Citation
Capitol Hill residential development

Material Information

Title:
Capitol Hill residential development
Creator:
Read, Mark
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
39 pages, [14] leaves : illustrations, forms, maps, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Housing -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Architecture, Domestic -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Architecture, Domestic ( fast )
Housing ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
[Mark Read].

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
13802279 ( OCLC )
ocm13802279
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1983 .R425 ( lcc )

Full Text


# CAPITOL HILL RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT
ENVIRONMENTAt oe6N


MARK READ
Masters Thesis University of Colorado College of Design and Planning
Spring 1983
I


I would like to acknowledge the kind assistance of Mr. Larry Levi for his help in compiling economic information and for acting in the client relationship, and Mr. Ron Rinker on the architectural firm of Barker, Rinker, Seacat and Partners for providing programming assistance and helpful guidance.
THESIS ADVISORS
Gary Long : University of Colorado at Denver Ron Rinker: Barker, Rinker, Seacat and Partners



CONTENTS
PROJECT STATEMENT
Purpose & Goals , ,
NEIGHBORHOOD ENVIRONMENT
Adjacencies & Networks , , ,
Plate 1: SITE LOCATION Texture & Density ,
Plate 2: SITE ELEVATIONS
SITE ANALYSIS
Current & Contextual Use Plate 3. SITE ANALYSIS Traffic
Parking & Views
CLIMATE
Synopsis Data Summary Solar Access
Plate A: SITE AXONIMETRIC .
SITE SURVEY '
Description, Land Area & Elevation ,
Plate 5: LOT PLAT
Service Network & Easement .
Plate 6: SITE SURVEY
PROPOSED USE GUIDELINES
R-3 Zone
Plate 7: ZONING MAP
View Ordinance
Plate 8: VIEW ORDINANCE
PROGRAM
Program Guidelines Preliminary Scope Space Requirements Codes Zoning
SOLUTION DRAWINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS
1
2
3
A
5
e--A
6
7
8 9
10-11
11
12
13
1A
15
16 17
18
19
20 21
22
23
2A-25
26-37
38-39

m Fg to
to S tn m 4Ur m


PROJECT STATEMENT
To design a mixed-use, residential retail development that will provide owner-occupied housing in the Capitol Hill area of Denver, Colorado.
IP[
To provide medium-income one and two bedroom housing units and a small retail development that will fit into a dense urban texture.
The need for additional housing in the medium price range has been well established for this area. Current economic forces and housing trends have led to condominium conversions of a number of apartment complexes in the area which have been targeted for the upper income household. This project will attempt to provide the housing needs for the medium-income professional or small family unit in close proximity to the Central Business District of Denver.
To utilize the concepts of CONTEXTUAL DESIGN that will allow this project to be thought of as an infill structure that responds to the existing urban texture and that enhances the basic organization of the urban setting while providing the housing and retail needs that are set forth in the program.
The design concepts that will be utilized are:
1. responding to the larger scale factors of urban design such as spaces between buildings, views through both public and private spaces, and responding to the existing vehicular and pedestrian networks.
2. responding to existing buildings and utilizing their design elements as abstractions of the whole.
3. providing a background or a focal point through which the texture of the neighborhood is enhanced.


NEIGHBORHOOD ENVIRONMENT
The Capitol Hill neighborhood gained its name by its proximity to the State Capitol building and Denver Municipal office complexes which adjoin the Central Business District of downtown Denver. The area is bounded on the north and west sides by the major retail and traffic arteries of Colfax avenue and Broadway respectively. Interspersed within this neighborhood are service and retail pockets of activity providing all of the amenities associated with a dense urban setting. Located five blocks to the east is Cheesman Park, one of Denver s first and finest urban parks providing an open space recreational area.
IM
The Capitol Hill area is laid out in a standard grid block pattern typical to Denver and oriented to the cardinal points. Roadways are primarily 30 feet to 48 feet in width, the wider of which are used as one way streets opening onto a grid pattern of arterial thoroughfares that provide traffic flow in and out of the CBD. Residential streets of 30 feet width allow slightly restricted two-way traffic with parking on both sides of the street.
The Regional Transportation District (RTD) provides an intricate network of bus routes through the neighborhood, providing transportation to the CBD and to outlying shopping districts.
There is a mature system of sanitary and storm sewers, underground gas and water service, and above ground electric and telephone service throughout the area.
2


3


neighborhood cont.
The texture of the Capitol hill area is rich and varied in its human uses. It provides low, moderate and high income housing to a variety of occupants with a variety of occupations. The area has gone through a renaissance recently in terms of an appreciation of its architectural heritage with a number of restoration/renovation projects adding architectural interest and a renewed sense of jJride in the neighborhood.
As is noted in the Site Elevations and Axonometric, there is a remarkable degree of architectural homogeneity to the immediate neighborhood. Housing forms appear in two basic types. The first and original form is a 2 story brick house built between the late nineteenth century and the 1920's and 1930;s. Each unit, placed on lh to 2 city lots, were originally intended as single family residences. Many have been converted to multiple unit complexes but for the most part retain their character. The second and later form of housing is particularly undistinguished in its character, providing multiple unit complexes in rectangular boxes.
The vegetation pattern is sparse but homogenous comprised mainly of mature elm trees planted between the sidewalk and the street. At one time this created tree lined avenues but the pattern has recently been decimated by Dutch Elm disease.
OE^SOTY
According to 1980 Census figures that are on file with the Denver Planning office, the population density of the Capitol Hill neighborhood (an area described by Colfax on the north, Broadway on the east, Seventh ave. on the south, and Downing on the east; which is comprised of 433 total acres and 289 habitable acres), has a total population of 14,429 people. This translates to approximately 50 people per habitable acre.
4




SITE ANALYSIS
The site is currently being occupied by a former Safeway store that is now being used as a D.A.V. post and Bingo parlor. The Safeway Corporation was the group responsible for the current site configuration of vacated alley and transposed sanitary sewer. By so doing, they and the City created a 20' wide alley to the south that provides access from both Emerson and Ogden streets to the rear of the site.
In the original and current use of the site, parking for customers is provided on three sides of the building facing north, east and west.
The site lies within the heart of the R-3 Zoning District of Capitol Hill (refer to ZONING MAP) which allows for High Density Apartment complexes. Interspersed within this district are small pockets of B-l and B-2 Zones which allow for Limited Office and Neighborhood Businesses respectively. The immediate neighborhood context of the site encompasses both of these uses.
Housing appears in three forms. The first form consists of Single Family residences which are interspersed throughout the second form, which are Single Family and Duplex residences that have been converted to house multi-unit apartments for medium income households.
The third form is speculative apartment complexes that have over the years replaced the more typical and indegenous housing forms with a higher density solution for the medium income client. The relationships of these three forms to the site are illustrated on the SITE ANALYSIS,
SITE AXONIMETRIC, and SITE ELEVATIONS.
6


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ANALYSIS
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7


site analysis cont
The neighborhood businesses that have a direct relationship are located on the corner of Eleventh ave. and Ogden street. All are housed in one story structures that provide a multiplicity of retail establishments with, in most cases, limited parking provided in front of the buildings. This is a high activity area for the neighborhood which provides a constant source of both pedestrian and vehicular traffic. While most establishments operate under normal business hours, there are two restaurants, one bar/restaurant, and one convenience store that have extended hours which provides traffic well into the evening and early morning hours.
Well established patterns of use for both vehicular and pedestrian traffic are in existence around the site. Vehicular traffic finds its heaviest use along Eleventh ave. which provides a moderate but constant source of noise. The side streets have only moderate use with reduced speeds necessary because of narrow streets with parking along both sides. The access alley that links Emerson with Ogden recieves very low use, providing parking access to the apartment complexes directly to the south.
In the pedestrian mode, activity can be considered high for the neighborhood because of the attraction of the businesses. Although confined mostly to the sidewalks along the streets, the access alley provides a link with the businesses from the residential area to the west and southwest and recieves its fair share of traffic.
8



Parking is the single most identifiable factor that contributes to a sense of congestion for the area. Narrow streets with limited parking and, in some instances, the inability of apartment complexes and businesses to provide enough parking places for their residences and clients has made the situation much more critical than it has been in the past. Current parking requirements for the proposed use of the site must be carefully integrated into the texture of the existing patterns so that this problem will not be aggrevated any further.
As is noted on the SITE ANALYSIS, the orientation of the site allows for a panoramic view of the front range of the Rocky Mountains and the burgeoning CBD if the view plane reaches at least 25' above ground level. Street level views are best illustrated in the SITE ELEVATIONS. There is relatively poor view down an unkept alley to the south.
9


CLIMATE
The information presented here and opposite was collected and compiled from the Local Climatological Data sheets published in 1978 by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for the Denver area. Many of the station locations noted in this publication are or were formerly in the CBD of downtown Denver which is relatively nearby to the site location. In recent years the official site of weather collection has been at Stapleton International Airport which is located approximately six miles further east into the plains at a less insolated and much less dense site. One of the few factors that is ameliorated by this location differance is heating degree days by a factor of about .90.
Denver enjoys a mild, sunny, semi arid climate unusual for 40 degrees north latitude where extremely warm or cold weather is of relatively short duration. Relative humidity and precipation are low which contributes to an abundance of sunshine.
ftffifi)[p@[rfoy][r / Ik
The warmest temperatures in the summer can be modified by an accumulation of clouds in the afternoon hours that are associated with some showers occurring in the early and later part of the season.
The coldest temperatures in the winter are associated with storm systems coming predominantly from the north. But conditions are at times modified by western air masses moving over the mountains that cause Chinook winds that can raise the temperature far above normals for the season.
Relative humidity averages out fairly even throughout the year, although the winter averages higher than the other seasons.
Most of Denvers precipitation occurs in the spring in the form of snow early in the season, accounting for 37% of the annual total. Stormy periods are often interspersed with periods of mild temperatures and sunshine that remove snow cover. The traditional rainy season is in May, while late summer is frequented by local thunderstorms. Winter precipitation in the form of snow accounts for only 11% of the annual total with its heaviest accumulations traditionally occurring in November. Snow cover can last for longer periods of time during this period of deep winter.
10


wiM
Although rarely severe, predominant wind direction is from the south. Fastest mile direction is from the north/northwest in the winter, spring, and autumn; south in the summer months. Severe winter winds bring cold artic air from the north and Chinook winds appear from the west bringing moderate temperatures but occasional high speeds.
Elevation: 5292 Latitude: 39 46? Longitude 104 53'
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JS
TEMP T i mean max 45.5 46.2 50.1 61 70.5 80.1 67.4 65.8 77.7 66.8 55.5 46.2 64
mean 29.9 52.6 57 47.5 57 66 75 71.6 62.8 52 59.4 52.6 50.1
mean min 16.2 19.4 25.8 55*9 45.6 51.9 58.6 57.4 47.8 57.2 25.4 18.9 56.2
DAYS base 65 heat 1088 902 668 525 255 80 0 0 120 408 768 1004 6016
cool 0 0 0 0 0 110 246 208 54 5 0 0 625
z 0 i* a. O III mean max 1.44 1.66 2.89 4.17 7.51 4.69 6.41 4.47 4.67 4.17 2.97 2.84
mean 0.61 0.67 1.21 1.95 2.64 1.97 1.78 1.29 1.15 1.15 0.76 0.45 15.51
mean min 0.01 0.01 0.15 0.05 0.06 0.10 0.17 0.06 TR 0.05 0.01 0.05
snow max,in. 25.7 I8.5 29.2 28.5 15.6 0.5 0 0 21.5 51.2 59.1 50.8
mean days snow >r 2 2 4 5 * 0 0 0 * 1 2 2 18
mean days Drecip. 6 6 8 9 10 9 9 8 6 5 5 5 88
mean days thunderstorm 0 * 1 6 10 11 8 5 1 0 41
DC CL r.h. 0500 65 66 67 68 70 71 70 69 69 64 68 65 67
r.h. 1700 48 42 40 55 56 56 55 55 55 55 49 50 40
mean days heavy foq 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10
n mean speed 9.1 9.5 10 10.4 9.6 9.1 6.5 8.2 8.2 8.2 8.7 9.0 9.0
prevail, dir. s S s S S 8 s S S s s s S
z £ fastest mile 55 49 55 56 54 67 56 42 47 45 48 51
dir. N W NW HW SE S sw N nw NW W NE
z 0 %poss. sun 72 71 70 67 65 71 71 72 75 75 65 68 70
mean sky cover, tenths 5.5 5.9 6.1 6.1 6.2 5.1 4.9 4.9 4.5 4.4 5.4 5.5 5.5
t < mean days clear 10 6 6 7 6 9 9 10 15 14 11 11 116
i RADI mean days part, cloudy 9 9 10 10 12 15 16 14 16 9 9 10 151
mean days Cloudy 12 11 15 15 15 a 6 7 7 6 10 10 118
11


climate cont
As was noted in the Synopsis and the Data Summary, the amount of solar radiation that reaches the general area of Denver is quite large with a mean value of 70% possible sunshine reaching the ground that is disbursed relatively evenly throughout the year.
As solar accessibility relates specifically to the site, almost all views to the south are unobstructed except in the case of the 4% story apartment complex located to the southeast. Also, early morning sun observed at ground level is somewhat blocked by mid-rise buildings located to the east of the site that have not been represented here.
The illustration below indicates the effect of shadow impingement on the site caused by the building mentioned at 3 times of the year, the period between winter and the equinoxes being most critical.
On the SITE AXONIMETRIC opposite, the effect of the worst case winter solstice shadow pattern is shown.
Summer Max. Noon sun angle
\ \
^^Equinoctial Noon sun angle
Winter Min. Noon sun angle
^ \\

B B. @
b b m
=3 0 a,
'S'fJS \\ Bill B- ffi \ \
JJ M. M. '
ifaal^T.
iff
EE ED
LX
site
Ogden st. East elevation
12


Heavily shaded area shows winter solstice shadow
pattern cast on the ground between 8 a.m. and caused by the building to the southeast. 12 noon,
SITE ^ pi.
AXONIMETRIC 4
13


SITE SURVEY
Located in Block 89 of the Brown, Smith and Porters addition to Capitol Hill: bounded by East Eleventh ave. on the north, Emerson street on the west, Ogden street on the east, and an alley (Ordinance 75, 1962) on the south.
The land area is comprised of sixteen lots plus a five foot width of two more lots fronting on both Emerson and Ogden streets with a vacated alley of sixteen foot width in between the two 125' long lot parcels.
For the purposes of this thesis, the total land area will be approximated. Exact Dimensions are noted on the SITE SURVEY.
Dimensions......................210' x 266'
Area (sq. ft.).................. 55,860 sq. ft.
Acres . ......................1.28 acres
Spot elevations noted on the SITE SURVEY are relative to the Denver Datum elevation of 5172.91 feet. When the spot elevations are added to Denver Datum, the average elevation of the site is 5302 feet above sea level.
There is a rise in elevation from the west side to the east side of the site of approximately 2 feet.
14


15


site survey cont.
There exists a mature system of service networks of gas, water, and sanitary sewer lines around the site Line dimensions and some spot elevations for the sanitary sewer lines are noted on the SITE SURVEY.
Electrical service is located in above ground lines located in the north-south alley to the south of the site.
The vacated alley that exists in the center of the site once contained a sanitary sewer that was moved for a proir building use, resulting in a Deed of Easement on the site as is noted on the SITE SURVEY, with its legal description below;
That part of Block 89, Brown, Smith and Porters Addition to Denver, described as follows:
A strip of land, 10' wide, lying 5' on each side of the following described center line:
Beginning at a point that is 13' east of the east line of lot 2 and 26' south of the north line of said Block 89; thence westerly on a line parallel with the said north line 115'; thence southerly on a line parallel with and 23' east of the west line of said Block 89, 200'; thence easterly on a line parallel with and 56.14' north of the south line of said Block 89, 115'.
16




PROPOSED USE GUIDELINES
It is the intention of this proposal to place a high density housing/ mixed use development on the site conforming to the requirements of the R-3 Zoning District. A zone change request from B-2 to R-3 or PUD will be required. In this High Density Apartment District, building size is controlled by limited bulk standards, off street parking and open space requirements. Maximum density is not specified. Listed below are the guidelines for the proposed use.
1. Allowable Floor Area Ratio (FAR):
-3:1
2. Bulkplane Standards:
Any building plane must not intersect the plane described below:
from the center line of all adjoining rights of way,
(Emerson, Ogden, Eleventh, & alley) up 20 feet; then inward 30 feet at a slope of 2 to 1 and upward 60 feet; then vertically from there on.
3. Setback Requirements.
front. 10' rear: 20'
side: 7.5'
4. Parking Requirements:
residential: 1.5 spaces per housing unit retail: 1 space per 200 sq. ft. of development
5. Greenspace Requirements:
for residential structures of one to three habitable stories: twenty percent of the area of the zone lot
for residential structures of four or more habitable stories: thirty percent of the area of the zone lot
unobstructed open space may be located on the ground and roof decks having an average height of not more than six feet above grade and shall be utilized only for landscaping and/or recreational facilities.
18


19


proposed use cont
WQ
In order to preserve the view of the front range 6f the Rocky Mountains from selected points located in parks within the city, Denver has instituted a Mountain View Preservation Ordinance. The site falls within the purvue of the Cheesman Park Ordinance as described graphicaly in the VIEW ORDINANCE opposite.
Problematically, The Ordinance allows for 1 foot of building height above a base elevation of 5383 feet for every 100 feet of distance your building is away from the base point described in the chart. The calculations for allowable building height are presented below:
1. average height at site:
5303 feet
2. distance from base point (approx.):
4500 feet
3. allowable height gain above 5383 feet:
4500' 4- 100' = 45 feet
4. total elevation allowable:
45' + 5383' = 5428 feet
5. total building height:
5428' - 5303' = 125 feet
Therefore, the total allowable building at the site is 125 feet above the average base elevation at grade of 5303 feet.
20


21


PROGRAM


PROGRAM GUIDELINES
The essential aspects of the Program Guidelines are intended to help focus on the question of the suitability of developing such a large site to its allowable limits and intended uses while still retaining an appropriate relationship to the texture, scale, and essence of the surrounding neighborhood.
One of the economic precepts of this project is to use the development of retail space as a source of continuing income to help alleviate the initial cost of the housing units to the buyers. Limits to such a development are location on the site, functional integration into the development, and the ability to provide required parking of 1 space per 200 sq.ft, of retail. The initial practical limit for such a development is about 8000 sq.ft, with 40 parking spaces provided on grade.
Of major concern is the ability to provide adequate sub-grade parking for the housing development. If the total allowable development rights of approximately 160,000 sq.ft, are used as a guideline between 275 and 290 parking spaces will be needed, requiring 2 levels of sub-grade structure. Whether this is desirable from an economic or a design standpoint is in question.
The full development of a 167,000 sq.ft, structure will have a very large impact on the surrounding neighborhood in terms of its sheer bulk and its contribution to an increase in the density of the neighborhood. Consideration should be given to these points in order to provide an adequate solution that answers to both economic sensibility and to a sense of caring for the existing texture that surrounds the site.
The unusual aspects of this site with its large surface area, rectangular shape solar access and vacated alley, point toward the possibility of creating an open recreation space for the occupants whose private/public aspects could be exploited to enhance both security and a sense of place and ownership for the occupants.
22


Preliminary Scope
GROSS LAilD AREA: 55,860 sq. ft.
GROSS BUILDABLE: (R-3 zone, FAR = 3:1) 167,580 sq. f t.
RETAIL SPACE: 6000-8000 sq. ft.
NET RESIDENTIAL BUILDABLE:
6000 retail 161,580 sq. ft.
7000 retail 160,580 sq. ft.
8000 retail 159,580 sq. ft.
GROSS SQUARE FEET
GROSS SQUARE FEET 161,580 160,580 159,580
EFFICIENCY 80% 85% 80% 85% 80% 85%
UNIT TYPE
1 bed. @ 600 sq.ft. 750 706 750 706 750 706
2 bed. @ 800 sq.ft. . 1000 941 1000 941 1000 941
Average sq.ft. 879 824 879 824 879 824
Total Units 183 196 182 194 181 193
UNIT MIX TOTAL UNITS
70% 1 bed. 128 137 127 135 126 135
30% 2 bed. 55 59 54 57 53 57
60% 1 bed. 109 117 109 116 108 115
40% 2 bed 74 79 73 78 73 78
50% 1 bed. 91 98 91 97 90 96
50% 2 bed. 92 98 91 97 91 97
Total Units 183 196 182 194 181 193
RESIDENTIAL PARKING TOTAL SPACES
1.5 per unit 275 294 273 291 271 290
RETAIL PARKING 6000 sq.ft. 7000 sq ft. 8000 sq.ft.
1 per 200 sq.ft. 30 spaces 35 spaces 40 spaces
23


RECREATION AREA
2 Racquetball courts t 1600 sq.
Excercise area 1700
Locker Rooms f 1200
Hot Tubs . t * 200
Sauna * 50
Circulation & Maint. 500
Common Room 2000
RETAIL DEVELOPMENT
3-4 spaces .... ,6000-8000
HVAC
HVAC for entire complex @ 1 % . . 1600
TOTAL 16,850 sq. ft.
HOUSING
Area left for Housing
167,580 16,850 ............... 150,730 sq.ft.
24


OFF-STREET PARKING REQUIREMENTS
LARGE CARS
a b c d e r P
re rt caatar-ta-rantar width
prtfal Ml mu hit l#*fth 1 two-row bin with
wtm It art f t car wins rood batwaan
[It' Uwf cvrtfo curb mrlop (-<
n iV' IS 12.0 23.0 29.0
u ro" 0 12.0 23.0 300
30 it" 14. 11.0 17.0 44.1 37.4
r o" 17.3 11.0 11.0 45.1 37.1
45* 114 13.5 12.0 52.3 44.3
ro 111 13.0 12.7 52.4 44.2
60" l'4" 20.7 11.5 11 59.9 55.4
10" 21.0 11.0 10.4 40.0 555
90" 110 23.0* 1.5 41.0
fO" 110 23.0* to 41.0
Two-way eircylftwn
COMPACT CARS
a b c d e f P rert cantaMa-rantar width perkknq ff*M itdl ohla lanjth l two raw bin with fia wdfh te rerb wwTh par car aunt rood batwaan [15 It"! Ml] iwk-it-oirt trtrlot <-t
( ] 7.5 7.5 11.0 19.0' 26.0' 26.0
CO } 7.5 14.0 11.0' 15.0 39.0 32.5'
4! 7.5 15.9 11.0 10.6 42.8 37.9'
6( J 7.5 16.7' 14.0 8.7' 47.5 40.4
9( 7.5 15.0' 18.0' 7.5 48.0 48.0
k
I
Two>ay circulate


CODE SEARCH CHECK LIST
Project HeO^mCa-_________________! H-Z t4->
Search by .______________________________________________________
Date___________________________________________________________________
1. APPLICABLE BUILDING CODES 2. ZONE 3. FIRE ZONE 4. OCCUPANCY GROUP
City County________ ^ M-IJ l\-2>
Fire Marshall^. UBC
2.
3.
OTHER REGULATIONS
State Board of Health___State Dept. Educ._____
FLOOR AREA (Chapter 5 and Table 5-C)
Construction Type T- T.V-. 31- F.P& xr-v.R.
Occupancy Type W2 H3> *-2 M- s-
Basic Allow. Floor Area(505a) xnnri. 2-i. OOO
Fire Zone 3 Increase x.33(505a) V.ooo
Added Stories Increase(505b) - CsAi ooo
Side Separation F.A. Increase(506b) 2 sides
* 3 sides uso1 loo Yo 126,000 -
4 sides
Group G Unlimited(506c)
Fire Sprinkler Increase(506d) ooo
group E-5, F, G
TOTAL ALLOWABLE AREA Z5fc,ooo 2-jHut f~\..
Actual Building Area: Existing Proposed Future Total
1 15^.580
26
FACTS


I
I
(0)(oj
H-2 / 4-3
4. FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS (Table 17a)
Construction Type x-f.e.. ~tt pg.
Exterior Bearing Walls A A
Interior Bearing Walls 3 2
Exterior Non-Bearing Walls 3. Mg. Kg..
Structural Frame 5 2
Permenant Partitions a a
Shaft Enclosures 2 2
Floors 2 .1.
Roofs 2.*Z5' a ***'
Exterior Doors & Windows t!A < xo'
*Exceptions b) fixed partitions
1. stores & offices
2. hotels & apartments
c) folding, portable, or movable
d) walls fronting on streets or yards
Inner Court Walls(504c)
Parapets Required(1709a) . > 2 Iff. goy
Attic Draftstops Required (3502b)
Attic Ventilations Required (3205c) .
WALL & OPENING PROTECTION (Type I, II, & III see sect. 1803 (Type IV & V see table 50a & sect ,1903 & 2003) 2103 & 2203)
Fire Resistance of Exterior Walls 1 WE. S*
Openings in Exterior Walls 4- 2, M.?. *5* n-t, M.p. < *'
BUILDING HEIGHT (Table 5-d) x-T*-. it 'T'*-
Allowable Stories 12.
Fire Sprinkler Increase (507) _ 4l = 1 3
Total Allowable Stories Maximum Height _
SL uHLif\| -j-fp * 12-g
B-T P-. s Li IZS1
27
FACTS


7. OCCUPANT LOADS (Chapter 33 & Table 33 -A)
Story __________________________1 1Z.______
Occupancy Group________________t-> -A._________
Area _________________________H. qqo___________
Sq.ft, per Occupant_____________2oo___________
Total Persons per Floor________________________
Total Number of Persons in Building a*t o

X .S
H-2>____
H ipoo___
_____
_____
o_____
8.
9.
EXIT REQUIREMENTS (Chapter 33)
___________________________________ti-----------
# Exits Required Each Floor______________Z._____________________2___________
# Exits Required Total Building 2 ** of ________Zy -a-Tog-ifc-s.
Required Exit Width - z - 1________________2-fs'________
Ramps Required
Corridor Widths
Dead End Corridor Limit
Corridor Construction
Door Rating
Stairway Width
Landings
Wheel Chair Storage Stairway To Roof Required Stairway Enclosure Rating Exit Signs Required Exit Sign separate Circuit
_________________
_________________
_________________
______1 HF-._____
_____V-4 rtP-____
______Ml_________
____ato__________
_________________
_________________


ze>
1 rfg-.

_L
____
2 1-4 E.. TE-^>
Exits by Occupancy ; max. PryrAHcj, fg.g- qhit *5o*___
l^-'S : Lff^l H W TOOH^) U^l/ 1 fcKlT ^ pew?
OCCUPANCY UNIT LIVE LOADS (Chapter 23, Table 23-A)
____Irtt -------to*?
____Pbop-v> ----------------------------------io
28
FACTS


H-2./
10. OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Separations Between Occupancies fl-f.2 = X v\Vi.________________
___________________________________ht2- Enclosure of Vertical Openings 2 Uiz. conurgriHb omi-v 1 g^poT-
Light THRsj TfePs-vA Hl Ventilation - z. pei=- hk. j '/^ u-r*nae.__________*ofcg-z
Sanitation 1 Uneven / 1 .o.fc.. 144 c.._______
Fire Extinguishing System Required >4-2. > i-Too ft___M-3 rto__________
Dry Standpipes Required >4-2. c. 1^--.-t -x. ttt____________________
Wet Standpipes Required________JJ____________*f______________________________
Combination Stnatpipes Required _____________Ho______________________________
Special Hazards & Requirements ______________________________________________
Exceptions & Deviations
1. g-Elci^ far Z 11 otx. 5o/ F / Hot t-g-ys. rMM S*_______
Z. *Z<=*\ck SA f-paoit^y f^ogg+K.-E* iH 1 y^c-u^rr-f_____
___________- : 'J,nr tL la*_> if*-*.-f 4- -| f**- ontr^a
-----------------------4 1 TtJi itr wmit= -p-yyE*A,FT&g-___________________
,3^SiO a : fg>E-____>4-2- _____________________________________________
______________4- irt > QUIT?* pp~E- i4*rvEM^A7>*>e-t> _____
29


CODE SEARCH CHECK LIST Project Search bv


Date
<4'?gg.WS-A-p OHAL-
1. APPLICABLE BUILDING CODES 2. ZONE
City J5t_ County___ "p.-'S
Fire Marshall >£_ UBC j*L_
3. FIRE ZONE
______5____
4. OCCUPANCY GROUP
------f-i lF-a
2. OTHER REGULATIONS
State Board of Health___State Dept. Educ.
3. FLOOR AREA (Chapter 5 and Table 5-C)
Construction Type___________________
Occupancy Type _____________________
Basic Allow. Floor Area(505a)_______
Fire Zone 3 Increase x.33(505a)_____
Added Stories Increase(505b) ____
Side Separation F.A. Increase(506b)
2 sides _______________________
3 sides________________________
4 sides _______________________
Group G Unlimited(506c)_______
Fire Sprinkler Increase(506d) group E-5, F, G
TOTAL ALLOWABLE AREA _______
Actual Building Area: Existing

r-1/r-a
aHu n.

Tt-f.R.
F-l




IT- f P-
JFr^.

4?x}eO

icxaoo
Proposed
Future
Total
30
FACTS


4. FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS (Table 17a)
@(o]@
f-1/ f-a>.
Construction Type rr -f e.
Exterior Bearing Walls A A
Interior Bearing Walls 2-
Exterior Non-Bearing Walls d. u-e_ "1 HC..
Structural Frame 3 z
Permenant Partitions 1 1
Shaft Enclosures 1 2.
Floors 2
Roofs 2. 1
Exterior Doors & Windows v-4 ^ ^A *-Z'
*Exceptions
b) fixed partitions
1. stores & offices
2. hotels & apartments
c) folding, portable, or movable
d) walls fronting on streets or yards
Inner Court Walls(504c) ____
Parapets Required(1709a) 4___
Attic Draftstops Required (3502b) ____
Attic Ventilations Required (3205c) ,____
5. WALL & OPENING PROTECTION
(Type I, II, & III see sect. 1803,1903 & 2003) (Type IV & V see table 50a & sect. 2103 & 2203)
Fire Resistance of Exterior Walls :! rt'g.. <- 2o '
Openings in Exterior Walls __________
6. BUILDING HEIGHT (Table 5-d) Allowable Stories Fire Sprinkler Increase (507)
OC-f.iZ. 31 -f-E- -

\
Total Allowable Stories 1 Maximum Height


7. OCCUPANT LOADS (Chapter 33 & Table 33--A)
Story ______________________i________
Occupancy Group ----------
Area _______________________tb
Sq.ft, per Occupant__________3>p_____
Total Persons per Floor_______
Total Number of Persons in Building
8. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (Chapter 33)
# Exits Required Each Floor___________2.____________
it Exits Required Total Building______£_____________r
Required Exit Width -f So = S'-VH
Ramps Required ___________________
Corridor Widths ___________44"
Dead End Corridor Limit ______________201_____
Corridor Construction ___________*t Hg-.
Door Rating ___________
Stairway Width ___________44 "____
Landings _______ 44"
Wheel Chair Storage ___________ho______
Stairway To Roof Required ____________isn_____
Stairway Enclosure Rating ____________2 M~e-
Exit Signs Required ___________-<*.?>__
Exit Sign separate Circuit____________
Exits by Occupancy
W2 Hctt _____________ ___________________
____" ISO1 / 200'
9. OCCUPANCY UNIT LIVE LOADS (Chapter 23, Table 23-A)
mscvrr Hl^ai 1 - ~7T -rs-g
- !>< -p-StF-

FACTS


f-1 /r-z-
10. OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Separations Between Occupancies -fz. hl2-- 3- HF-________________________
----------------------------------^5_________________- 4 ---------------
Enclosure of Vertical Openings 2 i4g-_______________________________________
Light ______'/ip Ventilation ^^e-v4 -l^c^r-v. ____________
Sanitation i e. . / rzE^-r/vor-x^-y-r ~1 .o. . ffc-g- -afcyi / lc^Mi.L>,te
Fire Extinguishing System Required > 1500 ifr___________iS~ ~
Dry Standpipes Required __________rib_______________________________________
Wet Standpipes Required___________Ho________________________________________
Combination Stnatpipes Required HO__________________________________________
Special Hazards & Requirements _____________________________________________
Exceptions & Deviations
33
FACTS


Oaz., / tfr-3
CODE SEARCH CHECK LIST
Project fLA^>i~pcs>u. iy\
Search bv ______
Date____________________
1. APPLICABLE BUILDING CODES
City ^ County_______
Fire Marshall UBC Jj£_
2. OTHER REGULATIONS
State Board of Health_____State Dept. Educ._____
3. FLOOR AREA (Chapter 5 and Table 5-C)
Construction Type T-x.x..
Occupancy Type
Basic Allow. Floor Area(505a) UHL-ir-A.
Fire Zone 3 Increase x.33(505a) CaOyOOO
Added Stories Increase(505b) l2oxO0O
Side Separation F.A. Increase(506b) 2 sides j
3 sides
4 sides
Group G Unlimited(506c)
Fire Sprinkler Increase(506d) MKliM .
group E-5, F, G 1
TOTAL ALLOWABLE AREA
Actual Building Area: Existing Proposed Future Total
2. ZONE
3. FIRE ZONE 3
4. OCCUPANCY GROUP _______Ss-3_______


6r-3>
FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS (Table 17a)
Construction Type n- y g-
Exterior Bearing Walls A " "" 111 "'T' A
Interior Bearing Walls > 2
Exterior Non-Bearing Walls 3
Structural Frame > 2.
Permenant Partitions X 1
Shaft Enclosures 2 2
Floors 2 1
Roofs 2 1
Exterior Doors & Windows
*Exceptions
b) fixed partitions
1. stores & offices
2. hotels & apartments
c) folding, portable, or movable
d) walls fronting on streets or yards
Inner Court Walls(504c) J___
Parapets Required(1709a) ____
Attic Draftstops Required (3502b) ____
Attic Ventilations Required (3205c) _____
5. WALL & OPENING PROTECTION
(Type I, II, & III see sect. 1803,1903 & 2003) (Type IV & V see table 50a & sect. 2103 & 2203)
Fire Resistance of Exterior Walls '1 u~g,. Z>X
Openings in Exterior Walls H.'p. ^-zo'__________
6. BUILDING HEIGHT (Table 5-d)
___________________________XL..- f-.a&
Allowable Stories t-iHt-irt.____________ta
Fire Sprinkler Increase (507) _________________________________
i
Total Allowable Stories U Maximum Height_______________________________
35
FACTS


Ramps Required bTfinyp ________________________
Corridor Widths _______-44 _____________________________________
Dead End Corridor Limit _________2.0'_____________________________________
Corridor Construction _______1 He..___________________________________
Door Rating ____________t___________________________________
Stairway Width _______fLd______________________________________
Landings _______Zm'' -g>o-r ^ uo"______________________
Wheel Chair Storage ________________________________________________
Stairway To Roof Required _________________________________________________
Stairway Enclosure Rating _________________________________________________
Exit Signs Required ________________________________________________
Exit Sign separate Circuit_________________________________________________
Exits by Occupancy - bi->-rAKC-e- -pj - *SC>'/2.*>o'
~ 200 1 __________________________________
9. OCCUPANCY UNIT LIVE LOADS (Chapter 23, Table 23-A)
_______fryc- _______-------------------------------------------------------f---12,SL -p=^-
36


10. OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Separations Between Occupancies <£*> ? = a me.._______
---------------------------------6r?> -r pi -f2_____= 1 ______
Enclosure of Vertical Openings 2 v4g..______________________________
Light ___^T'fVfciALn________________________________________________
Ventilation I-5'ghh T*T- ifr <=*._\A,ooo c^n f.t-
Sanitation ______________________________________________________
Fire Extinguishing System Required _________________________
Dry Standpipes Required ________________tdC_________________________
Wet Standpipes Required_________________ho__________________________
Combination Stnatpipes Required ________H o_________________________
Special Hazards & Requirements _____________________________________
Exceptions & Deviations
1. -rvpfc. T-^tnLru'i-rttr- n-Y f-fc,_____
otny. rt&T Hecptp_______LE__e?EJtl_£____________woj oy*H
________________________________________________________________________
KA^ __2jE__' \ Q____E-MTg,%>Hfeg- -pc_______
37
FACTS


!UD0[n]g
1. F.A.R.: 3:1
Zone Lot: 55,860 sq.ft.
Gross Buildable: 167,580 sq.ft.
2. Bulkplane Standards
The only limitation to the building form presented by the bulk plane standards is from the alley side of the site:
All other bulkplane standards from the centers of Ogden,
Emerson, & Eleventh streets have no effect on the site.

<- MM IT T f5>lA\i-C>\rAJC fOP-M
V
T3
O)
O
38


4. Green Space Requirements
[fitosD
Zone lot area = 55,860 sq.ft,
30% G.S. required = 16,760 sq.ft.
Nominal G.S, = 18' strip around perimeter
Assumptions:
1. 61' parking along Ogden
2. 20' G.S. along Emerson and part of Eleventh
3. 10' G.S. along Eleventh & alley
Sum provides 8,950 sq.ft.
- 16,760 sq.ft.
= 7,810 sq.ft, to be provided elsewhere
c
0)
TJ
O)
O
39


SOLUTION
DRAWINGS
AND
PHOTOGRAPHS


-ELEVENTH AVE-
SITE AND ROOF PLAN
CAPITOL HILL A k MARK T. READ MASTERS THESIS ARCHITECTURE =H=
RESIDENCE s= UNIVERSITY Of COLORADO COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND JZj_
" ** ** * PLANNING/SPRING, 1983 L,
----TENTH AVE -
__ J
1 i
rnn
L_J
i' .j




FIRST FLOOR PLAN
SECOND FLOOR PLAN
TYPICAL
TWO
BEDROOM
(WEST FACING)
SCAlC !'
TYPICAL
ONE
BEDROOM
(COURT FACING)

r<
-/
VH
'1
TYPICAL
TWO
BEDROOM
(EAST FACING)
j
~
f' ;v
HZ
s <
2 s
ID § S|
* 25 ft 8E j S ft"
3
D
-i.
82
>_i on
< z
g <2
£b
* St § 3? ^ £ si !S I 32
<



E
CAPITOL HILL RESIDENCE
EMERSON 4 OGDEN AT ELEVENTH AVE DENVER, COLORADO
MARK T. READ
MASTERS THESIS: ARCHITECTURE
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING SPRING. 1983


SCALE 1/S"a I*




CAPITOL HILL RESIDENCES
MARK T. READ
MASTER'S THESIS ARCHITECTURE
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING/SPRING, 1983


EAST ELEVATION
CAPITOL HILL RESIDENCES

MARK T. READ
MASTERS THESIS ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING SPRING, 1983




INDEX OF SPACES
RETAIL:
Total sq.ft.
Total on grade parking spaces
HEALTH CLUB:
Square Footage First Level Second Level Total
Breakdown of spaces Locker Rooms Sauna
Exercise Area Weight Room Racquetball (2 courts) Hot Tubs (2)
Common Room
Circulation __________
Common Outdoor Deck
HOUSING:
Total Sq.Ft.
Total Number of Units
Breakdown of Units
Number of 2 Bedrooms Number of 1 bedrooms
UNDERGROUND PARKING:
First Level Second Level
Total
6600 sq.ft. 34spaces
5230 sq.ft. 1950 sq.ft. 7180 sq.ft.
800 sq.ft. 65 sq.ft. 1560 sq.ft. 400 sq.ft. 1600 sq.ft. 200 sq.ft. 1250 sq.ft. 1305 sq.ft. 1790 sq.ft.
151,430 sq.ft. 101 units
67 2 bed. 34 1 bed.
sq. ft,
31,324 sq.ft. 32 252 sq.ft.
63,576 sq.ft.
# of spaces
large car__________small car
52 spaces 22 spaces
57 spaces 21 spaces
109 spaces 43 spaces
Total # of Spaces = 152



MdjA |euee


s.w. view


M0IA TW'U



fit* m Lwls
21* r m C j
- i.*' rii |K*r ' ft * :a il, i ^
&q ^'T f,_ -.iJ '<*" fc1 mi " |# **$
rj, HMP f .. '1 g£; 4**^ :' >~*2* *-** -
*.**£ it. -,,
i t '** 1 ait. -*., f 1 f .* jgM -' t V. * /" <3*i