIL , TILE ' LATEX MODIFIED PORTLAND CEMENT ' CEMENT PLASTER • MESH METAL LATH • BUILDIN G PAPE R • ASPHALT I M PREGNATED GYP BOARD , STEEL STUD • STEEL FRAMf PANEL SYSTEM HOT WATER IS SUPPLIED BY HEATERS AT ZONE 801 LERS TO FIN TUBE [!] • .. THIRD HVA C

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I I I I CONCLUSION In general the oos1gn meets tne prqam ana tne major potnts or my thesis reasonably well, but there are aspects which would benefit from OOJitional stu(}y. Among them: a clearer statement of entry at the main entrance to the building would strengthen the and further attention to the lobby area could help define the spa:e a00 better inform those who enter about where and what to 00. Of the parts of the projet which work: well, the open courtyard may be the strongest. In tnjlt1on to providing natural for interior rooms and the opportunity for a pleasant, safe outlblr experience, it turns the focus of the building inward, which fortifies the iooa of an internal community. The which overlook it give o hint, which can be raoo from the street, of a special within. The various populations have been seporota1 without stU"oficiCYJ opportunities for diverse social experiences and freemn of choice has been extenOOd to a satisfoctory Services to the noo-resiOOilt population have been confined to areas of the building where they can be proviOOd without impinging upon resiOOflt prcq-ams. Although the building seems to be pleasant and rather inviting, population density, oorm1tory style sleeping occommooatloos and the relatively hard, cold surfa::es of materials like vinyl tile flooring, would probably urge people to make arratl93ffients for alternative housing as soon as possible. I believe it to be an unusual experience for an architft to attempt to create an environment which causes its users discomfort to the point of wanting to leave it -but in this case it is called for. People who have been helped must move on to make room for others who are in need. 163

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r APPENDIX OTHR ALTRNATRIVS FOR SHLTR (M) men (W) 'w'Omen (f} families (C) children Safe Harbor 22nd & La'w'rence 45 dey detox (H) Tr1dad 1743 lafayette teenaQe runa'w'ays 2162 la'w'rence room and board for 22 (M) Brandon Center runa'w'SIJS, battered 'Women (W) Denver General Hospital lobby 1s open 'w'hen temperature drops belo'w' zero Echo House 929 M&r1ne 5 ap&rtmenb, food for 4 \!leeks t or 1 single elderly, pregnant or d isabled person St. Francis Hospitality 2162 LB'w'rencc safe house, receptionist for messages, baths, laundry, phone, clothing exchange. 296 2456 831 8502 296 9090 6 2 0 9190 449 3 092 Denver Rescue Mission 23rd &. La'vlrence 4 days per month for 4 2 ( M) Catholic Worker House 2420 Welton housing for lOto 13 (M,W,C) Runa'vlays Marycres t Convent 3851 W . 52nd St. temporary housing for ne'w'comers to Denver (W ,C) Socred Heort 2844 La'w'rence 3 days to 2 'Weeks housing (W J) Operation Shelter 2440 Blake room and board for 1 38 { M) Denv er Police 1 331 Cherokee (W ,F) 294 0157 296 6390 343 9890 433 4280 296 6666 296 2456