Citation
Le tout ensemble

Material Information

Title:
Le tout ensemble
Creator:
Eichelberger, Douglas J
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
approximately 65 leaves : illustrations (some color), chart, maps, color photographs, plans (some color) ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Hotels, motels, etc -- Designs and plans -- Denver (Colo.) ( lcsh )
Buildings, structures, etc -- Conservation and restoration -- Denver (Colo.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Douglas J. Eichelberger.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
11279255 ( OCLC )
ocm11279255
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1984 .E47 ( lcc )

Full Text

AURARIA UBi-"
le tout ensemble
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ENSEMBLE
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for The Degree of Master of Architecture.
Douglas J. Eichelberger Spring 1984


The Thesis of Douglas J. Eichelberger is approved.
University of Colorado at Denver Date:


TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. Introduction
II. History
III. Project Background
IV. Program
V. Site Analysis
VI. Climate
VII. Zoning
VIII. Building Codes
IX. Tax Incentives
X. Design Solution
XI. Conclusion
XII. Bibliography


INTRODUCTION


INTRODUCTION
One of Denver's finest old neighborhoods is Capitol Hill. Unfortunately many of its best architectural examples have been destroyed. This thesis will involve the adaptive use of three unique houses encircling the corner of 7th Avenue, Pearl and Washington Streets. As an alternative to their destruction,
I am proposing a small luxury hotel using these three buildings and new architecture. The approximate square footage being 27,000 40,000 square feet.
Because this is an Architectural, not a development or real estate thesis, I will omit the multitude of pages filled with numbers that would be necessary to ensure economic and legal security for a project such as this. I will include brief tax considerations since they relate to the feasibility of the project.
Throughout history our built environment has been an image of ourselves reflecting our beliefs, goals and values.
Today real estate calculations of cost and quick return are too often the motivation behind our architecture. As a result, land prices have skyrocketed. Many of the finest buildings are being destroyed, being replaced with more efficient (sic) money makers. Not only is this a loss of fine architecture, it is a loss of irreplaceable physical representations of our traditions and past.


When econouiic concerns become the focus of development, marketing becomes the standard for quality and success. We begin to lose sight of the whole of our environments. We forget that architecture and art is most of all orchestration of many parts. The process of different parts working together is consistent in daily life, nature, marriage and government.
We isolate and fragment our attitudes towards our buildings. They exist on specific lots in specific parts of town, but in this process we draw our attention away from the fabric or community as a whole. It is this wholeness that is healthy and necessary in the realization and passage of time.
Cliches such as "bigger is better" or "new is better" give a hint at our modern ideas. Unfortunately bigger is only quantitatively more, rarely is it better. New, only reflects a purchase or completion date. As a result, we have sacrificed much of the quality in our environment for quantity.
This problem holds consistently for architecture as well as the smallest consumables in our lives. We have developed a disposable attitude maintained by the marketplace. This attitude renders all things finite, with a quick shelf life and replaceable in principle. Both diapers and buildings are treated with an equal irresponsibility. Everything isn't replaceable, and we are slowly recognizing many times quantity is void of last-
ing value.
On assuming things replaceable we assume an attitude in


which v/e quantify finite life/use spans. A building may have a life span of 20 years, a car 5-10 years and at age 65 we retire people from actively participating in the business world. Rarely do we consider the talents and experience of the elderly, the driveability of a car or the inherent quality of a building. Thus we find a quality finite and fragmented dimensions, yet we know quality isn't bonded by time. Vje see quality as having some inherent permanance like the Parthenon, Chartres Cathedral and Shakespeare.
Our problem breaks down to three falsely assumed attitudes. First, the assumption that unplanned parts can function independently and not adversely affect the whole. Second, that all things are replaceable. Thirdly, that the desire for big and new inherently equals quality.
Inflated land costs have rendered the site I have chosen at approximately 2.5 million dollars, leaving high-rise development the obvious building option. The three old houses on the site would be destroyed. As shapers of our environment, I feel we have the responsibility to maintain the highest possible levels of coherencey and richness in our built environment. Believing high-rise development isn't a responsible way for designers and developers to address our rich urban environment, I am proposing an alternative.
My ideas are as follows, first is the process of evolution meaning supply, the given form or idea is continually


adjusted, repaired and altered to accomodate change. It is a process of change, repair and growth. It is the process in which our societies have developed and the one which nature follows.
Second, our older buildings are extremely valuable.
Their loss would be devastating to us psychologically because they are physical representations of our traditions and past.
The process I am referring to is called Adaptive Use. Fitch defines it as follows:
Adaptive Use: Most old buildings whose future is at risk are in danger precisely because the original tenants for whom they were designed no longer inhabit them. Since these buildings will often have neither important historical associations nor exceptional artistic merit, it will be difficult to save them for purely muscological purposes. Hence new uses must be found for them; and adapting them to new uses may involve fairly radical physical interventions of one sort or another. Aside from the fact that such buildings will often be quite sound and viable as built space, their main aesthetic value will be in the role they play in the streetscape (le tout ensemble, as it is defined in New Orleans). While their retrieval involves many of the procedures which used to be called "remodeling," there are subtle but important differences. Now we recognize that there is a visual identity which must be preserved and celebrated rather than concealed. The new use is to be inserted into the old container with the minimum visual dislocation. Subtle though it may appear, this shift in emphasis involves a profound revolution in taste and underlies the rehabilitation of the waterfront in South Boston, of the riverfronts in Paterson, Georgetown, and San Antonio, and in the whole of downtown San Francisco.
The idea is not new. It is the process that has shaped
art, science and architecture. It acknowledges the importance
of our existing built fabric.


%
Throughout history, the cost of making anything a city, a house, even a quilt has been high in terms of both labor and materials. Thus every artifact was used and reused until it "wore out" or "fell apart." Final dissolution was postponed as long as possible by patching, remodeling, and repair.
*
And often, dissolution was not absolute even then: the artifact was cannibalized, every possible bit and piece being salvaged for reuse in new combinations. This sort of conservation of energy cut across every level of preindustrial societies. In Periclean Athens the columns of earlier temples were used in the retaining walls of the modernized Acropolis; and down at the foot of the hill, other column drums were used in the construction of a new road in front of the Stoa of Attalos. Builders of the noblest Romanesque churches were not above recycling whole columns from the ruins of nearby Roman temples, even where the columns did not always match in style or size. And the very aesthetics of Orthodox churches in the Eastern Mediterranean derived from the use of brick and stone scraps salvaged from pagan sites (with pagan inscriptions and bas-reliefs turned upside down to empty them of their original iconographic significance).
And if such cheeseparing practices were common among the rich and mighty, they were universal among the common people, urban and rural alike.
Christopher Alexander and his associates use the principle


of the evolution process to draw a beautiful analogy between any living organism and the human settlement: any living system must repair itself constantly in order to maintain its balance and coordination, its quality as a whole. In the case of an organism, it is only the constant repair, the adjustment of chemical fields, the replacement of cells, and the healing of damaged tissues which maintain the basic morphology of the organism.
"In the case of the environment, the process of growth and repair that is required to maintain morphological integration is far more complex," the authors point out. Repair not only has to conserve a preordained order, as it does in an organism, but also must adapt continuously to changing uses and activities, at every level of the scale. For environments, therefore, an organic process of growth and repair must create a gradual sequence of changes, and these changes must be distributed evenly across every level of scale. There must be as much attention to the repair of details rooms, wings of buildings, windows, paths as to the creation of brand-new buildings. Only then can an environment stay balanced both as a whole and in its parts, at every moment of its history.
Because old buildings are direct physical representations of our past and traditions both individually and cumulatively, their use and re-use becomes a tangible source for us to perceive and experience the cumulative process of change that is


life. Traditions, written, verbal and physical are essential to our development. Traditions describe our beliefs, our knowledge and understanding. Through tradition each newborn is spared reinventing the wheel. They become our guide in developing a sense of belonging and identity, give us pride and roots and a feeling of continuity. Continuity is extremely important because it makes us feel an active part of the cumulative process we call life or the passage of time.
Imagine yourself standing holding in one hand the hand of your father, in the other the hand of your child. This feeling gives us a sense of balance and continuity, or being part of a whole. The cumulative process -life- is apparent. This essentially is the same as the account of the Grecian columns given earlier; the columns being used in later times in different context and for different uses. In their form they hold their original use (the past), in a new use they hold both the past and present. With more alterations, they express a cumulative series of events that may stretch hundreds of years. These plastic elements, viewed in the cumulative process of change can help us reaffirm our place in that process. At a grander scale it can give us a source of strength and community, because 'we' cumulatively have repaired, experienced disaster, repaired and grown. This is the essence of national architecture i.e., the architecture of Florence, Italy experienced by the Florentine people.


The basic problem, a concern from the beginning, was that of economics. Some economic incentives are becoming available The Federal Government is offering tax credits and incentives that are making it much more appealing economically to reconsider demolition and seriously consider rehabilitation. These incentives vary from facade/easement credits and accelerated depreciation rates to outright penalties for destroying historic buildings. Of course these economic incentives add to the reality and feasibility of all problems such as this.
Successful adaptive use is very difficult and very challenging for the designer. It becomes much different than new architecture on a vacant lot. All decisions require a sensitive integration of two sets of ideas and forms (new and old).
The attitudes or guidelines I have previously set out are two fold. First, the project must function as a whole, from the conception of the idea to its detailing. Second, in clearly expressing the passage of time both new and old must be stated clearly. This requires the original use to be apparent and the new use to function well.
My goal then is to choose and manipulate architectural elements, in the way a poet uses language. In this case my architectural/poem will work towards wholeness and continuity.
My hope is to create an example that by sensitively working with the evolving process of adaptive use we can aesthetic ally enrich and stimulate our built environment both for ourselves and for future generations.


HISTORY


During America's movement westward, Denver was tormed along the banks of the Platte River and Cherry Creek. Two communities formed Auraria and Denver. When gold was discovered in 1858 Denver became an overnight boom town. Mining became a major source of growth and income. In order to support the miners all forms of trade and agriculture had to develop as rapidly. Mining continued to be a major source of industry in the state and despite many changes still is.
In 1860 Auraria and Denver incorporated. By this time many fortunes had been made. Denver's social elite lived in the area known as Curtis Park. The great fire of 1864 devastated Denver. Since much of the early construction had been of wood the losses were high. A new building code was adopted which required more brick construction. The brick which was made locally was a pastel sandy red.
The railroad was firmly established in Denver by 1870.
It had another great impact on Denver's growth and economy. Again, many fortunes were made, this time on railroad development.
After the 1864 fire many of Denver's wealthy people began to rebuild in Capitol Hill, so that by 1898 the social register recognized Capitol Hill as the neighborhood of the socially elite.
Today along Capitol Hill's tree lined streets we find some of Denver's finest examples of residential architecture


as well as an excellent visual history. The solid economic status has continued to remain high up to and including the present.
Much of the significance of Denver's fine homes is due to the people who lived in them. Their histories here are important for two reasons. First they give us a sense of life in these houses. From these inhabitants, we can learn how they were used. Second, in order to be eligible for Federal Aid placement on the National Historic Register is required.
These histories would serve as part of that application process.


The Bonfils House brings a touch of Europe to Denver with its French Mediterranean styling designed by architects M. Biscow and Hewitt. Built in either 1909 or 1911 the home displays lunettes over the windows as the outstanding motif and other motifs on the front carved with white stucco.
The solid construction of the home reflects the great care that was given to building in the early 1900's. The materials in the home consist of concrete for the foundation, brick stucco for the exterior walls, a wood frame roof of medium flat pitch, and difficult framing with a built-up clay tile covering. The interior was built with yellow pine floors, and plastered walls and ceilings. The fifteen rooms include a parlor, a dining room, kitchen, four bedrooms on the first floor, five bedrooms on the second, five baths, a breakfast room, library and pantry. In 1928 a brick addition was made; and in 1957 a second garage was added.
Few homes in the Denver area can boast of having three outstanding owners, but the Wood-Morris Bonfils house can. These three owners, Guilford S. Wood, Andrew S. Hughes, and Miss Helen Bonfils each made significant contributions to the development of the Denver area.
THE WOOD-MORRIS-BONFILS MANSION 707 Washington Street Denver, Colorado


The first owner, Guilford S. Wood, who obtained the title for the land in 1907 and builtthe home in either 1090 or 1911, made his fortune, like so many of Colorado's historical figures, in gold and silvgjr. He was both President of the Vindication Consolidated Gold Mining Company and Vice-President of the South Sierras Power Company. He was not only a businessman but a concerned Denver citizen as well. Realizing that the young city of Denver needed play areas for her children, he founded the -Denver Playground Association, in recognition of the educative value of recreation.
The second owner, Andrew S. Hughes, made his contribution to Denver by making her a major link in cross country transportation. He was virtually a pioneer in this effort and helped to establish the overland stage line. He also served as Traffic Manager of Denver, a form of early day Denver planning. He died in March 17, 1924, leaving the home to his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Randolph Morris, who lived there until her death in 1934 and his death in 1937. Helen Bonfils obtained the title to the property, becoming the third owner.
The old saying that the third time is a charm must be true for the home's third owner, Miss Helen Bonfils, was a great philanthropist. Indeed, one could almost ask of her:
What didn't she donate and help build? Although she is well-known for her contribution to Denver theatre, called The Bonfils Theatre and founded in 1953, she contributed to Denver's schools, churches and hospitals. She continued in her father's footsteps by helping to set-up and finance the- University of Colorado Medical Center, by giving financial support for the Bonfils Tumor Clinic and by supporting the Belle Bonfils Blood Bank in 1943 to 1945. She is also accredited with helping to establish the University of Colorado's School of Nursing expansion in 1942 and in 1956 the establishement of the Colorado Foundation of Research in Tuberculosis. She was also interested in education and co-financed the Margery Reed Mayo Day Nursery; she also gave $500,000 to St. Mary's Academy. She donated to one hundred churches of all denominations but is most recognized for her donation to the Holy Ghost Catholic Church for which she received the Pro Ecclesis of Pontiface Medal (the Papal Cross) from Pope Pius III and the first Mother Pancratis Bonfils Medallion from the Sisters of Loretto.
Even though her list of awards is long for her financial support to many institutions, this does not agive true insight into her genuine love of people. She also supported individuals who were in need, specifically old women in the Denver area. They would come to her office and she would say


to each one, "Cotie right in, honey," and give her a check.
No wonder Helen Bonfils is described by one of her friends as "the kindest person I ever knew."
And so, it is only fitting that a house that holds so many memories of her owners leading Denver from an unsophisticated boom town to one of growing sophistication be officially recognized.
This house as a memorial to the three distinguished families that once called it home is a memorial as well to the contributions each made to the community of Denver. All three families are noted philanthropists and trusts still stand in their names for this purpose. Both the Woods and the Bonfils made major contributions to the field of education and the processes of education in Denver and in Colorado. All three families were leaders in industry and finance in the State.
The Bonfils, today a highly prominent family, have likewise done much to forward the arts in Denver, the theatre and other cultural pastimes.
Architecturally, the house represents a past era of fine and gracious living within the city limits of Denver, favored by Denver's first families. It is of a piece with other large mansions and yet it has a unique flavor of its own.
It is curious that the families, whose names are household words, were yet so private as to make it difficult even now to reconstruct the lives they lived in this grand old mansion. It is truly a landmark in Denver history and architecture.
This history was prepared by Mary M. Clement, Historic Denver


THE KASSLER-DUNKLEE HOUSE 727 Washington Street Denver, Colorado
The Kassler-Dunklee House is historically significant for its close and long time association with two prominent Denver families, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Stebbins Kassler and Mr. and Mrs. Edward Vaughan Dunklee, all of who have made outstanding contributions to various civic, political, philanthropic and social organizations in the city, state and nation.
The house, an adaptation of the Mediterranean style, was designed in 1910 by the Denver architectural firm of Biscoe and Hewett for Mr. and Mrs. Kassler. The architects, Maurice Biscoe and his partner Henry Harwood Hewitt, were primarily residential architects while they practiced in Denver. They designed a number of large homes in the Country club section of the city, and they also designed the buildings for Clayton College and Colorado General Hospital.
Biscoe, originally associated with the New York architectural firm of Tracy and Swartwout, first came to Denver to supervise the construction of St. John's Cathedral. That firm also designed the Denver Post Office Building. Biscoe traveled between Denver and New York for twenty years and maintained a Denver office with Fisher and Fisher. In 1920, he returned east to become associated with Andrews, Jacquese


and Rantoul of boston, the firm that designed the Equitable Building in downtown Denver. Boscoe died in Massachusetts in 1953.
Hewitt, originally from Bloomington, Indiana, studied at M.l.T. and in Europe for several years. He came to Denver after a year in Chicago and became Biscoe's partner. In 1913, Hewitt moved to Los Angeles where he is best known for his school buildings.
Edwin S. Kassler, the original owner of 727 Washington Street, was the son of George W. Kassler and his wife Maria Theresa Stebbins Kassler, both natives of New York State.
The senior Kassler, one of Denver's pioneer citizens and bankers, took an active part in the growth of the infant city after his arrival here from Omaha, Nebraska in 1860. He was a business associate of David H. Moffat and through this, became the assistant casTiier of the First National Bank in 1874 and head casher in 1880 when Moffat became president of the Bank.
After the Kasslers arrived in Denver, they lived for a time in the Moffet's house on Lawrence Street and it was there that Edwin S. Kassler was born on 29 October 1866.
Kassler grew up during exciting times in Denver for he saw it develop from a raw frontier town into one of the major cities in the west. He attended Denver schools: the Arapahoe Street School; old East High; the Brinker Institute.
During his lifetime, Edwin Kassler continued the legacy of leadership and community service begun by his father. For many years, he was closely associated with the Citizens Savings Bank and with real estate loans and investments. In 1916, he became president of the Denver Union Water Company and the president of the Nevada-California Electric Corporation in 1918.
In 1954, Kassler was honored for his fifty years of service as a director of the Colorado Telephone Company. He was also a trustee of the Denver Museum of Natural History for thirty-five years. In 1960, after his long association with Denver banking interests, Kassler was reputed to be the oldest active banker in the country.
An avid golfer who had won many tournaments, Kassler was one of the founders of Overland Park Club and the Denver and Cherry Hills Country Club.
On 25 November 1962, after eighty active and productive


years as a member of Denver's financial community, Kasler died at the age of ninety-six. He was Denver's oldest native citizen .
Edwin Kassler married Olivia Denham Cooper on 6 June 1892. She was the daughter of Jane 0. Cooper and former Governor of Colorado, Job A. Cooper, who held office from 1889 to 1891.
Mrs. Kassler, whose ancestors came to America on the Mayflower, was a member of the Colonial Dames and the Daughters of the American Revolution. She participated in Republican political affairs and served as Colorado chairwoman of the Republican Women's National Committee for Herbert Hoover when he ran for president in 1928. She was also a board member of the Denver Oprhans Home, serving as its president in 1901 and was one of the founding members of the West Denver Neighbor-hoos House, a day care facility for children of working mothers that is still in operation today.
The Kasler home was the scene of many social functions in addition to meetings and activities centered around the organizations in which both of the Kasslers were involved. The three Kassler children grew up in this house.
Mrs. Kassler died at her home in February 1930 after a long illness. Mr. Kassler continued to live there and on 27 January 1933, he married Leila Buchtel Chamberlain, daughter of Helen Barnam and William Harmon Buchtel and granddaughter of P.T. Barnam. She died in Denver on 12 April 1950.
The Kasslers sold 727 Washington shortly after they were married and during the difficult times of the depression years in the 1930's and early '40's, the house had several owners, none of whom lived in the house for any great length of time.
In 1934, the house stood vacant until Mrs. Ella Marie Brooks, widow of George L. Brooks, and James H. and Antoinette Miller moved in. Miller was associated with the Cripple Creek Mining Company. Succeeding occupants were Dr. and Mrs. Haynes J. Freeland, William A. and Ruth W. Bryant, III and Frederick W. and Carolyn T. Harding, who lived there only six months before it was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Edward Vaughan Dunklee in 1948.
Edward B. Dunklee was a prominent Denver attorney, civic leader and former state legislator. He was the son of Judge George F. Dunklee who came to Denver in the late 1800's and studied law in the office of John Q. Charles, Senator Thomas M. Patterson and Charles S. Thomas. He was admitted to the


bar in 1887 and served as county Attorney of Arapahoe County from 1901 to 1902 and then became a Denver District Court judge in 1922. He founded the law firm of Dunklee and Dunklee, in which three generations of the family have practiced. Judge Dunklee died in November 1951 at the age of ninety-three, after over fifty years as a judge and practicing attorney in Denver.
Edward Dunklee, born in Corpus Christi, Texas in 8 August 1888, came to Denver as a very young boy. He was active in Democratic politics and served both in the Colorado House of Representatives and in the State Senate. He founded the Colorado Association of the United Nations and served thirteen years as its president and was also the regional chairman for the United States Committee for the United Nations. Other activities included service as a trustee of Colorado Woman's College from 1915, organizer and first president of the Knife and Fork Club and membership in the Westerners.
On 22 June 1915, Edward Dunklee married Obie Sue Pulliam in Loveland, Colorado where Mrs. Dunklee had been born on 18 November 1892. They had four children: David Vaughan, Donald Pulliam, Edward, Jr. and Dorcus (Mrs. William Dunklee).
As in Kassler's day, this house was once again a place for many important gatherings, meetings and other social events. Several nationally prominent figures were guests in the house. Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, a delegate to the United Nations, was once a guest in the house and wrote her newspaper column in the sunroom. Adlai Stevenson, a friend of the Dun-klees, was a frequent" visitor. Others~~rrrcluded many of the top educators in the country, including the deans and presidents of the colleges and universities attended by the Dunklee children.
Mrs. Dunklee served as president of the Colorado University Alumni Association and for many years their meetings were held at the Dunklee home. She was also a member of the English Speaking Union, the Monday Literary Club, the League of Women Voters, and the Institute of International Education.
Mrs. Dunklee served on the Denver Library Commission and the boards of the Friends of the Library, the YWCA and on the national board of the American Association of University Women. For her contributions and devotion to these and many other organizations, Mrs. Dunklee received several honors and awards from educational, civic and religious groups.
The house, whose interior plan was ideal for entertaining, was always ready for any type function or any number of guests. Extra chairs, kept in a front hall closet, could be quickly


set up in the living room, a caterer engaged and all would be in readiness in no time at all.
After Mr. Dunklee died on 15 January 1963, Mrs. Dunklee continued to live in the house until her death in October of 1977. The house was then sold by the family and it has had several owners since. It is unoccupied at the present time.
Researched and compiled by Barbara S. Norgren, July 1981



MOORE HOUSE 700 Pearl Street Denver, Colorado
The Moore house was built in 1896. Little is known about the Moore family or the later occupants of the house.


PROJECT BACKGROUND


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The concept of a small urban luxury hotel gives Denver a chance to offer an alternative to the standard hotel chain. In many cities we find this lodging option in great demand.
Its beginnings stem from European counterparts, as well as 'bed and breakfast' lodging. These small hotels offer luxury and choice, from room size to decoration, to wine. Their greatest asset is their small personal scale and privacy.
We often find them located in grand old houses because their layout and original use is so similar.
The site consists of three existing houses. Capitol Hill is one of Denver's most pleasant neighborhoods. Along these tree lined streets we find her finest examples of residential architecture, 707 and 727 Washington and 700 Pearl. Also included will be the site of 720 Pearl, 16 city lots in all.
This site is located within easy access of the Central Business District, hospitals, restaurants, shopping and parks. Vehicular circulation by auto and public transportation is made easy by its central location. Stapleton Airport can be reached within 20 minutes. This site has a rare advantage over most urban sites in its excellent solar access.
In consideration of site specific characteristics we find the site unique for several reasons. First, its location is important.
The three houses turn the corner on 7th Avenue. With


With this placement and a retaining/security wall they create an encircled unit open to the south.
All these houses are designed in a variation of a Mediterranean style, with a white stucco finish. The site
extremely unique in that both their style and placement makes then read as a unit. Their stylistic similarity unites them. The contrast of the surrounding newer development heightens this feeling. The corner then becomes a series of events which makes the sites' sense of past more complete.
The size of all the buildings is substantial enough to make them valuable as build space. In other words their proportions are large enough to offer re-use options. The four (3) lots at 720 Pearl also are large enough to accomodate the new construction that will be necessary.
Architectural description and analysis summery: The houses are all large, with large public spaces, living room, and parlor for entertaining. The private spaces are generous and the public-private separation is good. The houses have varying degrees of ornate detailing, reflecting the luxury and affluence for which they were designed.
Morris-Woods-Bonfils Mansion Architectural Description
15 Rooms: Parlor, dining, kitchen, 4 bedrooms in 1st; 5 bedrooms on 2nd; 5 baths; breakfast room; library; pantry.
Construction: Foundation-cont. concrete; exterior walls -


common brick stucco; roof-wood frame, medium flat pitch; difficult framing with builtup clay tile covering.
Interior Finishes: Yellow pine floors, plaster walls and ceil-ing.
KASSLER-DUNKLEE HOUSE Architectural Description
18 Rooms: Living room, dining, kitchen, 6 bedrooms on 2nd;
4 bedrooms 1/2 story; 5 baths; breakfast room, sunroom, butler pantry, vestibule, library.
Construction: Foundation Const. Masonry; exterior walls
common brick stucco; roof wood frame, medium flat pitch; average framing with asphalt shingle covering.
Interior Finishes: Hard and soft wood floors, plaster walls and ceilings, paneling on first floor is solid not veneer.
MOORE HOUSE
Architectural Description
9 Rooms: Living room, 2 dining rooms, kitchen, 3 bedrooms 2nd floor; recreation room, bedroom.
Construction: Foundation Const. Masonry; exterior walls
common brick stucco; roof wood frame, steep pitch; average framing with asphalt shingle covering.
Interior Finishes: Hard and soft wood floors, plaster walls and ceilings.
SOURCE: Tax Assessor's Office
Denver, Colorado


PROGRAM


INTRODUCTION:
The design process will begin with the study of the three existing buildings and the site. This will be done in order to develop a sense of scale, proportion and function. Developing these ideas as a context, the new architecture can be addressed in a similar and sympathetic way.
This project will offer a wide range of design problems given the context. Since all the existing houses are in varying stages of disrepair and maintenance the proportion of new and old will vary with each house, each room and each detail.
GENERAL DESCRIPTION:
Guest Rooms
The project will include approximately 40-50 guest rooms 150-400 sq. ft. (not including the bathroom area). Approximately half of these will be in the new architecture. The larger rooms will be set upon suites with seating areas, fireplaces, sun-rooms, desks, wet bars etc. The smaller rooms will retain a similar quality but be simply furnished.
Services
The project will offer several conference rooms. These furnished with large tables could be rented out with complete wait services i.e., coffee, beverages, room service items.
These rooms could also serve the function of private dining areas for larger parties.
A restaurant open to the public seating 60-80 people -the front of the house approximately 1500 sq. ft., the kitchen approximately 700 sq. ft. The restaurant location should be off major traffic patterns with the option of dining outside, weather permitting. It should also be close to parking.
Because no guest rooms will be located in the basements, athletic and exercise facilities will be located there. These will include hot tubs, saunas, steam rooms, exercise rooms for floor exercises as well as stationary bicycles. There will also be billiard (pool) and game rooms.
The complex would share a lap pool and tennis court.
Grounds
The grounds will be shared by all. They should be landscaped with walks, planting beds, pools and level changes.
All to evolk the calm of a manicured garden despite the bustle of an urban setting.


Parking
The parking will be underground under the new architecture. It will be strictly valet for both lodging and dinner guests.
PRELIMINARY DIVISION OF SPACES:
727 Washington
Guest Rooms
- 3 large suites approximately 400 sq. ft.
- 3 medium rooms approximately 200 sq. ft.
- 3 small rooms approximately 150 sq. ft.
Service Rooms
- Conference room 1st floor 300-400 sq. ft.
- Pool and game room with fireplace and bar ment 400-500 sq. ft.
- Living room, library, sunrooms as original gathering. Livingroom opens onto deck.
- Office for Innkeeper 1st floor
- Room Service kitchen 300-600 sq. ft. Original with loading
- Sauna, hot tub, steam, lockers and showers arranged basement
- Garage or carriage house for possible storage and grounds-keeping needs approximately 400 sq. ft
707 Washington
This house will be very similar in size and function, however more work will be done with the grounds.
700 Pearl
A. Guest Rooms
- 2 large suites approximately 400 sq. ft.
- 2 medium rooms approximately 200 sq. ft.
- 2 small rooms approximately 150 sq. ft.
in the base-
for informal
location
m
Service Rooms
- Conference room
- Exercise Room Sauna, hot tub and steam, lockers and showers
- Room service kitchen
- Innkeeper's office
- Social Rooms (living room, dining)
-2-


700 Pearl (Cont'd)
B. Restaurant approximately 2200-2500 sq. ft. total Main office for the complex NEW ARCHITECTURE Guest Rooms
- 4 large suites approximately 400 sq. ft.
- 11 medium rooms approximately 200 sq. ft.
- 7 small rooms approximately 150 sq. ft.
Service Rooms
- Exercise room, hot tub, sauna, steam, lockers and showers
- Public rooms (similar to living room, library, den) approximately 1000 sq. ft.
- Room service kitchen 300 sq. ft.
Parking
- 40 spaces approximately 6000 sq. st. minimum located underground (in slope of hill)
NOTE: - Total new architecture sq. footage approximately
16000 sq. ft.
- Considering lot size and setbacks an approximate building foot print would be 60' X 95' = 5400 sq. ft.
- If possible limiting height to four stories.
-3-




^iTe.FtAM
WA/rlln^T^M


SITE ANALYSIS


The site is in the middle of Denver and enjoys Denver's
mild climate. It is an urban site that has to consider the
problems of density, pollution, dirt, noise and traffic. The
site is analyzed as follows:
Legal Description: SE^ SE^, Sec. 3, T. 4S., R. 68 W., 6th P.M. Lot 16 to 31, Block 17, Arlington Heights Addition, Denver, Colorado.
Context: As explained earlier, the urgency of the problem is
partly due to the development that has taken much of the neighborhood's grand residential fabric. Note in the diagram that much of this is already on a different scale. As mentioned earlier the strength of this site lies in the coherency as a whole it displays with location and style. It's context and importance will be as an oasis or pocket of the past, tying the older residential buildings together.
Contours: The entire Capitol Hill neighborhood rises from
Cherry Creek to a hill crest at approximately 8th Avenue. All the sites except 700. Pearl are relatively level. The site enjoys a maximum elevation difference of 28 feet.
This is desirable and gives the site both variety and natural drainage.
Views: Because the land falls off to the south, 70Q Pearl has
the grandest vistas. All views into the interior of the site would also be desirable.
Utilities: Access will be off Washington and Pearl Streets.
Because of my urban sites density and the infrastructure that must support it, I assume there would be no problem concerning connections with or burdens on the existing utility system.
Vegitation: The grass would need to be redone after construc-
tion. The tall elms that once lined Washington are now gone. The trees have not been maintained on the property and would need to be groomed into shape. None of the trees are striking enough to merit designing around.
Trees and shrubbery would be desireable as bird habitat, shade, color and privacy. Much landscaping would be done due to the importance of the interior space.
Noise: Noise from traffic would be a problem on Washington
in the evening rush hour since it is a major cross town artery. Natural barriers will be considered to correct this.
Soil: A soils survey was not available. Based on the knowledge
of soil in the surrounding area, 30-35 feet below grade there would be a layer of blue claystone bedrock. A caisson foundation would be recommended, with an end bearing of 50 KSF.


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CLIMATE


Local Climatological Data
Annual Summary With Comparative Data
1982
DENVER, COLORADO
>r4TES o'
Narrative Climatological Summary
Denver enjoys the mild, sunny, semi-arid climate that prevails over much of the central Rocky Mountain region, without the extremely cold mornings of the high elevations and restricted mountain valleys during the cold part of the year, or the hot afternoons of summer at lower altitudes. Extremely warm or cold weather is usually of short duration.
Air masses from at least four different sources influence Denver's weather: Arctic air from
Canada and Alaska; warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico; warm, dry air from Mexico and the southwest; and Pacific air modified by its passage over coastal ranges and other mountains to the west.
The good climate results largely from Denver's location at the foot of the east slope of the
Rocky Mountains in the belt of the prevailing
westerlies. During most summer afternoons cumuliform clouds so shade the City that temperatures of 90 or over are reached on an average of only 33 days of the year, and in
only one year in five does the mercury very briefly reach the 100 mark.
In the cold season the high altitude and the location of the mountains to the west combine
to moderate temperatures. Invasions of cold air from the north, intensified by the high altitude, can be abrupt and severe. On the other hand, many of the cold air masses that spread southward out of Canada over the plains never reach Denver's altitude and move off over the lower plains to the east. Surges of cold air
from the west are usually moderated in their descent down the east face of the mountains, and Chinooks resulting from some of these westerly flows often raise the temperature far above that normally to be expected at this latitude in the cold season. These conditions result in a tempering of winter cold to an average temperature above that of other cities situated at the same latitude.
In spring when outbreaks of polar air are waning, they are often met by moist currents from the Gulf of Mexico. The juxtaposition of these two currents produces the rainy season in Denver, which reaches its peak in May.
Situated a long distance from any moisture source, and separated from the Pacific source by several high mountain barriers, Denver enjoys a low relative humidity, low average precipitation, and considerable sunshine.
Spring is the wettest, cloudiest, and windiest season. Much of the 37 percent of the annual total precipitation that occurs in spring falls as snow during the colder, earlier period of that season. Stormy periods are often interspersed by stretches of mild sunny weather that remove previous snow cover.
Summer precipitation (about 32 percent of the annual total), particularly in July and August, usually falls mainly from scattered local thundershowers during the afternoon and evening. Mornings are usually clear and sunny. Clouds often form during early afternoon and cut off the sunshine at what would otherwise be the hottest part of the day. Many afternoons have a cooling shower.
Autumn is the most pleasant season. Local summer thunderstorms are mostly over and invasions of cold air and severe weather are infrequent, so that there is less cloudiness and a greater percent of possible sunshine than at any other time of the year. Periods of unpleasant weather are generally brief. Precipitation amounts to about 20 percent of the annual total.
Winter has the least precipitation accumulation, only about 11 percent of the annual total, and almost all of it snow. Precipitation frequency, however, is higher than in autumn. There is also more cloudiness and the relative humidity averages higher than in the autumn. Weather can be quite severe, but as a general rule the severity doesn't last long.
t^ 1 O NATIONAL OCEANIC AND / NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, NATIONAL CLIMATIC DATA CENTER
I I WClCJ ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION / DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE ASHEVILLE. N.C


DtNVtS, C01000
S.lttOI. tirNiT10NL "
Meteorological Data For The Current Year
S..ndd MOUNT UN __ . .
ATIONAL *p ___________ t.
ll
Fastest mil*
'}
. )
) %
\
1
I*
?
I 1*
M 1
62.
lb.2
** 9 3j 9 9|
t
17
JUL
21
0 3 9 * 151 :.** w r.t\ 73, *6 * 6i 66 16 0.2 7.6 3U : y ' \ C 1 1" I
i - 4 ~ i.n C.5C 8 1.2 1.2 19 69 37 37 6U 1 7 U.7 6.8 31 ; * "i i i: 111 8
11 2* 75 C 7 0.27 11 1.8 0.7 22 72 *7 *8 68 1 3 1 .7 6.8 32 U 1* 'Cl | 6.7 7 13 10
-7 3*3 1050 0 2.3* 2.no 2* 27.1 23.6 2* 65 *6 53 61 2? 0.7 n.6 37 *1 2* rS 6.6 5 1 | 13!
f CP 0EC 0EC JAN
-15 * 6208 611 1 5 2.00 2* *0.8 23.6 2* 66 *0 39 60 21 0.6 7.9 KM N W 2 * ,oh 9 H 12' 1 1*1 1 1
" (1 \ * \ 8*0.5
11 0 M I \ I 0 I 0 0 8 37.8
P 1 1 e 0 0 | 9 1 0 9 36 .*
6 0 0 21 n 1 1 29 1 0 3*.l
3 n 0 9 5? 5*.*
9" a r> 21 2* . 6 1 1 l 35.1
DATA CORRECTED AFTER PUBLICATION OF THE MONTHLY ISSUE.
Normals, Means, And Extremes
Winds under Fastest Mile hem! in a ire F.> 1-Minute winds with direct lens in cor pa
Temper lures "F Normal Precipitation in inches
Normal Extremes Base 65 F Water equivalent Snow, Ice pellets
I 5 E 3 > 1 <3 1 E >1 1 t > £ | I| ac r 8 >- if a 0 >- 8 1 c I E <5 z E 1 1 II : > E > E 5 Si J i| Sc 1 >- Maximum monthly s >- 1 g r. NT X (N Is S >
(a) M8 M 8 *8 *8 *8 *8 *8
J M3.5 16.2 29.9 73 1 982 -25 1963 1088 0 0.61 1 ** 19*8 0.01 1952 1.02 1962 23.7 I9*a 12.* 1962
r M6.2 19.M 32.8 76 1 963 -30 1 9 36 902 0 0.67 1 .66 1960 0.01 1970 1.01 1953 18.3 I960 9.5 1953
M 60.1 23.9 37.0 8M 1971 -1 1 19*3 868 0 1.21 2.89 19** 0.1 3 19*5 1 .*8 1959 2 9.2 1961 16.3 1952
a 6 1.0 33.9 M 7.5 85 1 960 -2 1975 525 0 1.93 * 17 19*2 0.03 1 963 3.25 1967 28. 1936 17.3 1957
M 70.3 M3.6 57.0 96 1 9M? 22 195* 253 11 2.6* 7.31 1967 0.06 197* 3.55 1973 13.6. 1950 10.7 1950
J 80.1 51.9 66.0 1 UM 1936 30 1951 80 1 3* 1.93 * .fca 1967 0.09 1980 3.16 1970 0.3 1951 0.3 1951
J 87 .M 50.6 73.0 1 0M 1939 M3 1972 0 261 1 78 6 1 1 965 0.17 1939 2.*2 1 965 0.0 0.0
a 85.8 57. M 71 .6 1 01 1938 M 1 196* 0 203 1.29 6.85 1 9 79 0.06 1 960 3.*3 1951 0. q 0.0
5 77.7 "L* 62.8 97 1 960 ?n 197 1 120 63 1.13 * .67 1961 T 1 9** 2.** 1936 21.3i 1936 19.* 1936
0 66.6 37.2 52.0 88 1 9M7 3 1969 mob 8 1.13 *.17 1969 0.05 1962 1.71 19*7 31 .2 1 9 6 91 12 .* 1969
n 53.3 25.M 39 .M 79 1 9 M 1 -8 1950 768 0 0.76 2.97 19*6 0.01 1 9*9 1.29 1975 39.1 1 9* 6. 15.5 19*6
0 *6.2 18.9 32.6 75 1980 -1 1972 100* 0 0. 3 2.8* 1973 0.03 1977 2.00 1982 30.8 1973 23.6 1982
JUL f EB a v SEP MAY NOV DEC
6M .0 36.2 50.1 10M 1939 -30 1936 6016 680 15.51 7.31 1957 T 19** 3.55 1973 39.1 19*6 23.6 1982
"
Wind ?
Fastest -ile c S |
* t *
i t s
Fg i 3 l 3
a u n ,3 E P 6 £ >- 0 ll
15 5 31 53 * 1976 33 7? 6.6
5 * 9 NW 196 J 7 2 6.9
S 63 NW 1952 n 6 1
S 56 N W 19601 68 6.0
s 5* St 1978 6* 6.3
s * 7 5 1956 72
s 56 sw 1965 7? * 9
s *2 N 1978 6.01
s * 7 NW 1955 1958 * *
s *5 NW *! *.*
s *8 W 196? 66 6.*
s 5 1 NC 195 3 68 6 *
JUL
s 56 SW 1965 70 6 .*
Mean number of da1.
f-unrne to vi"vi
i *
1 5 1*1
1 >1 1 ll
117 |?6 1?0
J7. ?! $ i ?. \ 2 ? 5i|St > >- f t ^ 0 r - 1 f i f? £P
J 2 6* 2 9 * p! 1 1
9 3 11 9 6 1 1 Oj
9! 0 1 II
61 T 1
5' 2 * I
* 1 5 b i
;
1
J
1
A-.-jge
, stat'on L'r ensure
to
9 3 3.9 9 J* 9 51*3 9 3 3 .* 9 3 3.9 3 36.3
* 39.9 9 38.7
8 39.6
9 3 7.6 939.9 83* .6
NORMALS. MEANS. AND EXTREMES TABLE NOTE(S): 1. Extreme wind data Is through 1981.
(a) Length of record, years, through the current year unless otherwise noted, based on January data.
(b) 70 and above at Alaskan stations.
* less than one half.
1 Trace.
NORMALS Based on record for the 1941-1970 period.
OATF. OF AN EXTREME The most recent in cases of multiple occurrence.
PREVAILING WIND DIRECTION Record through 1963.
WIND DIRECTION Numerals Indicate tens of degrees clockwise from true north. 00 indicates calm.
FASTEST MILE WIND Speed is fastest observed l-m1nute value when the direction is in tens of degrees.
Moans and extremes above are from existing and comparable exposures. Annual extremes have been exceeded at other sites in the local i tv .i follows:
Temperature Precipitation
Highest:105 In Aug. 1878. Maximum mm t lily
Minimum monthly Maximum In 2ft liours:
Wind
Fastest mile: 65 W in May 1oll,
Snowfnl1 FTaTlinum monthly
8.67 in Mrtv 18>
l'. l>0 in t\ c . 18SI
h.6 J in Mv 1876
67 . In iVc . lli


Average Temperature
Heating Degree Days
Year Jan J Feb [ Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept | Oct Nov Dec Annual
19* ! 33.7 V*.' ; 36.7 5* . 52.9 *.*.* 7ft.* 7* 3 *.3.2 13.0 *0.7 3*. 1 51.9
19** j-. 7 j?.* 3!.* /. 5*.' ft'. ; r 77.6 *.2.0 ft* *C. 7 30. 7 *4.7
19**. 31.6 3 3.9 1 ; * *;. 56.6 72.* 71.5 69. V 12.4 *1.1 30. * *4.6
19*1 31 . | *. * 1 11.9 ft.? 7*.* 71.7 ft J.* *6 2 3 3.* 37.*. ftl .7
J 9 7 3'.* 2* 3*. 3 *'..* 61.* 4 72.' 72.9 ft*..? 1ft.* 31.0 33.1 * 9 *
19fc* ? .* 7* .* 3;. 51.' 19.7 4 72.* 7?.9 ft*. .7 ftl 3 'ft. * . ft *4.7
}9*9 16.3 37.* 2 17. ' 7?.* 71 .* ft 3.2 *4 ft * 9 ft 32.5 * 9 ft
191' ? 9 * 1 j 1 4' * 6 8.9 4 6.9 * h.S ft*> 4 14.1 36.3
19^1 ?*. 33.9 1 36. 17.2 ft'.' 7 2.* 1 70.7 ft 1.5 *.? 3. 1 79.n
195? 3*.9 3 6. r IT.* *. 2 5* * 1 ' 7 3.1 72.3 45.4 ftl. 3 12.1 3 7.6 50.6
195 J 39.6 32.7 * 5 *7. 11.* 4 7* - 71 .2 * ft 0 ft* *3.1 3 1.* ftl .
195* 3* 3 * !.? 36.3 5 3. * 17.? i ! 7ft. 72.7 6 ft 7 ft 2 * * 1 3..7 63.5
1 9 * ? 7.? 2.l 36.6 59. * 4*.' 7 ft.* 73.1 ft 3.9 6*.- 36.7 3ft.* 50.2
195* 3*.n ?7.7 *' 1 .... 67.9 7.* 7?.? 49.7 ftft.l ftft.9 37.7 3ft. 7 51.5
195 ?r . * 7 39.1 * 1. * 52.9 ft ? .9 72.* 7 2.4 ftl .* 11 .* 36.8 39.6 ft~ 7
19 6 37.9 37.* 3? .... fcl 7 4 *.: 7ft 7 2.* *.* 53.9 C 6 35.6 51 .*
19 3c.r 37.? 37.6 St. ? 7*.'. 7 ?.* 7 3." (.1.1 *6.! 37.6 36.5 sr.r
fl9f 27.6 2*.* 3* 1 5* 6 57.? t *. 72.7 73.9 65.0 52.r 3 9 ft 26.5 *9.7
1 9fc J j,.. 36.2 2*.9 ** * 56.7 6*.: 71 .* 7 2.2 56.5 60.C 3*. 7 2 7.7 *6.9
1 9fc ? 19.ft 2 9.0 2*.ft ! ". ? 69. * t * 72.9 72.6 ft?.* 53.* *1.1 31.6 *9.7 -
19* 19.1 I 7 S'.' 1-.9 ft'. 7* * 48.7 t5.9 57.9 *1.7 26.5 54.6 1
1 9 6 * J-.f ?.* 3 2.0 * ft. ft 56. ft' ' 76. 7' .* ft 7.5 57.7 * c. c 33.2 *9.7
1 9 6 r 3* .0 ; ?.* 29.C 11.2 57. 1 4 9 72.7 70.2 55.7 55.1 *3.3 35.0 *9.6
1966 2 6.6 ?.* -2.5 **. ft 5 6.7 4*.* 7ft.9 7-.6 65.0 57.3 *1.5 31.9 50.5
1967 3*.r 16.1 *2.9 ** .? 62.* ft'.ft 69.1 ft 8.2 t?. 1 5?.* *0.5 26.5 * 9 ft
1 91 * 29.7 3*. *' ft * 2.' 5 2.9 ft * 7 1.7 4* 1 60.9 51.9 35.7 28.9 *6.4
1969 36.C 35.* 12.2 57.2 59. 2 t: 7*. 7 2.9 69.5 39. r 39. 1 32.5 *9.9
1973 3".6 3* .6 22.5 *2.7 68.* 1-.2 7?.- 73.9 59.5 *5.9 39.1 > *9.5
1971 32.1 3C.6 36.5 7. 5*.2 69.- 7-, 72.8 57.5 *9.* 39.1 31.9 *9.5
197? 30.5 36.2 *9.8 *6.5 57.c 6 2 70.7 71.0 62.1 52.1 32.9 2*.9 *9.9
1973 2T.3 36.6 29.9 *3.2 55.6 6 .5 71.0 73.5 59.9 5* .5 39.5 31.6 *9.9
197* 23.7 35.2 *.? *7.9 61 .( 6 * 7*.7 69.S 69.* 52.9 38.C 31.2 50.5
1976 J'-7 27.3 **.! 5*. Ji 6 2 72.7 70.6 59.5 53.2 36.8 37.5 *9.
197* 32.3 39.3 37.1 *9.2 56.7 6 ft. 2 75.3 70.2 61.8 *.9 39.5 35.5 51.0
1977 79.2 38.0 39.9 51.1 tC.7 7 1.9 79.2 7C.2 66.6 53.3 *0. 3 35.1 52.5
1976 26.6 3 1.* *3.3 sr. 69.* 6*. 9 7* .7 69.6 65.0 53.1 37.8 2*.6 *9.7
1979 16.0 3*.2 *:.5 *9.1 6*. * 6!.* 73.7 69.5 66.3 53.6 33.3 3*.5 *9.5
ir 26.0 3*.5 36.C *7.7 57. 1 7 1.9 76.9 73.2 65.6 52.9 *1.9 *1.2 52.2
196 1 37.3 36.2 *1.2 56.* 57.1 7r.* 75.9 72.0 be.? 52.6 *5.9 35.8 5*. 1
i9t: Bfcost 30.3 30.0 32.r *1.1 *7.9 55.1 6 1 72.7 73.1 61.7 *9.0 35.7 30.9 *9.3
ME 4*. 32.9 3e.7 *7.ft 56.7 6 4.7; 72.9 71.3 62.8 51 .6 39.6 32.* 50.3
** *2.71 95.9 61.3 6G. 69.* 5 .ft 6 6.* 85.0 77.0 65.5 52.6 *5.1 63.5
"IN 17.3| 27.3 26.1 3*.6 *9 C 5 2.5 56.9 57.6 98.6 37.7 26.6 19.7 37.0
I*?- J IVJ-Ml 1 4A* -ft ft
ms*tt
i **.-.*
1V* 6 ft4 J 969-7,
1 40-71 J4l-72 |47?-?J 1 9 7 J 7 *t 1 9 7 7 :
l5-7ft
197{,-77
1977-7*
197e-79 1979-6'
1963-61 I H'l-e? 1962-6*
Vug jSept Oct 1 Nov Dec j.n Feb Mar Apr j May Ljunnl
11? 7', 3 4ft J 1*17 7ft 6 6*6 *; 1 'ft ft n
7 1 * 24 22 V ft V' 112' 106 9 1 '6? 9 6/ *. 2 ir 7?
* ; 7'. 7*3 48: V?1 1 -** 1 H>6 * 11 2 ft 6 3
, 2 4ft 307 ft* * 47 * 1 122 in 7 ft 4 1 *.(* 2"*
9 t 6 1 3 *#1 44 V : r 1 9ft* r 3 2 ft 74 *46 *
l | 1 8 38 V 729 lie* 1064 8ft 751 * ft*. 3* t 1 *
1 *ft TV4 8 71 in* 926 *21 101 1 3 7* 2*i*
56 01 749 496 1 C ft 1 73* 969 ft 3? 2 00 76
14* 56* 77- 97 7 101 8 95* 8 1 7 506 329 2 ft
C 2 3 ft TV 7TJ in 4 1063 32 ft 2 1 8ft 2* ft
is 107 39 4ft C. 1 23 4 lift? 20 771 ft ft 2*r ft*.
5 1 At. 321 766 1 024 1277 -31 ft 7 J 507 137 6 7
9 1 99 38 1 *' 3 1 3 102* 457 85? ft?l 33? 6ft
| 1 9Sj Jl! 8*0 6* 3 1006 *0 859 * ft 9 25*
1*?; 6-4 764 40 7 1105 7*9 771 * 1 * 137 0
1 * 18 1 35 737 4? 0 1204 93ft fc6S * 3 6 335 6 7
2' 4ft 1 3tft 6 1 I 1 2* ' 1 ft 0 5* 751 *73 31 3 8 1
2 5 3* 9*1 43 V 120* '76 828 51* 2*7
*1 56 1 36' 663 Till .-.3 Cl 727 26 C 2*3 26
1? 19 37* 5 70 69 * 10 71 >1 * 733 522 306 92
1511 S7
69*
*T7f
561*
Cooling Degree Days
Precipitation Snowfall
Year j Jan j Feb Mar 1 Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec (Annual Season | July | Aug |sept| Oct | Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr j May[june Total
19* 3 C.2 3| 0.12 0. 3 1.0* 2.96 1.2? C.7? 1.2e 0.07 0.27 0.*1 0.37 9.12 19*3-** 0.0 c.c o.e: io 2.3 3.0 12.1 3. 3 28.1 23.6 7.7 0.0 81 .1
1 9* * 1.08 0.25 2.89 3.92 1.73 0.9? 3.3* 0 *6 T 0.06 0.52 0.37 15.5* 19**-*5 0.0 0.0 c.c C.O 5.5 5. 9 12.2 6.2 3. C 23.0 7 0.0 55.8
19*6 0.70 C.*9 0.13 2.55 2.32 2 .c? 2.19 2.55 1 .17 0.7e o.*o 0.09 15.39
19*5-*6 c.o 0.0 T 2.3 3.8 D. 6 10.2 *.6 3.2 T 0.8 0.0 25.7
19*6 0.6* 0.27 C.52 2. C * 1.95 C .62 1.6C 1 .38 1.18 0.88 2.97 0.0* 1*. 3* 19*6-97 c.c o.e . 3.8 39.1 0. 7 7.3 1 2.3 12.0 *.7 1.3 T 81.6
19*7 0.37 C.87 l.C* 1.3C *.bl 2.76 1.5? 1 .27 0.91 3 1 0.73 0.27 19.06 19*7-98 c.c c.c 0.0 3.1 b.* 6. * 23.7 7.3 22.0 5.5 T 0.0 7* .*
14*8 1 .** 0.** 1.71 2.52 1.8* 1 .9* 0.80 0.*1 0 5 0.16 0.65 0.26 12.62 19*8-*9 0.0 o.e o.e :. 8 b.7 *. 8 20.5 0.9 1*.2 12.7 T 0.0 60.1
19*9 1.17 0.03 2.2 9 1 .*6 3.31 * .27 1.35 0.9? 0.28 1.36 0.01 0.33 16.76 19*9-50 0.0 c.c 0.0 7.2 0.0 6. 0 8 8 2.9 5.9 9.0 13.6 0.0 52.9
1950 0 7 0.20 0.31 2.96 2.80 3.3? 0.56 0.27 1 58 0.1? 1.00 0.32 15.93
1950-51 0.0 0.0 0.0 c.o 11.9 5. 9 15.7 1 0.5 17.6 12.9 0 0 0.3 7* .8
1951 0.83 0.78 1. 7 2.01 1.76 2 .27 0.83 * .*7 0.97 2.16 1.17 0.69 19.*3 1951-5? c.c c.c * .2 7.7 1*.5 11.2 0.3 1 n.2 25.2 11.2 T 0.0 8* .5
1952 0.01 C 6 8 2.12 2.75 3.06 0.1? 1.06 1 .*1 C.5* 0.18 1.31 0.19 13.93 1952-53 0.0 o.e o.e 1.2 1 *. 5 3. 1 7.9 1 6.5 11 .8 12.0 1.7 0.0 68.2
195! 0.39 1.39 1.15 1 .29 2.66 1 .*t 1 .96 1.25 0.20 0. ** 1.00 1.02 1 2 3 1953-5* 0.0 o.e 0.0 c. 1 7.2 1 *. * 2.7 n.b 6.3 7.6 2.6 0.0 *1 .5
195* 0.23 0.0* C 9 0.86 0.6C 0.6ft 1.90 0.51 0.77 0.06 0.57 0.71 7.51 1959-55 0.0 0.0 0.0 r.* 3.9 8. 6 3.5 1 2.2 19.5 * .9 0.0 0.0 53.0
1955 0.23 0.85 1.1* 0.* 8 2.*7 1 .39 2.99 2. 1 2.72 0.66 0.56 0.15 16.05
1955-56 o.e 0.0 o.e *.l 7.3 2. 9 b.3 1C.5 1 3.C 3.7 T 0.0 *7.8
1956 0.39 0.77 c.e9 0.7? 2.36 0 .** *.17 1.83 0.01 0.27 1.25 0.62 13.72 1956-57 0.0 o.e o.e C 6 21.3 6. 3 5.3 1.6 8.9 25.5 8.6 0.0 78.3
1957 0.3 2 C.73 1.C9 * .1 3 7.3! 1 .09 1 .29 2.03 0.*? 2.62 0 9 0.06 21.56 1957-56 0.0 0.0 T 3.9 3.0 0. 8 8.9 1 2.0 1* .* 1* 1 0.0 0.0 57.1
195* 0.73 1.00 1. 8 1.73 * 6 1 .*7 3.5- 1.17 1.51 0.37 0.7* 0.6* 18.80 1958-59 0.0 c.o T 2.6 9.7 7. 7 17.9 1 .S 26.8 17.6 T 0.0 99.3
1959 1.2* 1.31 2.85 1 .35 3.3! C.** C.5 0.25 1.82 2.*6 o.*o 0.26 16.5* 1959-60 c.o 0.0 12.9 1 1.8 5.3 2. 7 10.7 1 8.3 9.0 9.3 T 0.0 80.0
I960 C 7 7 1.66 C. 89 2.56 2.2 7 C .63 1.31 0.06 0.38 2.*6 0 9 1.50 1*.98
1960-61 0.01 0.0 o.e * t 5.1 1 7. 8 1.0 7.9 29.2 8.6 6.* 0.0 80.6
196 1 0.07 0.66 2.51 1 .36 *.12 1.11 1.60 1.21 *.67 0.77 0.93 0.30 19.01 1961-62 0.0 0.0 5.8 6.2 11.* 3. 8 17.2 1 1.3 6.8 10.0 0.0 0.0 72.5
196? 1.33 1.05 C.5? 1 .1C 0.8* 1 .52 0.5* 0 *6 0.19 0.05 0.66 0.17 8.95 1962-63 c.o 0.0 0.7 c.o 5.C 1. 2 9.1 2.1 18.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 36.3
1963 0.71 C. 2 1 1 .*2 C.C3 C.6F 3.59 0.55 2.52 1.25 0.31 0 5 0.51 12.23 1963-6* o.e 0.0 o.e 1.1 3.5 5. 9 2.6 1 2.7 18.* 12.1 1.0 0.0 57.
196* 0.26 1.0* 1.38 1 .25 2.53 0.6? 0.7? 0.27 0.*1 0.19 0.88 o.*o 10.1* 1969-65 0.0 0.0 o.e T 6.C *. * 13.2 1 7.1 1* .9 0.3 T 0.0 55.9
1 96 c 1 .OC 1.27 1.20 1 .0 5 1.62 * .1* 6.*] 1.06 2.58 0 5 0.36 0.53 21.87
1965-66 0.0 c.o 5.5 r.r 5.5 5.6 3.6 1 *.6 2.6 6.9 2.9 0.0 *6.9
1 9ft fc 0.30 1.26 C. 32 i..s 0.3* 1 .*1 l.C* 2.06 1.15 0.96 0.32 0.17 10.81 1966-67 0.0 c.o T 8. 3.0 1.9 9.9 . * 6.6 3.6 3.0 0.0 *0.7
1967 0.8* 0.39 C. 79 3.0ft *.7 * .6 3.25 0.63 0.60 1.13 1.01 1 .06 23.31 1967-68 0.0 c.o 0.0 1.7 9 1 3. 1 3 C 7.3 9.2 15.1 I 0.0 58.6
1966 0.51 0.7* 0.85 2.39 0.71 0 .50 1.3* 2.53 0.59 0.75 0.71 0.51 12.13 1968-69 0.: 0.0 o.e c.* 5.8 6. 9 2.6 *.? 13.2 T 0 0 0.0 33.3
1964 0.17 0. 3 1.10 1.33 6.12 2.99 1.81 0.79 1.67 *.17 0.62 0.32 21.52 1969-7C 0.0 0.0 0.0 31.2 5.1 3. 1 0.9 r. 3 20.5 * 7 T 0.0 65.6
1970 0.1C C.01 1.3* C.97 C 6 * 3 .83 1.67 0.5* 2.*7 o.e? 1.19 0.09 13.73
197C-71 0.0 0.0 * .t 5.9 9.2 C. 9 8.6 11.9 9.6 6.0 T 0.0 56.7
1971 0.35 0.78 C. 5 3 1.9f 1.3* 0.23 1.20 0.85 2.85 0. ** 0.16 0.25 10.96 1971-72 o.e c.o 17.2 3.1 1 .* 8. * 10.9 9. 1 7.1 17.2 0.0 0.0 7* .*
197? 0.36 C.** 0.50 3.5? C 9 2 .9* 0.63 2.71 2.07 0.62 1.69 0.70 16.87 1972-73 c.o 0.0 0.0 9.7 19.* 9. 8 12.1 3.0 15.1 2*.8 1.0 0.0 9* .9
197? 1.31 C.16 1.76 3.73 5 C 6 C .20 2.* 1.28 2.85 0 7 o.e j 2.8* 22.9b 1973-7* 0.0 c.o o.e 2.3 9.3 3C. 6 8.2 1 r. 3 12.6 17.8 o.e T 91.5
197* 1.03 C. 82 1.32 2.26 C.Ct 2.Cl 2.3* 0.16 0.98 1.66 1.06 0.29 1* .0 3 1979-75 c.c c.o 1 .6 1.0! 11.9 2. 1 3.6 *.0 1*.3 10.9 6.1 0.0 55.7
197* 0.23 0.37 1.19 1 .1* 2.e: 2.1! 2.7* 2.00 0.2* C. 30 1.88 0 7 15.51
1975-76 c.c c.o 0.0 2.7 15.2 7.3 3.2 6.9 18.7 1.2 0.0 0.0 59.7
19 7* C 1 9 C. 5* 1.3* l.?7 1.3* 0.63 2.31 2.50 1 86 0.9J 0.32 0.16 13.91 1976-77 o.e 0.0 o.e 7.2 * .5 3. 1 2.* 3.1 9.6 * 7 0.0 0.0 3*.6
1977 0.16 C.27 1.2* 2.13 c. 3 * 1 .02 2.9* 1.00 0.10 0 6 0.59 0.03 10.3* 1977-78 u.c 0.0 o.e 3.3 * 1 r. 7 5.5 6.2 6.6 *.b 13.5 0.0 *6.5
1976 0.27 0.2 7 1.C7 1.6? 3. t 1 .I 3.5* 0.26 0.07 1 5 0.50 0.82 1 1.7C 1978-79 0.0 n.o * 2.7 6.9 1*. ? 9.1 5.8 18.2 6 1 6.2 0.0 73.2
1979 0.3* C 2 1.25 l.*l 3.5! 2.S' 0.6 1 5.85 0.36 1.28 1.66 1.06 20.36 19T9-8C c.c 0.0 c.c 2.7; 22.3 16.5 12.3 9.6 12.1 10.0 T 0.0 85.ft
I960 O.t* 0.*ft 1.15 2.5* 2.73 C.C9 2.93 1.65 0.63 0.1C 0.66 0.10 13.67
1980-81 c.c 0.0 o.e 1.5 7.1 1.2 *.l 9.3 2* .0 2.9 T 0.0 *5.1
198 1 0.24 C.35 2.22 1.01 3.7e 0 .63 0.9- 1.16 0.35 0.79 0 2 0.66 12.59 1981-6? c.c c.o o.e :.6| 3.3 9.9 *.6 1.8 2.1 2.C T 0.0 26 *
148 2 0.3? C.C9 C. 18 0.3* 3.*; 2.2 6 C.92 1.16 1.38 1.51 0.*7 2.3* 1 5 1982-83 c.c 0.0 o.e 1.2 1 3 27. Jt
BE c or: be cocr
l6 C.*7 0.57 1.11 1.96 2.*? 1 .* 1 .6 1 .*2 1.10 l.co 0.67 0.63 1 55 HE * c.o l.6| 3.6 j 7., H 7.9 7.5 w.s 1.6 5 9.1
* Indicate- a station move or relocation of instruments. See station Location table.
Record rar. value's above are means through the current year tor the period beginning ir. 167- for temperature and precipitation, 1935 for snowfall. Temperature and precipitation are from City Office locations through 1934. Heating degree davs are from City Office locations through Jiaie 1939. Snowfall if from City Office locations through Jine 13-.. Otherwise the data are from Airport locations.


altitude angles


muvt*?


ZONING


Thu., a P.U.D
The site 1s now zoned A-3. hotel and hotel uses are penn.;tto<> in K-4 tation of a plan is require-', for .U.o. Hot the following zoning requi ro. .orris fo important, using them as a gui-te to begin some oerameters of space ana. sonic, nasic Perarneters:
. v.'ou !.1 i be roc ; oning. The nre.-cr jli(' t i on .
it-3, -4 where to rive the proved
16 lots at 12p 25 feet each = 56,000 dquare Feet
Betoacks: 10 ft. front, 7*5 ft. sides, 20 ft. rear Open space: 20fi of lot if unuer 3 stories, 30? of lot if more than 4 stories
Floor area maximum: for R-3, 3>- lot sjze = 150,000 oq. Ft i,.a
for E-4, 4x lot size = 200,000 3q. Ft I,la Parking: Hotel Class 2, 1 space / 600 So. Ft.
Bulk Restrictions: see following page Zoning Description:
R-3: High Density Apartment District, Building size is con-tolled by limited bulk standards, off street parking and open space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed 3 times the site area. Maximum density is not specified and is determined by the size of the individual units and the factors mentioned above.
R-4: Very Hi-oh. Density Apartment and Office District, The purpose of this district is to provide a location for very high density apartment and intensive office development. Building size is controlled by limited bulk standards, off street parking and open space requiremen Allows hotel or motel uses and limited accessory retail shopping. Building floor area. cannot exceed 4 times the site area.
P U D / P B G :
The Planned Building Group and the Planned Unit Developm are specific zone districts written by district approved by the city council.
owners ana


The PBG and the PUD is required by tlio city to be in
i
harmony with its' General Comprehensive Plan for I,he ore- any adjacent property, the character of the neighborhood and any other matters affecting the oublic health, safety ana general welfare of all concerned.
The PUD is a form of development characterized by a unified site design for clustering buildings and providing common open space, incresed density, and a mixture of ouilding types ana land uses. A PUD permits the planning of a project ana the calculations of densities over the entire development area, rather than on a individual lot-by-lot basis. It also refers to a process mainly revolving around site plan review, in which city agencies and neighborhood residents have considerable involvement in determining the nature of the development.
The PUD has been most commonly used for housing developments but Denver allows all types of uses providing that they are judged to be compatible with uses within the project and with uses located on adjoining properties.


SETBACK AND BULK REGULATIONS FOR
------- STRUCTURES IN
: . O' R-3 ZONES
THE SKETCHES BELOW GENERALLY DESCRIBE THE SETBACK AND BULK REGULATIONS FOR MOST BUILDINGS CONTAINING A USE BY RIGHT: HOWEVER, FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATIONS TO INDIVIDUAL PROPERTIES, INTERESTED PARTIES ARE ADVISED TO CONTACT THE ZONING ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT.
FRONT VIEW
Actual bldg, height is determined by floor area ratio and provision of of f-s-tr-aet-parking ----- ------------
PREPARED BY THE DEHVEJt PLANNI.NC OFFICE


BUILDING CODES


.ji'.-'Vi.i; DUInDIiiG CODE Ki'iVILA
i'ire Zone //3
Group K Division 1 Hotel, Hotel
Dot mixed use- no fire separation require! between unit:; building Types:
Tyoes of Construction
II. oteel, concrete, masonary- height limit, 6 stories,75 Ft.
2 hour ratea exterior wall
III. Allows use of heavy timber-height limit 4 stories,65 Ft.
2 hour rated exterior wall
IV. Steel, concrete, rnasonary- height limit,4 stories,65 Ft.
1 hour rated exterior wall
Chapter 5:
509 each unit will be provides with 1 lavatory and 1 bath/shower Chapter 13:
section 1302: H-l More than 1 story shall be at least 1 hour fire resistive construction.
Section 1305: Light, ceiling heights, ventilation, tiolet room facilities- 7 ft. ceiling minimum ceiling height Chapter 17:
Table y 17-A: OccupancyH-1 fire zone, types of construction and fire resistive requirements in hours section 1711: Projections from buildings; cornices, canopies non-combustables
Section 1714: Guardrails; at least 42" high,not more than 9" clear spacing
oectin. 1727: Vechicle exit facilities; ramps should be within
2 feet of grade level and at least 20' inside property line.


Chr 'tor 2 j:
jection 2 J04: Oorj.-truction 111.; floors stray /.uteri; 1 permitted lection 200;,: I"ire protection depending on height Chapter 23:
design ana loading: determined by design Chapter 24:
masonary: 0ir.ee the existing construction is masonary Chapter 33:
Jection 33^2: Exits must oe accessible in 2 directions fro... rooms.
Jection 33^3: lire doors must swing with exit direction identification; all uoors must be marked Jection 3304: Corridors and exit balconies; minimum 7' high minimum 44" wide; dead end corridors no more than 20' long Section 3305: Stairs maximum rise-71-'"; minimum 10" run
Section 3306: Ramps; maximum slope; 12 verticle to 1 horizontal
landing must be 5' in ramp direction Section 3322: Exits group H; shall not exceed 50' or one flight
of stairs; entry and exit doors no more than 100-150'
if automatic sprinkled.
Table 33-B: Exit doors to corridors; 45 minute rating Doors to exit enclosures; 90 minute rating
Chapter 33:
Section 3305: Fire Department Connections
Section 3olJ: Every room used for sleeping must have single station fire aexectors Section 3312: Jpecial extinguishing systems Chapter 57:
Swimming pools


TAX INCENTIVES


Tax incentives are making the option of rehabilitation more appealing. A summary of three points are of interest for this project.
First, to be awarded placement on the National Historic Register and to receive government tax benefits, 75% of the exterior walls must remain intact.
These buildings would qualify for the 25% ITC rating.
The easement value, being the difference between two possible uses, could be valued as high as 10-20 million dollars.
Investment Tax Credit Computing
If incurred before January 1, 1982, in taxable years ending before such date, expenditures for the interior or exterior renovation, restoration or reconstruction of a building that has been in service for at least 20 years before such rehabilitation has begun qualify for the investment credit if the improvements have a useful life of five years or more. The credit is available for rehabilitation of buildings used for business or productive purposes, but not for those used for residential purposes. The use of the building for this determination is its post-rehabilitation use.
If more than 25 percent of the exterior walls are replaced, the rehabilitation will not qualify for the credit. Similarly, building enlargements do not qualify.
Rehabilitation expenditures in connection with a certified historic structure, incurred before January 1, 1982, in taxable years ending before that date, and certified by the Secretary of the Interior, qualify for the credit. However, if it is claimed, rapid five-year amortization may not be claimed.
However, for expenditures incurred after December 31, 1981, in taxable years ending after such date, the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 provides a new, albeit similar, investment tax credit for rehabilitating qualified buildings and for rehabilitating qualified certified historic structures. The credits amount to 15 percent of expenditures for qualified buildings


30 to 39 years old, 20 percent of expenditures for buildings at least 40 years old, and 25 percent of expenditures for certified historic structures. The 15 and 20 percent credits apply only to nonresidential buildings, but the 25 percent credit applies to residential buildings as well. The regular investment credit and the energy investment credit do not apply to any portion of the basis that qualifies for this new rehabilitation credit (.35). Expenditures must be capitalized and must be made for real property with a 15-year recovery period. There must be a substantial rehabilitation of the building.
This generally means that the qualifying expenditures over the tax year and the preceding year must exceed the greater of the adjusted basis of the property or $5,000. However, in the case of any rehabilitation that may reasonably be expected to be completed in phases that are included in architectural plans and specifications (completed before the rehabilitation begins), such expenditures may be made over a 60-month period (.40) .
Rehabilitation of structures certified as historic by the Secretary of the Interior must still be approved by that Secretary before the credit is available. This rule applies to buildings located in a registered historic district, unless the taxpayer obtains certification that the building is not of historic significance. Taxpayers who rehabilitate certified historic structures without the prior approval of the Secretary of the Interior will be limited to straight-line depreciation.
Code Sec. 48 111450
What Are Facade Easements?
Generally, a conservation easement is a right or privilege which authorizes one to do or maintain something on the property of another person which benefits the one receiving the easement. A facade easement is a conservation easement which applies to a building facade. The easement exists separately from ownership of the underlying property, but it does represent an interest in the property which accrues to the owner of the easemenet.
Some more specific properties of easements are:
They may be affirmative and permit use of the landowner's property by the owner of the easement, or negative, in that they prohibit the property owners from use of their property to which they would be entitled otherwise.


The rights granted by an easement are permanent; they do not terminate with the original landowner's interest in the property.
Colorado state law determines what types of organizations may accept easements. Historic Denver, Inc., is a tax-exempt organization and is authorized to accept easements.
Historic Denver can only consider for easements those buildings which are certified by the Colorado State Preservation Officer as being in the National Register of Historic Places or designated as a local landmark by the Denver Lakdmark Commission.
Facade easements do not restrict the property owner's use of the interior of the building so long as that use does not affect the facade.
Why Should People Want to Donate Easements To Historic Denver?
There are sound financial reasons for donating facade easements to a charitable organization. Donors may deduct the value of an easement from their income and/or estate taxes, subject to limitations on allowable income tax deductions in individual cases.
In general, donations of easements are treated as any other charitable deduction. Dollar value is based on fair market values and are proportionate to the rights included in the easement. The general guideline established by the IRS is that the value of an easement is "...the difference between the fair market value of the property unrestricted and the fair market value of the property restricted." The value must be established by a competent appraiser.
Tax Consequences of Conservation
The donation of a facade easement in perpetuity to Historic Denver, Inc. may have income, gift, estate, and real property, the consequences which will benefit the aonor. The tax consequences must be determined between the donor, assisted by his or her attorney or other professional advisor, and the taxing authorities. Historic Denver cannot calculate or assure tax benefits.


The following information is intended only as a guide which Historic Denver hopes will be helpful to the donor of a facade easement.
Federal Income Taxes
In general, the donation of a facade is treated as any other charitable deduction; it is subject to limitations on deductions and charitable contributions in individual cases and is eligible for tax carry-forwards. In order to qualify for income tax deductions, the easement must be granted in perpetuity and is not transferable by the donee for money, property, or services.
In order to establish the value of the easement, it is necessary for the donor to enlist the services of a competent appraiser. The IRS considers the value of the easement to be the difference between the value of the property encumbered by the easement and the value of the property were it not so encumbered. In other words, the higher the development potential of the property, the higher the valuation of the easement will generally be.
Federal Estate Taxes
So long as the donation of the easement is made at least three years before the donor's death, the gift of the easement reduces the value of the property for estate tax purposes. Because the easement limits the development potential of the property, the property will usually be appraised at a lower value than if its use were not restricted by a facade easement.
State Income Tax
On May 13, 1976, Colorado gave express statutory recognition to conservation easements in gross (of which facade easements are one type) with the approval of Senate Bill No. 59. Since then, Colorado has accepted the same income tax deductions for facade easements as does the federal government.
Real Property Taxes
The donation of a facade easement normally will result in an eventual reduction of real estate taxes. Since property is assessed with due regard for the restricted use of the property, "...the valuation for assessment of a conservation easement which is subject to assessment and taxation, plus the valu ation for assessment of lands subject to such easement, shall equal the valuation for assessment which would have been


determined as to such lands if there were no conservation easement." Roughly, this means that tax assessors consider that the present and future value of the buildings is reduced by the valuation assigned to the easement itself.
The area of assessment for real property taxes can be a complex one, and Historic Denver suggests that the donor address questions concerning valuation to:
Legal Department
National Trust for Historic Preservation 1785 Massachusetts Avenue, N.N.
Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 673-4000
For general information, write to:
U.S. Dept, of Interior
Heritage Conservation & Recreation Service P.0. Box 25387 Denver, Colorado
AND ask for copy of: Land Conservation and Preservation Techniques .
For information regarding landmarked buildings, call or write:
State Historic Preservation Officer Colorado Heritage Center 1300 Broadway Denver, CO 80203 (303) 839-3394
Denver Landmark Commission City Planning Office 1445 Cleveland Place Denver, CO 80202 (303) 575-2736
If you are interested in donating your building facade, call or write:
Historic Denver, Inc.
Conservation Easements Denver, CO 80203 (303) 837-1858
Historic Denver cannot accept all offers. It will give priori to those which facilitate its ongoing projects.


DESIGN SOLUTION


EXISTING SITE
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le tout ensemble
ARCHITECTURAL THESIS COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
5/84
DOUGLAS J EICHELBERGER


LOWER LEVEL
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ARCHITECTURAL THESIS COLLEGE OF DESIGN ANO PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
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2nd LEVEL
le tout ensemble
ARCHITECTURAL THESIS COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING .UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
DOUGLAS J EICHELBERGER


3rd LEVEL
le tout ensemble
ARCHITECTURAL THESIS COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER V84
DOUGLAS J EICHELBERGER


4th LEVEL
ARCHITECTURAL thesis COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
le tout
DOUGLAS J EICHELBERGER


CONCLUSION


My thesis goals can be summarized as follows:
Denver's finest architectural examples are either demolished or have a short life expectancy.
I believe it is important to maintain things of value.
In the context of architecture, to enrich our urban fabric and encourage community pride. This maintenance is also important in the complex psychological meanings older buildings hold for us.
I believe a highrise isn't a responsible solution to the development of my site. The design has a responsibility to maintain the highest levels of coherency and quality in our built environment.
Evolution, or in architecture, adaptive use, is the process by which buildings can be repaired and altered to accommodate change.
Adaptive use must be the sensitive integration of two sets of ideas, new and old. The product must function, the new and old should be clear and coherent.
All this should aesthetically enrich and stimulate mankind and our city. My conclusion will involve the analysis of myself and my relationship to this project.
My title "Le tout ensemble' tranlates to mean 'the whole picture' or everything! Since there is no possible way to separate us from our work; a brief insight into my intention and spirit will be helpful to set the stage and reveal the way in which I addressed this project.
The overriding concern in my life is the human condition,
'Le tout ensemble' on the whole picture. How we relate to nature, ourselves and community. Being out of touch seems our problem. For example, if we were in touch with nature we wouldn't have such a pollution problem. We would understand nature and acknowledge our bond to nature. My solution to this problem is sensuality i.e., the stimulation of the senses, feelings. The final goal becomes something that lacks exact description, but that can be found in both people and inanimate objects including architecture. The words that come to mind that might come close are depth, sensitivity, integrity, honesty, sensuality (feelings), wholesome, lusty, healthy, all that equals life.
This life has no age limit, it can be found in the twinkle


of an eye. Mesa Verde has this attraction as does the sculpture of Michelangelo and some of Picasso's paintings. When I think of the time in my life when I felt the most in touch, it was the time I spent in the Mediterranean Italy, Greece and Spain. The time when my senses were the most stimulated with bright sun, sparkling white buildings with the crisp dark shadows, the cool blue ocean and hearty food. Looking back, I believe this is the basis of my attraction for this site, with its three Mediterranean style buildings and some magical feelings.
Analyzing the site reveals its tremendous potential; three stucco buildings in Denver aren't a surprise, but three buildings of similar style, turning a corner, forming a feeling of community or compound is rare. These buildings are still standing in an area of Denver in which almost all new development is above eight stories, adding to their interest. They stand out in much the same way an antique placed in a modern room does; interest increased by contrast. Even more difficult to find in an area developed like this is good solar access.
As a result all the qualities of Mediterranean Architecture such as the high light shadow contrast and brilliant color combinations of green foliage and terra cotta roof tile are realized. To have all these assets, plus these buildings cascading down a hill offered an opportunity much too rare and romantic to pass by.
My initial feelings regarding function included European style Health Club or a small hotel. I believe it was important to maintain the integrity of the older buildings this involved as few alterations as possible. Because of the original function of the houses a distinct separation is made between public and private space (this is mostly due to the entertaining that went on). This public-private distinction seemed to work well with the hotel idea and so I pursued it. I felt the project needed architecture that was more sympathetic than similar, something reflecting the grace of life that the other buildings were designed for.
All work should improve the site and make the project read more coherently as a compound. The result should offer a variety of space inside and out. The Public rooms should be large but warm and intimate, conducive to interaction. The guest rooms should be finely furnished and detailed but not so they would encourage guests to only stay in their rooms.
Too often hotels become islands of isolation and loneliness.
This would defeat my purpose.
With all this in mind, I feel my solution was very


successful. The architecture anchors the feeling of compound achieving, overall grace and elegance. I believe the interior and exterior spaces created would encourage participation and reward the senses. Like every designer I've created forms and spaces that I hope will achieve my goals. I've set the stage and the performance now involves and depends upon the participants. As one last note I feel this is the best work I've done to date both in design and presentation. This is a satisfying and encouraging way to leave school. Thank you.


BIBLIOGRAPHY


BIBLIOGRAPHY
Alexander, Christopher, Sarah Ishakowa, Murray Silverstein. A Pattern Language.
Davis, Sally, Betty Baldwin. Denver Dwellings and Descendants.
Denver Building Code Denver City Directory Denver Householder's Directory Denver Municipal Facts Denver Planning Office Denver Post
Denver Tax Assessor's Office Denver Water Board
Fawcett, Future of the Past.
Fitch, James Marstan, Historic Preservation: Curatorial Manage-ment of the Build World.
Fitch, American Building.
Glenn. Historic Preservation A Handbook for Architectursl Students. Historic Denver.
Kemp. Historic Preservation of Engineering Works.
McKee. Recording Historic Buildings.
N/A. National Register of Historic Places.
N/A. Architectural Description Guides (Co. Hist. Soc.)
Nat'l. Trust. Historic Districts.
Rifkind. Field Guide to American Architecture Rocky Mountain News W. Magazine.
Warner. Business and Preservation.
Warner. New Profits From Old Buildings.
Very Special Thanks to:
Steven Grim, Mary Rae and Associates, Robert Caudle and Associates .


le tout ensemble
ARCHITECTURAL THESIS COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
DOUGLAS J EICHELBERGER


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SOUTH ELEVATION
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EAST ELEVATION
SECTION A
DOUGLAS J EtCHELBERGER