Citation
Croatian cultural center

Material Information

Title:
Croatian cultural center "The Cardinal Stepinac," Richmond, British Columbia, Canada
Alternate title:
Croatian pastoral center
Creator:
Levar, Peter A
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
approximately 100 leaves : illustrations, maps, plans (some color) ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Community centers -- Designs and plans -- British Columbia -- Richmond ( lcsh )
Community centers ( fast )
British Columbia -- Richmond ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Cover title: Croatian pastoral center.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
prepared by Peter A. Levar.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
08822064 ( OCLC )
ocm08822064
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1982 .L48 ( lcc )

Full Text
lBVAR
A+P
LD
1 190
A72
1982
L48
CROATIAN

PASTORAL CtNTCR


CROATIAN CULTURAL CENTER: j
"THE CARDINAL STEPINAC
RLchmond,
BrLtLsh Columbia, Conodo
An Architectural Masters ThesLs Prepared by Peter A. Levor
Submitted to the ThesLs Committee Department of Architecture College of Environmental Design University of Colorado ot Denver
Spring Term 1982


Dedicated to my tulfe, Linda, for her Love and encouragement...
and spectot thanks to my parents for theLr support throughout my schooling.


CONTENTS
Project Description The Community Croatian Architecture Zoning Codes
Township of Richmond
Site Analysis
Cllmote
Programming
Design Solution
Appendix
Bibliography


PROJECT D6SCRIPTION


The project that I hove chosen for my thesis Is o community center for the Croatian cultural group In Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The property Is owned by the Croatian Roman Catholic parish, "The Immaculate Heart of Mary,"
In 1979 the church celebrated Its tenth anniversary. Since 1969, the Croatian population In Vancouver has grown Immensely. Their Lack of space for social and recreational activities was limited by the fact thot space for such activities In Vancouver was and stilt Is at a premium.
This prompted the purchase of a 12.5 acre parcel of Land In Richmond; a suburb of Vancouver.
With this Land they have Intentions of developing a gathering place for the community to hold weddings, dances, picnics, religious functions, educational services and sports activities. The center would be a place where the Croatian people could preserve their cultural heritage as well as share It with the community In which It exists.
Presently there Is one building on the site. It Is primarily used os a shelter. The building measures 80' x 100' and could be Incorporated Into the design.
The scope of my thesis project would be to present a design to the


Croatian Community thot would satisfy their needs. These needs ore understood to be o community center with places for social activities, religious functions and educational services. The design would cover approximately 50,000 square feet. My aim would be to create an efficient design In which spaces would be multi-functional.
The possibility of this project becoming a reality Is quite high.
I feel that the design should Incorporate some economic limitations which would control the type of building construction. I would choose to establish a design that could be built In phases; to be developed: 1) as the need of the community Increased, and 2) with the availability of capital. I anticipate that the design proposal (my thesis) would be used to raise funds to moke the project a reality.
I expect to do a full set of presentation drawings (floor plans, sections, elevations, perspectives of Interior spaces, and exterior perspectives), along with a model. Incorporated with my presentation, will be structural, mechanical l-IVAC, and plumbing drawings.


SCHEDULE
Sept. 9 - 16 1 2.
Sept. 16 - 30 1 .
2 .
Rept, RD - Oct. 21 1 o
o V
Oct. 21 1 .
Oct. 21 - Nov. 4 1 .
2.
No. 4 Nov. 2D 1 .
Nov. 25 Dec. 2 1 .

Dec . 2 16 1 .
2.
Preface
Project description
The History of The Croatian CommonItu Ln Vancouver
Research Cutturot VoLues (Architecture
Zoning
Codes
Site Description and Surroundings Existing Building on Site
The Township of Richmond
A. Acrlot Photograph
B. SurfIclol Geology
C. Natural Areas
D. Land Use
F. Road Network
F. Sanitary Sewer Distribution Leisure Services In Richmond
Site Analysis
A. Circulation
B. Views
C C L Im o t e
D. Geology
E. Utilities
FInaneIng
Design Direction and Concepts
Design Program Blbllogrophy


SELECTED ADVISORY BOARD instructor:
CLtent Contact: A r c h L C o c t u r a L:
Structurat:
Mechanical:
Chotmers G. Long, Jr.
CoLLege of Environmental Design Director
Mike Slrnlc
Professional Engineer Jnm Wong
Sorocuso, Lomler and Partners Principal Architect
Chris Rooney
Seracuse, Lauiter and Partners Associate Architect
Ed Freer
Serocuse, Lawler and Partners Architect
Don Berry
Richard Welngardt Consultants, Professional Engineer
Davis C, Holder
U.C.D. Structures Instructor
Professional Engineer
Inc.
Chalmers G. tong, Jr.
College of Environmental. Design Director


TH6 COMMUNITV


THE CROATIAN PARISH
IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY
IN VANCOUVER
Between the first ond second world wors (1918 1945) the number of Crootlon settlers In Vancouver rose to over 1,000. There were very few Croatlans Ln Vancouver prior to the first world war. After the war they settled In large numbers. They were from Crkvenlce and from the Island of Krko; Brco, ond other areas of Croatia. Most of them were fishermen. There are also mony from Lika. They worked In mining and forestry.
The first few Larger waves of settlers began arriving after the second world war (1945). And to this day there are more Immigrating and settling In Vancouver. People are arriving either directly from Croatia or from Eastern parts of Canada, all looking for better earthly and somewhat quieter life. Today there Is between 10,000 and 15,000 Croatian people In Vancouver. The number of Croatian Immigrants continues to Increase; from other parts of the world as well as Croatia.
The people Individually and as a group brought with them a lifestyle of their own, with knowledge, history, and culture (mother tongue). All the elements of their cultural heritage. One of the most Important elements of tholr being Is their Catholic religion.
The Catholic Church In Croatia, from the first days of Its existence,


ujqs Integrated with Its people. Through history the Catholic faith has maintained Its Importance with the Croatian people. Naturally, because of this Importance, the neu) settlers In Vancouver tried to obtain some ties with their church. One way uias to bring Croatian priests that they would be led by.
The first Croatian priest to arrive In Vancouver was David Zrno,
In March 1935. A year later a Croatian priest from Chicago was sent -Father Ljubo Cuvalo. He worked with the Croatlons for seven months.
After the second world war, six Croatian Franciscan Fathers were asked to vollnteer their services on the west coast of North America. From these Vancouver received Father Ambroz Budlmlr and five other priests to visit the Vancouver Croatian people. He held masses with about thirty people In attendance. He stayed there about seven months; and recommended the archbishop continue to look for a pastor for the Croatian people. In return the archbishop suggested that he (Father Ambroz Budlrnlr) stoy on with the people In Vancouver.
Temporarily, the Croatlons attended Slovenian services. Later Father Ambroz returned to Vancouver. At first, the church services were held In a small Fngllsh speaking parish. In 1961, the first church organization


UJQs formed ond It was suggested that the new parish be catted, "Immaculate Heart of Mary." Upon this they began to work at buying some land on which the parish church could be built (along with priests rectory facilities). Donations were accepted, gifts upon gifts were received. Many other Vancouver based Croatian organizations also aided In funding. By 1963, there was an agreement reached with the city of Vancouver to purchase a parcel of land on Cast First Avenue, four adjacent lots were purchased for $27,298.90.
In March of I960, the city approved the drawings for the new church.
In 1969, the church was completed. Father Ambroz wos occompanled by Father Bono Prcla as the main parish priests. In 1971, three nuns arrived from Croatia. They were to help set on example for the whole Croatian community. In 1972, a house was bought near the church for the nuns,
The parish felt there was a lacking they wonted a school that would teach their young the Croatian Language and History. The decision was mode to start a Croatian school at least twice a week. This began In 1972, and classes were held In the church hall (with more than 100 children In attendence). The Instructors consisted of priests, nuns and some lay
people.


After a year the space at the church halt become too smaLL. Fortunately, the church found a school close by (Brlttanlo High School) where they could hold these classes. By 1979, they had o student population of 450.
The church committee helped In other ways -- they also shored In working on bingos (to raise money for funding the school program, os well os other Creation Society needs).
In February 1977, the parish purchased 12.5 acres of land In Richmond at a cost of $216,755.00. In June 1978, the construction of o large shelter began. The construction work was done vollntorlly by members of the Croatian parish. By September 1978, the center was opened. The Archbishop of Vancouver attended along with eleven Croatian priests (visiting from various ports of Canada and the United States, as well as from Croatia) and 2,000 parlshners. Adjacent to the shelter was a large parking, lot, and a soccer playing field.
In 1979, o 'confirmation ceremony' was held at the facility for 230 children, and approximately 3,500 ottended. The playing field Is used bu the Croatian Soccer Club. The "Croatian Pastorlal Center" Is presently being used for any large parish activities. In 1979, the church celebrated Its tenth anniversary.


CRORTIfiN flRCHITCTUR


CROAT I AM ARCH TECTLJRE
Croatia Is a region of southeastern Europe, along the north-eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. it was on Independent kingdom In the Middle Ages, and later n crown land of Austrlo-Ilungary. Presently, Croatia Is a constituent republic of Yugoslavia, occupying 21,611 square miles In the northwest. The capital of Croatia Is Zogreb.
The present-day peasants throughout Croatia build their houses out of stone. Rural Architecture In the coostot villages still Include the type of primitive one-room house (Bunjo), consisting of a round base, an open fireplace, with a crude slob of granite os o roof (originally dating back to the 8th century).
Under the rule of the medieval nobility, the master architects built churches, palaces, monasteries, walls and gates. During the Old Croatlon or PreRomanesque Period (c700 1000 AD), numerous churches were built In the style of miniature churches, with bases In the shape of o cross, threp-, four-, six-, and eight- foiled clovers, and with cupolas above.
The dome-shaped structures were typically Slavic and were brought from the old country -- as the European churches of this time hod only wooden roofs. The different foundations and shallow engraved decorations


were o continuation of old forms expressed In the new medium of stone.
In the Middle Ages, the regions making up present-day Yugoslavia, were exposed, on the one hond, to Byzantine ecclesiastical and political Influence and on the other hand, to the Influence from the West, with Benedictine monks os the standard-bearers of political and religious concepts originating In Rome. With them came the attendant Western artistic Ideas and elements first from Italy, and later from France and Germany.
From the 9th to 11th century the style of architecture termed Pre-Romanesque dominated. Small churches characteristic of this period are free In form, constructed of dressed stone, with stone vaults, frequently domed, their walls articulated by pilasters and blind arcades that give richness to their otherwise modest facades.
The eleventh century brought with It closer contact with the western civilization, and from that time on, the Croatian Architecture developed parallel with that of the rest of western Europe. The Romanesque Basilica simple, massive and archaic, with a square base, a three-decked nave, and rows of pillars along the sides -- Is typical of the Architectural style so often duplicated In Croatian churches.
Although the Romanesque styte was widespread and became recognized


throughout Europe, Croatian architects succeeded In Introducing their oum characteristics Into this design. Dralded ornaments were common decorations used by Croatlons, and massive belfries gave Croatian churches the appearance of fortresses rather than of temples.
The Croatian architects of the 13t,h and 14 th centuries were primarily concerned with the building of fortresses, watts and military units. The population of the fortified cities grew, and houses, because of Limited space, became two and oven more floors high. Streets were winding and narrow.
Between the 14th and 16th centuries, new stone buildings replaced old wooden houses. Towers, fountains, harbor, and many public and private structures were erected. (Dubrovnik)
The massive Romanesque style gave way to the more gracious and less weighty Gothic style. More tight come In through the higher windows that characterized this style, and balconies Lent a new elegance to palaces and summer homes. The gothic style from France and Germany, as well as from the Dalmatian Coast spread widely In upper Croatia.
The later Renaissance did not result In many outstanding architectural achievements In Croatia. The Dalmatian cities were losing their Independence,


and most of the country tuas a bloody battlefield os a result of the efforts against tho Turkish Invasions. A special style of architecture developed In the Croatian regions while under Turkish domination. A strong oriental Influence was aparent In Croatian mosques, fountains, knocks, amams, markets, and cemeteries.
The main characteristics of the Turkish architecture were tho absence of geometrical plonnlng, crooked streets, picturesque houses with well-kept gordens, which were almost unnotlceobte from streets. The exteriors of buildings wore simple, severe, squat and built of heavy stones. The Interior however, were rich, comfortable, and colorful, with huge transparent ceilings mosaics and the gracious rhythm of orabesques.
The strengthening of the middle class hod a decisive Influence on the architecture of the 19th century. Tho prosperous middle class craved luxuries, and the architects found a clientele eager for their work. Many foreign architects discovered o fovoroble market for their abilities In Croatia. One of these was Bartol Felblnger, who particularly Influenced the development of modern architecture In Zagreb. The buildings he created were symmetrical and peaceful In their classical, beauty, with columns, balconies and entrances characteristic of this form.


Austrlon Hermann Bolle, otong with his studenbs ond followers developed o mixture of oil possible styles, on era tulbhoub ony style of lbs oiun.
Their buildings were richly decorobed sbruebures with domes, pillars, belfries, angels, and floral and geomebrlcal designs. The Inberlor of bhese buildings was Impracblcal wlbh dark, narrow hallways, sleep sbalrways, and unusually high ceilings In small rooms. (19th cenbury)
During the time of Imitation and formalism, on architect by the name of Viktor Kovaclc become active In Zagreb. l-le emphasized that every style Is the product of Its time. He felt that architecture must serve and satisfy the practical and artistic needs of men. (20th century)
Among the modern Croatian architects, one can discern two different groups. The larger of the two groups continues the tradition of Felblnger and Kovaclc -- architecture which satisfies the needs of the Croatian people and expresses the characteristics of Croatian soil. The second group of architects tends to Ignore the notional tradition and emphasizes International patterns and trends In contemporary architecture. These architects belong mostly to the younger generation and have, for the most part, been educated abroad.


NiaZVUVA

anas
tivavz


ZONING


ZONING
Project Nome
Location
Use
Prepared By Zoning Ordinance Zoning Official Consulted Zone Classification
Yard Requirements
Maximum Allowable Building Height
Maximum Allowable Height of Structures
Croatian Culturot Center (Cordlnal Steplnac)
Richmond, British Columbia, Canada.
Thesis Preparation.
Peter A. Levar.
Richmond Zoning Bylaw.
Richmond Zoning Department.
Presently zoned Agricultural District.
(The land would be rezoned for the purpose
of the thesis.)
The required zoning change Is to a general commercial district.
Front minimum 7.5 M (2-1,61 Ft.)
Side minimum -1.5 M (14.76 ft.) for one-storey buildings
- minimum 7.5 M (24.61 ft.) for buildings exceeding one storey
Rear minimum 7.5 M (24.61 ft.)
(1) No building shall, exceed 12 metres (39.37 ft.) In height, above natural grade;
(ll) No building shall have more than two storeys.
No structure Including poles and towers shall exceed 2-4 metres (78.74 ft.) In


Off Street Parking
Off Street Loading
height, measured from natural grade.
One space per each 50 square feet of floor area used for social or dance purposes.
Church Assembly one space per each five seats.
One per 1860 sq. M. (20,022 sq. ft.)


CODS


ConstructLon Type
Structural Frome Pure Ratings
Floor Fire Rating
Roofs fire rating
Number of exits required
Arrangement of exits
Distance to Exits
No no am bu stlbte Construction
All loodbearlna uiolls, columns and arches shall have a fIre-resistant rating at least, equivalent to that required for the supported assembly but In no case should there be a fIre-resistant, rating of less than 1 hour.
Floor assemblies Immediately above crowl spaces shall have a 1-hour fire resistance rating.
Other floor assemblies shall be 2-hour fire separation.
Roof Assemblies shall have o 1-hour flre-
resistance Each floor rating. area In which there Is a high
occupancy load shall conform to table.
Total # of persons Minimum it of Exits
61 - 600 2
601 - 1000 3
over 1000 4
Fxcept where a floor area Is divided by a fire separation so that It Is necessary to pass through It to travel from one exit to another exit, the least distance between 2 exits from a floor area shall be
(b) % the maximum diagonal dimension of the floor area, but not less than 9 M.
150 ft. with sprinklers (45 M.)
100 ft-., without sprinklers (30 M.)


Door Width Requirements
StoIr Width Requirements Stolr Landing Requirements
Corridor Widths
Deod End Corridor Limits
Stair o n d Balcony R < a 11 Requirements
Rarnp Requirements
Celling Height Mlnlmums
Standpipe Requirements
(a) Mot more than 1219 mm (48 Inches)
(b) Mot less than 610 mm (24 Inches) If there Is more than one door leaf provided
(c) Mot one less door than loaf 813 mm (32 In ches) If only
At least 11 00 mm (44 l n c h e s)
At least width of 300 the mm ( door one foot) wide r than t h r
At least 1100 mm (44 l n c h e s)
6 M.
Not less than more than 920 800 mm mm (36 (32 Inches Inches) ) and not
1 In 10
The cleor height above and below a mezzanine floor assembly shall be at least. 2.13 M (7 ft.
63.5 mm (2% Inches) diameter hose


CLASSIFICATION BY GROUP OR DIVISION OF TYPICAL OCCUPANCIFS
A 2 Assembly occupancies Art galleries Churches and similar places of worship Community halls Dance halls Day-core centres Exhibition halls (other than classified In Group E) Gymnasia Llbrarles Licensed beverage establishments Recreational piers
A 3 Arena-type occupancies Indoor swimming pools with or without spectator seating
A 4 Assembly occupancies In which provision Is made for the congregation or Bleachers Grandstands
gathering of persons for the purpose of participating In or viewing open olr activities, Including:
C Occupancies used for sleeping occommodotlons excluding those covered In Group B, Institutional occupancies, Including: Convents


Major occupancies above other major occupancies
Separation of assembly occupancles
Separation of residential occupancies
(4)Except as permitted Sentence ( 3.1.3.3.(1)Except as provided In Sentence
(2) , different divisions of Group A major occupancies shall be separated from each other and from all other mojor occupancies by a fire separation having a flre-reslst-ance rating of at Least 1 hr.
(3) Except as provided In Sentence (4),
Group C major occupancies shall be separated from all other major occupancies by a fire separation having a fire-resistance noting of at Least 1 hr.


GROUP A
ASSEMBLY BUILDINGS
Group A, DLvLsLon 2, 1 and 2 Storeys
3.2.2.14.(1)A building classified os Group A, DLvLsLon 2 shoLL conform to Sentence (2) provided the buLLdLng
(a) Ls not more than 2 storeys Ln buLLdLng height, ond
(b) Lf unsprLnkLered, Ls not greater Ln buLLdLng area than the votue Ln TobLe 3.2.2.A., ond
(c.)Lf sprLnkLered, Ls not greater than tujLce the area LLmLts of CLause (b).
(2)The buLLdLng shaLL be of combustLbLe or noncombustLbte constructLon used eLther sLngLy or Ln combination, and
(a) basements and ceLLars shaLL be subdLvLded by a 1 hr. fire separation Lnto areas
not exceeding 500 m or they shaLL be sprLnk Lered,
(b) fLoor assembLLes LmmedLateLy above basements or ceLLars shaLL be a % hr. fLre separotLon,
(c) fLoor assembLLes LmmedLateLy above croujl spaces shaLL have, Lf of combustLbLe constructLon, a 3/4 hr. fLre-resLstance ratLng, except that thLs requLrement Ls waived Lf the crawl spaces are subdLvLded by a 3/4
hr. fLre separatLon Lnto oreas not exceedLng 500 m^, or they are sprLnkLered (see ArtLcLe 3.2.2.3),
(d) other floor assemblies shaLL be a fLre separotLon ond, Lf of combustLbLe construction, shaLL have a 3/4 hr. fLre-resLstance rating,
(e) mezzanines shaLL have, Lf of combustible constructLon, a 3/4 hr. fLre-resLstance ratLng,
(f) roof assembLLes shoLL have, Lf of com-


bustlble construetlon, q 3/4 hr. fire-reslstonce robing or In buildings not exceeding 1 storey In building height, the fIre-resistance rating moy be waived provided that the roof assembly Is constructed os o fIre-retardant treated wood roof system conforming to Sentence 3.1.12.1.(1) and
(l)lf unspr Ink tered, tl^e building area Is not greater than 800 m'- If facing 1 street, 1,000 m^ If facing 2 streets, or 1,200 m^
If facing 3 streets, and
(LL)lf sprlnklered, the building area Is not greater th n twice the area limits of SubcLouse (l), and
(g)all loadbearing walls, columns and arches supporting an assembly required to ahve a fIre-resistance rating shall have a 3/4 hr. fIre-resistance rating or shall be of noncombustible construction, except that such members and assemblies supporting a fire separation as described In Clause (b) shall have a 3/4 hr. fIre-resistance rating.


Separation of buildings 3.2.3.15.(1)Except as provided In Sentence
connected by walkways 3.2.3.16.(2), where buildings ore connected
by a walkwoy, each building shall be separated from the walkway by at least a 3/4 hr. fire separation.
FIRE ALARM AND DETECTION SYSTEMS Table 3.2.4,A,
Major Occupancy Classification: Occupant Load above which a Fire Alarm
System Is Required:
Group A, Division 1, 300
2 and 3 (except licensed beverage establishments, restaurants, schools and colleges)


Outdoor ptoces of assembly
B teachers
(5) Aisles In Group A, Division 4 occupancies
(a) shall be Located so that there are not more than 20 seats betuieen any seat and the nearest aisle,
(b) shall be at least "1,200 mm In width, except that an aisle serving fewer than 60 persons may be 750 mm In width, and
(c) shall not hove steps unless the gradient of the aisle exceeds 1 In 8.
(6) Except as provided In Sentences 3.3.2.12,
(1) and (2), where steps are provided In aisles, such steps shall
(a) extend the full width of the aisles,
(b) have risers not exceeding 230 mm In height, and
(c) have treads with a run of at least 250 mm.
3.3.2.12.(1)Where steps are provided In aisles of bleachers of the telescopic type, such steps shall
(a) have risers not exceeding 250 mm, and
(b) hove treads with a run of at Least 280 mm.
(2) When the vertical distance between seating platforms In bleachers exceeds 280 mm on Intermediate step shall be provided the full width of the aisle and proportioned
to provide 2 equal risers between platforms and, when the vertical distance between seating platforms exceeds 450 mm, 2 Intermediate steps shall be provided the full width of the aisle so that there are 3 equal risers between platforms.


LLbrorLe
3.3.2.13,(1)Where a book storage room In
o Library exceeds 250 m*' Ln area, or where
the book stocks exceed 10 m Ln height or
penetrate more thon 1 storey
(o)the book storage room shoLL be separated
from the remainder of the building by a
2 hr. fire separation, or
(b)the building shall be sprlnklered.


Exit width
Headroom clearance
(3)The clear width of any corridor used os an exit shall be at Least 1,100 mm. (6)Every door leaf In an exit doorway shall be
(a) not more than 1,219 mm In width,
(b) not less thon 610 mm In width where there Is more than 1 leaf provided In the width
of a doorway, and
(c) not less than 813 mm In width If there Is only 1 leaf provided In the doorway.
3.4.3.5.(1)Except as provided In Sentences (2) to (4) every exit shol.1 have a head-room clearance of at least 2,150 mm.
(2)The heodroom clearance for stairways measured vertically above any landing or the nosing of any stolr tread shall be at least 2,050 mm.


TOWNSHIP of RICHMOND


RICHMOND: AIM OPPORTUNITY CENTER
Richmond Ls on Incredibly f ast~grouilng self-contained community with tremendous opportunities. It has o healthy mix of Industrial, commercial, residential and agricultural components. Richmond Is just minutes away from downtown Vancouver and alt the big city amenities, yet far enough awoy to have Its own community Identity.
Richmond manages to enjoy more hours of sunshine and fewer hours of rolnfall than Its neighbours to the north and east.
The municipality had the foresight, a couple of decodes ago, to set aside a targe area for Industry. There are three major Industrial estates, Brlghouse, Crestwood, and Riverside. Richmond also has a number of smaller Industrial parks, and business parks.
The Vancouver International Airport Is a major economic factor In Richmond. Close to 10,000 people are employed at the airport CP Air Is the largest single employer.
The fishing Industry also clearly plays an Important role to the economy of Richmond. BC Packers Is another of the large site dependent companies located In Richmond. BC Packers Is located In the southern extremity of Richmond In Steveston where a healthy, busy fishing Industry


has existed for more than a century.
Another Industry which has always been a part of Richmond, Is agriculture. Richmond Is famous for Its production of cranberries, blueberries strawberries and raspberries.
The visitor Industry Is Important to Richmond, particularly since It Is the Location of the Vancouver International. Airport, as well as being atong Highway 99 which connects to Interstate 5 In the U.S. The provincial government's promotional and advertising activities, the Lower value of the Canadian dollar as opposed to the American dollar, and the energy situation all hove contributed to the Increase In the number of visitors to Richmond.
There has been a change In lifestyle from a rural lifestyle to on urban lifestyle In many parts of the municipality. However, there are still quiet, secluded spots In Richmond where people can enjoy the beauty of Mature; as well as the excellent shopping facilities, restaurants and
other services.



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MAJOR ARTERIAL ROAD
drown' rjuO"*t IR7R
MAJOR COLLECTOR STREET
SIGNALIZED INTERSECTION
source* G.VRD Regional Rood Program


SANITARY SEWER DISTRIBUTION
GVS a DO FORCE-MAINS
----- MUNICIPAL FORCFMAINS
PUMP SI AT ION
[...] AREAS PRESENTLY SEWERED
Oil AREAS SERVICEABLE UNDER EXISTING PUMP STATION
OH SPECIAL AREAS
f H PROPOSED EXPANSION
drown jime 1979 source fngineering Opl, Wicnmond


BUS ROUTBS
//
GF (^MASSEY. rr / / TUNNEL £ '

\

>
?r^'',AvE \ |5^ LADNFR
---------1 44 -f / EXCHAN
I POP
1.A0NCB fOl.NK


TRAILS PLAN
PLANS have been approved by Council for a comprehensive layout of recreational and nature trails (for cycling, horseback riding, walking, etc.) throughout Richmond which will eventually provide interconnecting paths between the dyke, schools, parksites, historic sites, waterways and other points of interest.

v,
JU

Proposed basic Trails Plan route
* Staging Areas (in use)




RICHMOND Leisure Facilities
Sciroof
MrmleJp* mnrUn achunf part Prh*x! o eowwreW Imaura 1
OarMe Jr. 2
Huph 6
Klofl G*or 2
tr Ni* School 3 Minoru 5
So-Hti Arm 4
Stov-Mtof' Part 5
MJOHU WK
1 *fn* Jlrti Canfr*
2 Sport* Mlon
3 AtfjmHc Cantm
4 ChvMl
HUGH PCYP WK
6 Fife*, md Putt Go* Coi
SOUTH ARM FAR*
7 South Arm Part
8 Pool
STEMESTON PARK
9 Cominunly Cantra
10 Mittal Arts Cantra tl Pool
12 Las! Remand Comn**ty Contra
13 Sw Island Comm* if ty Mall
14 Nature Par*
15 Outdoor E due a tint i Contra
16 Murdoch S*nors Contra
17 RCA Forum
<1 Donald Brn* Launching
r^=7=D LJi.
I i


SISrYlUNd 3115


FRASER-DELTA THRUWAY
400.57 rn (1314.23 )
(0
o
o
ro
OJ
SETBACKS

57 m (15 )
30.48m, 60 96 m
NOJ.^8"y ccii? l( 100') ] (200 )
I
- \
- EXISTING STRUCTURE
\ 762 m (25')
399.89 rn (1312.0 )
-?
CM O'
762 rn
Slie RNRLVSIS
LOT (21) of SECTION (19), tU.0CK(4), RANGE (5) WEST, PLAN 3924 2
S i o AW A Y _____122.18m (400,3 5 )


TOPOGRAPHY
The slbe Is flab tuLbh o minimum slope for drainage bo bhe dlbches locobed along bhe norbh and soubh properby lines.
The slbe Is generally open field lulbh large expanses grassed areas over bhe lasb feiu years spruce brees have been planbed around bhe perlmeber of bhe slbe.


DITCH
t
OPEN SPACE
457 mm (18") TOP ORGANIC MATERIAL ON SILTY CLAY
!
DRAINAGE
EXISTING PARKING AREA
BACKFILL GRANULAR MATERIAL
I *
-!
SEPTIC FIELD -j^
SIT RNflLVSIS




VLeiu North
VLeuJ Eost


View South East
View West


Aerial view of south eos corner ond surrounding residences.
W

View eost.



T
mu iiii>iiiiimwiwpii miim unruiwMint
Aerial view of east end of site with existing structure.


CIIMAT6


TEMPERATURE
MONTH NORMAL DEGREE DAYS
Maximum MInImum Mean Normal
Januory 5.9 - 0.4 2.4 483.5
February 7.7 1 .1 4.4 382.8
March 9.6 2.1 5.8 377.8
April 12.9 4.9 8.9 271 .1
May 16.8 7.9 12.4 173.9
June 19.6 10.9 15.3 86.1
Ju ly 22.2 12.7 17.4 35.3
August 21 .6 12.5 17.1 39.7
September 18.5 9.9 14.2 114.4
October 13.7 6.4 10.1 246.1
November 9.2 2.9 6.1 356.1
December 6.6 1.1 3.8 462.2
Year 13.6 6.0 9.8 3032.1


PRECIPITATION
MONTH
January
February
March
AprLL
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Year
NORMAL
n Snoui Totat
7 22.4 147.3
0 7.9 116.6
a '5.3 93.7
.0 TR 61.0
.5 47.5
.2 45.2
.7 29.7
.1 37.1
n 4. 61 .2
.2 122.2
.9 2.3 141.2
.4 14.5 165.4
.8 52.4 1068.1
Rati
12 5.
109.'
89 .:
61
47
45
29
37
61
122
138
151
1017


SUNSHINE
MONTH NORMAL
Jonuory 55.2
February 92.5
March 129.5
April 180.0
May 253.0
June 243.5
July 304.5
August 255.0
September 187.9
October 115.8
November 69.6
December 44.4
Year 1930.9
WIND
NORMAL
SPEED
12.9
12.1
13.5
13.7
11.8
11.6 11.8 10.8 10.8 11.6 12.4 13.0
DIRECTION
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
12.1


attitude angles


Table B Btu/ft1 Insolation on Inclined Surface* at 48 dap North Latitude
Data Solar Tina nj/rt* Hmirlr Tola 1 Inert 1 'ne '< On Surface* Tflta< Vtrh laapart To Tito Nor 1 ona 1
19 ft! 59 II *0
ot m M. i .1... It 1L 1 . n t PI V e SC 9 su V C SC s su V C SC S SU V
rw u su s f u sv f SC i U su 9 SC K if TV _. it r~ ft SU ft SC f
9 ft ft 22 2ft 17 2 2 2ft 30 1ft 2 2 79 34 >1 2 2 )0 )4 It l 1 31 37 22 1 1
Jin. >1 3 ftft 111 Iftft 110 41 > 124 167 1)2 ) ft 1)1 III 140 )) 1)3 lift 14) 71 7 171 117 1)9 1) 3
10 1 3 lift 20) lftO 10) 12 1*7 272 206 104 12 1*3 2)4 216 100 11 140 240 220 ft) 10 lift 777 704 41 7
11 1 107 123 lift 2)1 Iftl 47 III 2)1 74ft 16) 27 114 240 760 144 It 104 741 26) 1)0 10 71 71ft 24) 17ft
113 11 100 14) IOO ft) 0 210 244 210 00 6) 21) 27) 21) 6) 41 710 179 110 49 1 19) 7)) 111 1
1 * 1 9 9 3 1 , ft ft 4 1 1 10 10 4 1 1 11 11 4 0 0 11 II 4 9 0
1 ftft 111 Iftft ft) 10 10 13* Iftft 102 ft ft 164 17ft 10) ft ft 170 106 104 1 1 144 11) 94 1 4
f ) 100 hi 21ft 179 71 1) Iftft 2ft) 117 61 1) 20) 1)7 Iftl 47 It 204 241 lftO 31 10 117 744 147 1 1
10 t lift in 3ftl lftO 1ft) 27 Iftl 177 751 1)4 14 194 20) 1)5 121 1) 114 704 1)1 104 11 14) 7)1 217 )t 1
11 Iftft in Iftl 179 20) ft Iftl 277 7ft0 100 31 134 17ft 294 lftO 2ft 1)6 272 711 173 17 9) 710 247 in ft
11 111 in 1ft 7 111 Iftl III lift 24ft ft 04 14ft lift 96 24) )07 24) 96 70 7)) >01 2)3 70 ft II) 2)1 id ft
7 3 37 in 101 49 10 10 lift 170 49 ft ft 1*7 121 47 0 1)4 1)3 4) 7 7 13) D1 3) 3 3
1 ft ftft 20) 10ft 1)1 2ft 1) lift 770 1)2 14 14 770 2)0 17ft 1) 13 7)0 2)7 127 12 12 21) 21) *4 1 9
Mar. 11 ft 3 1 ft 7 21ft 2ft) 10) 7 17 24ft HI 207 76 16 24) 792 20) 3) IS 2)9 210 1ft) 2ft 1) 201 24) 1)1 10 10
11 1 11! lift 2ft) )00 221 127 J07 297 30) 216 19 112 1ft 0 297 Iftft 32 1)7 17) 70) 123 1) 97 214 21) 10) 10
1 110 17ft 271 111 212 111 1)1 267 31) 247 131 172 2)4 )0* 7)4 127 M 2)4 794 2)4 Ift 11 167 7)1 147 II
ft ft 17 17 ft! I) ft ft ft! 7 9 ft ft 106 71 9 1 1 III 7) 7 7 7 111 70 3 3 3
7 3 13 lift 1)1 7ft II 19 20ft Iftl 49 17 17 214 17) 39 1) 1) 710 172 41 14 14 704 1)3 21 10 10
1 ft Iftl 1ft) 1)0 lift (1 71 25ft 1)9 141 20 20 250 240 12ft 10 11 2)3 2)3 11) 14 14 771 200 49 12 17
ft 3 Iftl Iftl 111 21ft 113 )l 270 29) 200 10 77 263 290 194 37 20 7)7 269 174 2) II Iftft 717 11) 1 ) 1)
10 1 111 Iftl )0) Iftl ID 91 2 39 302 140 1)0 3) 744 1ft) 23 120 21 771 77) 72) ft) 19 1)1 70ft 1)2 1) 14
11 1 131 ftft ) 11 lftO 2*9 212 311 217 701 171 Iftl 30) 760 179 144 247 70ft 24 7 144 104 711 744 719 104 14 11) 193 1)3 14
J 7 ft )0 tft 4 ft 4 )4 17 4 4 4 37 19 4 4 4 )* 10 3 3 3 *0 17 2 2 7
ft ft H Iftft 100 27 II II 137 104 14 16 16 166 106 1) 1) 1) 170 10* 1) 1) 1) 162 91 10 10 to
7 3 Ilf 219 177 7 7ft 74 2)1 112 7) 27 22 2)7 111 60 70 20 2)6 174 4) II II 212 144 1) 1) 1)
ft 171 2*2 lift lift ft) 11 Iftft 241 142 2ft 25 26ft 2)7 12) 2) 2) 261 22) 101 21 21 111 lift 4) 1) 13
ft 3 111 232 211 717 111 ftft 2D 27ft 202 ft) 27 271 270 192 5ft 24 234 2)2 1)4 22 77 197 190 06 14 14
10 1 231 111 )0) 2ft) Iftl 17) 170 796 2)1 160 76 2)0 200 72ft 120 )2 22* 257 200 II 2) 14) 160 120 11 17
II 1 lift Iftl )0) 73ft 244 171 lift 2ft0 211 21ft 1)9 711 269 7)1 107 96 174 2)9 221 1)0 30 1) 13) 1*1 37 17
11 111 113 III )0ft 71) 11) Iftft 7ft) Iftl 26) 194 1)7 7)6 76ft 216 1)7 116 707 2)1 207 114 17 no 14ft no 17
1 7 21 60 )2 ft ft ft ftft 34 ft ft ft *j )4 9 1 74 3) 7 7 7 74 2ft S 3 3
ft ft 7ft 131 110 3) 21 21 171 112 1ft 1ft ift 17ft 111 19 11 19 192 10ft 16 16 16 170 fti 2 12 12
7 3 lift 223 111 ft) 7ft 7ft 2 ftft 19) 77 23 2) 2*1 100 3ft 7) 2) 2J0 172 3ft 20 70 20ft 1)9 3 1) 1)
1 ft 191 Iftft lift 1)7 ftft 21 271 lift 140 34 27 26ft 2)2 lift 73 1) 2)ft 710 ft) 7) 2) 212 147 3 16 16
Jmta 11 ft 1 223 113 lift lift 1)2 77 202 27) Iftl 97 31 271 26) 17) 60 27 2)2 24) 147 24 24 166 177 4 17 17
10 1 23ft lift 100 Iftl Iftl l)7 271 2ft0 244 160 7 7)0 272 270 124 *1 77) 744 lift 1) 2) 147 147 1 3 11 19
11 1 210 Iftft )0Q 2ft 1 74) ID 742 204 27) 216 143 217 261 241 16) 107 177 7)0 216 144 34 9) 140 1 3 4ft 19
II 111 2)0 210 )0I 710 7)0 Iftl l)ft 20) lift 1*9 161 710 24 9 710 161 lift Ift4 27) 194 lift 19 ftft 1 ) ftft 19
(Based on data in Table 1. pp. 387, 1972 ASHRAE HANDBOOK OF FUNDAMENTALS; 0% pround reflectance, 1.0 clearness factor)


T util if 5 Btu/ft* Insolation on Inclined Surfaces at 49 doq North Latitude
Oar* Solar TIm rni/rr' *,t, Total Inaolat Imi. * V On Sutfataa Ttltad Vttk i t .* Ta Tfca Nnrfront at
38' 48 If 90'
AX r* _ i H _ i * 11 f SW V 1 St 1 SW W t SI f SW V 1 SI S sv V
rn u SV S 51 e W SW S sc E if sv 8 8E B V SW s St i w SV i sr f
5 7 10 3? 11 5 3 3 36 19 3 3 3 40 19 4 4 4 42 19 4 4 6 42 11 3 3 3
4 6? 1*1 33 28 19 19 153 107 18 18 18 161 10J 16 14 14 163 101 13 1) 13 136 M 11 II II
1 3 Ill 214 174 9 76 26 21* 178 73 7* 7* 731 177 39 27 21 130 171 42 20 20 703 1*1 1* I* 14
0 4 1/1 238 13* 15* 63 29 144 236 1*0 31 7? 7*3 731 111 25 23 7)4 119 99 21 >1 111 17) 4) 14 16
9 ) 715 178 274 214 176 69 776 274 199 93 79 764 264 178 60 17 1*9 744 133 24 24 117 164 8) 17 17
10 7 230 277 237 761 189 174 766 290 2*6 159 81 7*4 274 224 123 33 120 231 19) 07 23 II) 17) III 10 13
II 1 777 758 238 291 2*1 177 737 784 274 213 139 700 243 231 104 97 174 2 34 22) 140 31 84 1*8 1)7 34 11
It 179 274 278 301 2 78 714 193 739 184 239 133 137 137 -269 112 139 116 198 2)7 198 114 19 107 144 107 19
1 II 87 3f 16 11 1! 92 64 10 10 10 99 8? 9 9 9 103 68 1 107 41 6 4 6
7 3 85 180 131 73 71 71 134 160 47 19 19 10J 103 58 18 10 704 167 47 14 14 191 I** 20 12 17
8 4 1*1 233 222 143 31 23 243 279 137 2* 74 7*0 230 125 72 27 14* 124 109 19 19 110 109 4) 14 14
9 1 lit 740 263 210 116 44 262 273 201 89 76 250 269 187 58 74 1*3 737 141 27 21 191 204 no I) 13
10 7 723 2 f I 23* 260 181 101 233 292 237 13 4 39 237 782 237 1/7 23 213 764 >14 94 22 146 700 144 16 U
11 1 2*8 7*1 233 293 235 157 273 2P8 785 713 170 150 177 768 119 I 167 2*8 2*4 138 41) 9 17) m 73 17
17 734 705 273 304 273 203 177 261 796 261 179 1** 1)9 179 239 144 106 111 23) 111 106 It 1)0 177 130 l
7 5 33 107 33 44 11 11 170 103 44 10 10 179 113 43 f 9 1)4 117 10 1 IS) 114 31 * 6
I 4 32 183 130 124 21 18 103 205 124 17 It 111 111 121 13 13 213 713 113 14 14 194 191 90 10 10
9*pt. M t J 147 274 2*9 196 94 21 231 261 197 75 19 231 266 191 53 18 273 26) 183 30 16 Iff 2)0 14) 12 It
10 2 18! 718 179 231 167 62 775 217 25* 1*3 73 710 286 2*1 125 19 700 777 2)6 101 It 1*7 130 183 40 12
II 1 203 708 282 787 220 120 195 284 789 201 08 176 277 28* 191 34 131 262 269 168 18 13 70* 717 1CJ 1)
17 213 HI 761 299 261 171 147 136 302 256 147 119 744 296 2*4 119 68 224 781 274 It 1) 160 171 160 1)
7 3 0 3 7 1 0 0 3 3 1 0 0 3 J 1 0 0 4 3 1 0 0 4 4 1 0 0
8 4 *4 173 137 04 11 11 136 140 91 10 10 1*6 139 93 9 9 131 143 93 1 1 147 11) 7 4 6
Off. 21 t J 3* 173 211 167 70 13 186 229 174 39 1* 191 2*0 100 46 13 1?0 244 178 32 11 170 271 1)7 8
10 1 13) 161 2*1 278 137 27 187 263 239 128 14 18* 170 1*2 116 13 173 249 2)9 101 ! 3 136 1*0 707 38 10
n 1 137 143 233 246 195 83 160 243 7 77 191 37 1*7 266 101 187 79 DO 760 274 168 14 0 110 1)7 ni 10
17 144 133 231 279 7 36 133 114 2 39 291 2 39 111 93 233 29* 213 99 48 774 788 77* 68 10 178 747 1 10
8 4 3 77 21 17 2 2 76 30 19 2 7 28 35 71 2 I 30 36 It 7 1 31 )t 22 i 1
9 ) *4 111 1*6 117 *7 10 121 163 179 38 9 110 174 137 33 9 131 184 I4| It 8 17) 181 1)3 i) 4
lp*. 71 10 7 8) 134 133 186 104 13 139 217 702 107 17 1*0 229 It! 90 11 137 7)3 71) 91 10 117 227 101 67 1
11 1 107 124 213 777 15* 48 120 228 7*3 167 70 113 733 753 161 If 10) 2)6 238 13) 11 70 >14 2)8 127
17 113 37 138 741 198 92 80 207 739 707 80 65 210 170 710 63 *8 707 171 70t 8 179 150 179
9 3 27 78 108 07 78 7 87 127 98 77 ) 93 134 103 75 6 97 161 110 71 3 93 112 109 14 *
10 7 13 111 173 144 88 11 117 192 180 89 10 119 203 192 07 9 118 211 197 8) l 104 105 90 46 6
11 1 84 103 132 207 1*2 3* 103 708 276 1*0 17 90 111 139 1*9 II 0 721 24* 1*6 9 64 104 23* 175 7
17 9C 73 179 722 179 74 63 190 7*1 190 65 53 193 23* 195 33 .0 193 740 193 *0 t 175 744 173 7
(Based on data in Table 1, pp. 387, 1972 ASHRAE HANDBOOK OF FUNDAMENTALS; 0% ground reflectance, 1.0 clearness factor)


PROGRAMMING


GOALS
1. To achieve o pLoce which the Croatian community coulc) express Its cultural heritage.
7, To have a gathering place to encouroge Interaction between the Croatian community of Vancouver with the surrounding community.
3. To Integrate the new facility Into the fabric of the existing community.
4. To Insure security for materials, equipment, and people In the new facility.
5. To create and define an Inviting outdoor space.
6. To be compatible with the scale of the surrounding structures.
7. To be energy efficient.
8. To provide Immediate vehicular access for pick-up and delivery.
9. To have both refined beautiful spaces and flexible durable spaces.
To operate the facility with as few staff as possible.
10.


KITCHEN
Function:
For Forge dinners or banquets, provisions should be made for o full size kitchen.
Affinity:
The kitchen should be located near the auditorium and/or the soclol hall gymnasium, also ctub rooms. This would moke the kitchen available for small gatherings as well as large banquet gatherings.
Requirement:
Adequate storoge space, cabinet space, and electrical outlets for such appliances as the refrigerator and range. Exhaust fans should olso be provided.
Area:
1,600 sq
ft
(157.93 m2)


OFFICE AND INFORMATION Function:
To control the entrance and supervise activities.
Requirements:
An office of approximately 120 sq. ft. Is required, with sufficient window space to provide maximum supervision of the lobby, lounge, club rooms, auditorium and social hall gymnasium.
A space for Information ond some storage should be Included In this space. Area:
300 sq. ft.
(27.87 m2)


RESTROOMS
Function:
The restroom focLLLfckes ore to serve the Indoor focLLLttes.
Requirements:
Restrooms shoutd Include multipurpose units, combining outomotlc towel ond soop dispensers, mirror ond shelf ond o combination paper towel dispenser and waste receptacle. These should be wall recessed.
Toilet facilities should be made accessible to the disabled.
Area:
2 @ 250 sq. ft.
500 sq. ft. (46.45 m2)


CLUB ROOMS
Function:
To provide space for meeting ond various club activities such os chess, choir, cooking, ond other cutturol reloted activities.
Affinity:
One large club room should be located adjoining the kitchen.
Regulrements:
2
Club rooms should provide a minimum of 500 sq. ft. (46.45 m ) of floor space per club room.
Windows In club rooms ond lounges ore placed high In o wall. This provides more space for furniture, bulletin boords, pegboords, chalkboards ond exhibits.
Area:
1,200 sq. ft. (111.48 m2)


ARTS AND CRAFTS ROOM
Function:
Space for cultural activities that are characterIstlc of the Croatian people such as weaving, pottery and woodwork.
Requirements:
The arts and crafts rooms should be equipped for crafts, with provision for gas, compressed air, and a sink with hot and cold water. The sink should have a clay trop.
Ample storage cabinets, closets, or lockers should be Included for the safe storage of craft materials and exhibit materials.
(157.93 m2)
Area:
1,600 sq. ft.


LOUNGE AND LOBBY
Function:
ClrcuLotLon ond gotherlng space.
The Lobby of the community center Is the space Inside the entrance.
AffInIty:
The Lounge should open off the Lobby, and If possible, should be close to the central office and to the multipurpose room, auditorium ond/or social hall-gymnasium. The lounge ond lobby are often combined Into one room. The office, club rooms, multipurpose room, and restrooms should be adjacent to the lobby lounge.
Area:
800 sq. ft.
(74.32 m2)


LOCKER ROOMS
Function:
To provide o place to change ond store street clothes while using sports facllltles.
The lockers are- to be used In connection with outdoor sports, they should be located so the players will have access to them without going through the entire building.
Requirements:
The floor of the locker room should pitch to a central drain or drains to facilitate cleaning and washing.
In the women's locker room dressing booths should be supplied to the ratio of 10 percent of the total number of lockers.
Hair dryers and nonbreakable liquid soap dispensers ore also recommended. Area:
2 500 sq. ft. = 1,000 sq. ft. (92.9 m2)


SHOWER ROOMS
Requirements:
8 shower heads are to be provided for the mens shower room, each head should be 4' apart.
4 shower heads ore to be provided for the women's shower room with Individual shower and dressing baths to be provided.
Area:
2 300 sq. ft. = 600 sq. ft. (55.74 m2)
shower
2


CHECKROOM
Function:
This room will oct as a control room for checking out of equipment such os basketballs, soccer balls and other sports equipment that would be provided by the facility.
To be maintained by minimal amount of personnel.
Area:
150 sq. ft. (13.93 m2)


PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM
A special room should be provided ond equipped os o darkroom. Ventilation should be provided.
Hot ond cold running water, special light plugs--both wall ond base--and photographic sinks for developing ond washing prints should also be provided .
Function:
General photographic activity, processing of film, enlarging use of o copy camera, etc.
Affinity:
To other club rooms, class rooms.
Finishes:
Floors finished concrete.
Doors should be light proof.
Area:
200 sq. ft.
(18.58 m2)


EXHIBIT AREA
Function:
The basic objective of the exhibit area Is to collect., preserve, study and exhibit objects of the community, and provide related educational services In order to Increase public knowledge and stimulate creative activity.
Affinity:
To the administrative section of the complex and to provide some kind of constant observation.
Should be oriented meaningfully. Also, consideration should be given to easy traffic patterns.
Area:
800 s:^ ft.
(74.32 m2)


SOCIAL HALL GYMNASIUM
FunctLon:
Used for o variety of socLoL activities, dancing, bonquets, Ln oddLtLon to bosketboLL and other forms of othtetLcs.
The size of the social h all - gymnasium should be at lea st 80 ft. (24 .384 m)
by 100 ft . (30.400 m). This will perml t a bas k e t b a 11 CO urt of 50 ft (15.24
by 84 ft. (35.603 m), with a minimum he Ight of 22 ft. (6 .705 m). The se
dImens Ion s will permit 4 tier s of teles coplc b teacher s o n one sld e of the
social ha ll gymnasium, seat Lng approx Imately 200 sp ect ators.
Provls Ion should be made for a mechanic ol vent Hating sy stem (for ced air) .
There shouLd be no windows at eLther end of the socLoL hoLL gymnasium.
It Is preferable to have no windows In the social hall gymnasium as they have Little functional value. If It Is necessary to use windows, they should be placed on the north side, or If used on two sides, then on the north and south not on east or west sides.
Affinity:
To the locker rooms, storage, other facilities such as the multipurpose room, racquet ball and squash courts,
and kitchen


Area:
(743.2 m2)
8,000 sq. fb.


AUDITORIUM
Function:
In order to obtain maximum benefit from the auditor to be used for a variety of social activities, such dancing, as well as banquets.
The size of the auditorium shou Id be at least 80 ft
(30 .480 m).
Aff Lnlty:
The audItor lum should be centra Lly located to the k
for banque t s, a Iso th e stage fo r performances and rn
sho uld be b ullt In co nj unction with the audIto r lum.
be provided for the s torage of tables and chal rs, e
sho uld also be c lose for easy a ccess.
Area:
10,000 sq. ft. (929.0 m2)
lum, this facility Is as folk, and social
. (24.384 m) by 100 ft.
Itchen and bar facilities uslc bands. The stage Ample space should tc. The restrooms


MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
FuntLon:
The multipurpose room should be designed bo occomodote such activities os general meetings, social recreation, active table games, folk dancing, and orchestra practice.
It should be rectangular In shape with a minimum width of 30 ft. (9.144 m). The floor should have a non-skid surface to prevent many common accidents. The floor should also be level In order to permit multiple use.
Affinity:
Multipurpose room should be located near the club room, lobby In close proximity to office supervision.
Requirement:
It should be acoustically treated, due to the noise factor.
Area:
1,200 sq. ft.
(111.43 m2)


STAGE
Function:
To be used for ploys, music bonds, presentotlons.
Requirements:
The stage proper should be about 20 ft. (6.096 m) In depth and the prosenlum opening should be at least two thirds the width of the room. Able to be opproached from the floor of the main room.
Affinity:
To changing rooms with washroom facilities, accessible from the auditorium, and access to the outside for easy moving of equipment. Storage to be Incorporated with the stage If possible for economic purposes.
Mechanical:
It Is desirable that the room be equipped with a modern public address system, permanently Installed with matched speakers and with outlets for additional microphones and phonographic equipment.
Alt stage lighting should be controlled from a dimmer control cabinet


equipped with a rheostat
Area:
2,000 sq. ft.
(185.8 m2)


STORAGE
Sufficient storage space for equipment, maintenance, and custodial purposes. Requirements:
Equipment storage there should be an opening 6 ft. wide between the auditorium and/ or social halt gymnasium and the storage space.
Maintenance storage should be adjacent to outdoor areas, located on ground level.
Custodial storage a supply closet equipped with a slop sink and space for mops, palls, brooms, and cleaning supplies. Should be centrally located.
Area:
1,400 sq. ft.
(130.06 rn2)


DAY CARE CENTER
Function:
To provide facilities for child core with minimum supervision. Should Incorporate space for group activities, ond private spaces for creativeness, washroom facilities and storage.
Affinity:
The day core center should be readily excesslble and adjacent to a protected outdoor play area.
Area:
1 ,400 sq. ft.
(130.06 m2)


LANGUAGE LABORATORY
Func tlon:
The Language Laboratory provides a place where pupils can Listen to recordings In Croatian and make their ouin recordings. I ncorporated with this would be a lecture room that would also serve as a classroom.
Affinity:
Should be Located In a quiet and remote orea away from heavy traffic yet easily accessible from the other classrooms.
Requirements:
Small rooms with Individual booths equipped with tape machines, microphones and headphones. Also sufficient storage space should be provided for the equipment and tapes.
Area:
800 sq. ft
(74.32 m2)


CLASSROOM
Function:
To Instruct, students on the historical and cultural aspects of the Croatian people as well os other academic courses.
Affinity:
The classrooms should have a quiet location, away from noisy outdoor areas. Located near the language lab.
Area:
1,600 sq. ft
(148.64 m2)


RACQUETBALL AND SQUASH COURTS
Function:
To be port of the recreational activities ot the center.
Affinity:
Should be easily controlled ond located near the gymnasium, multipurpose room, and locker changing rooms.
Requirements:
2 Racquetball courts 2 Squash courts
Area:
2,784 sq. ft.
(258.63 m2)


RESIDENCE
Function:
The residence will house some resident ond visiting priests. It will oct os o control point for the cultural center.
Affinity:
The entrance should be visible from the residence, close to the recreational and facility. It should also be close to the playing fields.
Requirements:
It should be provided with -
5 bedrooms 600 sq. ft. (55. .74 m2)
Kitchen 150 sq . ft. (13. .93 m2)
Living Room 200 sq . (T (27. .87 m2)
Dining Room T 80 sq . ft. (16. .72 m2)
Office 120 sq. ft. (11 . .15 m2)
Washrooms 70 sq . ft. ( 6, . 50 m2)
Mechanical and m2)
Storage 180 sq. n* (16. .72
Total Area = 1,500 sq. ft. (139, .35 m2)
Total Area


SPACE REQUIREMENTS sq. ft
Day Core Center 1,400
Lobby 800
Language Lab 800
Classrooms (2) 1,600
Club Room 1,200
Arts and Crafts 1 ,600
Museum Exhibit 800
Multipurpose Room 1,200
Locker Rooms (2) 1,000
Storage 1,400
Office and Info 300
Restrooms (2) 500
Social Hall Gymnasium 8,000
Kitchen 1,600
Bor 360
Stage 2,000
Auditorium c Q o Ml o
Lounge
800
130.06
74.32
74.32
148.64
111.48
148.64
74.32
111.48 92.90
130.06 27.87 46.45
743.2
148.64 33.44
185.80
929.00
74,32


Coot Check 120
Photography Room 200
RocquetbaLL ond Squosh Courts 2,784
Showers 600
Mechanical and Circulation 5,600
Equipment Checkout 150
Residence 1,500
Total Area 46,314
11.15
18.58
258.63
55.74
520.24
13.93
139.35
4,302.57


DESIGN SOLUTION


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