Citation
An art academy and museum

Material Information

Title:
An art academy and museum
Creator:
Noble, Kathy
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
72 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, chart, maps, color photographs, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Art museums -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Art schools -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Art museums ( fast )
Art schools ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Kathy Noble.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
13775712 ( OCLC )
ocm13775712
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1983 .N62 ( lcc )

Full Text

environmental design AURARiA LIBRARY
An Art Academy and
Museum
ARCHIVES
LD
1190 AT 2 1983 N62
Thesis Fall 1983
Kathy Noble


Introduction
For my thesis, I propose to design an Art Academy & Museum, to be located at 19th & Lowell, near Sloan's Lake, Denver.
The Academy will provide an educational and artistic center.
Granting the Master of Fine Arts degree, this institution will encourage two basic goals: the pursuit of excellence and the exploration of interchange between artistic disciplines.
The Academy comprises approx. 250 full-time students working in ten major disciplines: painting, drawing, printmakina, textiles, metalsmithing. photography, sculpture, ceramics, graphic design and a film/video program. The students will be taught bv practicing professional artists and designers whose continuing individual growth will stimulate instruction. The value of their experience will help students establish themselves professionally in the art and design world.
The .Academy will reach out the conrrtunity and art world with publications, events, and lectures. Visiting and local artists, lecturers and critics will be regularly invited for seminars and workshops. This exchange will enrich the education program and play an important role in the cultural life of the region and state.
The students will learn in an environment that combines the advantages of a "cloistered art ccnmunity" with the cultural resources that an urban environment can provide.
The Musuem will offer exhibits of an ever-changing collection of past and current art. The Musuem is the public aspect of the Arts Center, concerned with "product", whereas the studio's are private and concerned with "process".
The Museum will be open to the public and encourage participation by scheduling exhibits, giving lectures, seminars, etc. It is planned to accomodate a visiting capacity of approximately 350 people.


The galleries will contain a permanent exhibit and changing exhibits. The permanent exhibit will be representative of a range of history and influence. The changing exhibits will be used in conjunction to the needs of the studio's. For example, the ceramics studio will have the opportunity to study Chinese porcelain, etc. These galleries will also offer the opportunity for students and faculty to exhibit their work to the public. The galleries will range in capacity: fran spaces that can accomodate large sculptures to galleries scaled to residential dimensions that make viewing the art on display an intimate and personal experience. The galleries will enhance the art by skillful handling of natural light, careful relationships to the outdoors, simple detailing, gallery to gallery connections that offer many alternative routes, and simple materials.
The site is particulary appropriate to this project and program.
To the West is Sloan's Lake, a public park, with a panoramic view of the Mountains beyond. The lake and park enhance the 'sanctuary' quality of the Acadony and provide good accessibility to the Musuem. To the East, the site looks toward Downtcwn Denver and recognizes its place in the larger carmunity. The Arts Center has the opportunity to become a regional and state-wide institution for the creation and enjoyment of the Arts.
The tranquility of the Mountains is shared in the contemplative nature of the Museum. The dynamism of Downtown enhances the creativity of the Academy.
It is the spatial expression of these forces; the creation of a 'dynamic tranquility' that I wish to explore and in which the strength of the Project will be achieved.


CONTENTS


Site
Vicinity Map Area Map Description Soils
Demolition Plan
History
Site
Project
Program
Analysis
Regulations
Zoning
Denver Building Code
Climate
Sun Path
Climatological Sunmary
Guidelines
General Notes Daylighting
Design


SITE


Vicinity


E9jy


Description
The site contains approximately 12.7 Acres.
The property is located in Section 32, Township 3 South, Range 68 West of the 6th Principal Meridan in Denver, Colorado
The North boundary is 21st Avenue wtih single family residences beyond.
The South boundary is 19th Avenue with Lake Junior High School beyond.
The West boundary of the site is Lowell Boulevard with single family residences beyond.
The East boundary is single residences and Hallack Park.




Neighborhood
North
East


Lake Junior High School
South
Built in 1926, it was designed by Burnham Hoyt and M.H. Hoyt. Mr. Hoyt also designed the Red Rocks Amphitheatre and several other outstanding schools in the Denver area.


Downtown
East


Sloans Lake
West
In 1866 pioneer farmer Thomas Sloan dug an irrigation well on his farm, hit an artesian well, and the next day when the water stopped flowing, he had a 200 acre lake.
The lake grew after the city dredged a channel in 1866 so that an amusement park steamboat could make a three mile run along the shore.
The city bought the land in 1906 and the 290 acre park is managed by the Denver Dept, of Parks and Recreation.


Legal
Block 5, CHELTENHAM HEIGHTS, and Block 6, the resubdivision of Block 2,6,8,23,29 and 34 in CHELTENHAM HEIGHTS, together with the vacated alleys within said Block 6, and vacated King Street lying between Block 5 and Block 6 and South 1/2 of vacated West 20th Avenue adjoining said Blocks and adjoining vacated King Street, from East line of present alley in Block 31,
WITTER and COFIELD'S subdivision of the Town of Highlands extended South to North line of Block 6, CHELTENHAM HEIGHTS;
Block 30 and all vacated alley therein and East 1/2 of vacated King Street adjoining Lots 13, 20,
27 and 28 and adjoining vacated alleys, and North 1/2 of vacated West 20th Avenue adjoining Lots 12 to 19, inclusive, and adjoining vacated alley and adjoining East 1/2 of vacated King Street, resubdivisin of Blocks 7,8,9,28,29,30 WITTER and COFIELD'S subdivision of the Town of Highlands.
Lots 1 to 12, inclusive, except rear 8.0 feet, and West 1/2 of vacated King Street adjoining Lots 1 to 12, inclusive, and North 1/2 of vacated West 20th Avenue adjoining Lot 12 and adjoining West 1/2 of vacated King Street, Block 31, WITTER and COFIELD'S subdivision of the Town of Highlands.
Together with all of the right, title and interest, if any, of First Party in and to any land lying in the bed of streets, sidewalks, gutters, curbs, roads, alleys or avenues, open or proposed, in front of, in the rear of, or adjoining the above-described real property,and all right, title and interest, if any, of First Party in and to any awards made or to be made in lieu therof, and in or to any awards for damages to the above-described real property for consequential damages or the change of grade of any streets, and all the right, title and interest of First Party, if any, in and to strips and gores adjacent to, between, abutting or running through the above-described real property.
All in the City and County of Denver, State of Colorado


Soils
The soil conditions are fairly erratic over the site and vary with depth. Generally, 15.5 to as much as 25 feet of mixtures of sandy clays; medium plasticity clays; moist clays; very moist weathered claystones; weathered sandstone; soft, wet, weathered claystone; and some clay and claystone fills were encountered in the test holes. Claystone and sandstone bedrock were encountered below depths 17 to 25 feet in 15 of the test holes; however, no bedrock was found in the remaining five holes to depth 20 feet, the maximum depths investigated. Water soluable sulphates were present in several of the soils.
The engineering properties of the soils encountered in the test holes vary from low to non-swelling, very moist clays and weathered claystone to moderate to high swelling clays. The very moist soils will consolidate under moderate structure loads. The fills are typically very low to non-swelling and will consolidate under light structure loads.
Free water was found in nine of the test holes at depths varying from 3 to 10 feet. In addition, several of the remainder of the test holes were plugged at depths A to 11 feet, which also may be indications of ground water levels at the site.
These notes are from a prepared report by consulting engineers.


Demolition Plan
Phase All Buildings
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HISTORY




At the turn of the century thousands of people flocked to Denver in search of a cure for tuberculosis.
Many died, leaving dependent children alone in the city.
In 1907 Mrs. Fannie E. Lorber was elected president of a group of Denverites who opened a "sheltering home" for children of tuberculosis victims in a remodeled house at W. 19th Ave., and Irving St. "We bought the house for $2,600 when we didn't have 26 cents. We went to Larimer St., then the main business district, and collected money."
The facilities expanded to the present site at 19th and Lowell. A hospital, research facilities and dormitories for over 150 children were built.
As the threat of tuberculosis waned, by 1940, the center changed to the treatment of asthmatic children.
At one time there were more than 30,000 volunteers who worked without pay to finance the operation. During that time it was the world's largest free treatment and care center for children with asthma. The center was known as The Jewish National Home for Asthmatic Children and Children's Asthma Research Institute and Hospital.
As late as 1967, Rocky Mountain News wrote that "37 percent of the children brought to the center for treatment of asthma recovered almost overnight."
In 1979 the National Jewish Hospital and the National Asthma Center merged. By 1981, the facilities were moved to the present location at East Colfax Ave. and Colorado Blvd.
The site at 19th & Lowell has been vacated, and is presently owned by a non-profit foundation.




PROJECT


PROGRAM GOALS
Relating to FUNCTION:
ACADEMY:
- provide an educational and artistic center with an emphasis
on the exploration of interchange between artistic cisciplines
- provide the individual with the opportunity to work indivually and with a group, sharing ideas and talents
- combine the advantages of a "cloistered art carmunity" with the cultural resources that an urban environment can provide
- encourage the development of an interchange between the students and the ccnmunity
MUSEUM:
- create a "sanctuary in the City", where one may enjoy art in a relaxed and creative environment
- provide a center for the display of the Arts
- contain galleries that offer permanent and changing exhibits
- to be accessible to the public on a regular basis
- to be used by the students in relation to the classes given at the Academy
- encourage the use of the Museum for shows by local and visiting artists, with acccmpaning social events for the art corrmunity and interested public
- give seminars and lectures on current art works and topics Relating to FORM:
ACADEMY & MUSEUM:
- preserve existing trees; the use of open space in relation to the buildings is strongly encourged, ex. courtyards.
- the buildings are to be energy responsive and incorporate a "regional character:


- provide a clear sense of entry into the project
- provide a "center" for orientation for the students and visitors
- the Academy & Museum must project an image that combines the strength of the past and the vitality of the present
Relating to ECONOMY:
- the Academy & Museum will develop into a self-sustaining institution; funded by enrollment, exhibits, workshops, endowments, etc.
- building materials are to be selected based on durability and maintenance
- the Arts Center, although adaptable to change will be built to last as an enduring institution
Relating to TIME:
- As expectations and demands allow the Arts Center will expand to include a performing arts center, an outdoor amphitheatre, a school of music, dance and theatre, dormitories and private studio spaces, living units for faculty and visiting artists.


MUSEUM SQUARE FOOTAGE REQUIREMENTS
Entry Lobby Galleries
permanent exhibits 5,500 sq.ft.
changing exhibits 7,000 sq.ft.
Check Roan 80 sq.ft.
Restrooms 250 sq.ft, ea
Administration
Director 250 sq.ft.
Curator 200 sq.ft.
Secretary 150 sq.ft.
Conference Roan 250 sq.ft.
Restroans 80 sq.ft, ea
Service
Loading area 250 sq.ft.
Storage w/vault 800 sq.ft.
workshop 250 sq.ft.
Janitorial 150 sq.ft.
Security 200 sq.ft.
Mechanical 150 sq.ft.
SUBTOTAL 15,568 sq.ft.
( + 25% Allowable for mech. areas, circulation, structure, etc.)
TOTAL SQUARE FOOTAGE
approx. 20,000 sq.ft.


SPATIAL & FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
MUSEUM ENTRY LOBBY
- to be used as the main entry and reception to the Arts Center
- effective supervision of public parts of the building by as few people as possible
- lobby to be spacious, well lighted and ventilated
- educational spaces, auditorium and exhibiton spaces all direct and obvious frcm Lobby
CHECK ROOM
- Check roan usually to right of entry
- close to doors but not near enough to cause congestion
INFORMATION DESK
- usually at left of main entry
- can be opening fron office
- keep stairway, passenger elevator and starting points for exhibits close to this area
RESTROOMS
- should be adjacent to exhibition areas and auditorium
- staff restroans near offices combined with staff lounge
ADMINISTRATION SPACES
- the Director's office will be the administrative office working area; and an informal conference area for meeting with visitors and staff
- located near main entrance yet still tied to service functions receiving, shipping, registration and shop work
- secretarial area will also serve as a reception area for administration SERVICE
- storage area to accessible to shipping and receiving
- adjacent to security office, high ceilings


ACADEMY SQUARE FOOTAGE REQUIREMENTS
Painting
Studio
Faculty
Storage
Drawing
Studio
Faculty
Printmaking
Litho Area Work Area Cleanup Faculty
Weaving and Textile Design Studio
General Area Faculty
Jewelry and Metalsmithing Studio
General Arfea
Photography
B & W Darkroan
Studio
Faculty
Graphic Design Studio
Sculpture
Studio
General Area Faculty
1,500
1,500
1,500
1,500
1,500
1,500
1.500
1.500


Ceramics Clay Throwing Area Glazing Area Kiln Area Faculty 1,500
Film and Video 1,500
TOTAL SQUARE FOOTAGE 15,000 sq.ft.


MUSEUM & ACADEMY AREA OF SHARED USAGE
Auditorium
projection roan
2,000 sq.ft. 100 sq.ft.
Cafe & Cafeteria kitchen
2,000 sq.ft. 600 sq.ft.
Lecture Roans
1,500 sq.ft.
Library & Bookstore
2,500 sq.ft.
TOTAL SQUARE FOOTAGE
8,700 sq.ft.
SPATIAL & FUNCTION DESCRIPTION AUDITORIUM
- to be used by the students and general public. The students for lectures; the public for seminars, special exhibits and meetings, etc.
CAFE & CAFETERIA
- adjacent to the Museum to be used by students and public. LIBRARY & BOOKSTORE
- to contain art history and related books for general use


ART MUSEUM
I. Function: For exhibition of 2 and 3 dimensional art for instructional purposes.
Function: Provide a place for public viewing of
art.
II. Description of Work:
Various types of art shows will be exhibited; some of these will be traveling exhibits from museums and other agencies. In addition, in house exhibits will be part of the permanent display. Such in house shows will include student and faculty exhibits.
Often there will be openings and receptions -with refreshments, there may be occasions when large groups of adults and children are toured through the Museum
III. Affinity:
Museum should be close to the Administrative section to provide some kind of observation when it is open to the public.
Should have outside delivery capability with double doors. Galleries should open out to outdoor courts and sculpture gardens.
IV. Finishes:
Walls: Wall panels covered with fabirc and able
to hold pins and nails-should be able to handle heavy objects of art. Walls should be at least 12' high.
Floors: floors should be strong enough to handle
unusual sguare footage loading exerted by heavy stone or bronze sculpture.
Ceilings: Should incorporate a channel system
to hang walls, panels, art work, etc.
V. Heat: temperature range 65 -72
Cooling: temperature range 65 72
Ventilation: relative humidity control range should
be between 45% 60%


VI .
Movable Equipment:
Gallery benches Gallery tables Movable wall panels
Glass cases and pedestals for objects


PAINTING STUDIO
I. Function: Studio/laboratory for painting
II. Description of Work:
A one-to-one teaching relationship is the usual activity, however, group critiques, and projection of slides are sometimes used. Students normally stand to paint, however being seated especially for watercolor is not uncommon.
Many projects employ "in studio" source material i.e. still-life set-ups, or figure (model).
Other problems are accomplished from previous sketches, and others involve a spontaneous evolution of the painting. In addition, assemblage paintings utilizing foreign objects and materials in association with paint are also done.
III. Affinity:
Drawing
Printmaking
Sculpture
IV. Exposure:
Natural (north) light is desirable (but not necessary) only if it can be controlled with block-out shades allowing complete flexibility of control. Natural light source should be high, ie. clear-story or ceiling louvered sky-light.
V. Mechanical:
Ventilation: fumes from paint, turpentine, solvents must be evacuated.
Sinks and Drainage: Industrial type galvanized sink approximately 11' long, 24" wide,18" deep with multiple drains and faucets.
VI. Fixed Equipment:
Painting storage racks on end walls of painting studios can make use of 16' high ceiling so that racks may be layered. A moveable metal ladder on a track or other adequate means of accessibility would be necessary


DRAWING STUDIO
I. Function: Approx. 20 students drawing per studio
II. Description of Work:
Students draw from still life set ups and individual objects. Students draw sitting on benches, standing at easels*.; sitting on the floor and at some portable tables.
Instructor moves from student to student for advice and critiques.
Drawings will be pinned on soft walls and/or hung by molding.
III. The instructor may show a film or project slides in the room.
Some still life set ups are permanent, most are temporary, arranged on rolling stands from the storage area to the studio.
IV. Affinity:
Design Studio Still life storage area Seminar Room Faculty Offices
Outdoor instructional space, could be ground level or on a roof.
V. Finishes
Ceilings 16' height. Structural beams exposed to allow hanging of objects above eye level with pulleys, rope and wire.
VI. Mechanical:
Ventilation: strong ventilation to extract toxic
fumes of spray fixatives, turpentine and other solvents used.
Sinks and Drainage: very large double sink with hot and cold water.


J
Lighting:
System should be wired to three rheostat controlled circuits so that spot light intensity can be flexibly controlled. Individual spot lights should be adjustable in terms of their position on a modular track.
VII. Fixed Equipment:
Student access to lockers in hall or in central locker area.
Lockers to be double stacked: 12' wide, 24" deep, 36" high. Two students per locker


PRINTMAKING STUDIO
I. Function: Since the printmaking philosophy advocates a workshop-type teaching situation, work with all print media is to be undertaken in one large studio area. The printmaking floor plan provides the necessary autonomy within each media work area as well as easy access for mixed-media work.
II. The printmaking plan provides adequate space
and facilities for a complete range of print activities: including engraving, relief work
and silk screen.
III. Affinity:
Drawing, sculpture and photo lab would be three areas with natural affinity to prints -particularly photography.
Outdoor Space: easy access to ourdoors would provide pleasant work-area potential, but it is not imperative.
IV. Exposure:
Provide as much natural light as possible.
For example, engraving is best accomplished with natural light. High strip natural light, controllable desired.
V. Fixed Equipment
Student lockers for printmaking tools and equipment. Box lockers 12" wide 18" deep 12" high


WEAVING AND TEXTILE DESIGN STUDIO
I. Function: Space for weaving instruction and demonstration and space for fabric printing.
II. Description of Work:
The weaving studio provides space and facilities for the following activities:
Each student sets up their own loom and weaves.
Formal and informal critiques take place, utilizing wall space, table space, floor space.
Demonstrations may take place at any place in the room.
People gather for workshops, lectures, demonstrations, and discussions.
In the area used for fabric printing:
Fabrics are silkscreened on long tables.
Students do tie dye and batik, involving hot wax, on large tables with easily cleanable surfaces.
III. Affinity:
Outdoor Space: It would be very helpful to have the weaving sstudio open onto an outdoor space, particularly an enclosed patio type because many dyes must be set in the sun. Dyed yarns dry better outside, large scale works can be done there, and some weaving and other fiber construction processes are pleasant to do outside in nice weather.
IV. It would give the most flexibility to incorporate the weaving studios and the warping room into one large room, with built in storage areas at both ends.
V. Mechanical:
Sinks and drainage: floor drain or drains are needed near the fabric printing area.


PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO
I. Function: General phtographic activity motion picture as well as still. Processing of film, enlarging, use of copy camera, etc.
II. Affinity:
The copy camera-vacuum table area, should be in close proximity to Printmaking and Graphic Design.
III. Mechanical:
Ventilation: in dark rooms, some special venting
necessary for film processing equipment.
Sinks and Drainage to be specified for Dark Room.


GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIO
I. Function: Studio workspace for 20 students seated at drafting tables.
Maximum use of flat-wall space for exhibiting student and professional examples of graphic design, on a temporary basis.
Short slide and film presentations
Lectures and demonstrations.
II. Description of Work:
Student paints, cuts, uses drafting and other precision equipment.
III. Affinity:
Photography
Drawing
IV. Finishes:
Maximum wall spaces for exhibiting student and professional work.
V. Mechanical:
Because of toxic sprays for fixing work and certain toxic spray paints and oil-base pigments used by students, the ventilation of graphic design studios should be the same as painting and printmakling.


REGULATIONS



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DENVER ZONING ORDINANCE
Zoning Classification: R-3
Section 59-177 Permitted Uses Uses by Right:
(a) Art Museum, Public
(c) Community Center
(d) Library, Public
(cc) University or College: A University or College
furnishing residential accomodations for at least (20) percent of the student body or fifty (50) students, whichever is less.
Permitted home occupations:
(a.5) Fine arts studio in which are created or restored only individual works of art upon review by the Fire Dept.
Section 59-179 Permitted Structures
Location of Structures
Front Setback: 10'
Rear Setback : 20'
Side Setback: 7'6"
Off Street Parking Requirements
Class 2 Art Museum, Public
University or College
There shall be one (1) off-street parking space provided for each 600 sq.ft, of gross floor area
The proportion of compact car spaces provided to satisfy these requirements shall not exceed 50% of the total spaces required.


Off Street Loading Requirements
25,001 to 250,000 square feet of gross floor area =
1 (one) required space for loading.
Each loading space shall be at least 10 feet wide, 26 feet long and 1A feet high.
Maximum Gross Floor Area Allowable
Shall not be greater than three (3) times the area of the Zone Lot on which the structures are located.
Existing Lot Area:
12.7 Acres x A3,560 sq.ft, per acre = 553,212 sq.ft. 553,212 sq.ft, x 3:1 ratio = 1,659,636 sq.ft.


ZONING
CHART 1
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60' 7.5 16.7 14.0 8.7 47.5 40.4
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FIRE ZONE CLASSIFICATION 3
CHAPTER 5 OCCUPANCY CLASSIFIED
Section 501_____Classification of all buildings
B-2 An assembly building without a stage and an
an occupant load of 300 or more
F-2 Universities, colleges, and adult education
facilities in which each classroom has an occupant load of 'less than 50 persons.
CHAPTER 19 TYPE II BUILDINGS
Section 1901 General
The structural elements in Type II Buildings shall be of steel, concrete, or masonry. Walls and partitions shall be of non-combustible fire-resistive construction except that interior nonbearing partitions on one-hour or 2 hour fire-resistive construction, which are not part of a vertical enclosure, may have fire-retardant treated wood within the rated assembly. Materials of construction and fire-resistive requirements shall be as specified in Chapter 17. Allowable floor area and maximum height shall be as specified in Chapter 5.
CHAPTER 5
Section 505_____Allowable Floor Area
B-2, Type II (Table 5-C)
Basic Allowable
+ 33 1/3 % (Fire Zone 3 ) =
T otal
+ 200% (b) Areas of buildings over one story
Section 506 Maximum Floor Area Increase
22,500
7,500
30.000
60.000
Where public space, streets, or yards more than 20 feet in width extend on all sides of a building and adjoin the entire perimeter, floor areas may be increased at a rate of 5% for each foot by which the minimum width exceeds 20 feet, but the increase shall not exceed 100%
Total
120,000 sq.ft.


Section 505 Allowable Floor Area
F-2, Type II (Table 5-C)
Basic Allowable = 30,000 +33 1/3% (Fire Zone 3) 10,000 Total 40,000 + 200 % (b) Areas of buidlings over one story) 80,000 + 100%(Separation on all sides) 160,000
Section 503 Mixed Occupancy
When a building houses more than one occupancy, each portion of the building shall conform to the requirements for the occupancy housed therein.
The occupancy separation for B-2 and F-2 is 1 hour.
The area of the building shall be such that the sum of the ratio of the actual area divided by the allowable area for each separate occupancy shall not exceed one.
Section 506 Maximum Height of Buildings (Table 5-D)
B-2, Type II, 4 Stories, 75 feet
F-2, Type II 6 Stories, 75 feet
Section 5-08 Arcades
Arcades connecting buildings and used exclusively as passagewayss need not be considered as adjacent buildings.
Section 509 Toilet Facilities
See Table 5-E, based on square footage divided by 20 sq. ft. per person (5-E-4)
Section 510 Requirements for handicapped persons
At least one water closet and one lavatory for both sexes shall be provided for the use of handicapped persons. See 510 (c) for toilet facility dimensions


CHAPTER 7 REQUIREMENTS FOR GROUP B OCCUPANCIES Section 703 Location
Buildings shall front directly upon or have access to a public street at least 20 feet in width. The access to a public street shall be a 20 foot minimum width right-of-way maintained solely as access to the public street. The main entrance to the building shall be located on the public street or the main access.
CHAPTER 17 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS (Table 17-A)
Type II, For B-2 and F-2 Occupancy
Exterior Bearing and Nonbearing walls 4 hour
Interior Bearing Wall 2 hour
Structural Frame 2 hour
Permanent Partitions 2 hour
Vertical opening enclosures 2 hour
Floors
1 hour
Roofs
1 hour


CHAPTER 33 STAIRS, EXITS AND OCCUPANT LOADS
Section 3302 Exits Required
Number
Building or floors shall not have less than two (2) exits.
Floors above the first story having an occupant load of more than 10 shall have not less than two exits.
Mezzanines: if more than 2,000 sq.ft, or more than
60' in any direction will require two (2) stairways to adjacent floor.
Stories with occupant loads of 500 999 require three (3) exits minimum.
Stories with occupant loads of more than 1,000 require four (4) exits minimum.
Occupant load is determined by dividing the total square footage by 20sq.ft. per occupant(Schools)
Width
The total width of exits in feet shall be at least the total occupant load served divided by 50. The width of exits shall be divided approx, equally among the separate exits.
Arrangement of Exits
When more than one exit is required from a portion of a building or story, at least two (2) of the exits shall be remote from each other.
Minimum travel distance between exit doors shall be 25 feet for a building or story.


Section 3316 Exits: Group B Occupancy
Maximum travel distance
Exits shall be arranged so that the total length of travel from any point to an exit shall not exceed 150 feet.
Exception: With automatic fire extinguishing system,
the distance may be increased to 200 feet
Section 3320 Exits: Group F Occupancy Same as Group B
Section 3303 Exit Door Requirements Swing
All doors shall swing in the direction of exit travel when serving an occupancy load of ten (10) or more.
Type of Lock
Exit doors shall be operable from the inside without the use of a key.
Width and Height
Door to be at least 3'-0" x 6' 8".
Shall be mounted so that the clear width of the exitway is at least 34".
Change in floor level at doors
There shall be a level floor or landing on each side of a door.
The landing shall extend 2 feet beyond the edge of the door when open.
Public Way
Doors shall not swing into the public way.


Section 3304 Corridors and Exit Balconies
General
Foyers, lobbies and reception rooms meeting the construction requirements of corridors may be considered as corridors.
Width and Height
Corridors shall be at least 44 inches in width (3'-8") and provide a clear height of at least 7 feet.
Access to exits
When more than one exit is required, exits shall be arranged so that is it possible to go in either direction from any point in a corridor to a separate exit, except for permitted dead-end corridors.
Dead-end
Corridors may have dead-ends not to exceed 20 feet in length.
Exception: When the entire building is provided with
automatic fire extinguishing system, the dead-end corridor may be extended to a total length of 50 feet.
Section 3305 Stairways
Width
The rise of every step in a stairway shall not exceed 7|inches and the run shall be at least 10 inches.
Exception: When the entire building is provided with
an automatic fire extinguishing system, the dead-end corridor may be extended to a total length of 50 feet.
Landings
Every landing shall have a dimension equal to the width of the stairway. The dimensions need not exceed 5 feet when the stair has a straight run.


Section 3305 Stairways (Cont.)
Landings (Cont.)
The vertical distance between landings shall not exceed 12 feet, 6 inches.
On all floors above the first floor, a space at least 25 inches by 42 inches shall be provided for one wheel chair in each stairway enclosure as an area of refuge for handicapped persons.
Handrails
Stairways shall have handrails on each side. Stairway to Roof
In every building four or more stories in height, one stairway shall extend to the roof structure, unless the roof has a slope greater than 4 in 12.
Section 3306 Ramps
Width
The width or ramps shall be the same as required for stairways.
Slope
The maximum pitch of a ramp shall not exceed one vertical to 12 horizontal from the first floor to grade.
Landings
Ramps having slopes greater than one vertical to 15 horizontal shall have landings at the top and bottom. At least one intermediate landing shall be provided for each 5 feet of rise. Landings shall have a dimension of at least 5 feet.
Handrails
Handrails shall be provided on at least one side of every ramp.


Section 3312 Exit Signs
Exit areas shall be illuminated at all times the building is occupied.
Exception: Main exterior exit doors which are
clearly identifiable as exits.
Place wherever needed to indicate direction of egress.
Exit sign and exitway illumination must be on separate circuits from other power in building.


CLIMATE


Sun Path
June 22 Altitude Azimuth
A.M. P.M.
5 7 5.15 117.16
6 6 15.44 107.87
7 5 26.28 98.78
8 4 37.38 89.19
9 3 49.13 82.47
10 2 60.58 69.06
11 1 70.61 45.67
12 75.45 0.00
December 22
8 4 4.28 52.82
9 3 12.46 41.63
10 2 18.91 29.01
11 1 23.09 14.96
12 24.55 0.00


iVleitJorological uu j For The uurrent Year
Sutton OiNVER* COLORADO STAPLETON INTERNATIONAL AP Sundard time used: MOUNTAIN Latitude: *9* 45* N Longitude: 104#32*M Elevation (ground) : i 2>042_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Month Temperature * P Degree daye Bern 65*F r/.7r< Precipitation In Inchea Relative humidity, pet. Wind ii f Number of daye Average tetlon prevail re mb
Averegee Extremes Water equivalent Snow. Ice pellets i 03 1 11 Loca 1 17 *JC~ time 1 23 1loo Reeultant l Is Feateat mile fi li Sonflae to aoneet A ll H li j £ h ll Tempereture *P
Maximum Minimum
ll ll £ 1 I X S 1 I i ? 3 1 e- h O IN 3 1 II I i j O I! Vi | 3 3 ii 1 lb) ll hi l\ Ji Elev. 5332 feet oval.
JAN 37.5 1 A 1 23.8 5) 6 0 1 1206 0 0.27 0. 13 13-16 3.5 2.3 23-24 69 33 34 66 04 1.0 5.9 29 NN 23 6V 6.9 6 9 16 6 3 0 2 0 9 31 1 8J4.7
Ff 8 A 2,2 20. 31.A 2) 7 17 936 0 0.27 0.13 11-12 6.2 3.1 15-16 76 34 34 73 04 1.8 7.2 38 NE 20 73 6.6 4 11 13 6 2 0 8 0 7 28 0 8)3.4
MAR 57.0 29.6 A).3 77 31 -3 4 663 0 1.07 0.67 22-23 6.6 4.5 2-3 60 39 33 33 3* 0.6 8.1 27 W 14 84 6.4 9 8 14 4 2 1 0 1 13 2 8)4.4
APR 6).6 36.9 30.3 82 7 27 10 435 0 l.e; 0.86 9 4.6 4.2 9 64 38 33 31 2 1.7 10.3 41 W 17 78 6.4 3 14 ll 6 1 3 2 0 0 6 0 8)1.7
MAY 67.1 M .7 34.A 7 13 23 7 333 12 3.46 1.12 30-1 13.1 8.9 5-6 69 43 40 61 17 1.7 9.1 34 SE 16 45 6.1 9 8 14 12 3 3 1 0 0 2 0 8)3.4
JON 80.6 >3.1 66.9 93 24 41 1 87 132 1.17 0.45 4-3 0.0 0.0 63 39 34 54 16 2.0 7.B 38 N 7 67 5.7 10 9 11 7 0 7 0 ll 0 0 0 )7.J
JUL 90. A >9.0 74.7 23 30 2) 0 308 0.34 0.21 29 0.0 0.0 62 30 26 43 l A 1.4 8.3 34 NW 16 73 4.3 12 14 3 9 0 11 1 2 7 0 0 0 8)8.1
AUG 85.5 53.7 69.6 17 44 13 20 171 0.26 0.11 2-3 0.0 0.0 63 31 30 52 14 1.3 8.2 42 N 1 73 4.7 10 14 7 0 6 0 17 0 0 0 8)8.1
S'P 41.2 48.7 63.0 6 32 21 96 103 0.07 0.07 19-20 T T 20 31 23 20 40 17 2.4 8.1 30 5 7 83 2.3 21 7 2 2 0 1 0 7 0 1 0 8)7.1
0CI 66.2 37.9 33.1 1 28 23 366 2 1.43 1.24 21-22 2.7 1.7 22 34 31 20 49 14 0.9 7.2 26 HE 4 74 4.0 19 5 7 3 2 0 0 0 0 6 0 8)9.3
NPV 49.1 23.7 37.8 6 27 811 0 0.50 0.35 23-26 6.9 4.8 23-26 66 45 46 63 04 0.3 7.2 26 Nw 28 96 6.0 11 6 13 3 2 0 4 0 5 24 0 9)3.1
Of c 36.9 12.) 24.6 37 4 -10 6 1243 0 0.82 0.38 3-6 14.2 >.} 3-6 63 50 56 62 1 0.9 8.4 35 NE 3 72 5.3 10 10 11 7 4 0 1 0 9 31 4 8)2.4
OfC OCT MAY MAY
YFAR 63.3 36.1 49.7 98 2> -10 8 6202 748 11.70 1.24 21-22 62.2 8.9 3-6 64 40 38 56 14 0.6 8.0 54 SE 16 72 3.4 126 115 12. 74 33 20 fl 146 7 8)5.6
Normals, Means, And Extremes
Meane and extremee above ace from existing and comparable expoaurea. Annual extremee have been exceeded at other sltea In the locality aa tollowai Highest tcmpocature 105 In Auguat 1878| maximum monthly precipitation 1.57 in May 1I76| minimum monthly precipitation 0.00 in December I88I1 maximum precipitation in 24 houra 6.S3 in May 187(| maximum monthly enowfall 57.4 in December 1913| maximum enowfall in 24 houra 23.0 in April 1885) faateat mile of wind (5 from Heat in May 19)3.
(a) length of record, years, through tha Current year unless otherwise noted, based on January data.
(b) 70* and above at Alaskan stations.
* Less than one half.
T Trace.
NORMALS Based on record for the 1941-1970 period.
DATE Of AN EXTREME The most recent 1n cases of multiple
occurrence.
PREVAILING WIND DIRECTION Record through 1963.
WlhO DIRECTION Numerals Indicate tens of degrees clockwise from true north. 00 Indicates calm.
FASTEST MILE WIND Speed Is fastest observed 1-mlnute value when the direction Is 1n ions of degrees.
V
V


Average Temperature
Y.ar | Jan [ Feb | Mar | Apr I May | June| July j Aug | Sept | Oct~
Heating Degree Days
1
Vi
pi*
1*0
t**l
l*2
1**3
l66
1*47
l4l
1**5
l*Sl
1*52
1*
l>*
IMS
1*3*
1*5*
ll
IMS
1*60
1**1
l**2
1*61
1*64
1*65
1*66
1**7
1*6*
1*6*
1*70
1*71
1*72
1*71
1*74
1*75
1*76
1*77
1*7*
iiccn
Hill
wit-
M1M
Annual Season) July| Aug |Scpt| Oct ]Novi Dec | Jan 1 Feb | Mar| Apr May June; Total
31.1 !*3-3* 14 4 106 147 774 1 i10l *6*| 4! 172 271 29 9646
50.1 t*5*-*0 0 ft l*i U 613 674 1131 113* 627 614 2*3 1* 626ft
30.6 91*60-61 7 1) *0 1*4 73* j1167 lC26 1 104 160 2** 69 6014
4.l 1*41-42 14 271 43* *02 1150 1411 *7* 1 ) 4 4>7 173 72 6101
31. 1*62-4) 0 1* 1 w 1)7 .701 461 M17 76* i * 442 156 30 3*2*
4*.7 t6l.64 ft 7 2* 72* 4*0 1125 103* l C 6 21 *12 343 2)0 72 6096
4*.6 1*64-43 0 16 121 17* 741 **l *21 1044 M08 *11 2*3 61 601A
51.2 1*63-66 ft 7 2*6 107 643 74 1122 10J7 6*1 60* 20* 2 3*00
4*. 4 1*46-67 0 61 )* 6*9 101* 934 )2 6* 4** )* 11) 3*64
**.2 1*67-6* 4 16 10* )* 77* 11*6 10 b 6 *)l 751 ft 5 5 14) 1* 61*0
*. 6 1*61-6* 10 is 14) 1*4 *71 1114 *23 2i Lion 37* 204 144 609T
30.6 l*6*-70 2 0 36 601 76* *9* 1061 714 96* ftl2 200 76 100
*1.1 1*70-71 0 0 l*ft 3*4 770 *77 ion S 17 *0 If* 23 6186
30. n*71-72 Cft 0 2 71 474 771 101* 1061 12 621 4 ft 6 246 4 )!
31.6 1*72-71 *2 13 101 1*7 *60 121* 1162 20 771 6*6 2*0 3* ft)0)
31.3 1**1-74 8 0 166 321 7)1 1*2* 1277 11 671 30 7 1)7 67 3772
30.2 1*74-73 0 * 1** 161 101 1041 1024 *37 692 621 1)2 9 6)06
31.9 1*73-76 0 ft 1*) )ft* *40 4) 10C6 740 83* ft* 23* 64 3617
30.2 1*76-77 0 7 142 30* 75* C7 1109 7a* 771 *1* 1)7 0 3500
51.* 1*77.7* 2 14 16 )> 737 420 1206 *1* 663 *13 1)3 7 3711
30.0 4*.T 1*76-7* 0 20 *6 166 11 1243
41.* 4*.7 Cooling Degree Days
4*.7 Year |Jan Feb Mar j Apr MayjJune July AuglSeptj Oct Nov Dec Total
1*6* 0 0 0 0 13 44 112 2(4 46 0 0 0 721
30.3 1*70 0 0 9 0 16 *1 222 212 *0 0 0 0 691
4*.4 41.* 1*71 0 0 0 0 0 14* 201 24* 31 0 c 0 631
4*.* 1*72 0 0 0 0 6 110 210 207 Zl 1 0 5*2
4*. 3 1*71 0 0 y 0 2 13* l** 270 21 1 0 0 611
1*74 0 0 u 0 56 176 J07 137 )* 0 0 0 Til
4*.3 49.* 1*73 0 0 0 6 1 6* 2*4 1*2 1* 9 0 0 996
4*.* 1*76 0 0 0 r ) M2 )2ft 176 32 0 0 0 667
30.3 1*77 0 0 0 7 11 214 2*7 1*2 *3 0 0 0 7*
4*.4 1*76 0 0 u C 12 132 101 171 101 2 0 0 746
31.0
32.3
4*.T
50.2
41.4 17.0
Precipitation
Snowfall
Year Jan | Feb Mar Apr May June! July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Annual Season|julylAugiSept(Oct {Nov |Dec Jan Feb i Mar | Apr| May|june|Total
1*1* 0.82' 1.141 1.06 UC* 1.23 1.06 0.17 0.13 0.2* 0.*7 0.0* 0.37 8.43 l*)*-40 0.0 0,0 7,6 0.5 6.9 13.7 6.1 11.7 T 0.0 0,0 64,J
1*40 1.01 0.67 2.26 1.46 1.0 0.10 1.24 0.23 4.05 0.39 0.76 0 ft6 14.30
1 1*40-41 0.0 0.0 0.0 0,0 7.0 6.0 9.0 1.9 10.2 i.) 0.0 0,0 62.ft
|l*l l.ll 0.24 1.21 ). 3.71 2e*) 1.2* 1.14 2.41 2.*4 0.62 0 *6 22.03 1*41-42 c.o 0.0 T T 2.2 8.7 1.0 11.) 7.6 *.) 1.7 0,0 ftl.l
1*42 0.6ft! 0. *1 0.68 4.17 1.12 3.0* 1.02 0.77 0.81 2.*4 0.28 O.M 16.3* 1*42-4) 0.0 0.0 0.4 9,4 4.1 4.3 3.0 1.6 7.) T 4.3 0.0 )ft.l
1*43 0.2) 0. 12 0.45 1.0* 2.*6| 1.22 0.72 1.21 0.07 0.27 0.41 0.37 9.12 1*43-44 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 2.) 3.0 12.1 5.5 28.1 23.6 7.7 0,0 81.1
1**4 1.3* 0.23 !.! 1.92 1.73 0.92, 3.34 0.46 7 0.06 0.32 0.37 13.94 1*44.45 0.0 0.0 O.ft 3.3 3.* 12.2 6.2 3.0 23.0 T 0,0 33.8
i*3 0.70 0.9* 0.1) 2.33 2.32 2.02 2.1* 2.59 1.17 0.78 0.40 0,0* 13.3*
1*43-46 0.0 T 2.) ).* 0.8 10.2 4.6 3.2 T 0.8 0,0 21.7
1*46 0.6*' 0.27 0.32 2.0* l.*3 0.12; 1.60 !.) 1.18 0.88 2.*7 0.06 14.14 1*4 6-4 7 0.0 0.0 0.4 ).* 39.1 0.7 7.) 12.) 12.0 6.7 1.) T 81.6
:*47 o. :* 3.*7 l.0 1.30 4.61 2.76 1.32 1.27 0.*l 3.M 0.7) 0.27 1 *. 06 1*47-48 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 6.4 6.4 23.7 7.) 22.0 J.) T 0,0 74.4
1.S 1. 0.44 1.71 2.321 1.64 l.*4 0.60 0 4 1 0.43 0.16 0.63 0.26 12.62 1*48-49 0.0 0.0 0.0 0,8 6.7 4.1 20.3 0.4 54.2 12.7 T 0,0 60.1
1*4* 1.1* O.v) 2.2* 1.441 J.J1 4.27 1.35 0.92 0.28 1.3* 0.01 0.3) 16.71 19*9-30 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.2 6.0 8.1 2.9 l 3.4 9.0 13.6 0,0 32.*
1*10 o.il 0.24 0.31 2.** 2.60 3.321 0.36 0.27 1.38 0.12 1.00 0.32 13.9)
1*50-31 0.0 0.0 0.0 o.ft M.9 3.9 13.7 10.) 117,6 12.* 0.0 o.) 74.8
1*31 o.n 0.7* i.*7 2.01 1.78; 2.27! 0.1) 4.47 0.*7 2.18 1.17 0,6* 1 4 ) 1*91-52 0.0 0.0 4.2 7,7 14.3 11.2 o.) 10.2 25.2 11.2 T o.o 84.1
1*32 0.C1 0.6* 2.12 2.73 4.-6 ft- l2| 1.06 1.41 0.34 0.1 1.31 0.1* 13.4J 1*52-3) o.c 0.9 0.0 1.2 14.3 ).l 7,4 I*.) 11*8 12.0 1.7 0,0 61.2
1*3) 0.3* 1.3* 1.13 1.2*1 2.66 1.46) 1, 8 1.29 0.20 0 *4 1.00 1.02 14.2) 195J-34 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 7.2 14.4 2.7 0.6 6.) 7.4 2.6 0,0 ftl.l
1*34 0.2) 0 V 4 0.4* 0.18 0.60 0.66 1.** 0.31 0.77 0.06 0.37 O.M 7.31 1*54-33 o.o 0.0 0.4 3.9 8.6 3.5 12.2 11.3 ft.* 0.0 0,0 35.8
1*33 0.23, 0 5 1.14 0.4* 2.t 1.J7 2.*9 2.41 2.72 0.86 0.56 0.13 16.03
1*53-36 o.o 0.0 0.0 4.1 7.) 2.9 10.3 13.0 ), 7 T 0,0 6T. 1
1*56 0 ) 9 ' 0.77 0.89 0.72 2.56 0.44 4.17 1.1) 0,01 0.27 1.23 0.62 13.72 1*56-57 0.0 0.0 0.0 0,6 21.) 6.) 5.3 1.6 1.9 23.) 8.8 0,0 78.)
1*37 0.32 0.7) 1.0* 4.1) 7. It 1.0* 1.2* 2.0) 0.42 2.62 0.4* 0.06 21.58 1*57-58 0.0 0.0 r ).* ).0 9.1 .9 12.0 14.4 1ft. 1 0.0 0 w 37.1
1*3* 0.7), i.vO 1.41 1.73 4.46 l.> 7.30 1.17 1.31 0.37 0.74 0,64 18.80 1*58-5* 0.0 0.0 T 2,6 9.7 7.7 17.4 17.5 16 a 17.6 T 0,0 *9.)
1*5* 1.24, l.il 2.85 i.3 3.3) 0.44 0.8) 0.23 1.82 2.46 0.40 0.26 16.54 1959-60 0.0 0.0 12.* 11.8 5.) 1.7 10.7 i.) 1 9.0 *.) T 0,0 9.0
1*60 0.77i 1.66 0.8* 2.54 2.2* C.63 1.31 0.06 0.31 2.46 0.49 1.30 14.98
1*60-61 0.0 0.0 0.0 4,6 3.1 17.8 1.0 7.9 29.2 1.6 6.ft 0,0 80.6
1*61 0.07' 0.66 2.31 1.03 *.u 1.11 1.60 1.21 4.67 0.77 0.9) 0.30 1*.01 l*i1-62 0.0 0.0 5. 6.2 M.4 1.8 17.2 11.) 6.1 10.0 0.0 0,0 72.3
1962 1-3) 1.39 0.32 1.13 o.t* 1.32 0.34 0.46 0.1* 0.0) 0.68 0.1? 8.49 1*62-6) 0.0 0.0 0.7 0.0 3.0 1.2 9.1 2.1 18.0 9.2 O.C 0,0 36.)
196) 0.711 0.21 1.42 0.0 0.68 ) 5* 0.35 2.32 1.23 0.31 0.43 O.M 12.2) 1*63-64 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.1 3.) 3.9 2.6 12.7 ill.4 12.1 1.0 0,0 3T.J
19*4 0.26i 1.04 i.ii 1.2) 2.J) 0.62 0.72 0.27 0.41 o.li 0.M 0,*0 10.14 1*64-63 0.0 0.0 0.0 T 6.0 4.4 13.2 17.1 ;14.9 9,3 T 0,3 31.*
19*3 1.30; 1.27 1.20 1.0* l.*2 4.1* 4.41 1.06 2.38 0.43 0.36 0.3) 21.17
1*63-66 0.0 3.3 o.ft 3.3 1.6 5.6 1*.6 2.8 6.6 2.9 0.0 66.1
1966 0.10 1.28 0.32 1.46 0 ) 4 1.41 1.04 2.06 1.13 0.*6 0.32 0.17 10.81 1*66-67 0.0 T 1. > 1.0 1.9 9.9 4.* 6.6 ). ft 1.0 0,0 O.T
1**7 0. *4' 0.3* 0.7* 3.*3 4.77 4.6* 1.23 o.n 0.60 1.1) 1.01 1.0ft 23.31 1*67-68 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.7 9.4 D.l 3.0 7.) 9.2 13.1 T 0,0 38,*
1*6* 0.31- 0.74 0.15 2.)* 0.71 0.50 1.34 2.3) 0.3* 0.75 0.71 O.M 12.1) 1*68-69 0.0 0.0 0.4 3.8 ft. 9 2.* 4.2 13.2 T 0.0 0,3 )).)
*.** 0.17. 5.4) 1.10 l.il 6.12 2.9 l.ll 0.7* 1.67 4.17 0.62 0.ft2 21.32 1*69-70 0.0 0.0 31.2 3.1 3.1 0.9 o. 23.5 ft.7 r 0,0 65,8
1*70 0.10, o.oi C S* 0.64 >.l> 1.67 0.34 2.47 0.88 1.1* 0.0* 13.7)
1*70-71 0.0 0.0 4.6 ).* 9.2 9.7 8.6 11.9 9.6 6.0 r 0,0 36.7
l7l 0.33! 0.7* 0.3) i.ii 1.J4 0.2) 1.20 0.13 2.13 0.4ft 0.16 0.23 10.96 1*71-72 0.0 0.0 17.2 3.1 1.4 8.4 L0.9 9.1 7.1 17.2 0.0 0,0 7ft,4
1*72 0.36 0.44 0.30 3.92 0.4* 2.94 0.6) 2.71 2.07 0.2 1.6* 0. 70 16.87 1*72-7) o.c o.o 0.0 9.7 19.4 9.8 (12.1 5.2 13.1 2ft. 1.0 0,0 94,9
1*71 1.3l 0. 46 1.76 3.71 3.0* 0.20 2.47 1.28 2.89 0.47 0.8) 2.4 22.96 l* 7).7 4 0.0 o.o 0.0 2.) *.) 39.8 1.2 10.5 12.8117. 0.0 T 91,1
19H 1.0) 0.42 1.32 2.2* 0.06 2.01 2.34 0.16 0.*8 1.68 1.06 0.2* 14.0) 1*74-73 0.0 1 l.ft 11.9 2.1 3.6 4.0 1ft.) 10.9 6.1 0,0 >3.7
1*73 0.25 0 ft 7 1.1* 1.14 2.63 2.11 2.71 2.00 0.24 0.30 1.8* 0.47 19.31
1*75-76 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.7 13.2 7.) 5.2 6.4 18.7 1.2 0.0 0,0 34,7
1*76 0.1* 0.34 1.34 1.27 l.)4 0.6) 2.11 2.30 1.88 0.*) 0.32 0.1* 13.41 1*76-77 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.2 4.3 3.1 2.4 1.1 9.6 .7 0.0 0,0 3 4 ft
1*77 0.16 0.27 1.24 2.1) C 3 4 1.0*1 2.98 1.00 0.10 0.48 0.3* 0.0) 10. )4 1*77-78 o.o 0.0 ).) 4.1 9.7 3.9 4.2 1.6 6.6 13.5 0,0 4ft.1
1*71 0.2?j 0... 1.62 3.44 1.17 0.34 0.26 0.07 1.43 0.30 0.*2 11.70 1*78-7* 0.0 0.0 . r 2,7 6.* 1*.2
fC0*0 CCCID
NUN 0,.7j 0.36 l.te 2.01 2.3* 1.4* 1.70 !.) 1.12 1.00 0.66 0.61 14.30 MtSN 0.0 0.0 1.7 ). T.7 6.4 7.1 7.7) 1 12.6 *.6 I'.l T 3*,0
r-
# Indicates a station stove or relocation of instruments. See Station Location table.
Record mean values above are neans through the current year for the period beginning in 1872 for temperature and precipitation, 1935 for snowfall. Temperature and precipitation are from City Office locations through 1934. Heating degree days are from City Office locations through Jixia 1939. Snowfall if fron City Office locations through June 1934. Otherwise the data are fron Airport locations.


GUIDELINES


PRESERVE and present the history of the site.
The efforts of thousands of people over decades to further treatment and research for children should not be forgotten. There will be a permanent exhibit in the Museum to display photographs and narrative illustrating the history of the Site, Sloan's.Lake and the surrounding neighborhood.
EMPHASIZE the new community and its relationship to the neighborhood and the City.
Community spaces -exhibition areas, the cafe and cafeteria, and the general meeting area are of particular importance to the life of the facility.
PROVIDE a series of open and contained spaces.
The open space of the Park to the transition of entering The Academy & Museum to the containment of the buildings to the expansive quality of the interior arcades and courtyards.
All building occupants value being able to "open" interior areas to the outdoors when weather conditions permit.
SUPPLY a smooth, efficient ease of functions for the Studio's.
Studio's and Work Areas must permit easy set-up and storage of supplies and materials.


Daylighting
Fig. 1 Different methods ot admitting natural light from above, (a) Cross section, (b) to (h) Cross section and view from above. |i| and (jl Cross section.
Reference: Time-Savers Standards
I in







/
Cts

-bU,


DESIGN


West Colfax Avenue
Vicinity Map
1


001 OS* iZ 0
N
lIKId 3J!S
M\U3A\ l(lg| IS'-^V\
oiuiOAy is if, ls>^\




Second Floor Plan
N


1
South Elevation
North Elevation


Section A

111 nn iPilllllll! Hlw
ri nn 1
l' 1 i i ; i 1.... 1 1
East Elevation
Section C
Scale: 1/16 = 1-0'
Elevations & Sections


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Building Section C
Scale: l/4= f-0*
Mechanical Schematic
Systems Analysis




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