Citation
Traversale

Material Information

Title:
Traversale a residential - equestrian complex
Creator:
Bramblett, Bill
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
150 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, charts, maps, plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Stables -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Jefferson County ( lcsh )
Stables ( fast )
Colorado -- Jefferson County ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 117).
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Bill Bramblett.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
13752217 ( OCLC )
ocm13752217
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1986 .B676 ( lcc )

Full Text
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A Residential Equestrian Complex
ill Bramblett
Master of Architect ure Program University of Colorado at Denver
Spring 1986


'ffeA VBP-SAL-S'
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Bill- BRAAfELerT
The thesis of Bill Bramblett is approved.

-O
Barbara Price,
A.I.A., Principal Advisor
University of Colorado at Denver 17 April 1986


Introduction
Thesis Statement Project Statement Design Concepts Program
Program Summary
Adjacency Matrix
Spacial Inventory Residences Community Areas Stables
Indoor Training Outdoor Training Maintenance Parking Circulation
Site Analysis Vicinity Map Site Analysis Map Topographical Map and Section Vehicular Access RTD Routes Site Photographs
Site Data
Legal Description Area Zoning Map Soils Report


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Climate Data
Climate Summary Summary Table Solar Angles Azimuth Solar Angles Altitude Annual Wind Rose Directed Weather Attack Heating Cooling Summary
Code Requirements Applicable Codes Uniform Building Code Search
Bibliography
Appendix
The Natural Horse The Stabled Horse A Horse Stable Routine Horse Stable Design Temperature Lighting Ventilation Drainage
Equine Perception Equine Sleep Cycles Equine Group Size Composition of Equine Groups Regional Topography Personal Contacts
Design
Conclusion


INTRODUCTION


Indoor Arena, from The Spanish Riding School of Venna; Vienna, Austria; 1977.
In most major civilizations the horse has a long history as a working and military mount.
It has a much shorter history as a pleasure mount or recreational animal. The modern use of the equine species for human pleasure may have begun with the large stables and breeding operations of the rich and landed gentry on the European continent.
During the sixteenth century large buildings used exclusively for the breeding of pleasure horses and the schooling of horse and rider began to appear. The architects of the Renaissance gave their stables a magnificence appropriate to the position of the owners and the refinement of the special horses housed there.
One of the earliest stables forming part of a stately European residence is the Stallburg Palace which is still standing in Vienna. Designed by Joseph Emanuel Fischer von Erlach, it was built in 1565 as the home of the Lipizzan horses of the Spanish Riding School. In England, the great stable at Welbeck was designed for the Duke of Newcastle by John Smithson in the 1620's. The most striking of Renaissance horse environments was that designed by Jules Mansart about 1679 for Louis XIV at Versailles .
Although these examples of early private horse stables were the extremes of their time, they represent some general characteristics common to the large stables which are our heritage. They usually included indoor schooling arenas, carefully detailed stables for the horses, and offered a wide range of horse activities in the stables, barns, riding schools, and on the surrounding grounds.
Early stables in America were certainly less grand than the buildings mentioned above, but were in large part modeled after Continental-style architecture.
The Derby Farm, designed by Samuel McIntyre around 1790, the Palladian efforts of John Hawke's plan for Tyron's Palace around 1761 in New Bern,


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N. C., and Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, designed and built around 1772, were all centered on the gentlemanly principles of training and breeding animals with the intention of improving the species Recreational riding, driving and racing were also of prime importance on those large estates.
Large equestrian centers were not, however, limited to private facilities for the rich. In America there were public horse stables for the new independent middle class which was the product of a democratic society at the advent of the industrial age.
With the machine age, the use of the horse was rapidly changing character. By the close of World War I, the horse's position as a work animal for farming and transportation was ending. The evolving use of the horse as a purely recreational animal accompanied the rise of the modern middle class with its new transportation system, the automobile.
Recreational activity supported by automobile transportation grew to be the focus of the horse industry in the United States. The new private and public stable reflected that new focus of activity and new lifestyle for much of the equestrian population..
The general characteristics of such a facility included a centrally located stable and training area which housed many horses with different owners. The owners, and private trainers supported by them, lived apart from the stable. The form and materials of the buildings were often determined by economy and efficiency. The buildings were usually designed by nonprofessionals and the environments focused on mere boarding and maintenance rather than complete training. It is easy to understand why the new stable was and still is a mass-produced metal building.
America's love affair with the automobile and super highways created opportunities and problems for the urban and suburban dweller. It also created opportunities and problems for the modern equestrian With a horse trailer and vehicle to pull it over the new super highways, the horse owner could transport


his horse and equipment to various training facilities, horse shows, remote trails or open space.
In the process, however, this system of central care and resulting transportation created new difficulties. Among them were the expense of vehicles, maintenance, time and energy to commute to the local stable, training time with the horse, and then transportation to the local or distant events.
Multiple decentralized facilities and the freedom of the middle class lifestyle have created significant opportunities for horse and rider.
They have also created significant responsibilities for riders, trainers and other horse professionals. Equestrians now constantly commute from their home environment to the horse care environment, horse show facilities, alternative training facilities, or trails and open space. The enjoyment of a training workout with the most exciting animal can be diminished drastically by the commute to the stable when the temperature is -20 F and the roads icy!
This thesis project addresses a new concept in the field of equestrian centers. Its conceptual focus is to make the most desirable characteristics of the early European and American estate stables available to the modern middle class American equestrian. The method employed is the combination of a residential housing development with an equestrian training center which specializes in the riding diciplines of Dressage and Combined Training. The general goals of this project will include providing the advantages of: (1) economy of scale in horse care and facility ownership, (2) reduced commuting through proximity of the horse training center with the home environment, (3) increased availability of horse care professionals by including them in the community, (4) greater depth of activities in the horse experience, and (5) the simple joy a living close to the animals.
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THESIS STATEMENT


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At the end of the introduction there are five general "social" goals identified in the context of the residential/eguestrian center project.
In addition to the fulfillment of these broad goals by the final thesis product, a design, the thesis project is a vehicle by which the designer can test architectural ideas which are important to him as an individual. The thesis statement is the verbal expression of those ideas as a set of hypotheses to be tested during the design process.
There are four major architectural ideas that I wish to explore during this thesis project.
Those ideas are listed in this section first as simple statements to be followed by expansions of those statements.
The major thesis ideas to be explored include:
1)
The architectural design process can be used to create an equine environment which maximizes natural conditions for the horse while making improved physical care and protection by man as unobtrusive as possible.
2)
The horse barn, as a building type, can easily express more architectural meaning than the current standard metal building.
3)
The indoor arena of the equestrian center can be an architectural space which produces a religious experience.
4)
Designing with the natural features of the land can help a collection of dwelling units to have meaning as a neighborhood and a community.


While it appears that horses are their happiest in a feral or wild environment, they are probably their healthiest physically in an environment protected by man.
The horse's major activities include ingestive behavior, eliminative behavior, and social behavior, including different forms of communication and play.
The horse's major physical needs include fresh water and proper dietary levels of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Horses need minimal protection from the weather and naturally seek only a windbreak as protection. Other physical factors which tend to increase their level of health and longevity are those provided by man. These include high quality water and feed, moderate exercise, protection from predators and natural disaster, preventive health maintenance, and medical services to encourage recovery from sickness or physical injury.
To ensure the optimum of happiness, health and service, horses should be provided the type of environment that closely approximates the wonderful freedom of the feral horse population, and at the same time those man made conditions which improve their general health, safety, and physical condition.
Horses are sensitive and social animals that need a rich and varied environment to be happy.
Horse stalls and outdoor runs should be stimulating environments that allow contact with people, other horses, and the physical elements to provide a high level of stimulation for the animals.
It is common, however, for horse environments such as stalls to be isolated from other horses and stable activity by solid walls, solid doors and restricted views. In stables housing race horses and certain types of show animals, it is often the accepted practice to close the horses in dark stalls at all times other than when they are being worked.
My observation of environments like these has lead me to believe that this type of environment is unfriendly, unhealthy, and uncivilized.
The horse care environment should provide maintenance and protection from natural enemies.
It should facilitate the normal behavior patterns


characteristic of life in the wild. To these ends, the architectural features of the horse care facility should make it as open to the outdoors as possible, allowing for the normal physical behaviors of feeding, elimination, peer interaction, and playing. Those features should allow for as much sensual contact with other horses as possible without physical injury.
The purpose of the residential equestrian center is to provide the best individual living conditions for both people and horses and a high quality environment for their interaction. To that end it will be the goal of this thesis project to provide architecture that will give the horse population an environment closely approximating the conditions in the wild, allowing horses to indulge in natural behaviors, while making the improved physical care and protection by man as unobtrusive as possible.


Valy-Hi Company Presents
The Best Little Horse House In Texas
Metal horse barn. Valy-Hi Company; Dickinson, Texas.
Horse barns in Colorado tend to be mundane "Butler"-type metal buildings limited in their creative use of materials and architectural forms. Such buildings for stabling and training horses, born out of the need for economy in structure, are usually planned without much interest in providing an optimal environment for the horses stabled there.
The result of those economic concerns is the use of standard building forms which can be mass produced in the factory for field erection, the use of standardized meterials to allow great economy of scale in material purchase, and the use of a metal skin to provide low maintenance costs. The formal considerations of the final architectural product are not necessarily in harmony with the surroundings, either natural or architectural; there is no variety of finish; the formed metal panels stamped in a single pattern offer little variety of texture or color, form, and the apparent weight and mass of traditional barn architecture. The rendition of a grand traditional form into the minimum basic elements has resulted in a loss of architectural meaning.
Historically, the traditional barn has had a strong sense of structure, and a strong image of its use to house large and strong, yet warm and vulnerable animals. The traditional barn has embodied the spiritual sense evoked by a great volume with an identifiable purpose, and has presented the user with a rich palette of texture, color, and detail. A related goal of this thesis project will be to explore a large form that is more complex and challenging than the current visual standard. The horses and people of this residential equestrian center deserve an architectural experience reminescent of the grand traditional horse barn.


My childood experience included encounters with rural barns of the Midwest. Those encounters were associated with a sense of mystery, a sense of potential, and always the sense that I could soar in the great interior volume of such a space.
It seemed to me then, and it seems to me now, that barns and churches have many common characteristics and design elements. The first element to include in this comparison is the great interior volume, a space in which I lose my sense of individual focus in the presence of a space so much larger than that I occupy myself. Next is the experience of the building in its surroundings; it is a significant mass that is the focal point of the surrounding landscape. Both the barn and the church have a richness of material and detail beyond everyday life and these elements identify such buildings as something extraordinary. The permanence of the materials used in the construction of these building types, be they heavy timber or masonry, display the significance of a building meant to last. Both types have classical design elements which relate to the whole of an architectural past and cause them to find a place in history.
By incorporating those common elements mentioned, I intend to design the equestrian center indoor arena as a community space for the shared spiritual experience of the residents. This is the spiritual experience of people who want to focus a large part of their lives on a training relationship with very refined animals. In the context of the barn as a spiritual space, the constant attention of those people to their horses during the training process will become more than a physical activity. It will become more like the enveloping meditation of a religious experience.


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During the post-World War II period of American architecture, the focus of building was to provide ample single family housing for a booming population. The push was on to provide a quantity of housing at affordable prices for the working middle class American. Tract housing was the result of this effort; its simplified forms were arranged on a regular rectangular grid. Existing landscape features which established natural boundaries for communities and defined neighborhoods were bulldozed in the interest of construction economy.
In this process, the neighborhood community was lost. The loss has certainly been felt, and the trend in recent years had been to search out landscape amenities such as creeks, valleys and wooded areas and to design communities around them. By locating residential developments in ideally suited natural settings, a community can be made sensitive to such human needs as a sense of place. Buildings can be designed to provide appropriate human scale while reserving quality outdoor spaces for the residents and others who visit there. In an attempt to create a more democratic form of movement, residential plans can place special emphasis on reducing and regulating vehicular traffic on the site. In an attempt to minimize spacial endlessness, residential plans can break the community into masses and volumes com-phrehensible to the pedestrian. In providing for security and privacy, residential plans can capitalize on vegetation and other pleasing natural amenities. Residential planning at this time calls for environments that encourage leisure time activities and social integration. At the same time, separate space for the family unit and individual family members is necessary.


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The thesis project is a small residential community of 24 housing units arranged in multi-family clusters, focused on an equestrian training center. The development will include the residences, community areas, the stables, indoor training areas, outdoor training areas, and facilities for maintenance and parking, located on a fringe suburban site in northwest Jefferson County, Colorado.
The project site is a 68 acre parcel of gently south sloping ground adjacent to Brayfield Park, a Jefferson County Open Space park currently planned to include equestrian activities. It is currently used by the owner for his residence and for the location of his long lasting Arabian horse breeding operation. The surrounding area includes a mixture of great open space areas extending to the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, small one family horse properties, and some new residential single family developments.
There are many different breeds of horses, types of horse training and varieties of sport horse activities which are popular in the Denver metropolitan area. The current project is centered on the special needs of equestrians devoted to the breeds of horses, training techniques and activities of classical dressage and combined training.


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The major design concepts which are to be explored in the thesis project and their interpretation as project statements include the following:
FUNCTION
It is common for people interested in training horses to live in residential developments and for their horses to live in horse developments (stables). A lot of commuting must take place for the people and horses to enjoy each other. Much time, fuel for vehicles and vehicle maintenance can be saved if equestrians and their mounts live in the same designed community. The design of the community should optimize,the equestrian activities which can take place without commuting or transporting horses to other locations.
Horses are sensitive, social animals who need a rich and varied environment to be happy. The horse stalls and outdoor horse runs should be stimulating environments which allow contact with people, other horses, and the physical environment to provide a high level of stimulation for the animals.
People who train horses and work in the real world need help (physical and managerial) to adequately care for and to enjoy working with the animals (i.e. if a trainer spends all his/her time hauling manure, the personal relationship with the animal can be lost). The horse care environment should optimize efficient care using a small maintenance staff.
In a training environment, the movement of people and horses needs careful design attention for efficiency, safety, economy and social enjoyment. Horse/people circulation design is a key element in creating a good training atmosphere. Horse/people, people and vehicle circulation paths should not interfere with each other and at times must meet safely and efficiently.


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Exciting training/working facilities can attract professionals to help make an equine environment more self-sufficient. Such professionals might include: dressage/jumping instructors and trainers, farrier, veterinarian and assistants, grooms, horse broker, show organizer/ manager, truck driver, groundskeeper/gardener, doctor/emergency medical technician. Attractive spaces must be provided to meet the needs of such professionals to attract them to the community and to keep them there.
Horse facilities are used by heavy, strong, and sometimes rough animals (and people?); the facilities must be able to withstand much more punishment than an average residential development. Facilities, especially for horses, should be strong, durable, low maintenance, and have specially designed safe edges, have good drainage and soft surfaces where possible.
Dressage/ combined training horses are especially large, heavy animals. Areas for their care and training should be designed for the large horse and its special needs.
Caring for horses is hard physical work. Mechanized equipment should be used to advantage, but should minimally disrupt the community focus on equestrian training.
Horse barns and stables have a long design history. The careful study of that history should be made to identify the important design elements that are common to the general design of such facilities.
ECONOMY
Economies of scale can encourage joint ownership of horse care facilities and horse care equipment and vehicles, including: trucks, tractor, trailers, jumps, and show equipment. The design should encourage the efficient ownership, storage, and maintenance of such items.


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PROGRAM


PROGRAM SUMMARY


RESIDENCES AREA
Housing Units (10-2BR, 15-Housing Yard/Garden Housing Garages Swimming Pool Pool Locker Rooms (2) Pool Toilets (2) SQ FT -3BR) 37,400 15,625 12,000 2,000 400 300
Residences Total 50,100(Covered)
COMMUNITY AREAS AREA
Entry Foyer Community Room Lounge Barn Office Association Office Kitchen Laundry Storage Room Barn Manager's Apt. Toilets (2) Circulation SQ FT 200 850 240 160 160 300 80 100 650 400 700
Community Areas Total 4,140 (Covered)
STABLES AREA
Horse Stalls (50) Horse Runs (50) Feed Rooms (8) Tack Rooms (8) Barn Maint. Closets (8) Hay Barn Bedding Storage Manure Storage Circulation . SQ FT 7.200 18,000 960 1.200 130 1,500 1,000 450 3,000
Stables Total
15,000(Covered)


INDOOR TRAINING AREA
Indoor Arena Locker Room Shower Room Wash Rack Vet Bay/Tacking Area Restraining Stall Blacksmith Shop Circulation SQ FT 21,120 560 160 120 400 200 170 5,600
Indoor Training Total 28,400(Covere
OUTDOOR TRAINING AREA
Outdoor Arena I Outdoor Arena II Covered Lunge Ring (3) Outdoor Jumping Jump Equip. Storage Paddock Paddock Shelter (8) Pasture Pasture Shelter (2) Cross-Country Course SQ FT 12,900 8,600 12,330 0.9 acres 300 4 acres 1,600 20 acres 400 20 acres
Outdoor Training Total 14,630(Covered
MAINTENANCE PARKING AREA
Maintenance Shop Maintenance Garage Pump Room Mechanical Elec. Room Parking-Barn Parking-Visitor (Paddock) Parking-Trailer (Paddock) Semi-Truck Turnaround SQ FT 575 1,800 90 200 6,000 7,800
Maintenance Parking Total __2,700 (Covere<
PROGRAM TOTAL (COVERED)
114,970


SPATIAL INVENTORY


Space 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 Residences
2 Community Areas
3 Stables J
4 Indoor Training W #
5 Outdoor Training (4$ £
6 Maintenance-Prkng 3 9 3
CLUSTERS ADJACENCY MATRIX


Space 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 Housing Units
2 Housing Yard/Gard.
3 Housing Garages &
4 Swimming Pool 'A O
5 Pool Locker Rooms O 0 0 m
6 Pool Toilets Q Q 0
RESIDENCES



Space:
Housing Units

Users:
Residents, guests
Activities:
Living Activities Maintenance Activities Sleeping
Spatial Qualities:
Quiet retreat from active stable and training areas Privacy between housing units
Physical Requirements:
Units are grouped in clusters Approx. 4 units per cluster Views to equestrian center, training areas Units are 2-3 stories Balconies are outdoor galleries Include a "passage" fom home to horse environment Main visitor entrance opposite equestrian center Protected on North and NW Open to South and SE Covered parking-two cars



Areas:
Space Area
Description Sq Ft
Living Room 200
Dining Room 160
Kitchen 120
Sun Room/Nook 100
Master Bedroom 180
Master Bath 80
Bedroom (2nd) 140
Bedroom (3 BR Model) 140
Bath 40
Bath (at Mudroom) 40
Den 140
Mudroom 80
Circulation 120-140
Total Per Unit
2 Bedroom 1,400
3 Bedroom 1,560





Space:
Yard/Garden-Housing Units
Area:
625 sq. ft. per unit minimum
Users:
Residents, guests
Adjacencies
Activities:
Private open space for family outdoor activities
Spatial Qualities:
Private, landscaped "open space"
Physical Requirements:
Patio, partially covered (120 sq. ft./unit) Yard are (300 sq. ft. min./unit)
Garden area (200 sq. ft. approx./unit)
Lawn/garden sprinkler system
Shade trees
Privacy fence
South, SE exposure



Space:
Parking-Housing Units
y^Vrea *
480 sq. ft. covered
Users:
Residents, guests
Adj
acencies
Activities:
Vehicle parking
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
One two-car garage per housing unit One visitor parking space per housing unit (uncovered)
Pleasant walking path from visitor space to front entry of unit
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Space:
Swimming Pool
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Users:
Residents, guests
Activities:
Swimming, relaxing, interacting with neighbors
Spatial Qualities:
"Oasis" that blends with natural environment
P hy s ica 1 Requ i r emen ts:
Medium size pool Shallow water area Deep water area Diving area Underwater lights Concrete deck Small pool equipment room Pool water heater Circulator system Chlorinator Chemical storage Equipment storage Protected from North/NW
Area:

Adjacencies




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Space:
Pool Locker Room
Users:
Residents, guests
Area:
Adjacencies
Activities:
Clothing storage and changing area
Spatial Qualities:
Bright, airy feeling
Physical Requirements:
Men's locker room
Women's locker room
One locker per housing unit
Approx. 20 linear feet of benches
Concrete or tile floor with floor drain
Natural lighting skylights
Natural ventilation
Located on north side of pool


mmmmmmmmsmMimm *" *' v mmamsm as??*? Space: r Pool Toilets Area:
Users: Adjacencies
Residents, guests
Activities:
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
Men's toilet; wc, urinal, shower, lav Women's toilet; wc, wc, shower, lav Concrete or tile floor with floor drain Natural lighting skylights Natural ventilation
Located on north side of pool, adjacent to locker rooms


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Space 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 Entry Foyer .
2 Community Room
3 Lounge m fi
4 Barn Office id id b
5 Association Office 3 d
6 Kitchen O 0 0
7 Laundry O 0 0 0 0
8 Storage Room 0 Q p b# Q 0 3
9 Barn Mgr. Apt. o 0 0 0 o g 0
1 0 Toilets m mm 0 Q 0 Q
COMMUNITY AREAS




Space:
Foyer
Residents
Guests
Show and Clinic Participants Equine Professionals
Activities:
Entrance to the equestrian center Social gatherings Clinic registration
Spatial Qualities:
Rich materials Inviting space Rich architectural meaning
Users:
Physical Requirements:
View to community room
Industrial grade carpet
Display areas for trophies, photos
Area:
160 so. ft.
Adjacencies



Space:
Community Room
Area:
700 sq. ft.
Users
Residents
Guests
Show and clinic participants
Adjacencies
Activities:
Social gatherings Association meetings Clinics and educational meetings Horse show registration
Spatial Qualities
Comfortable, bright, "living room" environment
Physical Requirements:
Portable seating for 80 people Industrial grade carpet View to arena
May include mezzainine level Fireplace
Natural lighting skylights, clerestory Storage for chairs, cleaning equipment, tables Serving bar



Space:
Lounge
Users:
Residents
Guests
Equine Professionals
Activities:
Relaxation, conversation Observation of training and riding
Spatial Qualities:
Comfortable "den" type environment
Physical Requirements:
Sink
8' counter space Cupboards Refrigerator Microwave
View to indoor arena at side Carpet
Mud grate with pit for muddy boots Chairs, couches, table



Area:
240 so. ft.
Adjacencies


Space: Barn Office
Users: Barn manager Residents Trainers Equestri
Activities:
Stable and equine areas management bookkeeping
Communication between barn manager and residents, trainers and equestrian professionals
Spatial Qualities:
Equal status business office, invites participation
Physical Requirements:
View to arenas indoor, outdoor Furniture writing desk, 4 chairs typing table, computer desk


Area
160 sq. ft.
Adjacencies


Space:
Association Office
Users:
Association manager Residents
Activities:
Housing management and bookkeeping Communication between association manager and residents
Spatial Qualities:
Equal status business office, invites participation
P hy s ica 1 Requ i rements:
View to swimming pool, residences Furniture writing desk, 4 chairs, typing table, computer desk
Area:
160 sq. ft.
Adjacencies


Space:
Kitchen
Users:
Residents, guests
Activities:
Food preparation for community room gatherings
Spatial Qualities:
Bright and roomy feeling Semi-private nook area
P hy s ica 1 Requ i r ements:
Refrigerator with freezer Stove (ventilation required) Microwave Sink
Dishwasher
Storage for dishes, food Food preparation area 20 linear feet of counter space Clay tile floor with floor drain Sun nook table and chairs Windows (outside walls)


Area:
Adjacencies



Space:
1 Laundry-Horse Equipment
Users
Residents Maintenance staff
Activities:
Washing and drying horse clothing and stable equipment
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
Commercial size washer
Commercial size dryer
Large laundry sink (24"D x 36"W)
Concrete floor surface
Floor drain
Drying racks
Storage cabinets
Counter space (approx. 8 LF)
Waterproof covering on wall surfaces
Natural and artificial lighting
Natural and mechanical ventilation



Area:
80 sq. ft.
Adjacencies



Space:
Storage Room
Users:
Maintenance staff
Activities:
Storage of trunks, blankets, personal show equipment in off-season
Spatial Qualities:
Secure storage space Limited access
Physical Requirements:
Shelves 18" deep
42" sliding door
Concrete floor
Secure, barn manager access



Area:
100 sq. ft.
Adjacencies


Barn Manager Apartment
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Space:

Area
650 sq. ft.
Users
Barn Manager Guests
Adjacencies
Activities:
Barn manager home life
Spatial Qualities:
Quiet retreat from active stable and training areas
Physical Requirements:
1 bedroom
Mudroom
Bath
Kitchen
Living room
Closet storage
Windows with distant view
Exterior door to outside
Interior door to indoor training areas
Porch/deck


Space
Toilets (Barn) M & W
Users
Residents, guests Maintenance staff Trainers
Equestrian professionals
Activities:
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
Men's toilet: wc, urinal, lav Women's toilet: wc, wc, lav Supply closets Privacy stalls with doors Tile floor
Area:
200 so. ft.
Adjacencies


Space 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 Horse Stalls
2 Horse Runs @
3 Feed Room c#
4 Tack Rooms i y
5 Barn Maint. Clos.
6 Hay Barn 0
7 Bedding Storage % Q
8 Manure Storage # o 0 0
STABLES


Space: Area:
* Stalls 144 168 sq. ft.
Users Horses Adjacencies
Residents ___
Trainers 11 ^ s. / pe&Q\\l&
Equestrian professionals f >, |
Activities: | £*4UJ jj \, J \( ^pPa-^
Horse housing
Stall cleaning and maintenance Feeding
Spatial Qualities: / KAjMt-
Safe, comfortable environment for horse'^^ 1 ( Fee^ )\ l^Lo^pr// (f TA^ Bright, open feeling l frsvH JJ \ / ftoH
Access to sight and sound of other horses ' V 7a- // \\
and stable activities
Physical Requirements:
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12 'W x 12 D or 12'W x 14'D \\ / (=^L^n I <=i5TAU'
9 height minimum
Concrete floors with rubber mats, wood shavings Solid wood wall 5' high
Bars or mesh above 5' height If PmU
Sliding doors solid base bars \\ ' / if \\ u pr...\
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Horse run doors swinging Dutch door Automatic waterers Grain feeder Hay manger
Fire sprinkler system Natural lighting Protected artificial lighting


Space:
Horse Runs
Users:
Horses
Residents
Trainers
Equestrian professionals
Activities:
Horse relaxation, observation of center activities
Spatial Qualities:
Protected, safe vantage point with visual environment
Physical Requirements:
12'W x 30'L x 5'H minimum fenced area Pipe rail fence with electric wire Slope grade away from stall Drainage base with drainage tile South/southeast orientation
Area: 360 sq. ft.
Adjacencies



Space
Feed Room (each stable)
Users
Maintenance staff
Activities:
Storage of grain, feed supplements, and oral medications Storage of grain cart and buckets Weighing and mixing of grain rations
Spatial Qualities:
Dry, protected from weather Organized, "self-managing" facility
P hy s ica 1 Requ i r emen ts:
Grain bins (3) 6'x6'x8'
Natural ventilation 42" door/sliding Shelves for food supplements Concrete floor
Refrigerator for medications Cart storage Salt block storage Scale/counter



Adjacencies



Space:

Tack Room (each stable)


Area:
130 sq. ft.
Users:
Residents
Guests
Trainers
Adjacencies
Activities:
Storing horse tack
Cleaning, conditioning horse tack
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
Community tack rooms with individual locker space: saddle and bridle racks, hooks inside 4 locker spaces/tack room Mechanical ventilation Utility sink Counter space Mirror
Wood floor covering water resistant
Saddle rack above splash bin
Mud grate/box
Electric heat
Firs sprinkler system



Space:
Barn Maintenance Closet (each stable)
Area:
16 sq. ft.

Users: Adjacencies
Maintenance staff
Activities:
Storage of tools
Spatial Qualities:
P hy s ica 1 Requ i rements:
4'W x 4'D x 8'H minimum 42" sliding door Tool racks Shelves
Fire sprinkler system


Users:
Maintenance staff
Activities:
Hay storage
Loading and unloading of hay bales
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
1500 sq. ft.
Open for ventilation Covered for water shed Good drainage from site


Area:
1500 sq.
ft.
Adjacencies



Space

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Bedding Storage
Area:
1000 sq. ft,

Users:
Maintenance staff
Adjacencies
Activities:
Storage of two week supply of wood shavings for bedding
Spatial Qualities:
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmsmsmm
Physical Requirements:
Approximately 9500 cubic feet of storage Easily accessed by large truck Located near manure storage Portable construction
i



Space:
Manure Storage
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Area:
450 sq. ft.
Users:
Maintenance staff
Adjacencies

Activities:
Manure storage for approx. 30 days
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Spatial Qualities
Physical Requirements:
Approximately 4500 cubic feet of storage
Provide area for future methane gas production system
Heavy, low maintenance, noncorrosive materials
Locate out of line of views from equestrian center and neighbors


I
Space 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 Indoor Arena
2 Locker Room
3 Shower Room Q IP
4 Wash Rack 9 0 D
5 Vet Bay Sp* &
6 Restraining Stall Q Q Q Q 9
7 Blacksmith Shop 9 2 0 Q 0
INDOOR TRAINING


Space:

Indoor Arena
Area:
21,120 sq. ft. +
Users:
Horses
Residents
Trainers
Horse show and clinic participants
Adjacencies
Activities:
Horse training and conditioning Riding instruction Horse shows and clinics
Spatial Qualities:
Protected, bright environment Spiritual, harmonious feeling
Physical Requirements
24m x 80m + 4m x 20m = 80' x 264' =
21,120 sq. ft., total arena Height 16' minimum
Slanted walls (solid) 12-15; 4' high Mirrors on one long side, on one short side
Packed dirt, tanbark or fiber fill surface Natural lighting clerestorys/skylights Railing wood, solid 4' high View from community room/lobby/lounge Clinic/show seating 100 max. (separate from lounge viewing area)
Equip, exit door to outdoors 10' x 10' Tacking area for 2 horses
Equipment storage area jumping helmets, rails, obstacles






Space:
Locker Room (Barn) M & W
Users:
Residents, guests Maintenance staff Trainers
Activities:
Clothes changing Personal grooming
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
Lockers
Benches 10 linear feet Coat hooks for clothes Lavatory/counter space Mechanical ventilation Clay tile floor Waterproof wall finish Mirror
Area:
280 sq. ft. total
Adj
acencies



Space:
Shower Room, M & W
Users:
Residents, guests
Activities:
Showering, shampooing Personal grooming
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
2 showers (privacy stalls)
Drying area
Bench 8 linear feet
Clothes hooks
Wall mount hair dryer

Area:
80 sq. ft. total
Adjacencies



Space:
Wash Rack
Users:
Horses
Residents
Trainers
Equestrian professionals
Activities:
Bathing horses
Horse physical therapy
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
10'W x 12'D x 9'H Water service, hot and cold Shelf for shampoo, grooming tools Cross ties
Blanket rack in dry location Towel bars
Concrete floor with rubber mat, floor drain
Adjacencies


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Space:
Tacking Area/Vet Bay (4)
Users: Horses
Residents, guests Trainers
Equestrian professionals
Activities:
Grooming
Tack up for horse work Veterinary exams Veterinary treatment
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
8 W x 12'D x 9 H
2x wood wall panel 5' height
Cross ties
Concrete floor with rubber mat Saddle rack (fold up)
Bridle rack Blanket racks

Adjacencies


Space:
Restraining Stall
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Users: Horses
Residents
Equestrian professionals
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Activities:
Medical treatments
Spatial Qualities:
Nonthreatining to horses
Physical Requirements:
3 W x 7 L x 6 H Manufactured equipment Steel tube construction In open area or vet stall with entry and exit Lighting
Electrical service Utility sink
Concrete floor with rubber mat


100 sq. ft.
Adjacencies


Space:
Blacksmith Shop
Area
170 sq. ft.
Users: Horses
Farrier Horse Handler
Activities:
Hoof trimming Horseshoeing Hoof treatment
Spatial Qualities:
Adjacencies
Physical Requirements:
12'W x 14'L x 9'H, minimum dimensions Blacksmith forge (natural gas) Partition horse from equipment Provide farrier vehicle access Seating area (bench)
Concrete floor with rubber mat Anvil, tool shelves, water bucket Cross ties


Space 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1 Outdoor Arena I
2 Outdoor Arena II a
3 Covered Lunge Ring 4 Outdoor Jumping 0 0 a
5 Jump Equip. Stor. o 0 Q #
6 Paddock a a a 0
7 Paddock Shelter Q ' \
8 Pasture 0 g
9 Pasture Shelter Q 0 0 #
O 0 a o Q 0 Q
OUTDOOR TRAINING


:
Space:
Outdoor Arena I

Area:
12,900 sq. ft.
Users: Horses
Residents
Guests
Trainers
Adj
acencies
Activities:
Dressage training Horse shows
Spatial Qualities:
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Physical Requirements:
20 x 60m
Fence 1' high, one entrance panel at "A"
Lighting floodlighting for shows at night
Judges stand at "C"
Seating area 100 seats Tacking area




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Space:
Outdoor Arena II
Area:
8,600 sq. ft.
Users:
Residents
Guests
Trainers
Adjacencies
Activities:
Dressage training Liberty training Liberty exercise Horse shows
Spatial Qualities:
P hy s ica 1 Requ i rements:
20 x 40m
Fence 5' high board fence with 2 gates Dirt, tanbark footing
Lighting floodlighting for night work Tacking area




Space:
Users:
Covered Lunge Ring (3)
Horses
Residents
Trainers
Activities:
Horse training and conditioning Riding instruction
Spatial Qualities:
Area:
12,330 sq. ft. total
Adjacencies
Protected, bright environment Privacy
No distractions
Physical Requirements:
Independent from main area Two 55' diameter; one 70' diameter Covered for protection from weather Height minimum head space 12 ft. Curving slanted walls 12-15; 5 ft Adaptable to weather: open from sides roof in summer, closed in winter One entrance gate 5 ft. nonsagging Skylights
Artificial lighting Pack dit, tanbark fill



Space:
Outdoor Jumping Area


Area:
39,000 sq. ft.
Users: HOrses Adjacencies
Residents
Guests
Trainers
Activities:
Show jump taining Gymnastic training
Spatial Qualities:
P hy s ica 1 Requ i remen ts:
40m x 90m (or 130' x 300')
5' high board fence
2 entrance gates, close together
Lighting floodlighting for night work
Seating area 100 seats
Dirt, tanbark footing
Tacking area
Ambulance parking


Space:
Jump Equipment Storage
Users:
Residents
Trainers
Activities:
Storage for jump standards, poles, cavaletti and other items
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
Dirt floor
Full length vehicle access doors Entry door
Secure storage space Lighting artificial
Area:
300 sa ft.

Adjacencies



Space:
Users
Paddocks (8)
Horses
Residents
Trainers
Activities:
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
Area
1/2 acre
. ..

Adjacencies
Approximately 1/2 acre Good drainage Woven wire fence on treated post,
5' high
Automatic waterer, freeze protected Covered loafing shelter 12'W x 30'L x 9'H Truck vehicle access
Separate paddock with circulation spaces




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Space:
Paddock Shelters
(8)
Area:
1600 sq.
ft. total
Users: Adjacencies
Horses Residents Maintenance staff
Activities:
Loafing
Spatial Qualities:
Unobtrusive on landscape Protected, safe feeling
P hy s ica 1 Requ i remen ts:
Locate at the fenceline of paddocks 2 adjoining walls covered by a roof Automatic waterer nearby, freeze protected Same roofing material as Equestrian Center Same or similar wall finish material as Equestrian Center Sized for approx. 6 horses Good drainage
Dimension approx. 10' x 20'
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in the NW corner


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Space:
Pasture (3)
Horses Residents Trainers
Activities:
Grazing
Exercise
Loafing
Spatial Qualities:
Users:
Physical Requirements:
6-7 acres each
Loven wire fence on treated post,
5' high Good drainage
Automatic waterer, freeze protected Covered loafing shelter 12'W x 30 Truck vehicle access South slope Irrigation (mobile)


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Area:
Approx. 20 acres total
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Adjacencies

L x 9 H


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Space:
Cr9ss-Country Course

Area:
15-20 acres
Users: Horses
Residents
Guests
Trainers
Adjacencies
Activities:
Cross-country jump training Conditioning
Cross-country phase of horse trials and events
Physical Requirements:
15-20 acres
Variety of physical riding challenges including hills, streams, differences in soils, natural barriers and features and man-made obstacles Landscaping to enhance the natural setting 15-20 cross-country jumps: built with varied materials, heights, widths, up and downhill approaches Good drainage
Vehicle access to all parts of the course


I
Space 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 Maintenance Shop
2 Maint. Garage
3 Pump Room
4 Mech. Elec. Room (S
5 Parking-Barn 0 0
6 Parking-Visitor
7 Parking-Trailej:
8 Semi-Truck Turn o
MAINTENANCE PARKING


Space:
Maintenance Shop
Users:
Maintenance staff
Activities:
Equipment/vehicle repair and storage for tools
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
Repair bay (12'W x 20'D)
Equipment storage (200 sq. ft.) Workbench, parts storage (120 sq. ft Concrete floor Floor drain in repair bay Electric hoist, 7000 lb. capacity
Adjacencies



Space:
r Maintenance Garage
Area:
1800 sq. ft.


Users:
Maintenance staff
Adjacencies
Activities:
Storage of Equestrian Center service vehicles
Gasoline storage tank
Spatial Qualities:
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Physical Requirements:
Tractor bay (10'W x 20'D)
Pick-up truck bay (10'W x 20'D)
People van, 10 passenger bay (10'W x 20'D) Manure wagon bay (10'W x 20'D)
Tractor equipment storage (approx. 20' x 20') Water wagon bay/fire pump truck bay (10' x 20') Flat bed truck bay (12'W x 24'D)
Gasoline storage tank, underground, 1000 gallon gasoline pump Concrete floor
Floor drain, minimum one bay


Space:
Pump Room
Users:
Maintenance staff
Activities:
Spatial Qualities:
P hy s ica 1 Requ i remen ts:
Concrete floor with floor drain Freeze protection Water treatment equipment: water softner, chlorinator, water storage tank Good maintenance access Isolate for sound
Area: nn
90 sq. ft.
Adjacencies


Space
Maintenance/Electrical Room
Users:
Maintenance staff
Activities:
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
Locate at community areas Electrical service entry Electrical service panels Water heater
Forced air heating system Electric AC
Dust control system electronic cleaners Ventilation
Good maintenance access




Parking-Visitor and Trailer (2)
Users:
Horse show participants Clinic participants
Activities:
Parking for vehicles, trailers and trailer-tied horses at shows and clinics
Spatial Qualities:
Physical Requirements:
Combined with paddock space Graded dirt surface Swinging pipe vehicle entry gate Access from circulation road



Area
Two 1/2 acre spaces (paddocks)
Adjacencies



Space:
Semi-Truck Turnaround
Users:
Maintenance staff
Feed and bedding suppliers
Activities:
Truck access to hay, grain, bedding and manure
Large truck turnaround
Spatial Qualities:
Integral part of circulation road
Physical Requirements:
Approximately 100' in diameter Asphalt surface Good drainage
Access to hay, grain, bedding, and manure storage areas
Area:


CIRCULATION




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Space
Aisles-Indoor Covered Circulation
Users:
Horses
Residents
Equestrian professionals
Activities:
Access to and between stalls, indoor arena, wash racks, feed room, tack room, grooming, vet, and shoeing areas
Spatial Qualities:
Bright
Adequate aisle width and head room to allow easy circulation of people, horses and equipment
Physical Requirements:
Concrete floor, rubber tiles
10' minimum width, 12' maximum width
9' minimum height
Flat surface
Natural lighting and artificial lighting
Sliding access door (10' x 10' minimum
People access door 3068



Space:
Bridle Path
Users: Horses
Residents
Trainers
Guests
Activities:
Pleasure riding
Training
Conditioning
Spatial Qualities:
Neat appearance
Lanscaped to give a variety of visual experience
Routed with branch paths to give a
'challenge
Physical Requirements:
6' wide
Dirt surface topped with tanbark
Landscaped in harmony with natural features
7-10 cross-country jumps: built with varied materials, heights, widths, up and downhill approaches, and with nonjump alternate paths available at every obstacle
Path near property perimeter
Good drainage
Signage for directions and distances


Space:
Walking Paths
Users:
Residents
Guests
Activities:
Walking
Jogging
Exercising
Sitting
Spatial Qualities:
Neat appearance
Landscaped to give a variety of
visual experiences Routed to give a variety of
P hy s ica 1 Requ i r emen ts:
Asphalt surface
4' width
Landscaped
Good drainage
Protected from NW winds
Exercise stations
Benches
Signage for directions and distances Low-level post lighting Route for minimal crossing of bridle Path near property perimeter



Space:
Circulation Road
Users:
Residents
Trainers
Equestrain professionals Maintenance staff
Activities:
Vehicle access to and between
housing, stables and outbuildings
Spatial Qualities:
Neat appearance Landscaped roadsides
Physical Requirements:
26' width Asphalt surface Good drainage
Hardy landscaping at sides


SITE ANALYSIS


The project site is a 68 acre parcel of south sloping ground surrounded by existing and planned boundaries, both man made and natural. These boundaries include Quaker street to the west, Brayfield Park to the south, an abandoned railroad embankment to the east, the planned extension of West 72nd Avenue to the north, and the existing right of way of the Church Ditch to the north and west.
The site is on a large scale seen as a portion of the valley of Ralston Creek which flows east from the mountains through Brayfield Park. The gound rises gently,free of the flood plain area in the bottom of the valley to a higher elevation on the north property boundary.
Two man made water ways serving regional irrigation needs have a great influence on the site; along with an existing ridge at the north and west site boundaries they create a great variety of natural enclosed spaces, topography and vegetation. The Highline Canal bisects the low ground of Brayfield Park and crosses the project site at the southeast corner of the property. This water way effectively isolates approximately 7 acres at the southeast. The second water way, the Church Ditch enters the property at the southwest corner near Brayfield Park and winds dramatically near the top of the western ridge creating two small attractive acreages adjoining Quaker Street. The Church Ditch continues north to define portions of the north and west property lines. A sharp 20 foot fise in elevation at the western and northwestern portions of the site rises to meet the heavy vegetation bordering the path of the Church Ditch.


Project Site
Brayfield Park
VICINITY MAP


SITE ANALYSIS MAP


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0 100 300 500
TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP and SECTION


Project Site
Brayfield Park
VEHICULAR ACCESS


Project Site Brayfield Park
RTD ROUTES


P 3.1 i^j_ dins, i'jici tcK j--1.110

I
Highline Canal Ralston Creek Beyond
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North Table Mountain
Foothills

8IS
Foothills Existing Buildings Quaker Estates Residential
View of Site and Brayfield Park Beyond from NE SITE PHOTOGRAPHS
Panorama Matchline


SITE DATA


I
A parcel of land located in Section 1, Township 3 South, Range 70 West of the 6th Principal Meridian, County of Jefferson, State of Colorado and being more particularly described as follows:
Beginning at the north one-quarter corner of said Section 1, thence S00o36'll"E, 30.00 feet along the north-south centerline of said section to the True Point of Beginning; thence N8856'06"W,
1025.00 feet to a point at the intersection of said line and the southerly right of way of the Church ditch; thence S5828'15"W, 741.20 feet along the southerly right of way line of said ditch; thence N8313'43"W, 467.68 feet across the ditch and along the northerly right of way of the Church ditch; thence following the northerly right of way of said ditch N6451'00"W,
195.16 feet; thence N7823'17"W, 101.22 feet to a point; thence from said point S8920'55"W,
242.79 feet to a point on the west section line; thence from said point S0056'39"E, 251.50 feet from the NW section corner Section 1 along the west section line; thence from said point S0056'39E, 1041.40 feet along the west section line to the southwest corner of lot 2, said lot being 1 of the 2 correction lots in this quarter section; thence S8940'12"E, 2642.51 feet to the southeast corner of said lot 2; thence N0036'11"W, 1278.28 feet along the north-south centerline of Section 1 to the True Point of Beginning, containing 68.2 acres more or less.
Together with 15 inches of Church ditch water together with carrying rights for same; also all seepage or spring water arising on the tract.
Except right, title and interest of Farmer's High Line Canal and Reservoir Company and Golden and Church. Ditch Company.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION


n_r
2 Miles
T
AREA ZONING MAP
1


1
I
The site soils information has been adapted from an F. M. Fox & Associates, Inc. analysis on a site for a proposed subdivision located at West 72nd Avenue and Quaker Street. This building site is immediately adjacent to the thesis project site at its northwest property line.
Subsoil conditions are somewhat erratic across the site. The general conditions include 1.5 feet to 2.5 feet of mixed soils and clay overlying both sandstone and claystone bedrock. The bedrock is interbedded in some 3 of the 4 test holes. The shallow clays have low to moderate swell potential. The sandstone is either non-swelling or has a very low swell potential and the claystone has a moderate to high swell potential. A free water level was found in only one of the test holes at a depth of 9 feet.
It is recommended that the buildings should be founded on straight shaft piers drilled a minimum of 4 feet into firm slaystone and/or sandstone bedrock. Small diameter piers drilled a minimum of 12 feet deep are recommended. Piers should be designed for a maximum end bearing pressure of 15,000 PSF, side shear of 1,500 PSF for the portion of the pier in firm bedrock, and a minimum dead-load pressure of 15,000 PSF based on pier end area. The piers may be stopped short if refusal is encountered in very hard sandstone bedrock. The dead-load pressure should be maintained as high as practicable.
Since relatively impermeable clays and bedrock were encountered at shallow depths, water from natural precipitation will lead to the creation of "perched" water tables around coundations after construction and occupancy. For this reason, an overall building drain system should be constructed, and the final grade should have a positive away from foundation walls of 12 inches in the first 10 feet on all sides of the exterior foundation walls.
SOILS REPORT