Citation
Base facilities for Winter Park

Material Information

Title:
Base facilities for Winter Park Winter Park, Colorado
Creator:
Lesnick, Robert E
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
129 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, charts, maps (1 folded), color photographs, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Ski resorts -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Winter Park ( lcsh )
Ski resorts ( fast )
Colorado -- Winter Park ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Robert E. Lesnick.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09211740 ( OCLC )
ocm09211740
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1982 .L47 ( lcc )

Full Text
\ WINTER PARK SKI ARs= A
( WINTER PARK, COLORADO
MASTER QF AHCHiTEC URE
THESIS
SY
ROBERT EDWARD LESNiCK
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO DENVER


ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
' AURARIA LIBRARY
BASE FACILITIES FOR WINTER PARK WINTER PARK, COLORADO
ARCHITECTURAL THESIS
PRESENTED TO TOE COLLEGE OF DESIGN k PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
IN PARTIAL FULLFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE
BY R03SRT S. LESNICK FALL 1982


EASE FACILITIES FOR WINTER PARK WINTER PARK, COLORADO
AN ARCHITECTURAL THESIS
PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
IN PARTIAL FULLFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE
BY ROBERT E. LSSNICK FALL 1982


BASE FACILITIES Winter Park Ski Area Winter Park, Colorado
Master of Architecture Thesis by
Robert Edward Lesnick
University of Colorado, Denver


To my Parents
Acknowledgements
To all who have helped,
Thanks.


CONT
NTS
I II Thesis Description Advisors
HISTORY 1-2 History
SOCIOLOGY 1-2 Sociology
ECONOMICS 1 1 Winter Park and the Local Economy The Ski Area Dollar
SITE 1 Site Location
2 3-4 5 Vicinity Map Site Description Site Plan
6 Contours
7-13 14-15 16-17 18-19 Photographs Transportation Right-of-Ways Utilities
20-31 Existing Facilities
CLIMATE 1 2-4 General Climatic Description Climatic Data
4 Sunpath Diagram
SOILS 1-4 Foundation Considerations
5 6 Location of Exploratory Holes Soils Diagram


CONTENTS
7 Soils Legend
CODES AND ZONING 1-4 5-7 8-26 11 11 27-29 30-31 32-33 Zoning Design Guidelines Uniform Building Code Required Separations Height and Floor Area Allowables Colorado Energy Code Colorado Handicapped Code Colorado Passenger Tramway Code
PROGRAM 1 2-4 5 6 7-8 9 10-11 Introduction Spaces and Square Foot Allocations Nursery Rental/Repair Area Security Ticketing Public Restrooms
12-13 14 Space Descriptions Matr ix
15-16 Staging Area
CONSULTANTS 1-2 Consultants
REFERENCE 1-2 2-3 Maps and Drawings Literature


I
THESIS DESCRIPTION
The product of this Thesis will be the design of base facilities for the Winter Park Ski Area. The project involves the design of approximately 71,000 square feet,of interior space,and the development of associated pedestrian and vehicle areas. In addition to schematic design, the structural and mechanical systems will be developed.
The program includes approximately 9000 square feet of administa--tion space, 13,500 square feet of other employee areas, and 48,500 square feet of public space.
Site development will include placement of two gondola stations and the approximate location of the First Aid Complex.
The design of these facilities must be harmonious with the facilities to remain, West Portal Station and Administation Building. In addition the new facilities may be connected physically to them.


i i
ADVISORS
Faculty:
G.K. Vetter Chester Nagel Davis Holder Paul Heath Gary Long
Special Consultants:
William T. Brown
Vice President, Planning and Construction Winter Park Recreational Association
Fred W. Hegel AIA
WC Muchow and Partners, Architects


HISTORY
'WEST PORTAL CONSRUCTION SHACKS


HISTORY
The history of the Winter Park Ski Area begins in the 1920's when the area, known as the "West Portal", consisted mostly of tunnel construction shacks, which served as warming houses for early skiers. These shacks being leftovers from the construction of the Moffat Tunnel.
In the 1930's George Cranmer, who was Manager of Parks and Improv--ments for the City of Denver, began the effort to have Winter Park developed as a ski area. In 1940 Winter Park was officially dedicated. It had only one lift and a ticket cost a dollar. 3y 1947 the lift system consisted of three T-bars and four rope tows. Under direct control of the city, neglect overshadowed growth.
In 1950 the area was put under the control of a board of trustees, to operate the area independently from the city. It would have control over planning and development, funds, accounting, and per--sonnel.This board is known as the Winter Park Recreational Association .
In 1955 a large two-story warming house was built at a cost of 150,000 dollars, a very large investment at the time. This building is known as the Balcony House and stands today. It is the design of Steve Bradley, the executive director of that time. It was designed to give the building maximum exposure to the winter sun and minimize exposure to the north. Its pitched roof was oriented to discourage unwanted accumulations of snow.
During the 1960's Winter Park dominated the ski industry. In 1962 a 15,000 square foot ski and rental shop was constructed as part of a half-million dollar expansion program..Of the 700,000 thousand skiers using Colorado slopes, at that time, 125,000 attended Winter Park.
By 1970 the number of skiers had grown to 310,000 and lift capacity approached 10,000 per hour, one of the highest in the nation. In 1972 a new administation building was completed to handle the expanding staff.


HISTORY
2
By 1975 Winter Park had dropped,in national ranking of sizer to 5l With the opening of the Mary Jane Area, the areas rose to 4L .
In January, 1977 Gage Davis and Associates.completed for the Winter Park Recreation Association a report entitled "Winter Park Facility Program". This study was undertaken to identify the short term and long-term impacts of skier growth on the existing facilities and to determine the future and ultimate facility requirements for the total Winter Park Ski complex.
Among the recommendations resulting from this study were that:
The Balcony House is presently under capacity and should be replaced.
Parking at Winter Park base must be improved to accomodate additional cars and buses as well as management and employee parking needs.
In the fall of this year a new facility was completed at the Winter Park Base. It is known as the West Portal Station. It contains a cafeteria, shops and ski rental shop. The existing ski shop was removed during construction.


SOCIOLOGY 1
THE WINTER PARK SKIER
The following is a summary of statistical data obtained from "The Colorado Skier, 1977-1978 Season". The data is specific for the Winter Park Ski Area.
AGE:
The largest single group are those between 20 and 29 years of age, 42 percent. The 30 to 39 category is second with 22 percent. Those over 40 and those under 20 split the remaining percentage.
Those under 12 years of age comprise less than 1 percent of the total ski population.
SEX:
According to the data males comprise nearly 65 percent of the skier population. However, this information was gathered at the ticket sales area where males are the traditional ticket buyers .
When applying this data caution must be used.
EDUCATION:
Over 50 percent cf the skier population have at least a undergraduate education, with 21 percent having done post graduate work.
Of the remaining 50 percent 26 percent have had some college.
OCCUPATION:
The two major occupation groups are Professional/technical,26 percent; and students, 22 percent.Of the remaining, 40 percent would be considered white-collar occupations.
SKIER ABILITY:
The ability of the skier varys with the residency of the skier. In-state skiers seem to have greater ability, with 40 percent classed as Advanced or Expert. The largest group is the High-intermediate with nearly 40 percent, both in and out of state. Of the out-of-state skiers 15 percent consider themselves as beginners.


SOCIOLOGY
PARTY SIZE:
The following data describes the percentage of persons skiing in groups. This information should be useful in the apportionment of seating.
IN-STATE OUT-OF-STATE
One 16.7 10.5
Two 26.7 22.0
Three 18.2 7.2
Four 16.7 16. 1
F ive 8. 5 10.5
Six 3.6 7.2
Seven + 5.7 14.2
CONCLUSIONS:
While, from the above data, the average skier could be described he would not be useful for design in a facility which must serve al The following statements can be made. Skiers at Winter Park are generally young adults. They are well educated and are professional or would-be professional people. The majority are at least inter--mediate skiers and they ski in parties of various sizes.


ECONOMICS
WINTER PARK AND THE LOCAL ECONOMY
The Winter Park Ski Area is among the largest in the United States, #4(The White Book of U.S. Ski Areas). The area indirectly supports 23 lodges, 23 restaurants, 17 bars and numerous other commercial enterprises near the area.
Based on data for 1975 the ski industry, in Grand County, was responsible for close to. 27 percent of generated income. This percentage has undoubtedly increased with the addition of the Mary Jane area. By comparison manufacturing accounts for only 2.5 percent of county income.
As the above reflects, any expansion or change to the Winter Park Area will have a dramatic affect on the local economy. The design of the base facilities will not only affect the ski area, but to some extent the local economy. Successful design is therefore a must.
THE SKI AREA DOLLAR
The pie-chart below provides a breakdown of the Colorado ski area dollar with regards to what it buys.
Ski Lift Tickets
S3i
2i


aiT
1 Site Location
2 Vicinity Map
3-4 Site Description
5 Site Plan
6 Contours
7-13 Photographs
14-15 Transportation
16-17 Right-Of-Ways
18-19 Utilities
20-31 Existing Facilities


1
SITE
SITE LOCATION


SITE


SITE 3
SITE DESCRIPTION
The Waiter Park base are is located on triangular site of approx--mately 20 acres which are primarily level. It is bounded by the steep terrain of the ski mountain to west and southwest; the Fraser River, Grand County County Road, and the Moffat Tunnel to the east; and the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad tracks to the north.
The land, on which the Base Facilities are located, is the property of the Moffat Tunnel Commission. This land is referred to as the W.E. Evans Homestead. In 1934 the Denver Water 3oard entered into a contract with the Moffat Tunnel Commision to lease certain property on this land. The Winter Park Recreational Association(City and County of Denver) also leased the land subsequent to the Denver Water Board. As such building on this property is subject to the rights of the Denver Water Board and the railroad (see RIGHT-OF-WAYS).
The existing improvements on the site are as follows:
PARKING AREA
1) Nine acres of gravel and paved parking.
2) Two maintenance buildings along the ski mountain to the west of the public parking area.
3) Four(4) access bridges over the Fraser River.
FACILITIES AREA
1) West Portal Station (see EXISTING FACILITIES)
2) Administration Building (see EXISTING FACILITIES)
3) Balcony House ( to be replaced )
4) Eskimo Ski Club Building ( to be replaced /
5) Three chairlifts, Arrow, Hughes, and Gemini and related operator shacks.
6) Finish of the Alpine Slide
Of the existing site improvements all are"fixesMexcept where indica--ted. The maintenance buildings may be moved to increase parking.


SITE 4
The predominant views, from the base area, are to the Mary Jane ski mountain (see Photograph 1), to the Winter Park ski mountain( see Photograph 2). Secondary views are to the east and north.
A flood hazard study has not been completed for the upper Fraser River, but there seems to be little threat due to historic evidence and the deep, well-defined channel( Gage Davis and Associates ).


SITE 6
CONTOURS


SITE 9
PHOTO KEY


14
TRANSPORTATION, PARKING, AND AREA CIRCULATION
At the present time the majority of visitors to the area travel by automobile, the area is a 57 mile drive from Denver. There is a large parking lot to the south of the base facilities which is used both for visitor and employee parking. The employee parking is closest to the base facilities and secured from public access. This area also serves as the shuttle bus drop off area.Visitors must,at present, cross through the employee parking lot, by means of a semi-fenced pedestrian-way.
Charter buses, at present, park toward the rear of the base parking lot and along the county road,in overflow situations.
Historically significant, the Winter Park Ski Train operates on the weekends from January. It makes one trip a day leaving Union Station, in Denver, in the early morning. These trains are typi--caliy sold out on the first day of ticket sales for the next week--ends trip. The number of passengers,compared to the number arriving by car, is small. The train disembarks its passengers along the tracks to the north of the West Portal Station.
A town shuttle operates between areas in the town ana arrives at the base facility every 15 minutes. Due to the increasing size of the ski area and the fix on the amount of parking facilities in creased use of the shuttle system for destination skiers, those lodging in town,.will become necessary in the future.
There are plans for a 6 passenger gondola interconnect system between the proposed resort hotel complex and the Winter Park Base Facilities. This system will also interconnect with the Mary Jane Area. This gondola would be a pulse system with capacity of 450 persons per hour, however this number may be increased if further study indicates more capacity would be needed. At present skiers going to Mary Jane must either take the shuttle bus or the moun--tain lift system.


a i r &
Since the transportation system, as it exists, has reached capacity,expans ion and alternatives to present trends are being sought. The maintenance facilities to the west of the parking lot may be removed increasing the capacity of this lot. The ski train could increase its schedule and capacity. An increased shuttle system, as mentioned, would help to reduce automobile traffic by those skiers coming from town.
The expansion of the base facilities must address these transportation issues. The design of the expanded base facilities should include:
1. Inclusion of the gondola interconnect system facilities.
2. Redesign of the parking facilities to facilitate easier pedestrian flow and reduce hazards which may now exist.
3. Inclusion of a tranportation center for the shuttle bus system. With convenience and comfort as considerations. This should help make the shuttle system a prefered means of destination transportation and lessen the load on the parking facilities.
4. Relocation of the employee parking to another area
( behind the railroad tracks, to the north, has been proposed).
This will increase public parking and remove the pedestrian-way in the present parking lot. This close-in area could become pay parking.
MODE OF TRANSPORTATION TO SKI AREA(In State)
CAR 93% IS A CAR NECESSARY?
SCHEDULED BUS 0.9% Out-of-state skiers 54.5 NO
CHARTERED 3US 3.6% 41.3 YES
PRIVATE AIR 1.5% In-state skiers 60.2 YES
OTHER(TRAIN) 0.6% 32.S NO


SITE 15
RIGHT-OF-WAYS
The land in and around Che base area is under various public and private ownerships:
U.S. Forest Service Moffat Tunnel Commission Moffat Tunnel Right-of-Way City of Denver
The Denver Water Board presently controls two 100 foot right-of-ways which bisect the site approximately in the center.
The DRGRR and Grand County both have right-of-ways and or easements on or adjacent to the site, but like the above ownerships, there is some question as to just where these legal boundries are located.
On the 24th of June, 1980 a formal agreement was made between the City and County of Denver and the Winter Park Recreational Association. This agreement involves the construction of a protective, accessible tunnel (chase) about 255 feet of the Denver Water Board's Siphon No. 1, a 72" steel pipeline. This particular pipeline is generally operational only during the spring with the majority of flow occuring in the pipeline to the south (Siphon No. 1-A). The cost of the tunnel would be payed for by the Winter Park Recreational Association. For its part the Denver Water Board agreed that upon completion of the tunnel it would not unreasonably withhold a license for construction of structures on the site. However the Denver Water Board retains the right to remove or relocate any of its facilities at any time and in such a manner as it deems necessary or convenient.
In addition the Winter Park Recreation Association and the DRGRR are engaged in negotiations concerning the boundries of the DRGRR right-of-way as it concerns a proposed employee parking lot for the Winter Park 3ase Area. In terms of this project the outcome effects only the location of the employee parking which is presently located near the Administration Building in the main parking area.


SITE
ENVER WATER BOARD R.Q.W.


UTILITIES ON THE SITE ARE AS FOLLOWS:
1) NATURAL GAS, supplied by Public Service Company of Colorado.
2) ELECTRICITY, supplied by Mountain Parks Electric
3) TELEPHONE, supplied by Mountain Bell
4) WATER, supplied by Winter Park Water District
5) SEWAGE, handled by Winter Park Sanitation District
The Water and Sanitation districts are separate from the town or county.


ss SANITARY g GAS w WATER e ELECTRIC t TELEPHONE
SEVER


EXISTING FACILITIES
WEST PORTAL STATION:
Floor Description
2
3asement Level (16,000 ft ) Contains Public Lockers, Employee Lockers, Public Restrooms and Dressing Area,
Ski Shop Storage, 3oiler(space for additional boilers), Electrical, and Kitchen Dry Storage.
First Level (20,800 ft^) Contains Ski Shop,
Retail Space, Rental and Repair Area, Kitchen Dry and Cold Storage, Receiving Area and Dock.
2
Second Level (20,800 ft ) Contains Dining Levels, Scramble Area, Cafeteria Kitchen
Roof Level (1200 ft'1) Contains Kitchen Chillers
and Mechanical.
Structural Description
Columns T.S 8x8 Of various weights
Beams Giu-lams 5 ft. O.C.
Walls Metal Siding (black) exterior.
Foundation Raft type, top of slab 83'-6"
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING:
Ci_2>
Floor Description
Basement Level (6044 ft~) Contains Storage, Boiler, Ski School Lockers, Restrooms, Patrol Lockers
2
First Level (6044 ft ) Contains Nursery, Reception,
Offices, Apartment


EXISTING FACILITIES
SI
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING(cont.)
2
Second Level (6044 ft") Contains Office Space Upper Apartment Space
Third Level (4100 ft^) Contains Offices
Structural Description
Columns Steel
Beams Glu-lam
Walls Wood Siding
Foundation Spread Footings


EXISTING FACILITIES
LEST PORTAL STATION
FLOOR PLANS SCALE IM=32'-0"


SITE 23
EXISTING FACILITIES
WEST PORTAL STATION


SITE 24
EXISTING FACILITIES


SITE
EXISTING FACILITIES
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING FLOOR PLANS SCALE r'=16'-0"


EITE 26
EXISTING FACILITIES
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27
EXISTING FACILITIES
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING FLOGR PLANS SCALE 1=16-0


EXISTING FACILITIES
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
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FLOOR FLANS SCALE 1"=16'-0"

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EXISTING FACILITIES
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
ELEVATIONS
SCALE 1"=16'-0"

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EXISTING FACILITIES
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
ELEVATIONS SCALE 1"=16'-0"
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EXISTING FACILITIES
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
SECTIONS
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\_> i_I IVI AA I
1 General Climatic Description
2-4 Climatic Data
4 Sunpath Diagram


CLIMATE 1
General Cli ilia tlC Conditions, for Winter Park, Colorado Latitude: 39 54' North Longitude: 105 46' West Elevation: 9080 feet MSL
Winter Park is located along the Fraser Paver Valley in a High Mountain Climatic Zone (Colorado Solar and Weather Information).
On average the region receives precipitation(.1 inch or greater)
84 days out of a year. The majority of which is snow, which exists for, on average, 190 days out of the year. Some of the effects of snow,in.this region, are heavy loads on roofs ( design to 100 psf )
, road closures and the effects of reflected radiation. Sunshine bouncing off clouds and off snowbanks reaches very high levels of intensity. As such, though air temperatures are relatively low; one will feel comfortable during the daylight hours while remaining in the sun. At night or during periods of cloud cover the climate is harsh.
The prevailing winds are up the Fraser River Valley from the nothwest, with occasional strong southwest winds coming down the ski mountain; rare winds are from the southeast are experienced in the winter. Valley mountain winds may also affect the site.
During mid-day winds heated in the lower valley floor may flew up the valley and depending on the valleys shape may move directly up the sides of the mountain, slope winds. At night the situation is reversed and winds cooled at mountain altitudes will flow downward toward the lower valley floor. It is for this reason that the temp--eratures for Fraser, indicated on the following page, are generally regarded as too low for the Winter Park area.
As the Sunpath Diagram reveals, though the Base Facilities are located close to the ski mountain solar access is fairly good.


CLIMAT
2
Summary of Monthly Climatic Data for Winter Park, Colorado Latitude: 39 54 Longitude: 105 46'
Elevation: 9060 feet Substation No: 59175 Division 2 For Years: 1942-1979
Monthly Precipitation (inches)
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Ave. 2.41 1.93 2.69 3.00 2.77 2. ,06 2.02 2.31 1.69 1.83 2.10 2.25
Max. 4.73 3.52 4.27 5.41 5.15 5. ,69 4.40 5.28 7.14 5.56 4.19 6.64
Min. .85 .65 .98 1.22 .50 ,12 .40 .82 0.00 .29 .53 .35
Average annual Precipitation 27. .12" Max. 38.64 Min. 20.80
Monthly Snowfall (inches)
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Ave. 38.3 32.1 38.1 31.5 10.2 1.9 0.0 .0.0 2.3 12.3 29.4 34.9
Max. 81.5 62.0 61.0 72.0 34.0 26.0 0.0 0.5 36.0 51.0 63.5 95.0
Min. 17.0 10.5 13.0 5.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.0 13.0
Average annual snowfall 228.6" Max. 308. ,0 Min . 150. 0
Data for temperatures and degree days will be taken from Fraser. Colorado ( Latitude 39 57' Longitude 105 50' Elevation 8560 ). Although Eraser .is lower than Winter Park its temperatures will actually be lower than would be expected for Winter Park due to its location in the mountain valley. Cold air tends to settle in Fraser.
Monthly Mean Maximum Te mperature (F)
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Ave. 29.1 32.6 37.3 47.3 58.8 63.6 74.6 72.8 66.4 55.2 39.5 31.2
Monthly Mean Minimum Te mperature (F)
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Ave. -5.9 -2.8 3.6 16.0 24.3 29.6 34.3 32.5 24.1 16.! 5.3 -3.2


LIMA 1 b= 3
Monthly Mean Average Temperature (F)
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Ave. 11.7 14.6 20.5 31.6 41.6 49.1 54.5 52.6 45.3 35.8 uz.4 14.0
Degree Days (Base 65F)
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Ave. 1671 1450 1428 1037 727 484 334 396 625 921 1298 1640
Max. 1885 1736 1650 1260 812 573 410 484 741 1181 1520 1775
1357 1157 1245 819 612 380 235 284 511 772 1103 1457
Average Heating Degree Days 12016 Max. 12S79 Min. 10653
Data for solar insolation will be taken from Eagle, Colorado ( Latitude 39 39' Longitude 106 55' Elevation 6497 feet ). The actual amount of solar insolation for Winter Park should be mere than the Eagle fiqures due to its higher altitude and location in a high mountain valley with a high percentage of reflected radiation.
2 2
Total Horizontal Insolation (KJ/m -Day)* (BTU/ft -Day)**
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
8559 12234 17043 21933 25595 28473 27062 23649 20051 14335 9358 7841
** 754 1078 1501 1933 2255 2508 2384 2084 1767 1307 367 691
Annual average 13094 KJ/m Day 1595 BTU/ft^-Day
2 2
Direct Beam Normal Incidence (KJ/m -Day)* (3TU/ft-Day)**
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
16196 20154 24833 28792 33111 35630 35270 32751 29512 25193 19435 15836
1429 1778 2190 2540 2921 3143 3111 2889 2603 2222 171! 1397
Annual average 26409 KJ/nf-Day 2330 BTU/ft:-Day


CL!MAT tz 4
Percent of Possible Sunshine
Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
70 69 73 75 83 77 75 83 86 74 72
Annual Average 737=.
The Sunpath Diagram below describes the effect of the surrounding topography on the available sunshine,on the site,at a height of 9090 feet ?!SL. The dark regions are surrounding topograhy.


SOILS
1-4
5
6 7
Foundation Considerations Location of Exploratory Holes Soils Diagram Soils Legend


SOILS
Job #19,352 January 29, 1980
Prepared for the Winter Park Ski Area Chen and Associates, Consulting Engineers
FOUNDATION CONSIDERATIONS
The final selection of the foundation type for the day center buildig will depend on several factors, including economic considerations, owner assumption of some degree of foundation move--ment risk, and physical construction constraints. Based on our studies, we feel the following foundation types should be considered for evaluation. Design factors and parameters are also discussed.
The most desirable foundation to limit settlement is one that extends through the existing fill, soft organic soils, and very silty sand to tranfer the loads to the underlying competent natural silty gravel, cobbles and boulders. Drilled, end bearing piers have been considered. Piles driven through drilled holes in the fill and embedded into the lower natural, silty gravel were also considered ; however, due to the probable increased cost over piers, this system is not discussed.
Piers; The building could be founded on straight shaft piers bearing on the lower natural silty gravel, cobbles and bould--ers and designed for a maximum end bearing pressure of 15,000 psf. Considerable difficulty in drilling through the fill will be en--countered. Drilling with slurry in the hole will probably be rs--quired. Casing the holes, will also be difficult due to protruding boulders and the possibility of slightly slanted holes. Contractor claims for extras are also a possibility.
The installation of the piers would require careful observation of the drilling operations to verify complete removal of fill and soft natural soils and that a relatively clean pier bottom is achieved on the acceptable bearing stratum. If desired, the base of the pier would only have to be a few feet thick and the upper portion could be a column of the necessary diameter to resist bending. This could be achieved by setting a smaller diameter casing above the base concrete and backfilling around it with gran--ular soil, such as the existing fill without large rocks or deoris.


SOILS 2
The inner casing can then be filled with concrete and pulled.
Spread Footings on Structural Fill: An alternative would involve complete removal of the existing fill and upper soft natural soils and organic layer and replacing with controlled compacted granular fill. The fill would have to extend beyond the exterior of the foundation a minimum distance equal to the depth of the fill.
The existing fill could be used for structural fill if boulders larger than one foot and all depris are first removed. A granular fill compacted to at least 1007, standard Proctor density could sup--port spread footings designed for a maximum soil bearing pressure of 5000 psf.
Based on the exploratory holes, and assuming a basement with footings at about 10 feet below the existing ground elevation, approximately 12 feet (average) of structural fill would be required. Dewatering would be necessary, and in the spring when ground water is shallowest, would require large capacity pumping. Cuts would have to sloped at 1:1 or shored. Support will be required in the form of shoring adjacent to existing structures.
Settlement of the piers and structural fill foundation systems will be minimal and will take place during construction. Total settlement should be less than 1 inch and differential set--tlement should be less than 3/4 inch.
Raft Foundation: If the owner is fully aware of the poten--tial of continual settlement of the existing fill for an indefi--nate period of time and it is desired to construct the foundation on some of the existing fill, we recommend the following parameters should be followed:
(1) The raft or mat foundation should be designed to span unsupported distances of 20 feet.
(2) A 4-foot thick layer of sand fill containing no more than 15% silt and clay and no more than 40% gravel with a maximum diameter of 3 inches should be placed beneath the foundation level. This fill should be compacted to at least 100% standard Proctor factor of 75% relative density. This sand layer will pro--vide a base against which grout or mud-jacking can be performed
if undesirable settlement is ever experienced. If voids are present
to 4.
in the existing fill, it should be lined or gunnited prior to


SOILS 3
placing the sand fill.
(3) Basement construction may reduce settlement in two ways. First, it will decrease the amount of existing fill beneath the foundation. Secondly, the net increase in load on the remaininf fill will be small due to to the 10 foot fill removed.
(4) It is impossible to accurately predict settlement of a raft foundation palced on existing fill. However performance of other buildings founded on the fill indicates only a few inches of maximum settlement has ever occured. It is anticipated that settlement under a raft foundation would be less of a risk because small anomalies in the fill could be spanned by the raft. Hoever, because of the erratic charectoristics of the existing fill, the amount of differential settlement and the resulting structural effects is the main factor affecting the foundation which cannot be quantified.
(5) The raft could be designed for a maximum soil pressure of about 1300 psf without increasing the net load on the bearing surface significantly. Higher design pressures are feasible with an increase in potential settlement.
Lateral Earth Pressure
The basement walls should be designed to resist lateral earth pressures imposed by the backfill. If well-drained, granular soils are used for backfill, the lateral earth pressure can be based on an equivalent fluid pressure of 45 psf per foot of depth. Appropriate surcharge pressures should be added to the lateral earth pressure.
Floor Slabs
The lower floor can be incorporated with the raft foundation and will perform as well as the foundation. If another foundation system is used, the floor will be structurally supported so that settlement of existing fill will not affect it. If full replacement of the existing fill is chosen, the slab can be constructed on grade. In that case, it should be reinforced and .separated from all bearing members with a positive expansion joint.


SOILS4
Siphon
The existing sphon will pass through the build--ing foundation. The pipe should be completely independent of the building. The amount of relative movement between the pipe and the building will depend on the type of foundation beneath both struc--tures.
Underdrainage
If a basement is constructed, the floor should be protected in the event the ground water rises above that level. Perimeter and lateral underdrains should be constructed at least 24 inches below the floor level. The drains should consist of 6-inch perforated pipe installed in free draining gravel-filled trenches sloped into sumps which can be pumoed when necessary or to a positive gravity discharge. If the raft system, with the lower sand fill layer, is used, the underdrain system should be below the sand layer in order to prevent plugging if mud-jacking is ever performed.
Surface Drainage
The following drainage precautions should be observed during construction and maintained at all times after the building has been completed:
(1) Backfill around the building should be moistened and compacted to at least 90% standard Proctor density.
(2) The ground surface surrounding the exterior of the building should be sloped to drain away from the building in all directions. A minimum of 6 inches in the first 10 feet is recommended.
(3) Roof downspouts and drains should discharge well beyond the limits of all backfill.


SOILS
LOCATION OF EXPLORATORY HOLES
O Exploratory holes drilled and pit
excavated June, 1978, Job No. 16,5^1.
0 Exploratory holes and experimental caisson holes drilled Jan., 1980, Job No. 19,352


SOILS 6
Hole 2-78 El. 9087.5'
Hole 5-78 El. 9089.5
Hole 2-80 El. 9089'
9090
9085
9080
907
9070
9065
9060
§55/12 WC=6.7 -200=18 LL=30 ?I=16
§ 13/12
8/12
35/18
9055
i
(-
25/6
WC-11.2
-200=7
9050


7
SOILS
Soils Legend:
it III
<^1
i
Asphalt and base course.
Organic soils and very silty sand, soft to loose, moist to wet, black and gray.
Fill, tunnel muck from Moffat Tunnel excavation, gravel, cobbles and boulders in a silty sand matrix, erratic wood and other depris, slightly moist to wet, generally grayish brown, with some reddish zones, muscovite, rock types are igneous and metamorphic(very hard) and angular in shape.
J
Gravel, silty to slightly silty and clayey with large amount of rounded to subrounded cobles and boulders, dense to very dense, wet.
Undisturbed drive sample. The symbol 21/6 indicates that 21 blows of a hammer falling 30 inches were required to drive the sampler 5 inches.
Disturbed standard split spoon sample.
Sample from pit.
Sample from hole.
Depth to free water at the time of drilling.
Depth at which the hole caved.
Notes:
3. WC Water Content (%)
DD Dry Density (pcf)
LL Liquid Limit (%)
PI Plasticity Index (%) NP Non Plastic.


CODES S, ZONING
1-4 Zoning
5-7 Design Guidelines
8-26 Uniform Building Code
11 Required Separations
11 Height and Floor Area Allowables
27-29 Colorado Energy Code
30-31 Colorado Handicapped Code
32-33 Colorado Passenger Tramway Code


CODES a ZONING
ORDINANCE NO. 40 SERIES OF I960
TITLE: AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO AND ADOPTING ZONING FOR THE TOWN OF WINTER PARK, COLORADO, REGULATING IN THE TOWN THE USE OF LAND, THE LOCATION, SIZE, BULK AND HEIGHT OF BUILDINGS; THE SIZE OF LOTS AND OPEN SPACES ABOUT BUILDINGS; AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION PROVIDING FOR CHANGES IN THE REGULATIONS AND BOUNDRIES OF SUCH DISTRICTS, AND PROVIDING FOR THE ENFORCEMENT AND FURTHER REPEALING ORDINACE NO. 11, SERIES OF 1979.
Section 3
Definitions
Height of Building. Is the vertical distance above a ref--erence datum measured to the highest point of the structure. The reference datum shall be selected by either of the following, whichever yields a greater height to the building:
(a) The elevation of the highest adjoining side--waltc or ground surface within a 5 foot horizontal distance of the exterior wall of the building when such sidewalk or ground surface is not more than 10 feet above lowest grade.
(b) An elevation 10 feet higher than the lowest grade when the sidewalk or ground surface described in (a) above, is more than 10 feet above lowest grade.
Section 6
General Regulations,All Districts
6.3 Trash Storage/ Refuse Storage and Collection. No outdoor storage of trash is permitted in any front yard. All trash areas shall be effectively screened from view by the general public
(b) Commercial Pick-Up (Dumpsters). Dumpsters to be covered and area around dumpsters to be kept free of depris. Screening to be provided where practicable.
6.4 Relief From Yard Requirements Every part of required yard shall be open an unobstructed by any use or except as follows:
every
structure
(a) Sills, best courses,
pilasters
and chimnevs


CODES S. ZONING 2
may project not over 18 inches into the required yard.
(b) Cornices, eaves, and gutters may project not over 36 inches into the required yard.
(c) Outside stairways, fire escapes and balconies may project not over 5 feet into the required yard.
(a) Unenclosed porches, terraces, or pools with--out roofs may project not over 3 feet into the required front and side yards, and not over one half the distance of the required rear yard.
(e) Porte-cocheres, canopies, and marquees may project not more than 5 feet into the required front yard.
6.12 Easements. All easements granted to the Town or other public entities shall be at least 10 feet in width. No permanent structure shall be constructed on any easement.
6.14 Drainage. In order to show conformance with the Town's Master Plan any application shall show, where applicable, that the design and operation of the development proposal will ensure that:
(a) Historical flow pattern and runoff amounts will be maintained in such a manner that will reasonably preserve the natural character of the area and prevent property damage of the the type generally attributed to runoff rate and velocity increases, diversions, concentration and/ or unplanned ponding of runoff.
(b) Runoff volumes and peaks within the devel--opment site and in areas affected by runoff from the site will not exceed the runoff levels attributable to the site in its natural state.
(c) The development will not prevent the unim--peded flew of natural water courses.
(d) That all low points within the development i area are ensured adequate drainage.
(c) Where a proposed site is traversed by a water
course.....a stormwater easement shall be provided...... based on
the 100 year frequency flood but shall be not less than 20 feet.


CODES Si ZONING
3
6.17 Access Roadways for Fire Apparatus.
(a) Every building hereafter constructed shall be accessible to fire department apparatus by way of access road--ways with all weather driving surface, of not less than 20 feet of unobstructed width, with adequate roadway turning radius capable of supporting the imposed loads of fire apparatus and having a min--imum of 13 feet 6 inches of vertical clearance....
(b) The required access width shall not be obstructed in any manner,....
(c) The access roadway shall be extended to with--in 150 feet of all portions of the exterior walls of the first story of the building. Where access roadway cannot be provided, approved fire protection system or systems shall be provided as required and approved by the Fire Chief.
Section 11
Destination Center District (D-C District)
11.1 Purpose. The objective of the D-C zone is to encour--age intensive mixed residential and commercial uses on parcels of land in those areas designated as centers of visitor oriented activity inthe Master Plan for the Town of Winter Park. Concentra--ted mixed use development is deemed essential in said areas to foster greater pedestrian activity, less reliance on the automobile, comparison shopping, and other goals set forth in the Master Plan.
11.7 Minimum Yard Requirement. No building or structure shall be less than 10 feet on all sides from the edge of pavement of any street or road used primarily for vehicular purposes. Structure which abut a plaza, park, mall, greenbelt or other per--manent pedestrian open space area may abut and have openings onto such appurtenances (right-of-way).
11.8 Building Spacing. Where two or more buildings are constructed on the same lot, the minimum spacing between said buildings shall be 15 feet.
11.9 Maximum Height for Suildings And Structures. The max--imum height for all buildings and structures permitted by right in the D-C district shall be 55 feet.


CODES S. ZONING
4
11.11 Landscaping. The first 10 feet of any setback area from any street or road right-of-way shall be used as a landscape area.... Within said area no paving shall be permitted except for necessary driveways.
(b) Landscaping of setback areas as required herein shall be so arranged and maintained so as not to obscure the vision of the driver.of a motor vehicle or interfere with snow removal or storage operations, or otherwise cause a safety hazard.
Section 13
Off Street Parking Regulations
13.1 Required Spaces. Within the Town of Winter Park, all uses shall provide for off street parking in accordance with the following minima:
11. Uses not listed or not fitting within one of the above categories: the Town Administrator shall determine the off-street parking requirements subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees .
13. Parking spaces in addition to those mentioned above shall be provided and designed for employees at the rear of the property.
13.2 Permitted Reductions in Parking Requirements.... In the D-C and R-C districts a payment-in-lieu of providing required parking may be accepted by the Planning and Zoning Commision. Wo more than a 10 percent reduction shall be permitted.The amount shall be equal to the actual cost of providing hard surfaced ten foot by twenty foot parking stalls.
13.3 Loading Area Requirements. Non -Residential uses exceeding 25,000 square feet on a lot: there shall be one per--manently maintained loading space provided for each 25,000 square feet of gross building floor area or portion thereafter the first 25,000 square feet.


CODES a ZONING 5
ORDINANCE NO.16 SERIES OF 1979
TITLE: AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING GUIDELINES RELATING TO THE DEVELOPMENT, RE-DEVELOPMENT, LOCATION, CONFIGURATION, SIZE, SHAPE AND COLOR OF STRUCTURES, BUILDINGS, SIGNS AND LANDSCAPE OF THE TOWN OF WINTER PARK, COLORADO
Section 3
Design Guidelines
The recommendations of the Design Review Committee shall be based on the guidelines prescribed in this Section, and by other applicable Ordinances. If a development project is to built in phases, each phase shall be subject to the design guidelines prescribed in this Section.
(a) Building, location, configuration, architectural design, materials, and colors should be harmonious with the majestic mountain setting and the village scale of the town.
(b) Structures should not visually dominate the landscape or call undue attention to themselves unless they are of civic importance and occupy focal sites.
(c) Structures or portions of structures exceeding the height limits prescribed in other applicable Ordinances should be limited to chimneys, clock towers, ski lifts, church steeples, and similar harmonious architectural forms. RooftoD heating and Air conditioning equipment, large vent stacks, elevator penthouses, and similar features should be avoided, and, if permitted, should be screened from view.
(d) Roofs should have a pitch of at least 4 feet in 12 and should be covered with materials that are harmonious with their surroundings. Flat roofs shall be permitted only in special situ--ations, and then should be covered with harmonious materials.
Mansard roofs generally should be avioded.
(e) Deep eaves, overhangs, canopies, and other building features that provide shelter from the elements in winter and pro--viae shade in summer should be encouraged.
(f) 3uilding materials should be predominantly natural, such as wood siding, shingles,and native stone. Brick is acceptable.


COD
S. ZONING
5
Concrete block is generally acceptable only if specially designed and colored. Where stucco is used, gross textures and surface features that appear to imitate other materials should be avoided. Concrete surfaces should be used sparingly, and should be handled with delicacy and restraint. Aggregate is generally more acceptable than raw concrete, but the use of integral patterns can make con--crete surfaces harmonius.
(g) Fenestration should be suitable for the climate and for the orientation of the particular building elevation in which the fenestration occurs. Use of shutters and sunbreaks should be encouraged where appropriate.
(h) Design of accesory structures, fences, walls and other structural landscape features should be harmonious with the main structure or structures on the site. The same or other harmonious building materials should be used on main structures and accessory structures.
(i) Natural colors( earth tones ), gray, and white should be favored. Primary colors or other bright colors should be used only as accents and then sparingly and mainly in nonresidential areas. Use of penetrating stains rather than paint on wood surfaces should be encouraged. Exposed metal flashing or trim should be annodized or painted so as to be nonreflective.
(j) Commercial development generally should be rslative--iy tight knit and somewhat intimate in scale. Large and readily visible parking lots exposed to streets or pedestrianways should be avoided.
(k) Residential, multiple-dwelling, and lodge development outside central areas should have a looser, lower density charecter. Open spaces should be left in their natural state or landscaped, and large paved areas should not be permitted.
(l) Removal of trees, shrubs, and nonhazardous native plant materials generally should be limited to to the removal of those essential for development of the site.
(m) On hillsides, excessive grading should not be per--mitted for building sites, access drives, off-street parking, pool sites, recreation areas, or other improvements.
(n) Cut and fill slopes should be sculptural in form and


ULJUbb fci ^UiNJilMLz)
contoured to biend with the natural, undisturbed terrain.
(o) All grading and excavation scars should be planted with natural materials or others that will harmonize with the natu--ral landscape.
(p) Landscaping should be designed to harmonize with natural landforms and trees and other plant materials, except in commercial areas where the manmade look may be more suitable. In general lawns, geometric plantings, evenly spaced rows of trees, and other formal, urban landscape features should be avoided.
(q) Particular attention should be given the landscape design of off street parking lots to soften their harsh, barren appearance. Cars, as seen from grade, ana from higher elevations, should be screened as much as possible by trees, shrubs, hedges, fences, mounds, and similar landscape features. Plant materials used for screening generally should be evergreens.
(r) In residential areas, location and confiquration of buildings should maximize the privacy of surrounding dwellings and should intrude into the views to the minmum extent feasible.
(s) In residential areas, accesory buildings generally should be attached to the main building either directly or by means of a continuous fence, wall or screen at feet high of the same or
a complimentary material as the main building's exterior finish.
(t) Service areas, outdoor storage, drying yards, garbage cans and trash storage areas should be screened from adjacent properties, streets, and other areas by fences, planting, and other suitable means.
(u) Storage areas for boats, trailers, campers, and offroad vehicles shall be completely enclosed or screened from adjacent properties, streets, and other public areas by fences, plant--ing, and other suitable means.


CODES & ZONINO
8
UNIFORM BUILDING CODE 1979 EDITION
INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF BUILDING OFFICIALS PART III
Requirements Based on Occupancy Chapter 5
Classification of All Buildings By Use or Occupancy and General Requirements for All Occupancies
Sec. 501. Every building, whether existing ir hereafter erected, shall be classified by the building official, according to its use or the charecter of its occupancy, as a building of Group A,B,E,H,I,M, or R. as defined in Chapters 6,7,3,9,10,1i,and 12. (See Table No. 5-A)
Any occupancy not mentioned specifically or about which there is any question shall be classified by the building official and included in the group which its use most nearly resembles, based on the existing or proposed life and fire hazard.
Sec. 503. (a) General. When a building is used for more than one occupancy purpose, each part of the building comprising a distinct"Occupancy" as described in Chapters 5 through 12, shall be seperated from any other occupancy as specified in Section 503(a).
when a building houses more than one occupancy, each portion of the building shall conform to the requirements for the occupancy housed therein. The area of the building shall be such that the sum of the ratios of the actual area divided by the allowable area for each separata occupancy shall not exceed one.
(b) Forms of Occupancy Separations. Occupancy sep rations shall be vertical or horizontal or both or, when necessary, of such other form as may be required to afford a com--plete separation between the various occupancy divisions in the building.
Where the occupancy separation is horizontal, structural mem--bers supporting the separation shall be protected by equivalent fire-resistive construction.


CODES S. ZQNiNU
9
(c) Types of Separations. Occupancy separations shall be classed as "Four-hour fire-resistive," "Three-hour Fire--resistive," Two- hour Fire-resistive," and "One-hour Fire-resis-- tive."
1. A "four-hour fire-resistive occupancy separation" shall have no openings therein and shall be of not less than four-hour fire--resistive construction.
2. A "three-hour fire-resistive occupancy separation" shall be of not less than three-hour fire resistive construction. All openings in walls forming such separation shall be protected by a fire assembly having a three hour fire protective rating. The total width of all openings in any three-hour fire-resistive separation wall in any one story shall not exceed 25% of the length of the wall in that story and no single opening shall have an area greater than 120 square feet.
All openings in floors forming a "three-hour separation" shall be protected by vertical enclosures extending above and below such openings. The walls of such vertical enclosures shall be of not less than "two-hour fire-resistive" construction and all openings therein shall be protected by a fire assembly having a one and one-half-hour fire protection rating.
3. A "two-hour fire-resistive occupancy separation" shall be of not less than two-hour fire-resistive construction. Ail openings in such separations shall be protected by a fire assembly having a one and one-half-hour fire-protection rating.
4. A "one-hour fire-resistive occupancy separation" shall be
of not less than one-hour fire-resistive construction. All openings in such separation shall be protected by a fire assembly having a one-hour fire protection rating.
Location on Property
Sec. 504. (c) Building on Same Property and Buildings Containing Courts. For the purpose of determining the required wall and opening protection, buildings on the same property and court walls of buildings over one story in height shall be assumed to have a property line between them.


CODES & ZONINU
10
When a new building is to be erected on the same property with an existing building, the assumed property line from the existing building shall be the distance to the property line for each occupancy as set forth in Table No. 5-A and Part IV.
EXCEPTION: Two or more buildings on the same property may be considered as portions of one building if the aggregate area of such buildings is within the limits specified in Section 505 for a single building.
When the buildings so considered house different occupancies or are of different types of construction, the area shall be that allowed for the most restricted occupancy or construction.
ARCADES
Sec. 509. Arcades connecting buildings and used exclusively as passageways need not be considered as adjacent buildings for the the provisions of this chapter, provided that the wails of the building acjoining the arcades are finished with the same construction as required for the exterior walls of the building, with no communicating openings Between the arcades and the building, except doors; and provided that the arcades are of not less than one-hour fire-resistive construction or of noncombustibie materials, fire-retardant treated wood or of heavy timber construction with 2 inch nominal sheathing.


CODES <3. ZONING
11
REQUIRED SEPARATIONS IN BUILDINGS OF MIXED OCCUPANCY (HOURS)
A-3 B-2 r* r H-4 I
A-3 N N 4 3
3-2 N - 1 1 2
E N 1 - 4 1
H-4 4 1 4 - 4
1-1 3 2 1 4 -
HEAVY TIMBER CONSTRUCTION (TYPE IV) ALLOWABLES
MAX. HEIGHT (STORIES)
MAX. FLOOR AREA MAX. FLOOR AREA
(ONE STORY) (TOTAL)
A-3 r\ Lm 13,500 27,000
B-2 4 13,000 72,000
E 2* 20,200 20,200
H-4 2 11,200 22,400
1-1 1 6,800 6,800
7?
A day-cars area is not to be located above the CONSTRUCTION TYPE II (FR) ALLOWABLES MAX. HEIGHT MAX. FLOOR AREA (STORIES) (ONE STORY) first floor. MAX. FLOOR (TOTAL)
A-3 4 29,900 119,500
B-2 12 39,900 159,500
J- E 4'v 45,200 95,200
H-4 5 24,800 124,000
1-1 3 15,100 45,300


CODES S. ZONING 12
Based on the program requirements the following facilities may be considered Group A, Division 3. Occupancies.
RESTAURANT
BAR LOUNGE
EMPLOYEE LUNCH ROOM Chapter 6
Requirements for Group A Occupancies
Construction, Height and Allowable Area
Sec. 6Q2. (a) General. Buildings or parts of buildings classed in Group A because of the use or character of the occupancy shall be limited to the types of construction set forth in Tables No. 5-C and No. 5-D and shall not exceed, in area or height, the limits specified in Sections 505, 506 and 507.
(b) Special Provisions......Division 3
Occupancies lacated in a basement or above the first story shall be of not less than one-hour fire-resistive construction.
.... Division 3 Occupancies with an occupant load of 50 or more, which are locaced over usable space, shall be separated from such space by not less than a one-hour fire resistive construction.
Location on Property
Sec. 603. Buildings housing Group A Occupancies shall front directly upon or have access to a public street not less than 20 feet in width. The access to the public street shall have a minimum 20-foot-wide right-of -way, unobstructed and maintained only as access to the public street. The main entrance to the building shall be located on the public street or on the access way.
Sec. 604. (a) General. Stairs, exits, and smokeproof enclosures shall be provided as specified in Chapter 33.
Light, Ventilation and Sanitation
Sec. 605. Ail enclosed portions of Group A Occupancies customarily used by human beings shall be provided with natural light by means of exterior glazed openings with an area not less than one-tenth of the total floor area, ana natural ventilation by means of openable exterior openings with an area of not less


CODES & ZONING
13
than one-twentieth of the total floor area or shall be provided with an artificial light and a mechanically operated ventilating system. The mechanically operated ventilation system shall supply a minimum of 5 cubic feet per minute of outside air with a total circulated of not less than 15 cubic feet per minute per occupant in all portions of the building and such system shall be kept continuously in operation during such time as the building is occupied. If the velocity of the air at the register exceeds 10 feet per second, the register shall be placed more than 8 feet above the floor directly beneath.
.... There shall be provided in an approved location at least one lavatory for each sex, and at least one drinking fountain for each floor level.
Special Hazards
Sec. 608......Chimneys and heating apparatus shall conform
to the requirements of Chapter 37 of this code and the Mechanical Code.


CODES S. ZONING
14
3ased on the program requirements the following facilities may be considered Group 3, Division 2 Occupancies:
COMMERCIAL AREA
ADMINISTRATION AREAS
RENTAL/REPAIR AREA Chapter 7
Requirements for Group 3 Occupancies
Construction, Height and Allowable Area
Sec. 702. (a) General. Buildings or parts of buildings classed in Group B Occupancy because of the use or character of of the occupancy shall be limited to the types of construction set forth in Tables No. 5-C and No. 5-D and shall not exceed, in area or height, the lumits specified in Sections 505, 506 and 507.
(b) Special Provisions......Storage areas in
excess of 1000 square feet in connection with wholesale or retail sales in Division 2 Occupancies shall be seperatea from the public areas by a one-hour fire-resistive occupancy separation as defined in Chapter 5. Such areas may be increased to 3000 square feet when sprinklers, not otherwise required, are installed in the storage area.
Exit Facilities
Sec. 704. Stairs, exits and smokeproof enclosures shall be provided as specified in Chapter 33.
Light, Ventilation and Sanitation
Sec. 705. All portions of Group 3 Occupancies customar--ily used by human beings shall be provided with natural light by means of exterior glazed openings with an area equal to one-tenth of the total floor area, and natural ventilation by means of exter--ior openings with an area not less than one-twentieth of the total floor area, or shall be provided with artificial light and a mechanically operated ventilating system as specified in Section 505.
. ... Every building or portion thereof where persons are employed shall be provided with at least one water closet. Seperate facil--ities shall be provided for each sex when the number of employees four and both sexes are employed.


CQDtS fci 21U IN I INI l=>
1 5
. ... All water closet room shall be provided with an exterior window at least 3 square feet in area, fully operable; or a vertical duct not less than 100 square inches in area for the first toilet facility, with an additional 50 square inches for each add--tional toilet facility; or a mechanically operated exhaust system, Shaft Enclosures
Sec. 706......Elevator shafts, vent shafts and other vert-
-ical openings shall be enclosed, and the enclosure shall be as specified in Section 1706.
Special Hazards
Sec. 708. Chimneys and heating apparatus shall conform to the requirements of Chapter 37 of this code and the Mechanical Code.


CODES & ZDNINU
16
Based on the program requirements the following facilities may be considered Group E, Division 3 Occupancies:
NURSERY/ DAY CARE Chapter 3
Requirements for Group E Occupancies
Construction, Height and Allowable Area
Sec. 802. (a) General. Buildings or parts of buildings classed in Group E because of their use or character of the occupancy shall be limited to the types of construction set forth in Tables No. 5-K and No. 5-D and shall not exceed,in area or height, the limits specified in Sections 505, 506 and 507, except that the area may be increased by 50 percent when the maximum travel distance specified in Section 3302 (d) is reduced by 50 per--cent.
Location on Property
Sec. 803. All buildings housing Group E Occupancies shall front directly upon or have access to a public street not less than 20 feet in width. The access to the public street shall be a minimum 20-foot-wide right-of-way, unobstructed and maintained only as access to the public street, at least one required exit shall be located on the public street or on the accessway.
Exit Facilities
Sec. 804. Stairs, exits and smokeproof enclosures shall be provided as specified in Chapter 33.
Light, Ventilation and Sanitation
Sec. 805. All portions of Group E Occupancies shall be provided with light and ventilation, either natural or artificial, as specified in Section 605(see Group A Occupancies)
Sec. 806. Exits shall be enclosed as specified in Chapter 33. Elevator shafts, vent shafts and other vertical openings shall be enclosed, ....


CODES S. ZONINCd
17
Based on the program requirements the following facilities may be considered Group I, Division 1. Occupancies:
NURSERY
EMPLOYEE NURSERY Chapter 10
Requirements for Group I Occupancies
Construction, Height and Allowable Area
Sec. 1002. (a) General. Buildings or parts of buildings classed in Group I because of the use or charecter of the occupancy shall be limited to the types of construction set forth in Tables No. 5-C and No. 5-D and' shall not exceed, in area or height, the limits specified in Sections 505, 506 and 507.
Exit Facilities
Sec. 1004. Stairs, exits and smokeproof enclosures shall be provided as specified in Chapter 33.
Light, Ventilation and Sanitation
Sec. 1005......as specified in section 605
For further requirements on water closets, see Section 1711


CODES a ZONING 18
Water Closet Compartments and Showers
Sec. 1711. (b) Toilet Facilities. Each water closet stool shall be located in a clear space not less than 30 inches in width and have a clear space in front of the water closet stool of not less than 24 inches.
Where toilet facilities are provided on any floor where access by the physically handicapped is required by Table No. 33-A, at least one such facilty for each sex shall comply with the require--ment of this section.All doorways leading to such toilet rooms shall have a clear and unobstructed width of not less than 30 inches. Each such toilet room shall have the following:
1. A klear space of not less than 44 inches on each side of doors providing access to toilet rooms. This distance shall be measured at right angles to the face of the door when in the closed position. Not more than one door may encroach into the 44 inch space
2. A clear space within the toilet room of sufficient size to inscribe a circle with a diameter not less than 60 inches. Doors in any position may encroach into this space by not more than 12 inches.
3. A clear space not less th and 48 inches long in front of at least one wa the use of the handicapped. When such a water within a compartment, entry to the compartment width of 30 inches when located at the end and inches when located at the side. A door, if pr encroach into the rauired space in front of th Except for door swing, a clear unobstructed ac 44 inches in width shall be orovided to toilet -signed for use by the handicapped.
Water Fountains
Sec. 1712. Where water fountains are p one shall have a spout within 33 inches of the up-front controls. When fountains are located alcove shall be not less than 32 inches in wid
an 42 inches wide ter closet stool for closet stool is shall have a clear a clear width of 34 oviaed, shall not e water closet, cess not less tnan compartments de-
rovided. at least floor and shall have in an alcove, the


CODES & ZONING
19
Chapter 33
Stairs, Exits and Occupant Loads
. Sec. 3301.(a) Purpose. The purpose of this chapter is to determine occupant loads and to provide minimum standards of egress facilities for occupants of buildings, reviewing stands, bleachers and grandstands.
(d) Determination of Occupant Load. The occu--pant load permitted in any building or portion thereof shall be determined by dividing the floor area asigned to that use by the square feet per occupant as set forth in Table No. 33-A
(h) More than One Purpose. For determining exit requirements the capacity of a building or portion thereof which is used for different purposes shall be determined by the occupant load which gives the largest number of persons.
(k) Changes in Elevation. Within a building, changes in elevation of less than 12 inches along any exit serving a tributary occupant load of 10 or more shall be by ramps.
Exits Required
Sec. 3302.(a) Number of Exits. Every building or portion thereof shall have at least one exit and shall have not less than two exits where required by Table No. 33-A
In all occupancies, floors above the first story having an occupant load of more than 10 shall have not less than two exits.
Each mezzanine used for other than storage purposes, if greater in area than 2000 square feet or if more than 60 feet in any dimension, shall have not less than two stairways to an adjacent floor.
Every story or portion thereof having an occupant load of 501 to 1000 shall have not less than three exits.
Every story of portion thereof having an occupant load of more than 1000 shall have net less than four exits.
The number of exits required from any story of a building shall be determined by using the occupant load of that story plus the percentages of the occupant loads of the floors which exit


CODES S. ZONING 20
through the level under consideration, as follows:
1. Fifty percent of the occupant load in the first adjacent story above (and.the first story below, when a story below exits through the level under consideration).
2. Twenty five percent of the occupant load in the story immediately beyond the first adjacent story.
The maximum number of exits required for any story shall be maintained until egress is provided from the structure.
For the purposes of this section, basements and occupied roofs shall be. provided with exits as required for stories.
(b) Width. The total width of exits in feet shall be not less than the total occupant load served divided by 50. Such width of exits shall be divided approximately equally among the separate exits.
(c) Arrangement of Exits. If only two exits are required they shall be placed a distance apart equal to not less than one--half of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be sreved measured in a straight line between exits. Where three or more exits are required, they shall be arranged a reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes blocked the others will be available.
(d) Distance to Exits. The maximum distance of travel from any point to an exterior exit door, horizontal exit, exit passageway or an enclosed stairway in a building not equipped with an auto--matic sprinkler system throughout shall not exceed 150 feet or
200 feet in a building equipped with an automatic sprinkler system throughout. These distances may be increased 100 feet when the last 150 feet is within a corridor, complying to Section 3304.
See Section 3317 for Group E Occupancy travel distances.
(e) Exits Through Adjoining or Accessory Areas. Exits
from a room may open into an adjoining or intervening room or area, provided such adjoining room is accessory to the area served and provides a direct means of egress to an exit corridor, exit stairway, exterior exit, horizontal exit, exterior exit balcony or exit passageway.
EXCEPTION: Exits are not to pass through kitchens,


LJ1iIIt b 6a ZH_U\Jil\ILb 21
storerooms, restrooms, closets or spaces used for similar purposes.
Foyers, lobbies and reception rooms constructed as required for corridors shall not be construed as intervening rooms.
(f) Entrances to Buildings. Main exits from buildings requiring access by the physically handicapped, as listed in Table No. 33-A, shall be usable by individuals in wheelchairs and be on a level that would make the elevators accessible where provided.
Doors
Sec. 3303. (b) Swing. Exit doors shall swing in the direc--tion of exit travel when serving any hazardous area or when serving an occupant load of 50 or more.
Double-acting doors shall not be used as exits serving a tributary occupant load of more than 100 nor shall they be used as part of a fire assembly nor equipped with panic hardware. A double-acting door shall be provided with a view panel of not less than 200 square inches.
(e) Width and Height. Every required exit doorway shall be of a size as to permit the installation of a door not less than 3 feet in width and not less than 6 feet 8 inches in height. When installed in exit doorways, exit doors shall be capable of opening at least 90 degrees and shall be so mounted that the clear width of the exitway is not less than 32 inches.
(i) Change in Floor Level at Doors. Regardless of the occupant load, there shall be a floor or a landing on each side of a door. The floor or landing shall not be more than 1 inch lower than the theshold of the doorway. Where doors open over landings, the landing shall have a length of not less than 5 feet.
Corridors and Exterior Exit Balconies
Sec. 3304. (b) Width. Every corridor serving an occupant load of 10 or more shall be not less in width than 44 inches.
(c) Height. Corridors and exterior exit balconies shall have a clear height of not less than 7 feet measured to the lowest projection from the ceiling.
(d) Projections. The required width of corridors shall not


CODES fci gfUINIIINLu
be obstructed.
EXCEPTION: Handrails and doors, when fully opened, shall not reduce the required width by note than 7 inches. Doors in any position shall not reduce the required width by more than: one-half.
(e) Access to Exits. When more than one exit is required, they shall be so arranged that it is possible to go in either direction from any point in a corridor to a seperate exit, except for dead ends not exceeding 20 feet in length.
(f) Changes in Elevation. When a corridor or exterior exit balcony is accessible to an elevator, changes in elevation of the floor shall be made by means of a ramp.
Stairways
Sec. 3305, (b) Width. Stairways serving an occupant load of more than 50 shall be not less in width than 44 inches. Stairways serving an occupant load of 50 or less may be 36 inches wide.
Private stairways serving an occupant load of less than 10 may be 30 inches wide.
(c) Rise and P.un. The rise of every step in a stairway shall be not less than 4 inches nor greater than Ik inches. Except as permitted in Subsections (d) and (f), the run shall be not less than 10 inches as measured horizontally between the vertical planes of the furthermost projection adjacent treads. Except as permitted in Subsections (d), (e), and (f), the largest tread run within any flight of stairs shall not exceed the smallest by more than 3/8 inch. The greatest riser height within any flight of stairs shall not exceed the smallest by more than 3/8 inch.
EXCEPTION: 1. Private stairways serving an occupant load of less than 10 and stairways to unoccupied roofs may be constructed with an 8 inch maximum rise and a 9 inch minimum run.
(g) Landings. Every landing shall have a dimension measured in the direction of travel equal to the width of the stairway. Such dimension need not exceed 4 feet when the stair has a straight run.
(h) Basement Stairways. Where a basement stairway and a stairway to an upper story terminate in the same exit enclosure, an approved barrier shall be provided to prevent persons from


CODES
ZONING
23
Sl
continuing on into the basement.
(i) Distance 3etween Landings. There shall not be more than 12 feet vertically between landings.
(j) Handrails. Stairways shall have handrails on each side, and every stairway required to be more than 38 inches in width shall be provided with not less than one intermediate handrail
for each 88 inches of required width. Intermediate handrails shall be spaced approximately equal within the entire width of the stairway.
Handrails shall be placed not less than 30 inches nor more than 34 inches above the nosing of treads. They shall be continuous the full length of the stairs and except for private stairways at least one handrail shall extend not less than 6 inches beyond the top and bottom risers.
(c)Stairway to Roof. In every building four or more stories in height, one stairway shall extend to the roof surface, unless the roof has a slope greater than four in 12.
(p) Headroom. Every required stairway shall have a head--rcom clearance of not less than 6 feet 6 inches.
Ramps
Sec. 3306. (b) Width. The width of ramps shall be as required for stairways.
(c) Slope. Ramps required by Table No. 33-A shall not exceed a slpe of one vertical to 12 horizontal. The slope of other ramps shall not exceed one vertical to 8 horizontal.
Horizontal Exit
Sec, 3307. (c) Dicharge Areas. A horizontal exit shall lead into a floor area having capacity for an occupant load not less than the occupant load served by such exit. The capacity shall be determined by allowing 3 square feet per ambulatory occupant and 30 square feet per nonambulatory occupant. The area into which the horizontal exit leads shall be provided with exits other than additional horizontal exits as required by Section 3302.


CODES 6i ZlUiNIINS
z^
Exit Enclosures
Sec. 3308. (e) Barrier. A stairway in an exit enclosure shall not continue below the grade level exit unless an approved barrier is provided at the ground floor level to prevent persons from accidentally continuing into the basement.
Exit Passageways
Sec. 3311. (a) Discharge. The walls of exit passageways shall be without openings other than required exits
Aisles
Sec. 3313. (a) General. Every porsion of every building in which are installed seats, tables, merchandise, equipment or similar materials shall be provided with aisles leading to an exit.
(b) Width. Every aisle shall be not less than 3 feet wide if serving only one side, and not less than 3 feet 6 inches wide if serving both sides. Such minimum width shall be measured at the point farthest from the exit, cross aisle or foyer and shall be increased by \\ inches for each 5 feet in length toward the exit, cross aisle or foyer.
(e) Cross Aisles. Aisles shall terminate in a cross aisle, foyer or exit.
(g) Slope. The slope portion of aisles shall not exceed 1 foot fall in 8 feet
(h) Steps. Steps shall not be used in an aisle when the change in elevation can be achieved by a slope conforming to Section 3313 (g). No single step or riser shall be used in any aisle. Where the steps are used in an aisle such steps shall extend across the full width of the aisle and shall be illuminated.
Exits: Group E Occupancies
Sec. 3317. (c) Distance to Exits. 1. No opint in a room in a building shall be more than 75 feet from a minimum protection as provided by an exit corridor, enclosed stairway or exterior of the building.
(d) Exits Trough Adjoining Rooms. Interior rooms may exit
through adjoining or intervening rooms, provided the total distance


CODES & ZONIINO
zs
of travel through such rooms to an exit corridor does not exceed that specified in Subsection (c) 1 above and is direct, obvious and unobstructed means of travel. Such paths of exit travel shall not pass through kitchens, storerooms, rest rooms, closets, or other similar spaces.
Exits: Group H Occupancies
Sec. 3319. (g) Locking Devices. In buildings housing occupancies in which the personal liberties of inmates or patients are restrained within the building and are constructed in conformance with the special provisions of Section 1002 (b), the exterior doors may be fastened with locks, provided that room doors shall not be fastened by other means than doorknobs or similar devices which can be opened readily from the corridor side without the use of keys or any special knowledge or effort.


CODES & ZONING
TA3LE NO. 33-A MINIMUM EGRESS AND ACCESS REQUIREMENTS
Minimum of Two Square Feet
Exits where the Per
Number of Occupant
Occupants is Over
Access by Means of a Ramp or an Elevator Must be Provided for the Handicapped
4. Assembly Areas, Less
concentatea Use 50 15 Yes"3
Conference Rooms Dining Rooms Drinking Establishments 12. Kitchen- Commercial 30 200 No
15. Mechanical Equipment Room 30 300 No
16. Nurseries for Children (Day-care) 6 50 Yes
17. Offices 30 ICO Yes3
20. Stores-Retail Sales Rooms Ground Floor 50 30 Yes
Upper Floors 10 50 Yes
23. All Others 50 100
3. Access to secondary areas on balconies or mezzanines may be by stairs only, except when such secondary areas contain the only available toilet facilities.
5. Access to floors other than that closest to grade may be by stairs only, except when the only available toilet facilities are on other levels.


CODES & ZDNINLi *
State of Colorado
Colorado Model Energy Efficiency Conscruction
and Renovation Standards for Nonresidentiai Buildings
Effective Date: July 1, 1978
Section 3 Design Conditions
301.0 Design Criteria
(a) The criteria of this section establish the minimum requirements for thermal design of the exterior envelope of buildings and establish criteria, for the design of the HVAC systems and their parts.
(b) A building that is designed to be both heated and cooled shall meet the more stringent of the heating or cooling require--ments as provided in this Code when requirements for the exter--ior envelope differ.
(c) When a building houses more than one occupancy, each portion of the building shall conform to the requirements for the occupancy housed therein.
302.1 Exterior DEsign Conditions
Outdoor Design Temperature*
*The following temperatures are based on data obtained from the Colorado Office of Energy Conservation, 1525 Sherman St., Denverr Colorado on November 25, 1981
Winter
Design Dry Bulb in o CNj Csl
Summer
Design Dry 3ulb 7 ^O-n 'to F
Design Wet 3ulb ^ qOt- j o r
Degree Days Heating 12,015
Degree North Latitude 39 54
302.2 Interior Design Temperature
(a) Indoor design temperature shall be 72F for heating and 78F for cooling. Other design temperatures may be used for equipment selection if they result in lower energy usage.


LJLJLJtr ho Cat
LJINIIM Ln
Z.O
302.3 Mechanical Ventilation
Ventilation air shall conform to Std RS-3 ( ASHRAE 62-73, Standards for Natural. Ventilation ). The minimum column value of Std RS-3 for each type of occupancy shall be used for design.
403.0 Buildings Utilizing Nondepletable Energy Sources
Any proposed building utilizing solar, geothermal, wind or other nondepletable energy for all or part of its energy source shall meet the requirements of Section 401 of this Code, except such nondepletable energy may be excluded from the total annual energy consumption allowed for the building by that section. To qualify for this exclusion, such energy must be derived from a specific collection, storage and distribution system.
403.1 Solar Processes
The solar energy passing through the glazing shall also be considered as qualifying if such glazing is provided with:
(a) Operable insulating shutters or other devices which, when drawn or closed, shall kause the glazing area to reduce max--mum outward heat flows to those in accordance with Section 502.2(a) and Section 502.3.
403.2 Nocturnal Processes
This provision shall also apply to nocturnal cooling processes in lieu of energy consuming processes. The exclusion paragraph
403.0 shall also apply to nocturnal cooling processes used>in lieu of energy consuming mechanical equipment.
503.1 Calculations of Heating and Cooling Loads
(a) The design parameters specified in Section 3 shall apply for all computations. Heating and cooling design loads for the purpose of sizing HVAC systems shall be determined in accordance with one of the procedures described in Chapters 24 or 25 of
Std RS-1 (ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals) or an equivalent computation procedure.
51Q.4 Building Exteriors
In exterior spaces, the lighting power budget shall be based on the use for which the space is intended ( for task performance, safety or security ) and on efficient energy utilization.
(b) Facade Lighting
Facade lighting for power budget puposes shall


UUUbb fci, _____________________ll\JIl\Ji_3 zs
be no greater than 2 percent of the total interior lighting load of the building.
602.1 Building Envelope Requirements Design Criteria
(b) The proposed design may take into consideration the thermal mass, orientation and exterior color of the building components, using verified criteria developed by a recognized re--search organization in considering energy conservation when approved by the Building Official.


CODES &. ZONIiMIS
State of Colorado Handicapped Code Review 1975
Entrances
At least one primary entrance to each building shall be useabl by those in wheelchairs.
Public Walks
Public Walks shall have a 48 inch minimum width, 5 percent maximum slope, and extend 1 foot beyond each side of a door.
Parking Spaces
Parking spaces for the handicapped will have a 12 foot minimum width.
Ramps
Ramps will have a maximum slope of one vertical to 12 hori--zontal and have a level platform for every 30 feet of run.
Stairs
If possible the riser should not exceed 7 inches in height. Rest Rooms
Ther should be a least one handicapped toilet stall in each toilet room. Urinals should be mounted 19 inches above the floor or at floor level. Lavatories should be accessible to individuals in wheelchairs. Mirrors and towel racks should be no more than 40 inches above floor level.
Water Fountains
Water fountains shall be accessible to the handicapped. Telephones
Telephones shall be accessible to the handicapped, and an appropriate number equipped for those with hearing disabilities.


CODES 6i z: U IN IIN L=i
o
Doors
Doors snail have a minimum clear opening of 32 inches, and level for at least 5 feet on either side. Doors not intended for use and potentially dangerous shall have knurled knobs.
Elevators
Elevators shall have an opening on the same level as the entrance


CODES & ZONING
State of Colorado
Department of Regulatory Agencies
Passenger Tramway Safety Board
Rules and Regulations
Effective Date: December 30, 1977
2.1.2 (2)
No Passenger Tramway installation shall be permitted whenever the Passenger Tramway operator does not have permanent and irrevocable control of the following air space ( except when the Passenger Tramway is located on National Forest land ):The area bounded by planes having an outward slope of one horizontal and two vertical and commencing at a point twenty(20) feet horizontally outside of the intersection of the vertical planes of the ropes or cables and the ground surface.
2.1.4.2.1 (1)
Where skiing is permitted beneath the lift line, or at points where ski trails cross under a lift line, a minimum vertical distance of thirteen(13) feet between the design maximum snow depth and the top of the carrier seat shall be maintained under conditions of maximum sag.
2.1.4.2.1 (2)
Whenever the clearance is less than fifteen(15) feet, no public transportation shall be permitted beneath the lift.
Whenever the clearance is less then eight(8) feet for gondolas and empty chairs or ten(10) feet for foot passengers, provisions shall be made to prevent access to unauthorized persons to the area beneath the lift......
1.3
Reference to Other Codes and Standards The design installation, operation, and maintenance of Passenger Tramways and their components should conform to standards or codes published by recognized agencies listed herein .........


CODES S. ZDNiNU

the following agencies are hereby recognized (b) American Concrete Institute
(d) American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC)
(e) American Institute of Timber Construction (AITC)
(h) American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) (o) Uniform 3uilding Code published by the International Conference of Building Officials


PROGRAM
1 Introduction
2-4 Spaces and Square Foot Allocations
5 Nursery
6 Rental/ R.epair Area
7-8 Security
9 Ticketing
10-11 Public R.estrooms
12-13 Space Descriptions
14 Matrix
15-16 Staging Area


hROgram
INTRODUCTION
The program was derived from information supplied by William T.
Brown, Vice President of Planning and Construction for the Winter
Park Recreational Association. It is based on the original program
for the Winter Park Base Area,"Base Area Facilities Design Compe-
-tition Program", and a revised program. In addition several
2
changes were made to the revised program. A 9750 ft Rental/R.epair
2
Area is included as well as 4000 ft of additional retail space.
2
Dropped from the program is 10,000 ft of convention space.The pro-
2
-gram, as revised has a total interior area of 71,225 ft .
In addition provisions will be made for both a mountain gondola station and gondola interconnect station in the base area. Space will also be alloted for a First Aid Complex, Phase II of the revised program.
The placement of condominiums above the facilities will also be considered but will not be designed.


HHUbHA! VI
SPACES AND SQUARE FOOT ALLOCATIONS
Public Restrooms Nursery Ticketing and photo pass Information desk Lobby
Bar lounge P>.estaurant Restaurant kitchen Pay lockers Rental/ Repair Area Ski shop retail Commercial Area
4200
4600
2000
100
aeet)S&r PUBLIC FACILITIES
3433- /zoster
1500
i
3000 43.250
Bulk Storage
Fire proof record storage Transportation office Secur i ty
Grounds maintenance shop Grounds equipment Traffic control, security, grounds maintenance lockers with restrooms Dark room
T.V. communication center Library
Px-eproduction room Supplies storage Drafting room and map s torage
Planning and construction offices (3)
Planning and construction open space
2000
400
200
1070
400
600
400 EMPLOYEE FACILITIES
400
400
400
400
400
450
400


MHUUHAiVl
SPACES AND SQUARE FOOT ALLOCATIONS (cont.)
Conference rooms (2) Restrooms and coat closets Board room lockers with lounge
President and legal secretaries
Vice president, public affairs Legal assist, office President's office with conference Unassigned space Administration entrance and information Switch board reception Personnel application area
Personnel offices (3)
Lift operators lockers Lift section supervisor offices (3)
Courtesy Patrol lockers Ticket sales lockers Restrooms
Wax room and storage Trash room Janitor closets Employee lunch room and lounge
Employee nursery Circulation
6S0
450
800
250
175
150
350
1000
400
150 EMPLOYEE FACILITIES
150
300
400
350
200
200
250
200
400
500
7QQG
71,225 TOTAL INTERIOR SPACES
2000
2000


PRUUHAM
SPACES AND SQUARE FOOT ALLOCATIONS Bus unloading facilities
Restaurant {§ lounge exterior decks 2400
EXTERIOR SPACES
Gondola Facilities 2*00r
Interconnect Gondola Facilities PLAZA
/


PROGRAM
NURSERY 4600 square feet (interior space)
7000 square feet (exterior play yard)
The nursery function should be located in an area which is open to substantial natural light, easy to find by the public, adjacent to a safe, well protected play yard, yet in a portion of the complex where the noise of the children playing is not objec--tionable. Due to restriction on availiable land the feasibility of placing the play yard above grade level should be explored.
The indicated day care area is a nursery function but must be located in a portion of the complex which allows easy access to the Practice Hill. The day care operation works with children ages 6 through 10 who take full day or half day lessons. The space is utilized as a meeting, staging, lunch and rest area for ail children whose ski class hours do not coincide with their parents.
Facilities:
Nursery Area 2500 square feet
Crib Area 350 square feet
Day Care Area 1250 square feet
Kitchen 140 square feet
Rest Rooms 130 square feet
Laundry Room 100 square feet
Off ice 180 square feet
Play Yard
7000 square feet


F3 R CJ GHAM
RENTAL/ REPAIR AREA square feet
The rental/ repair area, included in the West Portal Station construction, has been determined to be inadequate and a suitable replacement should be included in the next phase of construction.
The rental/ repair area should be on ground level adjacent to the slopes. Visual contact by the1first time'skier should be kept in mind. The rental area should provide for a flow in which the skier fits his boots, skis and then picks up his poles as he goes out. The boot fitting area should be large enough to accom--modate 60 skiers at a time. Pay lockers (200 openings) should be placed on the walls for skiers' shoes and personal items. The ski fitting area should have'pits' for the fitter so that the skier has only to walk beside the pit to be fitted to the ski.
Storage space for rental boots and skis should be adjacent to allow personnel to work both areas. A sperate area in the ski rental area should be provided for the storage of overnight rental. The same racks could be used if planned correctly.
Facilities:
Rental Area
Repair Area
Night Rental Check and Personal Check
Rest Room-Men
Rest Room-Women
£*5-0
square feet
4.QQ&-square feet
450G- square feet 25 square feet 25 square feet


PROGRAM
Security 870 square feet
The Security/ Traffic Control Divsion of Winter Park plays an integral part toward getting the skier into the Winter Park Base Area and onto the mountain. It also must provide security to the mountain, base area complex and parking lot. Therefore, this dept, must be situated in a location which meets public needs and opera--tional needs of the company.
The Chief cf Security, ideally, should be located above the Scurity/ Traffic Control offices on a corner of a second level facing the parking area and ski racks. Maximum visual contact of the base area could be achieved and the offices below readily accessible. The security offices, isolation rooms, key control room and restroom should be on ground level adjacent to pedestrian traffic flew and parking area. The communication and monitor system should be in the outer office but not in public view. The ticket sales area and office should be back to back or adjacent to the security offices to allow access without public contact. Security parking for two vehicles should follow this same criteria so that there is minimal public contact with vehicles involved in the transfer of money.
Facilities:
Office ISO square feet
Reception Counter 2 work stations 300 square feet
Office (Isolation) 90 square feet
Office (Isolation) 120 square feet
Communication/ Alarm System 25 square feet
Key Reproduction 25 square feet
Storage 100 square feet


o
PROGRAM
Security (cont.)
Restroom 35 square feet


PROGRAM
y
TICKETING 2000 square feet
Ticket sales could be split into two different locations as it presently operates, but it is desirable to have ticket sales in one location if it can be designed to handle large crowds over a short period of time.
Ticket sales location must be adjacent to main public traffic, restrooms and security office. The majority of ticket windows should be outside in a semi-enclosed area protected from the weather. In addition interior ticket sales areas should be provided for group, ski school, and season pass sales. Other areas to be in eluded are an accounting room, storage room, coat room and men's and women's rest roms. The accounting room will contain a safe and the storage room should be fire resistant.
Facilities:
General Tickets 12 windows Special Groups Tickets Ski School Tickets Season Pass
Accounting 5t Storage Room
Coat Room
Rest Room Men
200 square feet 150 square feet 150 square feet 100 square feet
A
450 square feet 60 square feet 25 square feet
Rest Room Women
25 square feet


PROGRAM
Public Restrooms 42G0 square feet
The West Portal Station, as built,provides approximately 1000 square feet of a total of 5200 square feet provided in the original program.
The public restrooms should be located in several areas within the complex. Those areas are as follows:
(1) The main or lower level close to ticketing and the main pedestrian flow. This space should be large enough to handle major customer impact directly from the parking lot. The dressing rooms should be located adjacent to this space.
(2) Upper levels of the complex adjacent co a major stairwell and the restaurant/ lounge space.
(3) R.emote area on the most westerly portion of the complex to serve ski school students and Practice Hill/
Turnpike skier Traffic.
Other single restroom facilities are noted in the individual facilities inventories. The locations noted above are envisioned as large facilities to serve the public.
The following criteria must be met in these restroom areas
(1) All wall sections are subject to damage from ski boots and must be constructed of an indestructible mater--ial. ( a minimum of 24 inches above the floor)
(2) All fixtures must be wall hung except for lavatories and partitions.
(3) All lavatories must be supported by add--tional counterwork and under the counter, plumbing must be protected if possible.
(5) Dressing rooms must be immediately adjacent to the restrooms and it is desirable that they be interconnected internally to eliminate use of restroom stalls for dressing areas.
(6) Ventilation standards for public restrooms must be increased 20% to maintain adequate air change during heavy usage.


Public Restrooms (cont.) PROGRAM 11
Facilities : Rest Room-Men 1900 square feet
Rest Room-Women 2300 square feet


1Z
PROGRAM
COMMERCIAL AREA 8000 square feet
The commercial area should be centrally located. The area should be highly visible and adjacent to a plaza-type area.
Facilities:
Restaurants (2 2500) 5000 square feet
Retail Shops 3000 square feet
Ski Shop (not in total) 4000 square feet
EMPLOYEE NURSERY 2000 square feet
The employee nursery is for the care of children 5 years and younger. It should be located in an area open to substantial natural light. It may share the play yard with the public nursery but other facilities should be separate. It should be accessible to the administrative areas but not to the general public.
GROUNDS MAINTENANCE SHOP i^O^square feet
The grounds maintenance shop performs maintenance of the grounds and parking for the base facilities. Such services include snow removal, lawn maintenance and landscape maintenance. Heavy equipment is used so provision should be made for its storage.
In addition salts and chemicals used by the shop should be pre--vented from contaminating water supplies
DRAFTING
The drafting area will incorporate several different func--tions that are presently being duplicated. This area will contain the following: copy,reproduction and duplication equipment; drafting and layout equipment, darkroom; storage and document storage room and office space. Drafting must be located in such a way as to be accessible to sveral departments; Planning and construction, Marketing, Slope maintenance Plant Department. Sound-proofing is