Citation
I promise to play every day

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Title:
I promise to play every day
Creator:
Olivas, Jessica
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
Metropolitan State University of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Metropolitan State University of Denver
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
I Promise to Play Every Day by Jessica Olivas
An undergraduate thesis submitted in partial completion of the Metropolitan State University of Denver Honors Program
May 5, 2017
Gretta Mincer
Janet McClaskey Dr. Megan Hughes-Zarzo
Honors Program Director
Primary Advisor
Second Reader


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I Promise to Play Every Day Jessica Olivas
Metropolitan State University of Denver


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY
I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY TABLE OF CONTENT
Abstract...............................3 Barriers and Challenges
Introduction...........................4 Leadership Development
Mission Statement......................4 Future Implementations
The Event..............................5 Appendix A...........
Nutrition.......................5 Appendix B...........
Activities......................6 Appendix C...........
Community Programs..............7 Appendix D...........
Deciding the Date......................7 Appendix E...........
Venue..................................8 Appendix F...........
Target Audience.......................10 Appendix G...........
Schools Invited.......................10 Appendix H...........
Website...............................12 Appendix I...........
Volunteers............................12 Appendix J...........
Liability Release.....................13 Appendix K...........
Equipment.............................15 Appendix L...........
Funding...............................16 Appendix M...........
Day of Event.........................17 References...........


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Abstract
Obesity among young children continues to exist at high rates throughout the nation. In an attempt to raise awareness about health, I Promise to Play Every Day was designed to be a one-day event that promotes nutrition and exercise to elementary students by engaging them in relay races and awarding prizes. The event was held on Sunday, June 5th, 2016 from 1 lam to 3pm at the Regency Athletic Field at Auraria Campus. Third, fourth and fifth graders from Denver Public Schools within a 2 mile range from the Auraria Campus were invited using flyers sent home by their schools. Resources for the event included donations from local grocery stores and departments from Metropolitan State University of Denver. MSU Denver students and community members volunteered to facilitate activities and distribute snacks. According to sign-up forms from the day of the event, approximately 30 kids attended with their parents.


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As a community, we need to reach out to the youth and encourage them to exercise. If children become and stay active, they lower their chances of getting common illnesses related to obesity, high blood pressure, and heart disease. It is imperative to teach young students and parents the importance of nutrition and reducing consumption of unhealthy foods. Today, about 1 in 3 kids in the U.S. are overweight or obese and 1 in 4 kids in the state of Colorado are overweight or obese, (Alliance for a Healthier Generation, 2011). From 2007 to 2013, 31% of the students attending Denver Public Schools District were classified as overweight or obese (Denver Childrens Affairs, 2013). Nutrition awareness and healthy lifestyle promotion can be an effective method to reduce the rates of obesity by preventing it before it happens.
Programs exist throughout the nation to educate children in the community about nutrition and staying active. Such programs include Michelle Obamas Lets Move as well as local recreation center activity nights that promote the idea of daily exercise to kids. Alliance for a Healthier Generation has collaborated with schools, medical offices, and communities to offer every opportunity it can to children across America a healthier future. Opportunities such as these improve the health of kids who participate in them by keeping them active and aware of their health. However, can it ever be enough to engage the children in our communities and promote a healthy lifestyle from early on? Implementing this idea of daily exercise is going to require many attempts in order to instill it as a habit.
Mission Statement
Early prevention awareness and healthy lifestyle promotion is the key to reducing disease and illness. I brought my own academic discipline of science toward civic engagement by using my own knowledge of nutrition and exercise to design I Promise to Play Every Day. This one-day


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event brought children outside for opportunities to learn about the importance of nutrition and daily exercise as well as a chance to win fun prizes such as basic sports equipment.
The Event
The goal for the event was to bring community members from Denver Public Schools to Auraria campus for a fun day in the sun while learning about staying healthy. While Denver communities often come to Auraria campus for academic engagement, my event was innovative in that local low-income largely minority students came to Auraria Campus to play. Teaming exercise, nutrition, and play offers an opportunity for these students and families to identify Auraria Campus as one of their own communities much like home, neighborhood, and elementary school. I planned the event to have three sections where each offered different opportunities to learn about being healthy. The sections included nutrition, activities, and program involvement. Nutrition
The nutrition section was planned to offer snacks and have informational brochures about basic nutrition for children. Lana Jabari, candidate for B.S. Human Nutrition Dietetics at MSU Denver, wrote the content for the nutritional brochures and the hydration information. Jabari also provided me with a list of healthier-option snacks to purchase for the day of the event. After organizing the brochure, I translated the content into Spanish. The Honors Program donated printing for the brochures.
She initially advised me to buy fresh fruits and vegetables; however, when I checked Auraria Higher Education Campus (AHEC) policy on bringing outside food, I found that I could not bring any perishable food, including fresh produce, because it could spoil during the event and potentially cause illness to the guests. Due to this regulation, I was restricted to purchase packaged snacks such as wheat thins, granola bars, and organic fruit snacks with less sugar. At the event, a


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couple of tables were set up to hand out snacks to kids and their families. Volunteers were also invited to enjoy the free snacks.
The volunteer in charge of the nutrition tables also distributed the brochures and asked participants trivia questions regarding healthy diets. If the people answered correctly, they were asked to pick prizes from the table with MSU Denver gear. If the people did not answer correctly at first, the volunteer encouraged them to keep thinking until they got the answer right before picking a prize.
Activities
The field for activities included an assortment of relay races appropriate for 3rd-5th graders. In March of 2016,1 met with Dr. Susan Bamd, Professor of K-12 Physical Education, to brainstorm ideas for relay races. She helped me determine that since the field could hold 300 chairs, there would be space for approximately 10-15 activities. She lent me a binder filled with ideas for activities that I could potentially use for the event. I decided to go with activities that would encourage the participants to be active that only required inexpensive equipment.
A total of ten activities were organized throughout the field. These activities included: soccer weaving, jump rope race, hula hoop race, step ladder, dodgeball drop-off, hula blockers, inflatable obstacle course, frisbee toss, bean bag toss, and lacrosse toss (see Appendix M). Each of these activities was led by a volunteer. Auraria Campus Recreation provided all of the equipment for activities free of charge and stored it in the storage space of the Regency Athletic Complexs before the event.
Volunteers rewarded each player based on effort, perseverance and overall excitement. Kids could earn 1-3 tickets at each activity. After the kids accumulated many tickets, they went to the prize table and exchanged them. Accumulation of 10 tickets indicated participation in at least


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4 activities, which were redeemable for prizes such as, but not limited to, a hula hoop or a jump rope. The volunteer at the prize table was in charge of keeping track of prizes and their ticket exchange value. The bigger the prize, the more tickets were required. By the end of the event, all the prizes were claimed.
Community Programs
Sending a child home with a hula-hoop or jump rope completed part of the goal for this event, which encouraged kids to stay active during the summer. A second goal of the event was to introduce families to community programs available in the Denver area so that they could fulfill their promise to play every day. I collaborated with MSU Denver student, Adam Lee, and Campus Recreation Director, Tony Price, to invite community institutions to the event for an opportunity to encourage families to visit their locations. Such programs included Denver Parks and Recreation, Easton Training Center, Rooster Boxing Gym, and Mi Casa Soccer Club. I contacted Dolores Moreno, Director of Recreation, to invite Denver Parks and Recreation. Lee invited both Roosters Boxing Gym and Easton Training Center while Price invited Mi Casa Soccer Club. By inviting representatives from these community institutions, I built a commitment to collaborate work across and within community structures to achieve the civic aim of continuing exercise and nutritional awareness within the communities who had participated in I Promise to Play Every Day.
Deciding the Date
Deciding on a date was my first step to get the plans off the ground. My main concern was to have sufficient time to market the event in order to encourage students to attend. Variables that needed to be considered included: weather, the day of the week, the time of day, and availability of space at the venue. Organizing the event in August would not have allowed enough time for


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marketing because the students would have just returned from summer vacation. During the school year was also conflicting due to the standardized tests that students would be preparing for. Due to the unpredictability of weather, hosting the event in fall, winter, and spring seemed also unfavorable.
One contradiction I faced was deciding between class time and weekend. If I held the event during the weekday and worked with one school, attendance at my event would be certain; however, authorization to use class time for such an event would be extremely difficult. Conversely, if I held my event during the weekend, class time would remain interrupted, but attendance at my event would not be certain due to motivation and self-transportation.
After multiple meetings with Dr. Cynthia Sutton, Interim Program Director of the Honors Program at MSU Denver at the time, I found a way to integrate these contradictory perspectives. I would publicize my event during school days and hold the event during the last weekend of the 2015-2016 academic year to accommodate the parents work schedules without interfering with class time. Sunday, June 5th, of 2016 from 1 lam-3 pm was selected for the event. The next step for the event was to choose a venue that could accommodate the chosen schedule and was located relatively close to the target audience.
Venue
Choosing a venue required careful consideration of the intended audiences ability of getting to that location. I understood capacity limits are a part of safety and venue protocol. I also had to account for parking in regards to space and cost for guests. I needed to choose an accessible location that was in walking distance of the schools and RTD routes. I knew that venues off campus would charge rental fees; whereas, venues on campus would discount or waive the fee if I rented in affiliation with a student organization. Depending on the area around the chosen venue, I knew


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that I might need to hire a security guard. Security could range from local city officers to the locations own security officers.
Based on these factors, I chose to hold the event on Auraria Campus. My top two choices were the gym space in the P.E. building and the Regency Athletic Complex. I chose the Regency Athletic Complex due to the greater capacity limit and the cost of renting the space was waived because the event was coordinated under the name of Think Tank Student Organization. Before reserving the space, I met with Dr. Sutton to decide on the date and to create a brief event proposal to send to Jim Gillen, Associate Director of Athletics, to reserve the space. I, along with Patrick Marsden, Student President of Think Tank, signed the Agreement Form with Gillen to reserve the space under Think Tank for the event. Since I knew that weather made having the event outside potentially risky, I also secured the gym space in the P.E. building as a secondary location in case of unfavorable weather conditions.
The Regency Athletic Complex is located 0.7 miles from Greenlee Elementary School and 1.6 miles from Cheltenham Elementary School, Fairview Elementary School, and from Eagleton Elementary School. All of which are in walking distance to RTD stops that include the Regency Athletic Complex in those routes. Since I chose to hold the event on a Sunday, parking would be free due to AHECs parking policy.
Auraria Campus has a police department that works specifically to secure the area. After I spoke with Amber Cook, Assistant Director of Auraria Campus Services, she arranged with Sgt. Vigil to provide the event with a security guard. Cook sent me the Student Organization and Authorization Form that confirmed the event details for the security guard and listed the rate at $26.00 per hour from 9:30am to 3:30pm. Think Tank provided the funds to hire the security guard.


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Target Audience
From the beginning, I knew that I wanted to invite young students from minority backgrounds because of my personal experience of growing up in minority communities and seeing the lack of effective educational outreach. As a growing leader, I understand that communication is the key to education. Therefore, I knew I had to tailor the language I used in marketing to inspire interest of the kids and their families in my event. I chose the age group 7-10 years because I believed them to be old enough to understand the message and yet young enough to motivate with prizes. The long-term goal of the event was to plant the seed to start the habit of staying active and eating healthy from an early age.
In October of 2015,1 met with Carla Maribelli, Interim Program Director of the Center for Urban Education, to explore the options for the events target audience. Her program focuses on providing extra-curricular activities to students in Denver Public Schools. She introduced the idea of narrowing down the audience to the elementary schools close to the venue to increase chances of attendance; however, this limited the scope of the program. She also suggested that taking kids out during class time would be a difficult task to get approved by the school.
Due to limited transportation options, I narrowed down the target audience to schools on a 3-mile radius from Auraria Campus. I decided to focus my resources on the schools that were in closer proximity to Auraria Campus in order to increase the chances of getting people to attend. I then selected the following schools: Greenlee Elementary School, Cheltenham Elementary School, Fairview Elementary School, and Eagleton Elementary School.
Schools Invited
In January of 2016,1 attended the Colorado Leadership Alliance Summit held on Auraria Campus for the opportunity to learn more about leadership and networking. During the mentor


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walk portion of the summit, I walked with Sean Precious, HS Instructional Superintendent of Denver Public Schools (DPS), to get to know community leaders. When I learned about his connection to DPS, I brought up the service project and how it targeted his district, and he was kind enough to offer his help. After we conversed by email, Precious gave me the contact information for the principals of each elementary school that I was focusing on.
After getting permission from the principals of each school, I set dates and estimated a number for flyers based on class size per grade and per school. MSU Denvers Office of the Bursar, MSU Denvers Honors Program, and MSU Denvers Office of Student Activities donated printing supplies for flyers. Using donated resources, I printed 600 copies in a front and back format with English on one side and Spanish on the other. I asked the secretaries of the main offices to send the flyers home with the kids as part of the schools announcements. Due to the lack of time and printing cost, I decided to only hand out flyers to 4th and 5th graders who attended Greenlee Elementary School, Cheltenham Elementary School, and Fairview Elementary School.
Aside from sending flyers home with the kids, other students and I went to each school and handed out flyers to parents as they picked up their kids during dismissal. John Kietzmann, Assistant Director of Athletics, lent me the costume for MSU Denvers mascot, Rowdy the Roadrunner. One MSU Denver student dressed as the mascot and accompanied me to each school so that we could engage the kids as we handed out the flyers and have more of an impact on their interest to attend. For one of the elementary schools, we visited during their field day to hand out the flyers. As kids participated in their activities, Rowdy walked around and played with the kids while I and another student handed out flyers to the parents.
The flyers included brief information of event details and the link to the event website, promisetoplay.com, which contained an online RSVP system set up to keep track of the guests.


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The RSVP form solicited parent/guardian and student information as well as information about allergies and any accommodations needed (see Appendix G).
Website
MSU Denver student, Adam Lee, developed the website for the event using a content managing system called Weebly. The domain, promisetoplay.com, was purchased for a period of a year for $8.00 using personal funds. The website contains a home page where it describes the mission of the event and the various sections. It also has an RSVP form online where parents included general information as well as specific disabilities that might need accommodations. Volunteers also registered online through the website where they submitted their general preference as to what they wanted their volunteer duties to be.
The website contributed many benefits to the process of planning the event. It helped me see RSVP numbers immediately while I budgeted for snacks and prizes. Without the website, I would have had to pick up the waivers personally from each school, which could have unintentionally limited attendees to believe there was a deadline to RSVP for the event. Having the website gave me a central location to post information about the event where anyone who would be interested could reach it. I also translated the time and location details into Spanish on the website in order to accommodate the Spanish-speaking communitys access. The website is available for updates if the event is to be planned again in the future (see Appendix D through H).
Volunteers
I recruited a diverse group of volunteers for this event, and connected community organizations, Auraria students, and Denver business people into a coherent group of volunteers. The Nutrition club, Think Tank, Urban Leadership Program, and other potential student organizations were offered the opportunity to help with some aspect of the event. Each section


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required knowledge from various majors. The network of contacts made it possible to meet and recruit more people and organizations outside of MSU Denver.
I received help from volunteers throughout the organization process, which included anything from planning to the actual facilitation of the event. Lee, the developer of the website, also volunteered to wear the Rowdy costume while handing out flyers at Fairview Elementary School. Jabari, candidate for B.S. Human Nutrition Dietetics, helped to create the informational brochures about nutrition. I also consulted with her about healthier options of snacks to provide at the event. Marsden, student president of Think Tank, allowed me to use the student organization name so that I could get student discounts and fees waived. He also volunteered to wear the Rowdy costume and hand out flyers to Greenlee Elementary School and Cheltenham Elementary.
Through flyers and word of mouth, I recruited 18 volunteers to help on the day of the event. Working as one coherent team, these volunteers ran the check-in table, passed out prizes, facilitated the activities with kids, handed out nutritional brochures and snacks, kept food off the field, wore the Rowdy costume, DJed, and ensured the general safety of guests. Volunteers were prompted to register online through promisetoplay.com, where they were able to list their preferences on the duties needed to be covered (see Appendix H).
For the event, I organized the volunteers into groups, assigning each a specific time for a twenty-minute break. The volunteers were organized to run one duty before their break and switch duties after their break. This allowed for most of the activities to be available at all times without tiring the volunteers. The free snacks provided to the guests were also available to the volunteers.
Liability Release
During a follow-up meeting in April of 2016 with Price, Campus Recreation Director, who already had experience working with programs that bring kids to campus for activities, brought up


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the issue of liability for underage kids. He explained that if a child had gotten an injury while engaging in one of the activities, I would be at risk of being liable for the cost accrued by any injury. He then re-directed me to Bethanie Christensen, Contracts and Business Services Liaison for MSU Denver, to inquire about drafting my own waiver for the event. In April of 2016,1 met with Christensen who explained what a basic template for a waiver contained. She also sent me a previous waiver that another student organization used to play volleyball on campus with middle school students to use as my model. With her permission, I kept the waiver content and changed the event details to match those of I Promise to Play Every Day.
Addressing the waiver situation was a crucial step for the event to be successful with minimal risk. However, making sure that parents signed the waivers was a challenge that I met by including the waivers on the flyers that I sent home with kids through their schools. The event information was located on the top half of the page with the waiver content on the bottom half (see Appendix A). I translated the flyer and waiver into Spanish because all of the elementary schools invited were located in predominantly minority neighborhoods with Spanish being the most common foreign language as seen in (see Appendix B).
Another liability issue that I needed to address for the event was the media release waiver. Like any event that is documented by photography, the participants in the photographs need to give their consent. Gretta Mincer, Associate Director of Student Activities, provided me with an example waiver that was used for a different event. With her permission, I changed the event details to those of I Promise to Play Every Day and re-used the content. The media release waiver was placed on the sign-in table at the event so parents could sign it as they entered the event area (see Appendix C). Photographs of the event taken by multiple volunteers during the day were uploaded to a shared file on drop box in case of future use.


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Equipment
Basic equipment such as tables, chairs, canopies, and the Rowdy costume were utilized on the day of the event. Cost for tables and chairs was estimated at $80.00 for 10 tables and 20 chairs if rented from AHEC. However, Carmen Zacarias, a personal contact of mine, donated the tables and chairs for this event, eliminating some of the financial need. I borrowed a total of eleven tables and twenty chairs which were delivered to the location by another volunteer, Juan Olivas. I borrowed equipment for the activities such as ropes, cones, and balls from Price. He placed the equipment in the storage space of the Regency Athletic Field two days before the event, and also donated funds for an inflatable obstacle course, which was delivered and picked up by the rental company.
An MSU Denver student, Vinny White, volunteered to bring his DJ equipment and provide musical entertainment at the event. Mincer donated MSU Denver gear including hats, water bottles, pins, and even some books that talked about urban gardening. Jamie Hurst, J.D. Interim Director of Alumni Relations and Giving, provided some MSU Denver t-shirts for the volunteers. The t-shirts came from left over supplies from previous MSU Denver events and did not include assorted sizes. Volunteers were welcomed to pick a shirt and customize it to fit or otherwise asked to wear MSU Denver t-shirts.
Kietzmann lent me the mascot costume again for the day of the event at no charge. I had to pick up the costume on the Friday before the event because no one would be available to give me the costume on Sunday, so I left the costume at the house where the Honors Program is located. Being an Honors student, I was granted access to the Honors house so that I can unlock it after hours. After the event, I returned the gear to Kietzmann first thing on the following Monday morning as it was scheduled to be used for different events.


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Funding
I applied for three separate grants to raise funds to pay for snacks, prizes, and equipment. The grants included: Community Engagement Mini Grant from the Center for Urban Connections, Sustainable Campus Program Grant, and Service-Learning Mini-Grant. Unfortunately, all of the grant representatives told me that there were no funds left in their budget for the remainder of the fiscal year, so I had to adapt my plans for funding. They stated that if I held the event after the start of the new fiscal year, July 2016,1 would get the funds. I ended up with the choice to either go through with the event with the original date or start over with the process of reserving and distributing flyers for a new date after the start of the new fiscal year. Because I knew I could scale down on the snacks and I already had $100 for prizes, I chose to keep the original date in June and decided to look for additional funding.
I organized a general donation proposal and got a MSU Denvers Sales Tax Exemption Certificate from the Honors Program (see Appendix I and J). I took these forms and visited five King Soopers, three Safeways, three Walgreens, three Targets, and three Wal-Marts making a total of 17 stores distributed throughout the Denver area and surrounding cities. Despite my initiative, only five of these stores agreed to donate money in the form of gift cards to their stores. Aside from contacting grocery stores, I also received assistance from various departments and programs within MSU Denver such as the Auraria Health Center and the College Assistance Migrant Program, CAMP, both of which donated fifty dollars. Think Tank also donated funds to cover the cost of the security guard that was hired for the event. The funds totaled $411.00, with $155.00 raised from stores and $256.00 from programs at MSU Denver (see Appendix K).
I went to a total of 20 sources to raise funds averaging $20 per source. The return on investment for the amount of energy spent was not equitable because I spent too much time for too


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little money. However, as I have analyzed this, I realized that I should have printed flyers before I went to the stores so that they could publicize my event then I could have asked each store to donate money as well as recruit attendees to expand my audience. Also, now that I have learned that grant deadlines are earlier in the year, I will apply for the grants towards the beginning of the fiscal year.
The funds I secured were allocated to prizes, snacks, security, and additional supplies. The $100.00 donated by Target was used to buy the prizes for the kids and packs of bottled water for the volunteers. Prizes included toys that would encourage kids to be active such as hula-hoops, frizbees, jump ropes, rubber balls, and among other toys. The $130.00 donated by King Soopers, the Health Center, and CAMP were used to purchase healthier option snacks such as granola bars, wheat thins, and organic fruit snacks. The $25.00 donated by Walgreens were used to purchase sunscreen, hand-sanitizer, poster boards, and markers. The $156.00 given by Think Tank were used to pay for the security guards provided by the Auraria Police Department.
Printing for flyers, waivers, and brochures was donated by MSU Denvers Office of the Bursar, Honors Program, and Student Activities. Office of the Bursar donated 300 pages for flyers that were double sided and in color. Office of Student Activities donated 150 pages that were also double sided and in color. The remainder of printing was donated by the Honors Program with no limit that accumulated to 250 flyers for schools and 50 brochures for the day of the event.
Day of Event
Since the event was scheduled to begin at 11am, I asked the volunteers to arrive at 10am to help set up tables, chairs, and activities. I arrived at 8am to meet with Mark Laschanzky who was my contact to get into the Regency Athletic Complex. Then I went to pick up the Rowdy costume from the Honors House before I met with Price so that he could open the storage doors


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of the Regency to get the equipment. Between all of the volunteers and myself, we set up all the equipment for the activities across the softball field. The tables for the nutrition section and the community programs were arranged on the cement area located on top of the bleachers.
The schedule I organized for the event, would make sure that certain duties were always covered and that volunteers had time to rest and re-fill their water bottles. The volunteers were separated into four groups of 4 to 5 people with two separate sessions to cover and a break in between sessions. Group ls session 1 was between llam-12pm covering activities and tabling with a 20-minute break and finishing the day with session 2 from 12:20pm-3pm. The sessions for group 2 were scheduled to go from llam-12:20pm and then begin again from 12:40pm-3pm. Group 3 had their sessions arranged from 1 lam-12:40pm and then again from lpm-3pm. Finally, group 4 was arranged to volunteer from 1 lam-1:20pm and finish the day with the second session going from l:40pm-3pm (see Appendix L).
Volunteers helped me post signs at the entrance of the Regency Athletic Complex to help guests find the softball field where the event was located. The posters specifically lead the guests to the check-in table where they submitted the waiver and signed the media release form. The volunteers in charge of the check-in table then directed the guests to the nutrition tables for free snacks and the community program representatives right next to them and the activities spread through-out the field.
Based on the sign-in sheets and media release waivers, approximately 30 kids plus their parents attended. I counted 25 signatures on the media release which accounts for at least one parent, volunteers, and other guests at the event. Even though I did not meet my original numerical goal of 50 kids, I sill met my educational goal of providing kids an opportunity to play in the sun and win prizes with which they can stay active during the summer. I have identified several factors


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that may have limited the success of the event to reach the numerical goal. These factors are discussed in the next section.
Barriers and Challenges
Several challenges presented during the planning of the event that caused limitations such as marketing, time restraints, funds, and transportation. All of these factors influenced many decisions during the planning. Some of them left me with options and others did not. Due to lack of time, I was only able to contact the schools one time each. I would have preferred to have gone several times to each school to have built a connection with the students and the families. Perhaps an actual after school program could have been planned to help build trust between the families and the event.
Initially, I had planned to have catering provided for the guests on the day of the event. Due to AHECs policy, I could not bring an outside vendor unless they were enrolled on AHECs catering list. At first, I had investigated the prices for Vanilla Bean by talking to the manager for the campus location who directed me to their website, vbcoffeehouse.com. The website listed the catering option to have individual boxed lunches for $11.50 per person. Catering brought up the question about expected RSVPs and expected funds raised. Since my idea had been to feed fifty kids and their parents, volunteers, and the representatives from the community programs, my expected cost for catering ranged at about $1,000.00, which my funding could not cover.
Another challenge that this event posed was the ability to get enough kids to come down to campus on a weekend. In order to overcome this challenge, possible options included providing a bus to bring kids down and/or inviting schools to host their field day at this event. However, funds were required in order to provide transportation for the kids, and the availability of the space would be complicated to address if parents are present as well. An alternate option was to host this


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event specifically for Greenlee Elementary School and Fairview Elementary School since both of these schools are located within a one-mile range to Auraria Campus. There could have been a better chance of having more people attend if I had invited more grades from these particular schools because I would have been reaching out to nearby communities.
Leadership Development
At first, I believed my civic identity was completely dependent on becoming a doctor and serving the underserved community. However, through I Promise to Play Every Day, I was able to draw my existing knowledge of health and science and use it to educate the community about the basics of eating healthy and staying active. By deciding to take action today, I realized that I do not need to wait to be a doctor in order to have a positive impact on my community. I strongly believe that taking action as soon as possible is important to increase the chances for the children of today to have a healthy future.
Taking the initiative to organize and event such as I Promise to Play Every Day pushed me to step outside my comfort zone as a leader because it required me to contact new people and act within campus policies. I had to learn to build a network of contacts to get a hold of resources and materials needed for the event. Mincer, my first contact, referred me to Price as well as other contacts who in turn referred me to additional people. Navigating through the hierarchy of campus policy was a challenge in itself, from which I quickly learned to adapt my ideas to fit within the restrictions set by Auraria Higher Education Campus, AHEC. An example of this was following the restrictions on bringing outside food; since I could not provide fruits and vegetables, I brought packaged snacks. Overcoming many of these challenges helped me gain skills and strengthen some of my weaknesses.


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As the project coordinator, I had to utilize my strengths and the strengths of those on my team to ensure the success of the event. My most apparent weakness as a leader was delegating responsibilities with my team. I wanted to put the least amount of duties on others, which caused majority of the duties to fall on me. In order to succeed, I needed to trust my team and rely on their knowledge from each of their areas of expertise. My most effective strength was organizing steps to complete in order to move forward with the planning of the event. By expressing myself both orally and in written form I strengthened my communication skills as I learned to listen to others and understand what aspects of each conversation was beneficial for my plans. I learned to ask clear concise questions to maximize the effectiveness of a meeting and present myself in a professional matter so that I can gain the respect and trust from community members.
Future Implementations
I Promise to Play Every Day has potential to be organized again on campus. Since I have established the important contacts, the new coordinator would just have to choose a new date and update the proposals. Knowing to apply for grants earlier in the fiscal year will increase funding opportunities for snacks and prizes. Marketing earlier and throughout more schools and family-based locations will increase attendance. This event offers a lot of potential for growth within the Denver community as it can be modified to meet different expectations in different locations.
Individual schools could adapt the format of the event and organize it using their own fields and equipment. Prizes are an optional incentive as it would require additional funding. If allowed by the schools, the event could be held during the school day to eliminate extra transportation requirements, or it could be held in the evening to offer more of an opportunity for parents to attend. A possible way for the event to be introduced to schools could be via organizations such as Colorado I Have a Dream, CIHAD, and Colorado Omega State Delta Kappa Gamma,


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY
22
COSDKG. I strongly recommend any future coordinators of any program to form a connection between people they trust to help coordinate the event, including already existing organizations as they can provide additional resources that were not utilized in this event.


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY
24
PHOTO RELEASE
MhtJopolitan State University" OF DENVER
PROJECT# EVENT DATE
PHOTOGRAPHER LOCATION
I give my permission for Metropolitan State University of Denver to use my photograph/image in any publication or presentation of the University, including, but not limited to: multimedia productions, such as television, video, the MSU Denver website, etc. and I release all rights to the aforementioned photograph/image. I also understand that I will not be compensated monetarily for my time or for the use of my image. If you're under 18 years of age, the signature of a parent or legal guardian is required.

PRINT NAME SIGNATURE/DATE PHONE/EMAIL
PRINT NAME SIGNATURE/DATE PHONE/EMAIL
PRINT NAME SIGNATURE/DATE PHONE/EMAIL
PRINT NAME SIGNATURE/DATE PHONE/EMAIL
PRINT NAME SIGNATURE/DATE PHONE/EMAIL
PRINT NAME SIGNATURE/DATE PHONE/EMAIL
PRINT NAME SIGNATURE/DATE PHONE/EMAIL
PRINT NAME SIGNATURE/DATE PHONE/EMAIL
PRINT NAME SIGNATURE/DATE PHONE/EMAIL
PRINT NAME SIGNATURE/DATE PHONE/EMAIL
PRINT NAME SIGNATURE/DATE PHONE/EMAIL


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 25
Appendix D
<- -> o Pi promisetoplay.com | - m. &
I Promise To Play Every Day Home About Vendors RSVP Volunteer ft
I Promise To Play Every Day
Date | Fecha: Sunday June 5th, 2016 Time | Hora: 11:00 am 3:00 pm Location | Ubicacion: Regency Athletic Complex Address | Direccion: 1390 Shoshone St, Denver, CO 80204
De\


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY
Appendix E
26

C 0 https://promisetoplay.com/pages/about =
I Promise To Play Every Day Home About Vendors RSVP Volunteer |
Mission statement
About this Event: Event Information
Early prevention awareness and healthy lifestyle promotion is the key to reducing disease and illness. I Promise to Play Every Day will be a one day event that will bring kids outside for opportunities to learn about the importance of nutrition and daily exercise as well as a chance to win fun prizes that will keep them active.
Think Tank Student Organization of the Honors Program focuses on addressing issues in the community through sustainable changes. The issue being addressed with this service project is the high rate of obesity, specifically in the Denver Public School district. By raising awareness among the students and their parents, we hope to encourage physical activity and mindfulness of nutrition.
RSVP NOW!
Date | Fecha: Sunday June 5th, 2016
Time | Hora: 11:00 am 3:00 pm
Location | Ubicacion: Regency Athletic Complex
Address | Direccion: 1390 Shoshone St, Denver, CO
80204
Activities Nutrition Program Involvement
Come participate in fun activities and win prizes! We're having an inflatable obstacle course, relay races, and dance parties with a real life DJ.
Volunteers will be present to facilitate the activities and keep the kids and families within the designated areas.
Learn about all of the delicious and nutritious foods & snacks out there together! and enjoy free snacks! We'll send you home with an informational brochure of all the nifty things you learn here at the event.
Meet great people from Denver that want to help you stay active. Learn about the programs and clubs in your community that you can join. Check out our Vendors tab!
Potential and current organizations involved include: Think Tank Honors Student Organization, Center for Urban Education, Denver Parks and Recreation, Urban Leadership Program, MSU Denver's Department of Human Performance & Sport, Campus Recreation, and other faculty and staff from MSU Denver who are excited to contribute to this event.
Project Coordinator:
Jessica Olivas
Email: joliva12@msudenver.edu
Recruiter Specialist:
Adam Lee
Email: alee54@msudenver.edu


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY
<- -> O
f\ promisetoplay.com/pages/vendors
I Promise To Play Every Day
Metropolitan State University'
OF DENVER College Assistance Migrant Program
% DENVER
| JF PARKS & RECREATION
easton
TRAIN i N GCENTE R
w
Appendix F
27
Eo
Home About Vendors RSVP Volunteer
Vendors
Metropolitan State University of Denver C.A.M.P Program
CAMP is designed to meet the academic, financial, and social needs of migrant and seasonal farm workers and their children in pursing higher education.
View Website >
La Alma Recreation Center
Description soon to come
View Website >
Easton Training Center
Founded by Amal Easton, Easton Training Centers is dedicated to providing martial arts and fitness classes of the highest quality, and provide a safe welcoming enviroment for your child! Come to the event to learn more on what Easton has to offer!
View Website >
Roosters Training Center
Founded by Phillip Roybal Roosters Training Center sets your saftey as their number one priority, founded by a former MSU Denver collegue come to this event learn more on what Roosters Training Center has to offer!
View Website >
Denver West Youth Sports
Founded by Phil Lemos, Denver West Youth Sports keeps your children active and engaged! From youth wrestling, to youth football, your children will stay active in a safe and friendly environment, come to the event to see what Denver Youth Sports has to offer! (Website is currently in development).
View Website >


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY Appendix G 28
^ Q promisetoplay.com/rsvps/new
1 Promise To Play Every Day Home About Vendors RSVP Volunteer
RSVP
We would like to see you at this event! please download the waiver and turn it in to the volunteers at the check-in table at the event. Also, please fill out the following fields below to provide us with statistics, and a general idea of how many children we will expect to see (which will assist us in our quantity of snacks we should expect to
provide). For more information please view our contact information below!
Please download the event waiver form here and submit it to the volunteers at the check-in table at the event: Event Waiver Form
En espariol:Por favor, descargue el formulario de renuncia evento aqui y enviarlo a los voluntaries en la mesa de registro de entrada en el evento:
Event Waiver Form (En espanol)
* Parent/Guardian | Padre/Guardian:
* Phone | Telefono:
* Email:
* Food allergies | Alergias a los alimentos:
I will submit the waiver in person at the event | Voy a presentar la renuncia en persona en el evento Additional Information | Informacion Adicional:
Submit
Project Coordinator:
Jessica
Email: sample@email
Recruiter Specialist:
Adam
Email: sample@email


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 29
Appendix H
<- -> o Pi promisetoplay.com/volunteers/new
1 Promise To Play Every Day Home About Vendors RSVP Volunteer
Volunteer
Volunteer submissions have been closed*
We appreciate your interest in volunteering! please fill out the fields below and we will get in contact with you. For more information please view our contact information below!
* Name | Nombre:
* Email:
* Phone:
Preference(Optional) | Preferencia(Opcional):
V
* T-shirt size | Talla de camiseta:
* How did you hear about us? | i,Como supiste de nosotros?:
Additional Information | Informacion Adicional:
Submit
Project Coordinator:
Jessica
Email: sample@email
Recruiter Specialist:
Adam
Email: sample@email
Developed & Designed by Adam T Lee Email: adam.lee346@gmail.com Cell: 17201-480-1169


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY
30
Appendix I
I Promise to Play Every Day Sunday June 5th, 2016 10am to 3pm Regency Athletic Complex at Auraria Campus
Early prevention awareness and healthy lifestyle promotion is the key to reducing disease and illness. I Promise to Play Every Day will be a one-day non-profit event that will bring kids and their families outside for opportunities to learn about the importance of healthy foods and daily exercise as well as a chance to win fun prizes such as basic sports equipment.
The event will have three sections: activities, nutrition, and recruitment.
Activities will include a variety of relay races tailored to the age groups where the kids will win prizes with which they can remain active. The nutrition aspect will have interactive games for the kids and a bilingual informational brochure for the parents. We will have stands available with information on how to break unhealthy habits with snacking alternatives that are both nutritious and delicious. The recruiters will be organizations from the Denver community, i.e. sport teams and Denver Parks and Recreation, to get kids to stay active and involved in their communities.
We, Think Tank Honors Student Organization, would like to request a donation of funds to help cover the cost of prizes and catering. These funds would be used to supply healthy snacks and basic sports equipment such as balls, jump ropes, frizbees, etc.
Potential and current organizations involved include: Think Tank Honors student organization, Center for Urban Education, Denver Parks and Recreation, Urban Leadership Program, MSU Denver's Human Performance & Sport, Campus Recreation, and other faculty and staff from MSU Denver who are willing to contribute to this event.
Volunteers will be present to facilitate the activities and keep the kids within the designated areas.
Jessica Olivas
(720)537-6354
jolival2@msudenver.edu
Think Tank Honors Student Organization
Metropolitan State University of Denver


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY
31
Appendix J
MSU
DENVER
Attn: Accounts Receivable Department Dear Sir/Madam,
This letter is in response to your company's request for the sales tax exemption number for Metropolitan State University of Denver. Metropolitan State University of Denver is an institution of higher education in the State of Colorado and as such is tax exempt under Section 115 of the Internal Revenue Code (I.R.C.). Therefore, because Metropolitan State University of Denver is exempt for Federal Tax purposes under a specific code section by definition, it is not necessary for the University to have an exemption letter.
Metropolitan State University of Denver is exempt from sales tax on purchases for the institution under Colorado Sales and Use Tax Rules and Regulations 138-5-14(l)(B). Our sales tax exempt status may be confirmed by calling the Colorado Department of Revenue at 303-534-1208. Below is a certificate stating our tax exempt number and our Federal Identification Number.
SALES TAX EXEMPTION CERTIFICATE
I certify that: Metropolitan State University of Denver
P.O. Box 173362 Denver, CO 80217-3362
is registered with the below listed states within which your firm would deliver purchases to us and that any such purchases are for wholesale, resale, ingredients or components of a new product to be resold in the normal course of our business.
1. State: l Colorado ID#: | 98-02565 Expiration Date: | N/A
2. Federal Employer ID#: 84-0559160
Nonprofit
^GovernmentAgency^
Wholesaler
Retailer Manufacturer
I further certify that if any property so purchased tax free is used or consumed by the firm as to make it subject to a SALES or USE TAX we will pay the tax due direct to the proper taxing authority when state law so provides or inform the seller for added tax billing. This certificate shall be part of each order which we may hereafter give to you, unless otherwise specified, and shall be valid until canceled by us in writing or revoked by the city, county or state.
I swear or affirm that the information on this form is true and correct as to every material matter.
Authorized Signature:
Digitally signed by Beth Christensen DN: cn=Beth Christensen, o=Metropolitan State College of Denver, ou=Contracts and Business Services. email=christebi3mscd.edi
7=ls
Title:
Manager,
Contracts & Business Services
Date:
10/10/12
Accounting Services Campus Box 98 PO Box 173362 Denver, CO 80217-3362 Ph: 303-556-3030 Fx: 303-556-5023


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY
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Appendix K
Table 1 Funds, donations, and allocation.
Store Date City Donation Purpose
walgreens 5/26/16 Northglenn $25.00 Sunscreen, poster boards, markers, hand sanitizer
King Soopers 5/15/16 Denver $ 20.00 snacks
Target 5/20/16 Glendale $ 50.00 Prizes and bottled water
Target 5/20/16 Stapleton $ 50.00 Prizes and bottled water
CAMP 6/3/16 MSU Denver $ 50.00 Snacks
King Soopers 5/18/16 Thornton $ 10.00 Snacks
Auraria health center 6/3/16 MSU Denver $ 50.00 Snacks
Think Tank 6/2/16 MSU Denver $156.00 Security
Office of The Bursar 5/18/16 MSU Denver 300 pages flyers
Honors Program 5/19/16 MSU Denver 250 pages Flyers and brochures
Student Activities 5/17/16 MSU Denver 150 pages & MSU Denver gear Flyers and prizes
Carmen Zacarias 6/4/16 Denver equipment Tables and chairs
TOTAL $411.00


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY
33
Appendix L
Group 2
1 l-12:20pm 12:20-12:40pm 12:40pm-3pm
dodgeball drop-off BREAK rowdy
Check-In table BREAK Jump rope race
hula-hoop race BREAK Soccer weaving
soccer weaving BREAK hula-hoop race

Group 1
1 l-12pm 12-12:20pm 12:20-3pm
Jump rope race BREAK Frisbee Toss
Nutrition Table 1 BREAK Nutrition Table 2
Nutrition Table 2 BREAK Check-in table
La Alma BREAK Nutrition Table 1
Frisbee Toss BREAK 12:20-3pm
Group 4
11-1:20pm 1:20-1:40pm l:40-3pm
Rowdy BREAK No Food in field
inflatable obst crse BREAK step-ladder drill
step-ladder drill BREAK inflatable obst crse
DJ/ BREAK DJ/lacrosse toss
EASTON BREAK EASTON
Group 3
11- 12:40pm 12:40-lpm l-3pm
Hula blockers BREAK dodgeball drop-off
lacrosse toss BREAK prizes
bean bag toss BREAK Hula blockers
prizes BREAK bean bag toss



I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY
34
Appendix M
Bean Bag Toss: Mark target with hula hoop on floor, ask participant to face away from hoop and toss the bean bag into the hoop.
Check-in table: sign in the volunteers. Ask for signed waivers and to sign photo release. Explain event layout
Dodgeball Drop Off: set hoops at different distances and place 3 dodgeballs on starting point. Run the balls one by one to each hoop. Goal-beat your opponent or your own record.
Frisbee Toss: make the frisbee hit the target cones.
Hula Blockers: 2+ people place hoop on ground and stand in the middle. Goal- try and throw bean bags into oponent's hoop while blocking bean bags from landing in your own.
Hula Hoop Race: make it to the cones and back withouth droppinng your hula hoop, try doing a 360 while hooping!
Inflatable Obstacle course: supervise, no shoes and on kid per side at a time.
Jump Rope Race: jump rope to the opposite side and come back. Try jumproping backwards!
La Alma- represent La Alma Rec Center and hand out flyers at the table with other vendors.
Lacrosse Toss: catch the balls using the lacrosse stick. If you drop or miss a ball you have to do 5 jumping jacks until you catch at least 1-3.
Nutrition Table 1: Hand out snacks to kids but tell them they have to participate in the games as well. Distribute equal amounts by using paper bags
Nutrition Table 2: Hand out brochures and flyers on hydration and snacks
Prizes: Exchange tickets for prizes, encourage families to talk to vendors and grab snacks
Rowdy: Wear mascot costume and play with the kids and families.
Soccer Weaving: kick soccer ball while weaving through 4-7 cones back and forth. Goal- beat your opponent or your own record
Step-ladder drill: Run down the ladder facing forward and touching both feet in each spot.
Try sideways!


I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY
35
References
Alliance for a Healthier Generation. (2011). National Survey of Childrens Health. Retrieved from https://www.healthiergeneration.org/about_childhood_obesity/
Denver Child Health Fact Sheet. (2013). Denver Childrens Affairs. Retrieved from
https://www.denvergov.org/content/dam/denvergov/Portals/713/documents/2014_Data
-Lisa/Denver%20Child%20Health%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf


Full Text

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I Promise to Play Every Day by Jessica Olivas An undergraduate thesis submitted in partial completion of the M etropolitan State University of D enver Honors Program May 5, 2017 Gretta Mincer Janet McClaskey Dr. Megan Hughes Zarzo Primary Advisor Second Reader Honors Program Director

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 1 I Promise to Play Every Day Jessica Olivas Metropolitan State University of Denver

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 2 I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY TABLE OF CONTENT Abstract. . . . . . . .3 Introduction . . . . . . 4 Mission Statement . . . . . 4 The Event . . . . . . 5 Nutrition . . . . . 5 Activities . . . . . 6 Community Programs . . . 7 Deciding the Date. . . . . .7 Venue. . . . . . . . 8 Target Audience . . . . . 10 Schools Invited. . . . . . .10 Website. . . . . . . 12 Volunteers. . . . . . . 12 Liability Release . . . . . 13 Equipment . . . . . . 15 Funding. . . . . . . 16 Day of Event . . . . . . 17 Barriers and Challenges . . . .19 Leadership Development . . . 20 Future Implementations . . . .21 Appendix A . . . . . . 22 Appendix B . . . . . . 23 App endix C . . . . . . 24 Appendix D . . . . . . 25 Appendix E . . . . . . 26 Appendix F . . . . . . 27 Appendi x G . . . . . . 28 Appendix H . . . . . . 29 Appendix I . . . . . . 30 Appendix J . . . . . . 31 Appendix K . . . . . . 32 Appendix L . . . . . . 33 Appendix M. . . . . . .34 R eferences . . . . . . 35

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 3 Abstract O besity among young children continue s to exist at high rates throughout the nation. In an attempt to raise awareness about health, I Promise to Play Every Day wa s designed to be a one day eve nt that promot es nutrition and exercise to elementary students by engaging them in relay races and awarding prizes The event was held on Sunday June 5 th 2016 from 11am to 3pm at the Regency A thletic Field at Auraria Campus. T hird, fourth and fifth graders from Denver Public Schools within a 2 mile range from the Auraria Campus were invited using flyers sent home by the ir schools. Resource s for the event included donations from local grocery stores and departments from Metropol itan State University of Denver. MSU Denver student s and community members volunteered to facilitate activities and distribute snacks. According to sign up forms from the day of the event, approximately 30 kids attended with their parents.

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 4 As a communi ty, we need to reach out to the youth a nd encourage them to exercise If children become and stay active, they lower their chances of getting common illness es related to obesity, high blood pressure and heart disease. It is imperative to teach young stude nts and parents the importance of nutriti on and reducing consumption of u nhealthy foods. Today, about 1 in 3 kids in the U.S. are overweight or obese and 1 in 4 kids in the state of Colorado are overweight or obese ( Alliance for a Healthier Generation ," 2011 ). From 2007 to 2013, 31% of the students attending Denver Public Schools D istrict were classified as overweight or obese ( Denver Children 's Affairs ," 2013 ). Nutrition awareness and healthy lifestyle promotion can be an effective method to reduce the rates of obesity by preventing it before it happens. Programs exist throughout the nation to educate children in the community about nutrition and staying active. Such p rograms include Michelle Obama's Let's Move as well as local rec reation center activity nights that promote the idea of daily exercise to kids. Alliance for a Healthier Generation has collaborated with schools, medical offices, and communities to offer every opportunity it can to children across America a healthier future. Opportunities such as these improve the health of kids who participate in them by keeping them active and aware of their health. However can it ever be enough to engage the children in our communities and promote a healthy lifestyle from early on? Implementing this idea of daily exercise is going to require many attempts in order to instill it as a habit. Mission Statement Early prevention awareness and healthy lifestyle promotion is the key to reducing di sease and illness. I brought my own academic discipline of science toward civic engagement by using my own knowledge of nutrition and exercise to design I Promise to Play Every Day This one day

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 5 event brought children outside for opportunities to learn abo ut the importance of nutrition and daily exercise as well as a chance to win fun prizes such as basic sports equipment. The Event The goal for the event was to bring community members from Denver Public Schools to Auraria campus for a fun day in the sun while learning about staying healthy. While Denver communities often come to Auraria campus for academic engagement, my event was innovative in that local low income largely minority students came to Auraria Campus to play. Teaming exercise, nutrition and play offers an opportunity for these students and families to identify Auraria Campus as one of their own communities much like home, neighborhood, and elementary school. I planned the ev ent to have three sections where ea ch offer ed different opportunities to learn about being healthy. The sections included nutrition, activities, and program involvement Nutrition The nutrition section was planned to offer snacks and have informational brochure s about basic nutrition for children Lana Jabari candidate for B.S. Human Nutrition Dietetics at MSU Denver, wrote the content for the nutritional brochures and the hydration information. Jabari also provided me with a list of healthier option snacks to purchase for the day of the event. After organizing the brochure, I translated the content into Spanish. The Honors Program donated printing for the brochures She initially advised me to buy fresh fruits and vegetable s; however, when I checked Auraria Higher Education Ca mpus' ( AHEC ) policy on bringing outside food I found that I could not bring any perishable food including fresh produce because it could spoil during the event and potentially cause illness to the guests Due to this regulation, I was restricted to purchase packaged snacks such as wheat thins, granola bars, and organic fruit snacks with less sugar At the event, a

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 6 couple of tables were set up to hand out snacks to kids and their families. Volunteers were also invited to enjoy the free snacks. The vo lunteer in charge of the nutrition tables also distributed the brochures and asked participants trivia questions regarding healthy diets. If t he people answered correctly, they were asked to pick prize s from the table wit h MSU Denver gear. If the people di d not answer correctly at first, the volunteer encouraged them to keep thinking until they got the answer right before picking a prize Activities The field for activities included an assortment of relay races appropriate for 3 rd 5 th graders. In March of 2 016, I met with Dr. Susan Barnd, Professor of K 12 Physical Education, t o brainstorm ideas for relay races. She helped me determine t hat since the field could hold 3 00 chairs, there would be space for approximately 10 15 activities. She lent me a binder filled with ideas for activities that I could potentially use for the event. I decided to go with activities that would encourage the participants to be active that only required inexpensive equipment A total of ten activities were organized throughout the field. These activities included: soccer weaving, jump rope race, hula hoop race, step ladder, dodgeball drop off, hula blockers, inflatable obstacle course, frisbee toss, bean bag toss, and lacrosse toss (see Appe ndix M ) Each of these activities was led by a volunteer. Auraria Campus Recreation provided all of the equipment for activities free of charge and stored it in the storage space of the Regency Athletic Complex's before the event. Volunteers rewarded each player based on effort, perseverance and overall excitement. Kids could earn 1 3 tickets at each activity. After the kids accumulated many tickets, they went to the prize table and exchanged them. Accumulation of 10 tickets indicated participation in at le ast

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 7 4 activities, which were redeem able for prize s such as, but not limited to, a hula hoop or a jump rope. The volunteer at the prize table was in charge of keeping track of prizes and their ticket exchange value. The bigger the prize, the more tickets were required By the end of the event, all the prizes were claimed. Community Programs Sending a child home with a hula hoop or jump rope completed part of the goal for this event, which encouraged kids to stay active during the summer. A second goal of the event was to introduce families to community progr ams available in the Denver area so that they could ful fill their promise to play every day. I collaborated with MSU Denver student, Adam Lee, and Campus Recreation Director, Tony Price, to invite community institutions to the event for an opportunity to encourage families to visit their locations S uch programs included De nver Parks and Recreation, Easton Training Center, Rooster Boxing Gym, and Mi Casa Soccer Club I contacted Dolores Moreno, Director of Recreation, to invite Denver Parks and Recreation. Lee i nvited both Roosters Boxing Gym and Easton T raining Center while Price invited Mi Casa Soccer Club. By inviting representatives from these community institutions, I built a commitment to collaborate work across and within community structures to achieve the civic aim of continuing exercise and nutri tional awareness within the communities who had participated in I Promise to Play Every Day. Deciding the Date Deciding on a date was my first step to get the plans off the ground. My main concern was to have sufficient time to market the event in order t o encourage students to attend. Variables that needed to be considered included : weather, the day of the week, the time of day, and availability of space at the venue. Organizing the event in August would not have allowed enough time for

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 8 marketing because the students would have just returned from summer vacation. During the school year was also conflicting due to the standardized tests that students would be preparing for. Due to the unpredictability of weather, hosting the event in fall, winter, and spring seemed also unfavorable One contradiction I faced wa s deciding between class time and weekend. If I held the event duri ng the weekday and worked with one school, attendance at my event would be certain; however, authorization to use c lass time for such an event would be extremely difficult. Conversely, if I held my event during the weekend, class time would remain interrupted, but attendance at my event would not be certain due to motivation and self transportation After multiple mee tings with Dr. Cynthia Sutton, Interim Program Director of the Honors Program at MSU Denver at the time, I found a way to integrate these contradictory perspectives. I would publicize my event during school days and hold the event during the last weekend o f the 2015 2016 academic year to accommodate the parents work schedule s without interfering with class time. Sunday June 5 th of 2016 from 11am 3pm was selected for the event. The next step for the event was to choose a venue that could accommodate the chosen schedule and was located relatively close to the target audience. Venue Choosing a venue required careful consideration of the intended audience's ability of getting to t hat location. I understood capacity limits are a part of safety and venue protocol. I also had to account for parking in regards to space and cost for guests. I needed to choose an accessible location that was in walking distance of the schools and RTD rou tes. I knew that venues off cam pus would charge rental fees; whereas venues on campus would discount or waive the fee if I rented in affiliation with a student organization. Depending on the area around the chosen venue, I knew

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 9 that I might need to hire a security guard. Security could range from local city officers to the location s own security officers. Based on these factors, I chose to hold the event on Auraria Campus. My top two choices were the gym space in the P.E. building and the Regency Athleti c Complex. I chose the Regency Athletic Complex due to the greater capacity limit and t he cost of renting the space was waived because the event was coordinated under the name of Think Tank Student Organization. Before reserving the space, I met with Dr. Sutton to decide on the date and to create a brief event proposal to send to Jim Gillen, Associate Director of Athletics, to re serve the space. I along with Patrick Marsden, Student President of Think Tank, sig ned the Agreement Form with Gillen to reserve the space under Think Tank for the event. Since I knew that weather made having the event outside potentially risky, I also se cured t he gym space in the P.E. building as a secondary location in case of unfavorable weather conditions. The Regency Athletic Complex is located 0.7 miles from Greenlee Elementary School and 1.6 miles from Cheltenham Elementary School, Fairview Element ary School, and from Eagleton Elementary School. All of which are in walking distance to RTD stops that include the Regency Athletic Complex in those routes. Since I chose to hold the event on a Sunday, parking would be free due to AHEC's parking policy. A uraria Campus has a police department that works specifically to secure the area. After I spoke with Amber Cook, Assistant Director of Auraria Campus Services, she arranged with Sgt. Vigil to provide the ev ent with a security guard. Cook sent me the Studen t Organization and Authorization Form that confirmed the event details for the security guard and listed the rate at $26.00 per hour from 9:30am to 3:30pm. Think Tank provided the funds to hire the security guard.

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 10 Target Audience From the beginning, I knew that I wanted to invite young students from minority backgrounds because of my personal experience of growing up in minority com munities and seeing the lack of effective educational outreach As a growing leader, I understand tha t communication is the key to education. Therefore, I knew I had to tailor the language I used in marketing to inspire interest of the kids and their families in my event I chose the age group 7 10 years because I believed them to be old enough to underst and the message and yet young enough to motivate with prizes. The long term goal of the event was to plant the seed to start the habit of staying active and eating healthy from an early age. In October of 2015, I met with Carla Maribelli, Interim P rogram D irector of the Center for Urban Education, to explore the options for the event's target audience. Her program focuses on providing extra curricular activities to students in Denver Public Schools. S he introduced the idea of narrowing down the audience to the elementary schools close to the venue to increase chances of attendance; however, this limited the scope of the program. She also suggested that taking kids out during class time would be a difficult task to get approved by the school. Due to limited transportation options I narrowed down t he target audience to schools on a 3 mile radius from Auraria Campus. I decided to focus my resources on the schools that were in closer proximity to Auraria Campus in order to increase the chances of getting people to attend. I then selected the following schools : Greenlee Elementary School, C heltenha m Elementary School, Fairview Elementary School and Eagleton Elementary School Schools Invited In January of 2016, I attended the Colorado Leadership Alliance Summit held on Auraria Campus for the opportunity to learn more about leadership and networking. During the mentor

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 11 walk portion of the summit, I walked with Sean Precious, HS Instructional Sup erintendent of Denver Public Schools (DPS) to get to know community leaders. When I learned about his connection to DPS, I brought up the service project and how it targeted his district, and he was kind enough to offer his help. After we conversed by ema il, Precious gave me the contact information for the principals of each elementary school that I was focusing on. After getting permission from the principals of each school, I set dates and estimate d a number for flyers based on class size per grade and per school. MSU Denver's Offic e of the Bursar, MSU Denver's Honors Program and MSU Denver's Office of Student Activities donated printing supplies for flyers Using donated resources, I printed 600 copies in a front and back format with English on one sid e and Spanish on the other I asked the secretaries of the main offices to send the flyers home with the kids as part of the school's announcements. Due to the lack of time and printing cost, I decided to only hand out flyers to 4 th and 5 th graders who att ended Greenlee Elementary School, Cheltenham Elementary School, and Fairview Elementary School. Aside from sending flyers home with the kids, other students and I went to each school and handed out flyers to parents as they picked up their kids during dism issal. John Kietzmann, Assistant Director of Athletics, lent me the costume for MSU Denver's mascot, Rowdy the Roadrunner. O ne MSU Denver student dressed as the mascot and accompanied me to each school so that we could engage the kids as we handed out the flyers and have more of an impact on their interest to attend. For one of the elementary schools, we visited during their field day to hand out the flyers. As kids participated in their activities, Rowdy walked around and play ed with the kids while I and a nother student handed out flyers to the paren ts. The flyers included brief information of event details and the link to the event website, promisetoplay.com, which contained an online RSVP system set up to keep track of the guests.

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 12 The RSVP form solicited parent/guardian and student information as well as information about allergies and any accommodations needed (see Appendix G). Website MSU Denve r student, Adam Lee, developed the website for the event using a content managing system called Weeb ly. The domain, promisetoplay.com, was purchased for a period of a year for $8.00 using personal funds. The website contains a home page where it describes the mission of the event and the various sections. It also has an RSVP form online where parents inc luded general information as well as specific disabilities that might need accommodations. Volunteers also registered online through the website where they submitted their general preference as to what they wanted their volunteer duties to be. The websit e contributed many benefits to the process of planning the event. It helped me see RSVP numbers immediately while I budgeted for snacks and prizes. Without the website, I would have had to pick up the waivers personally from each school, which could have u nintentionally limited attendees to believe there was a deadline to RSVP for the event. Having the website gave me a central location to post information about the event where anyone who would be interested could reach it. I also translated the time and lo cation details into Spanish on the website in order to accommodate the Spanish speaking community's access. The website is available for updates if the event is to be planned again in the future (see Appendix D through H). Volunteers I recruited a diverse group of volunteers for this event, and connected community organizations, Auraria students, and Denver business people into a coherent group of volunteers. The Nutrition club, Think Tank, Urban Leadership Program, and other potential student organizations were offered the opportunity to help with some aspect of the event. Each section

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 13 required knowledge from various majors T he network of contacts made it possible to meet and recruit more people and organizations outside of MSU Denver. I received help fro m volunteers throughout the organization process, which included anything from planning to the actual facilitation of the event. Lee, the developer of the website, also volunteered to wear the Rowdy costume while handing out flyers at Fairview Elementary School. Jabari, candidate for B.S. Human Nutrition Dietetics, help ed to create the informational brochures about nutrition. I also consulted with her about healthier options of snacks to provide at the event. Marsden, student president of Think Tank, all owed me to use the student organization name so that I could get student discounts and fees waived. He also volunte ered to wear the Rowdy costume and hand out flyers to Greenlee Elementary School and Cheltenham Elementary. Through flyers and word of mouth, I recruit ed 18 volunteers to help on the day of the event. Working as one coherent team, these volunteers ran the check in table, passed out prizes, facilitate d the activities with kids, hand ed out nutritional brochures and snacks, kept food off the field wore the Rowdy costume, DJ ed and ensure d the general safety of guests. Volun teers were prompted to register online through promisetoplay.com, where they were able to list their preferences on the duties needed to be covered (see Appendix H) For the ev ent, I organized the volunteers into groups, assigning each a specific time for a twenty minute break. The volunteers were organized to run one duty before their break and switch duties after their break. This allowed for most of the activities to be avail able at all times without tiring the volunteers. The free snacks provided to the guests were also available to the volunteers. Liability Release D uring a follow up meeting in April of 2016 with Price, Campus Recreation Director, who already had experience working with programs that bring kids to campus for activities, brought up

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 14 the issue of liability for underage kids. He explained that if a child had gotten an injury while engag ing in one of the activities, I would be at risk of being liable for the cost accrued by any injury. He then re directed me to Bethanie Christensen, Contracts and Business Services Liaison for MSU Denver, to inquire about drafting my own waiver for the event. I n April o f 2016, I met with Christensen who explained what a basic template for a waiver contained. She also sent me a previous waiver that another student organization used to play volleyball on campus with middle school students to use as my model With her permi ssion, I kept the waiver content and changed the event details to match those of I Promise to Play Every Day. Addressing the waiver situation was a crucial step fo r the event to be successful with minimal risk. However, making sure that parents signed the waivers was a challenge that I met by including the waivers on the flyers that I sent home with kids through their schools. The event information was located on the top half of the page with the waiver content on the bottom half (see Appendix A ) I translated t he f lyer and waiver into Spanish because all of the elementary schools invited were located in predominantly minority neighborhoods with Spanish being t he most common foreign language as seen in (see Appendix B ). Another liability issue that I need ed to address for the event was the media release waiver Like any event that is documented by photography, the participants in the photographs need to give their consent. Gretta Mincer, Associate Director of Student Activities, provided me with an example waiver that was used for a different event. With her permission, I changed the event details to those of I Promise to Play Every Day and re used the content. The media release waiver was placed on the sign in table at the event so parents could sig n it as they entered the event area (see Appendix C) Photographs of the event taken by multiple volunteers during the day were uploaded to a shared file on drop box in case of future use.

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 15 Equipment Basic equipment such as tables, chairs, canopies, and the R owdy costume were utilized on the day of the event. Cost for tables and chairs was estimated at $80.00 for 10 tables and 20 chairs if rented from AHE C. However, Carmen Zacar Â’ as a personal contact of mine donate d the tables and chairs for this ev ent eliminating some of the financial need I borrowed a total of eleven tables and twenty chairs which were delivered to the location by another volunteer, Juan Olivas. I borrowe d equipment for the activities such as ropes, cones, and balls from Price He placed the equipment in the storage space of the Regency Athletic Field two days before the event, and also donated funds for an inflatabl e obstacle course, which was delivered and picked up by the rental company. An MSU Denver student Vinny White volunteered to bring his DJ equipment and provide musical entertainment at the event Mincer donated MSU Denver gear including hats, water bottles, pins, and even some books that talked about urban gardening. Jamie Hurst, J.D. Interim Director of Alumni Relations and Giving provided some MSU Denver t sh irts for the volunteers. The t shirts came from left over supplies from previous MSU Denver events and did not include assorted sizes. V olunteers were welcomed to pick a shirt an d customize it to fit or otherwise asked to wear MSU Denver t shirts. Kietzmann lent me the mascot costume again for the day of the event at no charge. I had to pick up the costume on the Friday before the event because no one would be available t o give me the costume on Sunday, so I left the costume at the house where the Honors Program is located. Being an Honors student, I was granted access to the Honors house so that I can unlock it after hours. After the event, I returned the gear to Kietzmann firs t thing on the following Monday morning as it was scheduled to be used for different events.

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 16 Funding I applied for three separate grants to raise funds to pay for s nacks, prizes, and equipment. The grants included: Community Engagement Mini Grant from the Center for Urban Connections, Sustainable Campus Program Grant and Service Learning Mini Grant. Unfortunately, all of the grant representatives told me that there were no funds left in their budget for the remainder of the fiscal year so I had to adapt my plans for funding They stated that if I held the event after the start of the new fiscal y ear, July 2016, I would get the funds I ended up with the choice to either go through with the event with the original date or start over with the process o f res erving and distributing flyers for a new date after the start of the new fiscal year Because I knew I could scale down on the snacks and I already had $100 for prizes, I chose to keep the original date in June and decided to look for additional funding. I organized a general donation proposal and got a MSU Denver's Sales Tax Exemption Certificate from the Honor's Program (see Appendix I and J ) I took these forms and visited five K ing S ooper s, three Safeway s, three Walgreens, three Target s, and three Wal Mart s making a total of 17 stores distributed throughout the Denver area and surrounding cities. Despite my initiative, only five of these stores agreed to donate money in the form of gift cards to their stores. Aside from contacting grocery stores, I also received assistan ce from various departments and programs within MSU Denver such as the Auraria Health Center and the College Assistance Migrant Program, CAMP, both of which donated fift y dollars Think Tank also donated funds to cover the cost of th e security guard that was hired for the event. The funds totaled $411.00, with $155.00 raised from stores and $256 .00 from programs at MSU Denver (see Appendix K) I went to a total of 20 sources to raise funds averaging $20 per source. The return on investment for the amount of energy spent was not equitable because I spent too much time for too

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 17 little money. However, as I ha ve an alyzed this, I realized that I sh ould have printed flyers b efore I went to the stores so that they could publicize my event then I could have asked each store to donate money as well as recruit attendees to expand my audience Also, n ow that I have learned that grant deadlines are earlier in the year, I will apply for the grants towards the beginning of the fiscal year. The funds I secured were allocated to prizes, snacks, security, and additional supplies. Th e $100.00 donated by Target was used to buy the prizes for the kids and packs of bottled water for the volunteers. Prizes included toys that would encourage kids to be active such as hula hoops, frizbees, jump ropes, rubber balls and among other toys The $130.00 donated by King Soopers, th e Health Center, and CAMP were used to purchase healthier option snacks such as granola bars, wheat thins, and organic fruit snacks. The $25.00 donated by Walgreens were used to purchase sunscreen, hand sanitizer, poster boards, and markers. The $156.00 gi ven by Think Tank were used to pay for the security guards provided by the Auraria Police Department. Printing for flyers, waivers, and brochures was donated by MSU Denver's Office of the Bursar Honors Program and Student Activities Office of the Bursar donated 300 pages for flyers that were double sided and in color. Office of Student Activities donated 150 pages that were also double sided and in color. The remainder of printing was donated by the Honors Program with no limit that acc umulated to 250 flyers for schools and 50 brochures for the day of the event Day of E vent Since the event wa s scheduled to begin at 11am, I asked the volunteers to arrive at 10am to help set up tables, chairs, and activities I arrived at 8am to meet with Mark Laschanzky who was my contact to get into the Regency Athletic Complex. Then I went to pick up the Rowdy cost ume from the Honors House before I me t with Price so that he could open the storage doors

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 18 of the Regency to get the equipment Betwe en all of the volunteers and myself, we set up all the equipment for the activities across the softball field. The tables for the nutrition section and the community programs were arranged on the cement area located on top of the bleachers. The schedule I organized for the event, would make sure that certain duties were always covered and that volunteers had time to rest and re fill their water bottles. The volunteers were separated into four groups of 4 to 5 people with two separate sessions to cover and a break in between sessions. Gro up 1s session 1 was between 11am 12pm covering activities and tabling with a 20 minute break and finishing the day with session 2 from 12:20pm 3pm. The sessions for group 2 were sche duled to go from 11am 12:20pm and then begin again from 12:40pm 3pm. Group 3 had their sessions arranged from 11am 12:40pm and then again from 1pm 3pm. Finally, group 4 was arranged to volunteer from 11am 1:20pm and finish the day with the secon d session g oing from 1:40pm 3pm (see Appendix L) Volunteers helped me post signs at the entrance of the Regency Athletic Complex to help guests find the softball field where the event was located. The posters specifically lead the guests to the check in table where they submitted the waiver and signed the media release form The volunteers in charge of the check in table then directed the guests to the nutrition tables for free snacks and the community program representatives right next to them and the activities sp read through out the field. Based on the sign in sheets and media release waivers approximately 30 kids plus their parents attended I counted 25 signatures on the media release which accounts for at least one parent, volunteers, and other guests at the event. Even though I did not meet my original numerical goal of 50 kids, I sill met my education al goal of providing kids an opportunity to play in the sun and win prizes with which the y can stay active during the summer. I have identified several factors

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 19 that may have limited the success of the event to re ach the numerical goal. These factors are discussed in the next section. Barriers and Challenges Several challenges presented d uring the planning of the event that caused limitations such as marketing, time restraints, funds, and transportation. All of these factors influenced many decisions during the planning. Some of them left me with options and others did not. Due to lack of time, I was only able to contact the schools one time each. I would have preferred to have gone several times to each school to have built a connection with the students and the families. Perhaps an actual after school program could have been planned to help build trust between the families and the event. Initially I had planned to have catering provided for the guests on the day of the event. Due to AH EC's policy, I could not bring an outside vendor unless they were enrolled on AHEC's cater ing list. At first, I had investigated the prices for Vanilla Bean by talking to the manager for the campus location who directed me to their website, vbcoffeehouse.c om. The website listed the catering option to have individual boxed lunches for $11.50 per person. Catering brought up the question about expected RSVP's and expected funds raised. Since my idea had been to feed fifty kids and their parents, volunteers, and the representatives from the community programs, my expected cost for cate ring ranged at about $1,000.00, which my funding could not cover. A nother challenge that this event posed was the ability to ge t enough kids to come down to campus on a weekend. In order to overcome this challenge, possible options included providing a bus to bring kids down and/or inviting schools to host their field day at this event. However, funds were required in order to pro vide transportation for the kids, and the availability of the space would be complicated to address if parents are present as we ll. An alternate option was to host this

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 20 event specifically for Greenlee Elementary School and Fairview Elementary School since both of these schools are located within a o ne mile range to Auraria Campus. There could have been a better chance of having more people attend if I had invited more grades from these particular schools because I would have been reaching out to nearby comm unities. Leadership Development At first I believed my civic identity was completely dependent on becoming a doctor and serving the underserved community. However, through I Promise to Play Every Day I was able to draw my existing knowledge of health and science and use it to educate the community ab o ut the basics of e ating healthy and staying active By deciding to take ac tion today, I realized that I do not need to wait to be a doctor in order to have a positive impact on my community. I s trongly believe that taking action as soon as possible is important to increase the chances for the children of today to have a healthy future. Taking the initiative to organize and event such as I Promise to Play Every Day pushed me to step outside my co mfort zone as a leader because it re quired me to contact new people and act within campus policies I had to learn to build a network of contacts to get a hold of resources and materials needed for the event. Mincer, my first contact, referred me to Price as well as other contacts who in turn referred me to additional people. Navigating through the hierarchy of campus policy was a challenge in itself, from which I quickly learned to adapt my ideas to fit withi n the restrictions set by Auraria Higher Education Campus, AHEC An example of this w as following the restrictions on bringing outside food; since I could not provide fruits and vegetables, I brought packaged snacks. Overcoming many of these challenges he lped me gain skills and strengthen some of my weaknesses.

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 21 As the project coordinator, I had to utilize my strengths and the strengths of those on my team to ensure the success of the event My most apparent weakness as a leader was delegating responsibili ties with my team. I wanted to put the least amount of duties on others, which caused majority of the duties to fall on me. I n order to succee d, I need ed to trust my team and rely on their knowledge from each of their areas of expertise. My most effective strength was organizing steps to complete in order to move forward with the planning of the event. By expressing myself both orally a nd in written form I str engthen ed my communication skill s as I learn ed to listen to others and understand what aspects of each conversation was beneficial for my plans. I learned to ask clear concise questions to maximize the effectiveness of a meeting and present myself in a pro fessional matter so that I can gain the respect and trust from community members Future Implementations I Promise to Play Every Day has potential to be organized again on campus. Since I have established the important contacts, the new coordinator would just have to choose a new date and update the proposals. Knowing to apply for grants earlier in the fiscal year will increase funding opportunities for snacks and prizes Marketing earlier and throughout more schools and family based locations will increase attendance. This event offers a lot of potential for growth within the Denver community as it can be modified to meet different expectations in different locations. In dividual schools could adapt the format of the event and organize it using their own fields and equipment. Prizes are an optional incentive as it would require additional funding. If allowed by the schools, the event could be held during the school day to eliminate ex tra transportation requirements, or it could be held in the evening to offer more of an opportunity for parents to attend. A possible way for the event to be introduced to schools could be via organizations such as Colorado I Have a Dream, CIHA D, and Colorado Omega State Delta Kappa Gamma,

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 22 COSDKG. I strongly recommend any future coordinators of any program to form a connection between people they trust to help coordinate the event, including already existing organizations as they can provide add itional resources that were not utilized in this event.

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 22 For more information contact: Jessica Olivas Project coordinator 720 537 6354 visit & RSVP at www.promisetoplay.com to win a prize! Appendix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romise to Play Every Day! Family Event on Sunday June 5th 11 am 3pm Regency Athletic Complex at Auraria Campus 1390 Shoshone St. Denver, CO 80204 3 Sections 1 Event! Activities, Nutrition, & Community Opportunities Come enjoy: relay races inflatable obstacle courses !! dance parties prizes snacks Denver pass to La Alma Recreation Center meet Rowdy the Roadrunner!

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 23 Prometo jugar todos los d’as! Evento Familiar el Domingo 5 o de Junio, 11am 3pm Direcci—n: Regency Athletic Complex at Auraria Campus 1390 Shoshone St. Denver, CO 80204 3 Secciones 1 Event o Actividades, Nutrici—n, y Oportunidades en la Comunidad Vengan a disfrutar : Juegos de carreras Carreras de obst‡culos inflables !! Mœsica para bailar Premios Aperitivos saludables Denver pass para La Alma Recreation Center Conozcan a Rowdy el Correcaminos de MSU Denver! Appendix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`J #,$*'G'@,3*)!4)!,G*'/'4,4!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!P)G7, A # ,4$) S *2*%$ @,$,!&)3%$)(!4)!)4,4 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! P)G7,!! Appendix C Para mas informaci—n contacten a: Jessica Olivas Cordinadora del projecto 720 537 6354 visite y reg’strese en la p‡gina www.promisetoplay.com para ganarse un premio!

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 24

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 25 Appendix D !

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 26 Appendix E !!!!

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 27 Appendix F !

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 28 Appendix G !

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 29 Appendix H !

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 30 Appendix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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 40 ! Appendix J

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 4. ! Appendix K Table 1 Funds, donations, and allocation. Store Date City Donation Purpose walgreens 5/26/16 Northglenn $ 25.00 Sunscreen, poster boards, markers, hand sanitizer King Soopers 5/15/16 Denver $ 20.00 snacks Target 5/20/16 Glendale $ 50.00 Prizes and bottled water Target 5/20/16 Stapleton $ 50.00 Prizes and bottled water CAMP 6/3/16 MSU Denver $ 50.00 Snacks King Soopers 5/18/16 Thornton $ 10.00 Snacks Auraria health center 6/3/16 MSU Denver $ 50.00 Snacks Think Tank 6/2/16 MSU Denver $156.00 Security Office of The Bursar 5/18/16 MSU Denver 300 pages flyers Honors Program 5/19/16 MSU Denver 250 pages Flyers and brochures Student Activities 5/17/16 MSU Denver 150 pages & MSU Denver gear Flyers and prizes Carmen ZacarÂ’as 6/4/16 Denver equipment Tables and chairs TOTAL $411 .00

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 44 ! Appendix L Group 1 Group 2 11 12pm 12 12:20pm 12:20 3pm 11 12:20pm 12:20 12:40pm 12:40pm 3pm Jump rope race BREAK Frisbee Toss dodgeball drop off BREAK rowdy Nutrition Table 1 BREAK Nutrition Table 2 Check In table BREAK Jump rope race Nutrition Table 2 BREAK Check in table hula hoop race BREAK Soccer weaving La Alma BREAK Nutrition Table1 soccer weaving BREAK hula hoop race Frisbee Toss BREAK 12:20 3pm Group 3 Group 4 11 12:40pm 12:40 1pm 1 3pm 11 1:20pm 1:20 1:40pm 1:40 3pm Hula blockers BREAK dodgeball drop off Rowdy BREAK No Food in field lacrosse toss BREAK prizes inflatable obst crse BREAK step ladder drill bean bag toss BREAK Hula blockers step ladder drill BREAK inflatable obst crse prizes BREAK bean bag toss DJ/ BREAK DJ/lacrosse toss EASTON BREAK EASTON

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 4Z ! Appendix M Bean Bag Toss: Mark target with hula hoop on floor, ask par ticipant to face away from hoop and toss the bean bag into the hoop. Check in table: sign in the volunteers. Ask for signed waivers and to sign photo release. Explain event layout Dodgeball Drop Off: set hoops at different distances and place 3 dodgeballs on starting point. Run the bal ls one by one to each hoop. Goal beat your opponent or your own record. Frisbee Toss: make the frisbee hit the target cones. Hula Blockers: 2+ people place hoop on ground and stand in the middle. Goal try and throw bean bags into oponent's hoop while blocking bean bags from landing in your own Hula Hoop Race: make it to the cones and back withouth droppinng your hula hoop, try doing a 360 while hooping! Inflatable Obstacle course: supervise, no shoes and on kid per side at a time. Jump Rope Race: jump rope to the opposite side and come back. Try jumproping backwards! La Alma represent La Alma Rec Center and hand out flyers at the table with other vendors. Lacrosse Toss: catch the balls using the lacrosse stick. If you drop or miss a ball you have to do 5 jumping jacks until you catch at least 1 3. Nutrition Table 1 : Hand out snacks to kids but tell them they have to participate in the games as well. Distribute equal amounts by using paper bags Nutrition Table 2: Hand out brochures a nd flyers on hydration and snacks Prizes: Exchange tickets for prizes, encourage families to talk to vendors and grab snacks Rowdy: Wear mascot costume and play with the kids and families. Soccer Weaving: kick soccer ball while weaving through 4 7 cones back and forth. Go al beat your opponent or your own record Step ladder drill: Run down the ladder facing forward and touching both feet in each spot. Try sideways!

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I PROMISE TO PLAY EVERY DAY 4* ! References Alliance for a Healthier Generation. (2011). National Survey of Children's Health. Retrieved from https://www.healthiergeneration.org/about_childhood_obesity / Denver Child Health Fact Sheet. (2013). Denver Children's Affairs. Retrieved from https://www.denvergov.org/content/dam/denvergov/Portals/713/documents/2014_Dat a Lisa/Denver%20Child%20Health%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf