Citation
Highland Village Historical District

Material Information

Title:
Highland Village Historical District
Creator:
Dulaney, Daniel P
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
72 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, charts, maps, plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
City planning -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
City planning -- Colorado ( lcsh )
City planning ( fast )
Colorado ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 49).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Daniel P. Dulaney.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09206086 ( OCLC )
ocm09206086
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1982 .D84 ( lcc )

Full Text
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ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN AURARIA LIBRARY
HIOHIjAND
HIGHLAND VILLAGE HISTORICAL DISTRICT'
MASTERS of ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSITY of COLORADO DANIEL P DULANEY
TIIESIS
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HIGHLAND VILLAGE HISTORICAL DISTRICT
MASTERS of ARCHITECTURE
UNIVERSITY of COLORADO Tl IESIS
DANIEL I. DULANEY WK2
An Architectural Thesis presented to the
College of Design and Planning University of Colorado at Denver
In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of
Masters of Architecture


CONTENTS
PREAMBLE
Statement
Submittal Information Acknowledgements Ded i cat ion
PROPOSAL
Project Description Issues Addressed Scope and Limits Personal Goals
AMENITIES OF HIGHLAND Schools
Community/Recreation Center
Parks
F i re
Pol ice
Library
Day Care
Roads
Bus Routes
HIGHLAND NOW
Populat ion
Land Use and Zoning
Hous i ng
HISTORY
SITE FEATURES
Subsurface Conditions
Foundation Recommendations
Topography
Flood Plain
Vegetat i on
V i ews
W i nd
Climate
Solar
APPLICABLE CODES AND RECOMMENDATIONS Code Survey Zoning Code
Floor Area Ratio Calculations PROFORMA PROGRAMME
Programme Conclusions Building Area
DESIGN ANALYSIS
APPEND IY
Thes i s Commi ttee Schedule of Thesis Intervi ews Di rectory B i bliography
FINAL DESIGN
Project Summary Solution
SYSTEM SYNTHESIS
S i te Analys i s Dra i nage Cost Estimate Structural Analysis


PREAMBLE


STATEMENT
Highland Village Historical District this title at first seems to be a lot of verbage, but it brings together everything that I want to accomplish. There is an existing need and desire of the community to revitalize this important part of our past, by redeveloping an image for the Highland Neighborhood and creating a Village of people, commerce and recreation.


SUBMITTAL INFORMATION
i
This text is presented for the fulfillment of Pre-Thesis Design.
Summer Term, 1982
Professors: Gary Long
Paul Heath


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I would like to most sincerely thank the following people for their personal thoughts and time which they willingly devoted to me.
Razetta Colby Colorado Historical Society Joe Gonzalas Highland Neighborhood Housing Service Martin Saiz North Denver Workshop Hank Saipe Van Schaack


DEDICATION
I would like to dedicate this part of my life to another special part of my life my wife Janis for her never ending support.


PROPOSAL


PROPOSAL
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The parti consists of an inner city block, with the concept of integrating Office Space, Retail Shops and Housing into the existing fabric of the city.
The boundaries of the site (see accompanying plan) are somewhat irregular and the location of the site is in a historical part of Denver. The area is the Highland Business District and the site lies between Boulder Street and Central Street, and southwest of W. 15th Street.
Most of the lot is vacant, except for a few buildings: 1. The Highland Bar, which is located on 15th Street and sits next to the Historic Inverness Building; 2. There are also a row of five homes which are in need of a lot of repair.
The only other buildings on the block are the Historic Inverness Building (which was mentioned) and a row of five single family homes, which are modest in style but are an important neighborhood boundary to the historic brown stone houses above on W 28th Street.
ISSUES ADDRESS
The Highland Business District is in slow repair, with existing structures being remodeled by developers with some interest in the area. The site being considered is a prime focal point to the district. Approaching the district from Downtown Denver, one does not have a feeling of entry into the district, due to the abandoned lot on the left. Its location is such that it


needs considered thought as to what should be built on it. This entrance, although lacking the characteristics of a true entrance, is one of the primary entrances to the Highland neighborhood, and should be looked at accordingly.
The current rejuvination is slow but there are small businesses moving in with that "old pioneer spirit".
The surrounding Highland neighborhood is run down in many ways, but there are residences that have that spirit which any rejuvinating neighborhood needs. They look at the Highland Business District as a primary asset to the community in its role as a market center and entrance to their community.
SCOPE AND LIMITS
The scope of this endeavor is to create an environment which will foster contact between the differing cultural settings. A market is a very good way to do this, utilizing shops, offices and housing in a way which enhances the existing community. To do this it is important to scale the project down to the existing environment and not overwhelm it.
PERSONAL GOALS
To achieve a better understanding of the issues which address architecture, by working with the community needs and integrating these needs with the surrounding environment.




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HIGHLAND AMENITIES
SCHOOLS
There are two elementary schools and one high school in the neighborhood. North High School has a capacity of 2,100 students. The 22 acre site includes land recently acquired to expand school facilities in conjunction with an anticipated capital program. Improvements to be added consist of a football field, baseball diamong, tennis courts, auditorium, additional parking and landscaping. Further, school officials are presently studying the feasibility of obtaining additional land to the east which would unify the sites of North High School and Valdez Elementary.
North High School is being studied by interested residents and City and School officials as to possible expansion south across Speer Boulevard.
This project will be a joint City-School endeavor to provide a campus adjacent to North High with additional open space and park land for the community.
Valdez Elementary School, with a capacity of 855, is a new school built in 1974. The school property, located on the southern edge of the neighborhood, encompasses approximately five acres.
Bryant-Webster School has a capacity of 690.
It is situated on approximately three acres of land. Two homes, located on the southeast corner of Shoshone Street, could be acquired for future parking and school expansions should the need arise.
There is one private school in the neighborhood called the "Jesus Center". This non-denomina-tional facility, serving kindergarten through


grade 12, is located at 3600 Zuni Street and occupies a site of about one acre. Most of the school's 1975 enrollment of 300 live outside the neighborhood.
COMMUNITY AND RECREATION CENTER
The Northside Community Center occupies two acres of city-owned land at 3551 Pecos Street. This facility leases space to the Denver Public Schools' Metropolitan Youth Center, an alternative education program for high school students and Mile High Day Care Association. The center also conducts its own youth and senior related activities.
Ashland Recreation Center at 2960 Fife Court is owned and operated by the Parks and Recreation Department. It is open after school, during the evening hours and during summer. It is located on .62 acres with the following facilities: gym, kitchen facilities, a large game room, and one small office.
PARKS
CXhere are two mini-parks in this neighborhood. One is Hirshorn Park at Erie and Tejon Streets on 2.2 acres. The other is Bernabe "Indio" Franco Park at W. 37th and Lipan Street, approx imately half an acre. This park could be expan ded further on W. 37th Avenue and Kalamath Street. Hirshorn Park is deteriorating and needs some improvements. This property could be expanded along Boulder Street in the future, which would entail acquisition of about four dwelling units.
FIRE
The neighborhood is served by a new fire station located on the corner of W. 38th Avenue and Vallejo Street, equipped with a pumper and a crew of 15 men and 3 officers.
POLICE
Police District Station #1, located in Jefferson Park, serves Highland. Highland is part of precincts 106, 109 and 110. The boundaries are W. 44th Avenue on the north, W. 23rd Avenue on the south, Lowell Boulevard on the west and the Platte River and Fox Street on the east.
LIBRARY
The Woodbury branch library with 48,000 volumes is located west of Federal Boulevard in the West Highland neighborhood. It serves an area within a one mile radius, covering most of Jefferson Park, West Highland, Sunnyside, Sloan Lake and Highland neighborhood.
DAY CARE
The day care centers are the Chapel Day Care Center, operated by All Saints Church (20 children) and the Mile High Day Care Program at the community center with 40 children. Five day care homes are scattered throughout the neighborhood. Three head start centers are located at 46th and Zuni Street, 30th and Zuni Street and 25th and Clay Street. The Denver Public Schools operate pre-school programs for four year old children at Valdez and Bryant-Webster Elementary School.


ROADS
There are major streets which are in and around the Highland area. The Valley Highway borders the southeastern edge. Speer Boulevard runs along the southwest border. Federal Boulevard is on the west, and 38th Avenue is on the north. Major collectors which run through the neighborhood, running north and south, are Zuni, Pecos and Osage. Collectors which run east and west are 32nd Avenue and 29th Street. Major access routes to Downtown Denver are the 13th, 16th and 20th Street Viaducts.
BUS ROUTES
There are bus routes on 38th Avenue, 32nd Avenue, 29th Avenue, Federal Boulevard, Tejon Street, Pecos Street, Osage Street, and the 15th, 16th and 20th Street Viaducts.
OTHER
AA new economic venture, in a grocery store called "La Tienda", has been started by Father Joseph Lara. It is located on the corner of W. 35th and Mariposa. The entire neighborhood is participating in this cooperative.
ENVIRONMENT
Highland, as the name implies, is situated on a bluff overlooking the Platte River Valley and the Central Business District. In fact, there is an elevation difference of approximately 150 feet from the river bottom to Federal Boulevard. The landscape displays an excellent variety of trees, plants and bushes.
Air pollution is a major metropolitan problem and, due to Highland's location, close to 1-25, a concentration of smog is an almost daily occurrence. A major contributor to air pollution is high traffic volumes on the numerous collector streets in this neighborhood and the arterial streets, which, with Interstate 1-25, add to the City's overall pollution levels.
Though there are forty-four acres of vacant property in this neighborhood, most of it is adjacent to the Valley Highway. Much of the vacant land is in small parcels of one to five lots, which are generally unkempt and weedy. Those lots south of W. 32nd Avenue and those in commercially zoned districts will probably be developed over time. Those few vacant lots in the heart of the low density residential section could be used by the community as vegetable gardens, redeveloped or sold to adjacent home-owners .
The Platte River Greenway, currently under development, is a system of parks, picnic areas and boating favilities linked together by 10 miles of hike-bike trails. The focal point of the Greenway is at the confluence of Cherry Creek and the Platte River, directly adjacent to Highland. This section features an outdoor amphitheater, a waterfront plaza and a soon to be developed 13 acre park, south of Speer Boulevard. Direct access from Highland to the Greenway by auto, bicycle and foot traffic is currently from 15th Street and 18th Streets.
The possibility of a hike-bike trail connecting the Greenway and W. 37th Avenue via the Denver-Rio Grande Railroad (D&RG) underpass at Inca Street is being investigated to provide direct access from the northern section of


Highland.
Future planning in the central valley should consider the impact of large scale development of the type proposed by Burlington Northern, which Marvin Davis is considering developing. Also, the West Bank Development which Goff Corp. is studying could have a tremendous impact on Highland and the Platte River Greenway.
The Platte River Greenway, the Auraria Higher Education Center and any future development in the Platte Valley could provide a tremendous stimulus for continued rejuvenation of the mixed-use area around and along the Highland bluffs in the vicinity of 15th Street, Boulder and Central Streets.


HIGHLAND
NOW


HIGHLAND NOW
Highland represents a valuable resource for Denver: it provides housing close to the Central Business District, Valley Highway and the Platte River Greenway; it has a hilly topography which provides panoramic views of the CBD; and it supplies moderately priced, reasonably sound, housing. Although some of its existing housing is blighted, much remains in good condition or can be rehabilitated. Sites are available on the fringes of the neighborhood for redevelopment of new medium and high density housing and commercial/ office uses.
Problems to be found within the neighborhood include: housing constructed prior to 1940 showing signs of deterioration; residents moving out and being replaced by low income, elderly and minority families; pockets of business zoning allowing uses detrimental to adjacent residential properties; and a lack of strong organized leadership.
POPULATION
A loss of over 500 dwelling units from 1950 to 1976 in Highland has led to a decrease of approximately 2,500 people. The downward trend may have been slowed due to the in-migration of Chicano families who usually have larger households. The percentage of Chicanos in the total population rose from 20% in 1960, to 47% in 1970. The population was comparable in age categories to the rest of Denver in 1970, with a slightly higher percentage of persons 65 years and older. The educational level shows median number of school years completed as lower than the City median. There is a high percentage of the population employed in semi and unskilled jobs.


The median family income rate of increase is slower in Highlands than in Denver. While the actual dollar figure has risen, the neighborhood income as a percent of the City median has declined.
LAND USE AND ZONING
Primary land use in the neighborhood is residential; the majority is single family in nature. However, multi-family uses of varying densities are found in virtually every residential block. To a great extent, this mix is due to the major residential zone, R-2, which allows both single and low-density multiple units. In addition, many higher density multi-units predate the current zone ordinance and are thus legally non-conforming.
Nearly 37 acres are used for commercial and office purposes. These uses are scattered throughout the neighborhood with major business nodes along West 38th Avenue, Speer Boulevard and Tejon Street. The remainder of West 38th Avenue is lined with predominately sound residential units that represent a valuable neighborhood housing resource.
As was mentioned before, private commercial redevelopment is occurring on 15th Street between Boulder and Central Streets. The Ashland Block, on which sits the "Inverness Building", owned by Jim and Angelo Karagas, for the most part has been renovated. First floor rentals have tripled and quadrupled, forcing out many long-term tenants. This is unfortunate because the artists added a pleasant atmosphere to the area.
The block across 15th Strret on the northeast side is owned by Heritage Financial Corporation. They are currently renovating the Marquis Building and plan on renovating the Slockett and Shan non Building at a later date. They also plan on turning the vacant land between the Marquis and Slocket Buildings into a park. Muddy Waters of the Platte River Cafe House, owned by Joe DeRose Shirley Salisbury and Jerry Yanish, is hoping to relocate within the development. We will see if that actually happens, since the new space will mean higher rent. It will also destroy the existing flavor Muddy's has to offer. Heritage Financial Corporation has given this block its own personalized name The Heritage Highland Block.
Industrial uses are scattered on small parcels with some concentration in the northeast section of the neighborhood. The industrial uses have located where zoning permits within industrial zones or in the B-4. Public and quasi-public uses account for 11% and vacant land comprises 7% of the neighborhood's net land use. The former consists of public facilities, schools, churches and fraternal organizations. Vacant land is scattered throughout the Highland in no definite pattern.
HOUSING
Housing in the Highland neighborhood is experiencing deterioration. Renter occupancy and percent of multi-units are increasing, while housing values are not rising as rapidly as for the city as a whole. Private investment in the neighborhood is minimal. Vacant and dilap-iadated structures were concentrated north of


North High School. Highland is a transitional neighborhood, requiring intensive effort on the part of government and the residents to improve the residential climate.
In the 1950's, at the same time that housing in the neighborhood was beginning to show its age and require repairs and remodeling, the move to the suburbs got into full swing aided by the Federal Housing Administration and the Veterans Administration. The families that bought and rented Highland homes, as a result of this move to the suburbs, were generally of lower income that those they replaced. Many were Chicano families displaced by highway construction and by urban renewal activities. Elderly home owners on fixed incomes tended to be left behind, further lowering the income level. In some cases, because eligible buyers were themselves moving to the suburbs, homes were difficult to sell. Former owners rented, upkeep gradually declined, and some homes stood vacant and boarded up. Private investment by mortgage lenders declined. The financial resources, skill, and ability to maintain and remodel homes declined as the need for better maintenance increased. The neighborhood became less socially cohesive, making it easier for commercial zoning and one way arterials to encroach upon the residential areas which resulted in further deterioration and led to further withdrawal of mortgage money.


HISTORY


HISTORY
Highland was one of the three original areas, clustered around the confluence of Cherry Creek and the South Platte River, that became the City of Denver. General William Larimer, a determined land promoter, claimed Highland on December 11, 1858, only a few months after gold "color" had been found nearby. He and his associates joined Highland to Auraria and Denver the next year, eventually extended the boundary north to what is today West 32nd Avenue, and from 1861 called the general area North Denver.... In 1875 another group of promoters incorporated nearby the town of Highlands, which was planned to be a utopian suburb that would have clearer air, purer water, and higher morals than Denver, whose industry, commerce, saloons, and red-light district had cast the city into a bad light at least in the eyes of some. Because the developers of Highlands would not allow commercial buildings within the town limits, the growth and prosperity of the business area along 15th Street west of the South Platte River was assured. But more than this,
15th Street was a natural area for commercial development. An extension of the Overland Trail had crossed the river there; later came bridges, first wood and then iron. There were few places where one could cross the Platte in those days, and so the heavy traffic funnelling down 15th Street from the east side added to growth of the business area. Cable cars later improved transportation and fostered still more growth.
The Old Highland Business District is significant for its role in local commerce and for its architectural features. It has been entered on the National Register of Historical Places.


These buildings are all that remain- today of a once-thriving business area in Denver, and their architecture, though not outstanding, is a good representation of the late nineteenth century commercial style in Denver. The structures are well-related to one another and still maintain the ambience, feelings, and associations of a bygone era.
The buildings in the District rose in the very short five year period from 1855 to 1890. Scottish-born Robert Marquis, president of the Marquis Canning Company, a wholesale grocery establishment, built both the Marquis Blocks; he had the iron fronts of both cast at iron works in Denver; later he lived in the older of the two buildings. Fred R. Slockett, a resident of Highlands and the owner of a meat business, built the Slockett Block to house his market; his brother Henry Slockett, a manager of the Small Hopes Mine in Leadville and a state representative from Clear Creek County, may also have been involved in the project. H. N. Shannon, another resident of Highlands, built the Shannon Block. By the 1890's these and other buildings in the District had a convenient mix of stores and offices. Here one could buy groceries, baked goods, boots, drugs, and furniture, and one could obtain the services of realtors, bankers, carpenters, printers and undertakers.
As time passed, however, changing residential and business patterns brought on urban blight, and the buildings decayed. Boarded and broken windows, flaking paint, and deteriorating brick cast a pall over the area. Several structures burned, and in the 1950's the construction of the Valley Highway carried other buildings to the wrecker's ball.
By the late 1970's all that remained was a part


of the original business district. These structures appeared to be threatened by not-too-distant demolition, but a short time ago developers interested in historic preservation have been purchasing the buildings for renovation and rehabilitation.
BUILIDINGS CONTRIBUTING TO THE INTEGRITY OF THE DISTRICT:
1. Marquis Block #1 (2501 15th St.): 1889, architects: Wilson and Robinson, three stories. On the ground floor the facade consists of closely spaced cast iron columns on the 15th Street and Central Street sides; brick on the remainder. The upper two floors are decorated with rusticated stone stringcourses, checkerboard patterned brick, header laid, and brick pilasters. Some windows have brick relieving arches. The building is crowned by a stamped tin cornice.
The exterior shows only minor changes from the original.
2. Marquis Block #2 (2509 15th St.): 1890, architect: F.D. Robinson, three stories.
This brick building has a cast iron front at ground level. The facade is divided into three bay windows by pilasters, and the rectangular windows have double pilasters between them. The insistent repetition
of rectangular forms is contrasted by the heavily decorated cornice, the equally elaborate iron pilasters of the first floor, a row of rosette-ornamented bolts, and by two windows with segmental arches above.
3. Slocket Block (2535 15th St.): 1890, architect: R.A. Wilson, three stories. The
first floor facade is of cast iron, the second of rusticated stone, and the third of smooth cut stone, all topped with a decorative stamped tin cornice and parapet. The windows of the second floor have a Romanesque arch with decorative glass. Those of the third floor are closely spaced with segmental arches and outlined in smooth stone.
4. Shannon Block (2563 15 St.) 1890, architect:
S.A. Layton, two stories. This brick structure at the corner of 15th and Boulder Streets has a cast iron facade facing 15th Street, and has a bevelled corner. Corbelled pilasters divide the facade into three parts. The second story has windows that are segmen-tally arched with a pattern of checkerboard, header-laid bricks above.
5. Union Hall (1501 Boulder): about 1886, three stories. This structure, built at the meeting of three streets, has a bevelled corner; one facade disappears below the level of the sloping street. The hall is built of brick with some rusticated stone trim and a pressed tin cornice. The hipped roof may be a later addition, as there is a dome underneath.
6. Ashland Block (2550 15th St.): 1886, two stories. This is a trapezoidal building with two bevelled corners. It is of brick with wooden pilasters dividing the first floor facade and a pressed tin cornice. The windows of the second story have a shallow compound segmental arch and rusticated stone sills. There has been some restructuring of the first floor facade, but the building is in good shape.*
"Old Highland Business District 5DV106"
Colorado Historical Society 1300 Broadway, Denver, CO




SITE FEATURES


SITE FEATURES
SUBSURFACE CONDITION
In general the subsoils at this site consist of zero to 9.0 feet of man-made clay fill which is underlain by stiff to very stiff, sandy clay.
Firm to medium hard claystone and sandstone bedrock is located at 2.0 to 13.0 feet below the ground surface. Hard to very hard claystone and sandstone bedrock is located at 8.5 to 17.5 feet below the ground surface in eight test holes. Ground water was measured at 9.5 to 16.5 feet below the ground surface. The natural clay and claystone subsoils exhibit zero to high swelling potential.
All structures should be supported by straight-shaft piers drilled into competent bedrock. An alternate system for several structures would be spread footings bearing on the natural, undisturbed soils or on structural fill. Recommendations are also given concerning the floor systems and swimming pool. All below-grade levels should be provided with a perimeter sub-surface drainage system as a precautionary measure.
Soluble sulfates tests on representative samples indicate a low to high percentage of water soluble sulfates. Type II cement for foundation concrete used in drilled piers is recommended.
FOUNDATION RECOMMENDATIONS
Method A
Piers should be designed for a maximum endbearing pressure of 15,000 pounds per square foor with a side shear of 1,500 pounds per
l


square foot for that portion of the pier in competent bedrock. The following design criteria should also be observed:
a. A minimum dead load pressure of 10,000 pounds per square foot based on pier cross-sectional area should be used.
b. Piers should be reinforced their full length and drilled a minimum depth of 14 feet.
c. A four-inch minimum air space should be provided beneath the grade beams between the piers to insure effective concentration of loads on the piers.
d. Casing of the piers should not be necessary; however, concrete should be placed immediately after drilling because of possible ground water.
Method B
An acceptable alternate foundation system for all of the proposed structures would be moderate pressure, spread footings or pad-type footings bearing on the natural, undisturbed soils below the existing manmade fill soils, or on a combination of natural soils and controlled structural fill and below frost depth after the existing fill has been completely removed. The footings should be designed for a soil pressure not to exceed 2,200 pounds per square foot based upon dead load plus one-half live load with a minimum dead load pressure of 1,000 pounds per square foot.
The following design criteria should also be observed:
a. Using the allowable soil pressures
recommended above, we estimate the maximum settlement of the structures will be in the order of one inch with differential settlement of less than one-half inch.
b. Continuous concrete foundation walls should be designed for a minimum amount of steel equivalent to that required for a simply supported span or heave of 12 feet.
c. Where existing man-made fill occurs under the footings, the material should be completely removed and replaced with a suitable fill material compacted to at least 95 percent of standard Proctor density, according to ASTM D698-70. Structural fill under footings should be closely controlled by a soils engineer. A suggested guide specification for placement and compaction of fill is attached.
d. The base for the structural fill should include all areas within a 1:1, vertical to horizontal, slope from the edge of the footings.
TOPOGRAPHY
The site has a 1-2% slope and drains to the southeast corner of the site.
FLOOD PLAIN
Flooding is no problem since the site sits 150 feet above the Platte Valley.


VEGETATION
The existing vegetation is primarily weeds with some sparsely located elm trees located on the southern edge near five run-down row houses.
VIEWS
TThe views are excellent to the Southwest, South, Southeast and East. You can get a panoramic view of Downtown Denver and of the Rocky Mountains .
WIND
The wind comes primarily from the Northwest in winter and the Southeast in summer.
There is excellent Southern exposure to the site which would allow for solar design considerations .
CLIMATE
The climate is considered in the temperate zone, which is semi-arid, and serves very well for solar application.
SOLAR
Orientation for solar glazing should lie between 20 East and 32 West of true South.
Average Daily Solar and Sky Radiation (Langley's)*
Jan. - 240 July - 620
Feb. - 325 Aug. - 560
Mar. - 425 Sept.- 460
Apr. - 510 Oct. - 345
May - 560 Nov. - 240
Jun. - 610 Dec. - 195
* U.S. Weather Bureau 1941-1970, Denver, CO


SOLAR CHART
o CD-
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W
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to- N c
Climate and Solar Energy Denver Planning Department


HEATING DEGREE DAYS, BASE 65 F COOLING DEGREE DAYS
U.S. Weather Bureau 1941-1970, Denver


MEAN & EXTREME TEMP. (F)
Month Daily Maximum Daily Minimum Monthly Mean Record High Record Low Normal Degree Days Base 65F Mean Number of D uvs Temperatures
90F and above 32F and j below
(Heating) (Cooling)
Jan 43.5 16.2 29.9 72 -25 1088 0 0 30
Feb 46.2 19.4 32.8 76 -30 902 0 0 27
Mar 50.1 23.8 37.0 84 -11 868 0 0 27
Apr 61.0 33.9 47.5 85 - 2 525 0 0 13
May 70.3 43.6 57.0 96 22 253 0 * 2
Jun 80.1 51.9 66.0 104 30 80 110 5 0
Jul 87.4 58.6 73.0 104 43 0 248 15 0
Aug 85.8 57.4 71.6 101 4) 0 208 9 0
Sep 77.7 47.8 62.8 97 20 120 54 2 1
Oct 66.8 37.2 52.0 88 3 408 5 0 9
Nov 53.3 25.4 39.4 79 - 8 768 0 o 25
Dec 46.2 18.9 32.6 74 -18 1004 0 0 29
Annual 64.0 36.2 50.1 104 -30 6016 625 32 162
Department of Commerce, 1977


UTILITIES


APPLICABLE CODES & REQUIREMENT'S
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CODE SURVEY
APPLICABLE CODES AND ORDINANCE
Denver Building Code (1969)
Uniform Building Code (1979)
Life Safety Code (1970) NFPA 101 OSHA (29 CFR 1910)
State Plumbing Code
Denver Zoning Ordinance (1980)
REMARKS
1. This survey summarizes the combined requirements of the several codes.
2. Life Safety Code is used primarily for exit and emergency lighting requirements not covered by the U.B.C.
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
Fire Zone--------------------------------:--3
Restrictions in Fire Zone ------------------ All occupancies and types of construction permitted by
codes.
OCCUPANCY REQUIREMENTS Occupancy
Group B-2 (Retail/Commercial)
Area--------------------------------------- 27,370 S.F.
Live Load Allowable
Retail ------------------------------ 73 P.S.F.
Commercial -------------------------- 30 P.S.F.
NOTE: Limit of 50 persons per room Group R-3 (Dwellings)
Area--------------------------------------- 48,840 S.F.
Live Load Allowable------------------------40 P.S.F.
Total Area of Proposed Buildings (Excluding Basement
Total-------------------------------------------76,210 S.F.


ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA ,
Types of Construction
Group B-2 (Retail/Commercial) 1 (F.R.) 2 (1 HR.) 3 (1 HR.)
Basic Allowable Area Unlimited 18,000 18,000
Increase for Fire Zone 3 6,000 6,000
Increase for Separation on 2, 3 or 4 Sides See D.B.C. See D.B.C,
Increase for Fire Extinguishing System 54,000 54,000
Total Allowable Building Area ' V 78,000 78,000

Group R-3 (Dwellings)
Basic Allowable Area Unlimited Unlimited Unlimited
Increase for Fire Zone 3
Increase for Multi-Story
Increase for Separation on 2, 3 or 4 Sides
Increase for Fire Extinguishing System
Total Allowable Building Area
Total Allowable Area 1st Floor sl V N V N V
ALLOWABLE BUILDING HEIGHT
Types of Construction
Group B-2 (Retail/Commercial) 1 (F.R.) 2 (1 HR.) 3 (1 HR.)
Feet Unlimited 65 65
Stories Unlimited 4 4
Group R-3 (Dwellings)
Feet Unlimited 65 65
Stories Unlimited 3 3
OCCUPANCY SEPARATION
No Separation Required
OCCUPANCY GROUP REQUIREMENTS
1. One-Hour construction throughout required for B-2 occupancies above the first level.
2. B-2 occupancies shall not be located above the second story except in Type 1 and 2 buildings.


FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS
Types of Construction
Construction Elements (Hours) 1 (F.R.) 2 (1 HR.) 3 (1 HR.)
Exterior Bearing Walls 4 . 1 4
Interior Bearing Walls 3 1 1
Exterior Non-Bearing Walls 4* 1 4
Inner Court Walls 3 1 1
Structural Frame 3 1 1
Floors 2 1 1
Roofs 2 1 1
Permanent Partition 1 1 1
Vertical Openings/Shafts 2 1 1
Exterior Openings 3/4* 3/4* *
Parapets Not Required w ith Incombu tible Roof
Temporary Partitions Incombustible
Proiections from Building
Mezzanines
Insulation
Draft Stops V Drywall Sheet Metal, Asbestos Board
Ceilings Incombustible 1 HR. Over Corridor
Skylights Wire Glass or Approved Self-Extinguishing
EXCEPTIONS AND LIMITATIONS (For Type 1 Construction)
1. Exterior non-bearing walls fronting on a street or yard at least 40 feet wide or which are at right angles to the property line may be of unprotected incombustible construction.
2. Openings in exterior walls need not be protected for B occupancies when the setback from the property line or center line of adjoining street or alley exceeds 20 feet. Court walls shall be assumed to have a property line between them.
3. When openings are required to be protected due to distance from the property line, the area of the opening shall not exceed 50% of the total wall area in each story.
SPECIAL PROVISIONS
1. UBC does not require enclosure of vertical openings to one adjacent floor.
Openings in a 2-HR. vertical shaft enclosure shall be: l\ HR. protection for exterior openings 3/4 HR. protection for interior openings
2.


3. Temporary partitions permitted to divide space occupied by one tenant provided they do not establish a public corridor with an occupant load exceeding 30.
EXIT REQUIREMENTS
Number of Exits Required
Level Use Net S.F. No. of Occ. No. of Exits Exit Width
1 Multi-Unit (50%) 24,420 oo N3 1* K5 1* v/ II 1 3
Retail 15,000 500 2 (Per Store) 10
2 Multi-Unit (30%) 14,652 49 t (21) = 2.3 1 3
Commercial 12,370 124 2 (Per Store) 3
3 Multi-Unit (20%) 9,768 33 f (21) = 1.5 1 3
NOTE: (21) equals number of dwelling units.
FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
Allowances for Automatic Fire Extinguishing System
Providing an automatic fire extinguishing system where not otherwise required by code allows one of the following:
1. The Allowable area may be tripled in 1-story buildings and doubled in multi-story buildings.
2. Maximum number of stories may be increased by one story.
3. The substitution of 1-HR. construction where required throughout except for stair enclosures, corridors, etc. as noted in UBC.
PLUMBING, FIXTURE REQUIREMENTS Group
B-2 (Retail/Commercial)
Water Closets (1-15) -------------
Urinals --------------------------
Lavatories (1-15) ----------------
Drinking Fountain (1/75) ---------
Other Fixtures (1 Slop Sink/Floor)
1
1/3 Water Closet Requirements 1 1 1


R-3 (Dwellings)
Water Closets (Per Unit) -------------------------------------------- 1
Lavatories (Per Unit) ----------------------------------------------- 1
Bathtub or Shower (Per Unit) ---------------------------------------- 1


ZONING CODE
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
Zone District ---- R-3, B-3
Zone Use----------R-3: Multiple Unit
B-3: Office, Retail and Multiple Unit
Zone Lot----------R-3: 1. Open Space (Not in-
cluding parking) is to be 20% of the area of the Zone Lot.
2. Open Space may be located on the round and on roof decks having and average height of not more than six feet above grade.
LOCATION OF STRUCTURE Building Setbacks
R-3 Front: 10 ft. (5 ft. in long dimension) Rear: 20 ft.
Side: 5 ft.
B-3 Front: 5 ft.
Rear: 5 ft.
Side: 5 ft. (@ street or alley)
ENCROACHMENTS AND SETBACKS
R-3: Outside Stair------- Front: 5 ft.; Rear:
10 ft; Side: 3 ft.
Balconies/Porches--- Front and Rear: 5 ft.


Canopies-------------Any distance in front
Cornices-------------Front: 3 ft.; Rear:
5 ft.; Side: 3ft.
B-3: Outside, Stair-------
Balconies/Porches
Canopies-------------
Cornices-------------
Front: 5ft.; Rear:
5 ft.; Side: 3ft. Front and Rear: 5 ft. Any distance in front Front: 3 ft.; Rear: 5ft.; Side: 8 in.
WALLS AND FENCES
R-3: Maximum 48 in. high in front setback:
72 in. elsewhere measure from lowest grade either side within 3 ft.
B-3: Maximum 42 in. high in front setback:
72 in. elsewhere measure from lowest grade either side within 3 ft.
BULK OF STRUCTURE
R-3:l.At horizontal lines which are co-direction al to the side line or lines of the Zone Lot and pass through points twenty feet above the mid-point of each such side line or lines.
2.At horizontal lines which are co-direction al to the center line of all streets abutting the Zone Lot and pass through points twenty feet above the mid-point of such center lines between the boundary lines of the Zone Lot extended.
3.If no alley abuts the Zone Lot, a horizontal line which is co-directional to the rear line of the Zone Lot and passes


3.through a point twenty feet above the midpoint of such rear line of the Zone Lot; and if the rear line or lines of the Zone Lot are established by an abutting alley or alleys such planes shall start at horizontal lines which are co-directional to the center lines of such abutting alley or alleys and pass through points twenty feet above the mid-point of such center lines between the boundary lines of the Zone Lot extended, and which planes extend up over the Zone Lot at an angle of sixty-three degrees and twenty-six minutes with respect to the horizontal (a pitch of two feet additional rise for each additional setback) until such planes intersect a vertical line thirty feet horizontally distant from the various points of beginning as above set forth, at which point the angle of the bulk plane shall change from sixty-three degrees and twenty-six minutes to ninety degrees or true vertical.
B-3:l.At horizontal lines which are co-directional to the center lines of all streets abutting the Zone Lot and pass through points 10 ft. above the mid-point of such center lines between the boundary lines of the Zone Lot extended.
2.If no alley abuts the Zone Lot a horizontal line which is co-directional to the rear line of the Zone Lot and passes through a point 10 ft. above the mid-point of such rear line of the Zone Lot.
3.Waiver: Structures not to exceed 40 ft. in height.


MAXIMUM GROSS FLOOR AREA
R-3: 3 X the area of Zone Lot B-3: 1 X the area of Zone Lot
MINIMUM GROSS FLOOR AREA R-3: NA B-3: NA
ZONE LOT COVERAGE R-3: NA B-3: NA
OFF-STREET PARKING
R-3: 1% spaces per dwelling unit See provisions of Article 614 of the Denver Zoning Ordinance .
B-3: lk spaces per dwelling unit See provisions of Article 614 of the Denver Zoning Ordinance .
OFF-STREET LOADING
R-3: Multi-Family: Up to 25,000 S.F. None
required.


Retail: Up to 15,000 S.F. None required.
B-3: Multi-Family: Up to 25,000 S.F. None
required.
Retail: Up to 15,000 S.F. None required.
SPECIAL PROVISIONS
R-3: 1. Minimum Size of Dwellings to be not less than 600 S.F.
B-3: 1. The proposed finish grade to be shown in intervals of 2 ft.


FLOOR AREA
RATIO CALCULATIONS
EXISTING SITE AREA TABULATIONS
Zone R-3 ---------------------------- 13,780 S.F.
Zone B-3 ---------------------------- 34.870 S.F.
Total Site Area---------------------- 48,650 S.F.
R-3 DISTRICT MULTIPLIERS AND PREMIUMS
3:1 F.A.R. Allowable -----------------41,340 S.F.
No Premiums for this District -------
Total Development Allowable --------- 41,340 S.F.
B-3 DISTRICT MULTIPLIERS AND PREMIUMS
1:1 F.A.R. Allowable -----------------34,870 S.F.
No Premiums for this District
Total Development Allowable --------- 34,870 S.F.
Gross Development Allowable --------- 76,210 S.F.
NOTE: Premiums are allowed for such items as upper
level open space but this has little impact on the Gross Floor Area.


PROFORMA


FINANCING PROFORMA
REVENUE
Projected Leasing Costs for Retail/Commercial
Basement Level (Retail) 7,500 S.F. @ $9.50/S.F.
First Floor (Retail) -- 7,500 S.F. @ $13.50/S.F.
Second Floor (Commercial) 12,370 S.F. @ $18.00/S.F.
Total Yearly Gross Income
Projected Selling Costs for Multi-Units
One Bedroom (6 Units) $150,000/Unit ----------
Two Bedroom (12 Units) $200,000/Unit ---------
Three Bedroom (3 Units) $250,000/Unit --------
Total Gross Income
Total Project Gross Income
COSTS
Land Acquisition (20% Down, OWC @ 12%)
Planning/Engineering (10%) -----------
Construction
Multi-Units ($65.00/S.F.) -------
Retail/Commercial ($45.00/S.F. ) -Selling Costs (3%) -------------------
Net Loss for First Year
$ 71, 250, .00
$101, 250, .00
$222, 660, .00
$395, 160, .00
$900, 000, .00
$2,400, 000, .00
$750, 000. .00
$4,050, 000, .00
$4,445, 160, .00
$1 ,459, 000, .00
$444, 516, .00
$3 ,174, 600. .00
$1 ,231, 650, .00
$133, 354, .00
$6 ,620, 926, .00
$2 ,175, 766. .00


FIVE YEAR PROFIT/LOSS PROJECTION
1 2 3 4 5
$2,175,766.00 Look at 18% (15 yrs.) $301,344.00 $301,344.00 $301,344.00 $301,344.00 $301,344.00
Maintenance (3%) $133,354.00 $146,690.00 $161,359.00 $177,495.00 $195,244.00
Leasing Revenue (10% inflation) $395,160.00 $434,676.00 $478,143.00 $525,957.00 $578,553.00
Profit/Loss ($39,538.00) ($13,358.00) $15,440.00 $47,118.00 $81,965.00
NOTE: ( ) is red ink.


/
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PROGRAMME CONCLUSIONS
HUMAN PHYSICAL EXTERNAL
CURRENT ISSUES 1. Close community being separated by higher income people moving in. 2. "Restless natives" 3. Lack of community awareness and involvement 4. Italian/Spanish culture with White moving in. 5. Area has small town feeling. 1. Uncontrolled growth. 2. Breaking up of important modes in community. 3. Lack of housing being built. 4. One-way streets. 1. High rollers moving in for big development. 2. Traffic breaking up community. 3. No direct link to Platte River bicycles and pedestrians.
PREDICTIONS 1. Existing community will be forced out. 1. Too high building density. 2. Lack of town feeling. 3. Existing market area being run down. 1. Loss of community with big development moving in. 2. High rollers will not look at existing community need without any guidelines.
RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Need more community involvement in controlling what is theirs. a. Limit re-zoning. b. Buy property. 1. Need more defined edges to community. 2. Existing market areas need upgrading. 3. Need more housing and upgrading of old structures. 4. Convert one-way streets to two-way. 1. More community standards to control growth. 2. Limiting vehicle access through residential areas. 3. More defined entrance to Highlands. 4. Connecting link for bikes and pedestrians to Platte River Greenway.


BUILDING AREA
R-3: Multi-Unit
Total Development Allowable ----- 41,340 S.F.
Multi-Unit ---------------------- 41,340 S.F.
One Bedroom (20%) ----------- 8,268 S.F.
Two Bedroom (60%) ----------- 24,804 S.F.
Three Bedroom (20%) ----------8,268 S.F.
Total----------------------- 41,340 S.F.
B 3: Multi-Unit, Commercial, Retail
Total Development Allowable ------ 34,870 S.F.
Multi-Unit ----------------------- 7,300 S.F.
Commercial ----------------------- 12,370 S.F.
Retail ---------------------------13,000 S.F.
Total----------------------------- 34,870 S.F.
Gross Total Building S.F. --------76,210 S.F.
PERCENTAGE SPACE ALLOCATION
Multi-Unit ------------------------ 64%
Commercial------------------------- 16%
Retail----------------------------- 20%


DESIGN ANALYSIS


DESIGN ANALYSIS
The character of the Highland Business District is unique to Denver. While it boasts the turn of the century architecture seen throughout older areas of Denver, it is different because of its location. Sitting up high on the bluff, it has a panoramic view of Downtown, while being separated physically by the river valley and train yards. The streets around the District are on the same diagonal grid as the Downtown area, making an interesting transition where they meet the regular street layout.
The buildings are generally two and three stories high and have columns spaced at around 20 feet. The existing store depths are anywhere from 40 to 80 feet. The clear ceiling heights are very high as they were in those days. They are anywhere from 10 to 12 feet high.
There is an existing service alley on the site behind the existing single family homes.
There is a mix of both office and retail in the area with plans for more in the future. The existing housing around the area is lacking except for the brown stone block on 28th Street between Umatilla Street and Vallejo Street.
There is a strong alignment of facades along 15th Street in the District, and their uniform heights strengthen the aesthetic quality of the area.
The streetscape lacks continuity in that the paving pattern is broken up with different treatments. There also seems to be a need for landscaping in front of the buildings to allow for shade and living color.




THESIS COMMITTEE
Bob Kindig -G. K. Vetter Gene Benda -Gary Long Paul Heath -Dave Holder
Adviser
Technical
Urban
General
General
Structural


SHEDULE OF THESIS
PROGRAM 8/13
N £
DESIGN ANALYSIS 9/1 10/1
V 2
SCHEMATIC DESIGN 10/2 11/1
v 2
DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 11/2 11/15
5s
DRAWINGS/ MODEL 11/16 12/6
5s 2
PRESENTATION 12/7


INTERVIEWS
6/26/82 Interviewed existing tenants at historical building (Elfego Baca) 2536-2556 W. 15th.
* He has to move rent doubled to $8.00/SF
* Karagus Brothers own building
6/30/82 Interviewed existing tenant who just moved in (Dick Taft of Bob White Architects) * Victoria (Dan) is leasing agent of (2536-2556 W. 15th) for Karagus. * Heritage Financial Corp. is doing development on site across the street. * B.R.S. Arch, are moving in upstairs.
7/15/82 Interviewed Jimmy Karagus (owner of 2536- 2556 W. 15th St.). * Building is on Historical Register. * He bought building for $240,000 in leases on ground floor @ $8.00/S.F. * He plans to do extensive remodelling on the inside and bring exterior up to original condition.
7/19/82 Interviewed Razetto Colby of the Colorado Historical Society. She gave me invaluable information on Highland Historical District.
7/22/82 Interviewed Tim Cullen (Heritage Financial Corp.) * Renovation of all 3 buildings with parking around sides and back. * $9.00/S.F. @ ground. * $13.50/S.F. @ commercial above first floor. * Muddys Cafe to hopefully stay they feel it's a landmark. * Lot behind has not been decided upon as to what type of development.
7/22/82 Interviewed Elizabeth Schlosser (of the Denver Historical Society).
* Ref. Rediscovery of N.W. Denver by
Ruth Viberg.
7/27/82 Interviewed Joe Gonzalas and Martin Careago of Highland Neighborhood Housing Service.
* Highland Streetscape Project on 32nd Ave. being worked on.
* Great place to buy tortillas is at place @ 38th & Federal.
* Gentrification is a problem and he sees most existing people to have gone in 5 years.
* Meeting 7/28/82 @ NHS 7:00 on "What to do with Blighted Structures".
* Area just west of NHS is considered old Scottish Village.
* Gaff Corp. looking at developing Forney Museum and adjacent Building.
* Marvin Davis considering development of Burlington Northern Property.
* Centennial City, Denver, CO.
7/27/82 Interviewed Martin Saiz of North Denver Workshop.
* Contact Mike Davenport on zoning information .
* Zoning Variance better than Zoning Change.
* Must conform to the Waiver Height Restriction of 40'0".
7/28/82 Interviewed Thomas D. Corrigan (Project
Engineer for Alberici Denver.Inc.) who is working on the Brock Residence Inn near my site. 2777 Zuni, Denver, CO 80211
* He was able to give me their sales report which I will use for my site.


7/29/82 Interviewed Hank Saipe of Commercial Properties Division of Van Schaack.
* He said office space would lease @ around
$18-20/S.F.
* Retail @ around $8-9/S.F.
* Development costs $50-60/S.F. Commercial
$60-80/S.F. Residential
7/29/82 Interviewed Steve Roesinger of Commercial Properties Division of Van Schaack. (They are the real estate co. selling site).
* 48,650 S.F.
* Zoned 13,780 S.F. R-3
34,870 S.F. B-3
* Price $1,459,000 Terms 20% down OWC @ 12%
* Property known as 2501 15th St. and 1445-49 Central.


DIRECTORY
Building Inspection Division 3840 York St.
Denver, CO 575-5186
Zoning Administration 3840 York St.
Denver, CO 575-2191
Jimmy Karagus
My Brothers Bar (Owner of Inverness Building)
433-0103
Colorado Historical Society (Razatta Colby)
1300 Broadway Denver, CO 343-6401
Heritage Financial Corporation (Tom Cullen)
595-9777
Denver Historical Society (Elizabeth Schlosser)
770 Pennsylvania St.
Denver, CO 837-1858
Highland Neighborhood Housing Service (Joe Gonzalas)
2533 W. 32nd Ave.
Denver, CO 458-6938
North Denver Workshop (Martin Saiz)
3401 Pecos St.
Denver, CO 477-4774
Van Schaack
(Hank Saipe, Steve Rossings) 572-5060


BIBLIOGRAPHY
CODES
Denver Building Code (1969)
Uniform Building Code (1979)
Life Safety Code (1970) NFPA 101 OSHA (29 CFR 1910)
State Plumbing Code
Denver Zoning Ordinance (1980)
SOLAR
The Passive Solar Energy Book
By: Edward Mayria
Rodale Press, Emmaus, PA c. 1979
Planning with Climate and Solar Energy By: Denver Planning Office, Denver, CO
Passive Solar Design Handbook Vol. 2 By: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Solar Applications c. 1980
Design with Climate By: Victor Olgyay
Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ c. 1963
Environmental Science Handbook By: S.V. Szokolay
John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY c. 1980
OTHER
The Image of the City By: Kevin Lynch
The M.I.T. Press, Boston, Mass. c. 1975
The Architect's Guide to Facility Programming
By: Mickey A. Palmer
American Institute of Architects,
Washington, D.C. c. 1981
Denver in Slices
By: Louisa Ward Arps
Sage Books, Denver, CO c. 1959
Yesterday's Denver
By: Sandra Dallas
E. A. Seemann Publishing, Inc.
Miami, FLA c. 1974
Denver A Pictorial History
By: William C. Jones and Kenton Forrest
Pruett Publishing Co. c. 1974
Denver Rocky Mountain Gold By: Thomas J. Noel Continental Heritage Press,
Tulsa, OK c. 1980
Rediscovering Northwest Denver By: Ruth Eloise Wiberg Northwest Denver Books c. 1976


Noisaa avNia


*
PROJECT SUMMARY
SITE AREA: 48,650 S.F. = 1.11 acres
TOTAL GROSS BUILDING AREA--------------- 75,671 S.F
COMMERCIAL/RETAIL SPACE ---------------- 26,365 S.F
RESTAURANT ----------------------------- 4,000 S.F
RESIDENTIAL
One Bedroom Office/Condo: 10 units @ 2184
-------- 21,840 S.F
Two Bedroom Rowhouse: 8 units @ 1,397
-------- 11,176 S.F
Two Bedroom Townhouse: 2 units @ 1,341
--------- 2,682 S.F
Two Bedroom Townhouse: 2 units @ 1,976
--------- 3,952 S.F
Three Bedroom Townhouse: 2 units @ 2,828
--------- 5,656 S.F
GARAGE Total Stalls = 150 ----------- 75,582 S.F


+-
+-
Site Plan
HIGHLAND VILLAGE HISTORICAL DISTRICT
w Ajcjvmrn**
iinivi 1411 J imaAiii nr
IWMi. t UIAWT


120
North
mavi>xs ANtiirmrniMr
n.v*s
I HNWI, v IM.ANKY na




Garage Level Two
120
Nonh


Section Five !/' r-r
Section Four
i/8J* r-o*
West.ElcvaiiQg
1/8- r-o*


Level Two A Level Three
l/8r-0 North 1/8"-I'-0" North
Level One
l/s" r-o*
Sorxh
i/8 r-o*
North
Section Two
i/8*r-o
Section Three
i/8- r-o
c ________
HIGHLAND VILLAGE HISTORICAL DISTRICT
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Section One
1/4' I'-O"
^ ^----------------
HIGHLAND VILLAGE HISTORICAL DISTRICT
M*rran w 4'4Jm*nif
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North East Elevation
1:20


South East Elevation
1*1
HISTORICAL DISTRICT
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DRAINAGE
SITE AREA: 48,650 S.F. = 1.11 acres
EXISTING GREENSPACE: *<2,050 S.F. = .96 acres
PROJECTED GREENSPACE: 8,015 S.F. = .18 acres
EXISTING BUILDING FOOTPRINT: 6,600 S.F. =
.15 acres
PROJECTED BUILDING FOOTPRINT: 20,544 S.F. = .47 acres
PROJECTED PAVING SURFACE: 20,091 S.F. =
.46 acres
I = .9 paving .85 roof .35 green space
I Historic = (.35 X .96) + (.85 X .15) _ 1,-,
1.11 'H1/
Y = AIR
Y Historic = .417 X 1.11 (6.2 IN/HR/12)(5 MIN/60)
= .019 acre feet
Y New = (.35 X .18) + (.85 X .47) + (.9 X .46)
1.11
= .094
Y New Y Historic = .094 .019 = .075 acre feet
= 3,267 ft.3
V
1
Roof ponding would occur on the 15th Street Building and also at the stage in the public garden. This would more than compensate for the total water detention of the site.


COST ESTIMATE
COSTS
Land Acquisition (20% down, OWC @ 12%) -
$1,459,000.00
PIanning/Engineering (10%) -
$ 444,516.00
Selling Costs (3%) --- $ 133,354.00
C0MMERCIAL/RETAIL
Class "A"
Type: Excel 1ent
Exterior Walls: Stone, face brick,
best metal walls, fine display fronts.
Interior: Best plaster and panelling,
highly ornamental, terrazzo, ca rpet.
Lighting, Plumbing and Mechanical:
Special lighting fixtures and effects, deluxe restrooms..
Cost/S.F. ----------------- $53-62
Sprinkled------------------$ 1.17
Elevators------------------ $ 1.75
Total $56.54/S.F.
TOTAL S.F. COST: 26,365 S.F. @ $56.54/S.F.
------------- $1,490,677.00
RESTAURANT
Class "A"
Type: Good
Exterior Walls: Metal or stone panels, good brick, usually part of a building.
Interior: Plaster, with enamel or vinyl,
carpet and vinyl flooring, decorated interior.
Lighting, Plumbing and Mechanical:
Good lighting and outlets, good plumbing.
Heat: Complete H.V.A.C.
Cost/S.F. ---------------------- $66.21
Sprinkled----------------------- $ 1.17
Total $67.38/S.F.
TOTAL S.F. COST: 4,000 S.F. @ $67.38/S.F.
--------------- $269,520.00
RESIDENTIAL
Type: Good
Cost/S.F. ---------------------- $31.13
Warm and Cooled Air-------------$ 1.14
Total $32.27
TOTAL S.F. COST: 45,306 S.F. @ $32.27/S.F.
--------------- $1,462,024.00


GARAGE/FOUNDATI ON
Concrete Drilled Piers: 49 @ 16" Dia.
e 15 ft. # @ $1^.37/s.f.
......... $ 10,561.00
Garage: 75,582 S.F. @ $20.00/S.F.
----------- $1,511,640.00
TOTAL PROJECT COSTS ----------- $6,781,292.00
REVENUE
Commercia1/Retai 1 : 30,365 S.F. @ $15.00/S.F.
------- $ 455,475.00
Res ident ial
One Bedroom Office/Condo: 10 units @
$300,000.00 --------- $3,000,000.00
Two Bedroom Rowhouse: 8 units @
$200,000.00 --------- $1,600,000.00
Two Bedroom Townhouse: 2 units @
$150,000.00 --------- $ 300,000.00
Two Bedroom Townhouse: 2 units @
$200,000.00 --------- $ 400,000.00
Three Bedroom Townhouse: 2 units §
$250,000.00 ------------ $ 500,000.00
Garage: 100 stalls $ $30.00/sta11/month
-------- $ 36,000.00
TOTAL REVENUE (1st year) ------------
NET LOSS (1st year) -----------------
NET PROFIT (2nd year) ---------------
NET PROFIT (3rd year) ---------------
Note: These figures only represent Appreciation is not included.
$6,291,475.00 ($ 489,817-00)
$ 540,622.00
$ 594,684.00
rental income.


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STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
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