Citation
The Inn at Val Moritz

Material Information

Title:
The Inn at Val Moritz thesis preparation report
Creator:
Jenson, Emmy Ruth
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
112, [10] leaves : illustrations (some color), charts (some color), maps (some color), plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Resorts -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Frazer River Valley ( lcsh )
Hotels -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Frazer River Valley ( lcsh )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 108-113).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Emmy Ruth Jenson.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
08815343 ( OCLC )
ocm08815343
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1982 .J46 ( lcc )

Full Text
Mr. Steve Bradley 9421 N. 63rd Street Longmont, Colorado 80501
November 4, 1981
Mr. Mike Brown IFG Leasing Company 2925 S. Jamacia Court Room 200
Aurora, Colorado 80014 Dear Mr. Brown: ,
The principals of Val Moritz, more specifically, Mr. Willard Gettle, have asked me to express my views as to the feasibility of the Val Moritz ski development.
In doing so, it is appropriate that 1 offer my credentials: who I am, who 1 am not.
I am fully retired, after thirty years of being responsible for the devleopment of Winter Park Ski Area. A word about that: when I became manager in 1950, Winter Park had an undepreciated book value of approximately $300,000. When I retired its value was approximately $20,000,000. from 1950 to 1979, the average growth rate was 12%
Thirty years as a planner, developer, and manager of what is now the second largest ski area in Colorado, is the basis of my qualifications. A ski area in Colorado, like a small city, is made up of many parts, all of which must be integrated into a harmonious whole. It was necessary to understand the parts, but not be mired in their details to the detriment of the whole picture; thus, you would be correct to assume I am a generalist.
I hasten to add, I am not a CPA, nor am I a professional appraiser. What I know about accounting practices is only what I learned, enough to assure myself, and my trustees, that the professonals 1 hired were doing a good job. It would be difficult, if not impossible, for me to present to you a detailed, statistically supported, economic feasibility analysis of the Val Moritz Ski Area development. On the other hand, it is not difficult to draw upon my experience, and express my judgements, which in the long run may be of equal or greater value.
To do so it is important to look at an array of related factors:
The growth of Colorado skiing over the past thirty years, and the probabilities of future growth.
a The growth of Winter Park, and its future
Growth patterns in the Fraser Valley
Some of the unique aspects of the Grand County area
Future projections for this area.
Page two
o How Val Moritz may fit into the scheme, and what its potential is for
success
Over the past thirty years the ski Industry of Colorado has seen enormous, almost explosive growth, averaging about 16% per year. Climate, the quality of Its snow, and sun, the east of access through a mojor metropolitan area with its busy international airport, its central location to major markets, all have contributed to making Colorado a major ski center for the continent, and more recently the world. This growth is expected to continue, perhaps even accelerate, as the State responds to the Impacts of energy development.
However, ther is a paradowx here. The growth, in the seventies had been In numbers of skiers, without a corresponding Increase in facilities. During the decade of the sixties, eight major destination resorts were developed west of the Mississippi River, five of them in Colorado. During the seventies, as demand continued to Increase, no new developments were opened, and only moderate expansions of existinq areas. Mary Jane at Winter Park was the only major one. Beaver Creek at Vail was finally opened last season; it took seven years and millons of dollars. Adam Rib, near Eagle, after several millions, is far from gaining approval. The reasons: excessive governmental regulations. Federal and State, and the attendant red tape and lack of decision making.
The point is, growth was drastically inhibited at a time when demand was accelerating. The same condition exists today, and is lik?lv to prevail for some time to conn?, despite President Reagan's deregulation policies. Every major ski area in the State is struggling with over-congestion on peak days, and the peak days are increasing. Winter Park is not exception. The comfortable capacity of the Winter Park-Mary Jane complex is roughly 9000 skiers. Many times last year and the previous one, there were in excess of 11, 000 skiers on the slopes.
Why not limit lift ticket sales to combat the congestion problem? A number of ski areas are studying the idea; Vail has already done so. It would be very difficult at Winter Park. There are not other ski areas in the vicinity to absorb the over-flow. Day skiers from metropolitan Denver, having driven for two hours, would have to either drive an additonal hour to Steamboat Springs, or at least another hour to Keysotne, Breckenridge, or Copper Mtn. The problem is not so critical along the Interstate 70 corridor where there are five major alternatives to choose from, all within reasonable driving distance. Not so in Grand County.
What about the destination skier, the out of State visitor staying at one of the lodges or condominiums? If ticket sales are terminated before he gets there, where can he go? It is not a simple problem.
This being the case, what are the prospects of expansion at Winter Park, and what are the possibilities of future development in the county? Winter Park is, and has been, studying the feasibility of expanding into Vasquez. If the project proves economically feasible, it will take at least five years to complete. Oevil's Thumb has been considered for a number of years, but it too is many years away, if it ever gets developed. Val Moritz is the only area coimiitted to immediate and certain development.


Page three
In the meantime, skier demand Is Increasing. I have spoken of Winter Parks growth rate. I predict it will continue, perhaps at a somewhat slower rate simply because of the congestion on busy days which, inevitably, Impacts the quality of the recreational experience. Conceivably, it may accelerate In spite of congestion, for a variety of reasons.
First, the Fraser Valley, the commrnlties near the ski area, have had until recently, a slow rate of growth, In no way comparable to what happened 1n Aspen,
Vail, Steamboat Springs, and Summit County. In the past thirty years Aspen and Vail have become international destination resorts. Steamboat and Sunmit County not far behind.. Huge sums were invested in condominiums, townhouses, second homes, and the attendant amenities; restaurants, markets, and related commercial activities, all of the aspects of a first class destination resort area.
Second, Fraser Valley was an eddy. The main current was flowing down the 1-70 Corridor. Initially Aspen was its largest pool; Vail was next; then Sunmit County. The concept of a "destination resort" was linked to its remoteness.
Aspen thrived on its remoteness, as has Sun Valley since 1936. Then came the oil embargo, and slowly the focus changed. Winter Park, hitherto much too close to Denver, and the hordes of day skiers that came from there, was also just a tank of gas away. Suddenly, Winter Park was thrust into a change that the Traser Valley was not equipped to accommodate. Out of state vacationists were burgeoning; the amenities were not.
Thirdly, there is another element that makes the Valley somewhat unique. Winter Park Ski Area, an independently managed part of the Denver Mountain Parks system, owned no real estate at its base. Traditionally, major resorts develop on the basis of real estate holdings at the base, which underwrite the development on the mountain. Vail, Steamboat, Breckenridge, Keystone, Crested Butte, Copper Mountain are prime examples. The ski area at Winter Park was, and is, financed totally out of ski area earnings. Thus, with no real estate holdings. Winter Park could not set the style and tone of the accommodations needed to support a destination resort. Private entrepreneurs were needed to do that, and they were slow to come into the Valley. That was yesterday; today, the evidence, from real estate and development activities, indicates that the sleeping giant is coming alive, with a vengeance.
What are the projections for the future? One, at least, deserves mention here.
In 1979 the SWA Group, of Sausalito, California, completed a study made for the County and the Upper Fraser Valley Community Plan. The plan notes that in 1979 there were 11,700 "Peak Day Skiers." By the year 2000 the plan anticipates a Peak Day skier population of 32,100. Using just the "low range" figures, the plan notes that in 1979 Peak Day Visitors (skiers and non-skiers) in the Valley amounted to 14,625. By the year 2000 it projects the number to be 40,125, over half of which (28,185) the Plan anticipates will be Destination Visitors, visitors staying in lodges, motels, condos, etc. Whether one agrees or not with the projections, the indications are quite clear; Fraser Valley will have substantial growth in the next 20 years.


Pago four
How does Val Moritz fit into this scheme, and what is its potential for success?
The first is obvious. There is plenty of room, and a growing need, for another ski area in the Valley. Val Moritz is scheduled to begin operations next year. Although modest in size, the ski area is already there, the basic trail system has been cut and groomed, and the lifts are being installed. If Winter Park is already over-congested much of the time, and if congestion continues to grow as it has in the past with no relief in sight for the next five or more years, visitors will welcome a reasonable alternative. Barely fifteen to twenty minutes away, in my opinion, Val Moritz is a very reasonable alternative.
However, one should not assume that its potential is limited solely to absorbing over-flow skiers from Winter Park, even though it might do quite well on this basis alone. First, let us examine its location, and then the site itself to see what its true potential is.
The U.S. Highway 40 corridor is the main east-west artery through the county, passing through a succession of small communities. Winter Park, Fraser, Tabernash, Granby, etc. Val Moritz is just off the corridor, perhaps a mile or two from Granby. Although the heaviest real estate development activity is concentrated in and near Winter Park and Fraser, projections anticipate development all along the corridor to Granby and beyond. Its central location in the County makes Val Moritz especially convenient to the comnunities of Granby, Grand Lake, Hot Sulphur Springs, and to the west, Kremnling. It is also convenient to the large work force of the Amax "Henderson Project" on the Williams Ford.
Also, only a mile or two away is the YMCA Camp of the Rockies, a large (and expanding) resort complex capable of accommodating in excess of 1000 visitors. If Val Moritz is successful in its efforts to establish a south entrance from the top of Red Dirt Hill, the YMCA Camp will be just across the highway.
The foregoing suggests to me a good potential for atrracting a share of the day skier market in the valley. However, the site itself is perhaps its own best resource. Unlike the Winter Park ski area, the ski area at Val Moritz is perceived as an amenity to a large resort community development consisting of at least one large resort hotel, condominiums, townhouses, and appropriate comner-cial support facilities, shops, restaurants, etc. It is the classic pattern. The ski area exists for, and is underwritten by, the real estate development, around it. Vail, Snowmass, Copper Mountain, Steamboat Springs and Keystone, though much larger, arc examples of the symbiotic relationship between the two. If the ski operation breaks even, or even shows a profit, as many do, all the better. Keystone is an outstanding example. The Keystone Corporation, wholly owned by Ralston Purina, is not in existence to develop and operate Keystone Mountain. The mountain is but one facet, albeit a large one, of a total destination resort community development. With that in mind, let us look at the ski area itself.
It is modest in size, with some potential for expansion. It is somewhat unique in that it flanks both sides of a very attractive valley with the trails and lifts converging at the bottom. In its present state it should comfortably ac-comnodate 1500 to 2000 skiers. On peak days it probably can handle 3000 skiers, with some congestion to be sure. Expansion potential exists primarily on the east side, which, in iqy opinion, is all to the good. The terrain is better.


Page five
Slopes descending from the west flank will attract the more advanced skiers whereas those on the east are designed for beginners and intermediate skiers; thus, the layout of the area provides for excellent separation of ability levels; beginners need not be terrified by experts whizzing by.
1 tie east side is outstanding, in that the terrain, averaging 20-30% is nearly ideal for beginner and intermediate skiers. This is what we call bread-and-butter terrain. 7j>prox1mately 80% of all skiers fall into this category. The existing slopes are attractively laid out; they are well groomed; they have variety; and there is room on both sides for expansion, should that become necessary. Equally Important, the magnitude or size of the east ridge area is greater than meets the eye when seen from a ,distance. I have alluded to the development as "modest," which it 1s, but I must hasten to add that the terrain on the east ridge, for the so-called duffer skier, is superior to anything we have at Winter Park and vastly superior to Idlewild. In other words, while the west ridge will provide Icing to the cake for the better class of skier seeking some excitement, the prime resource for duffer enjoyment, and Income, is on the east side.
Add to this the potential, which does exist, of being able to ski directly from your condominium, or townhouse, or private residence, to a lift that takes you to the summit, and then when you are through, to be able to return on ski is to your place of lodging, and you have in miniature the concept of Snowmass, one of the most popular areas In Colorado. The resource is there; thoughtful long range planning will refine it.
Overshadowing all of this is the question of adequate snowfall. The records are sketchy, at best. The base at Steamboat Springs.is between 6000 and 7000 feet.
The base at Vail, as 1 recall, is between 7000 and 8000. All things considered there should be adequate snow for at least a three to four month season. However, the Val Moritz people plan to install a snowmaking system, as has every major ski area in Colorado in recent years. There is adequate water, and the night-time temperatures in November and December should bo favorable enough to guarantee an opening date before Christmas.
A word about manmade snow. It is three or four times as dense as our natural snow, which is to say it has that much more moisture in every inch, and it compacts to a firm mass that resists the daily wear and tear of the steel edges on today's skiis. Colorado snow is dry; it is world famous for that; but, with an average of one inch of moisture for every ten inches of snow, it does not resist wear, it does bond well to the surface of manmade snow. Thus, throughout the season, average skiers cannot detect whether or not they are skiing on natural or manmade snow. The experts, of course, can.
In spring conditions, March and early April, manmade snow, under a hot sun, turns to "corn" snow, the most pleasurable snow, short of dry powder, that anyone can ski on. Natural Colorado snow, because of its low moisture content, turns to corn snow briefly, and then into slush; manmade snow does not. All of this suggests that Val Moritz with a first class snowmkaing system can extend its normal season at both ends. '
29
Page six
finally, I should make it clear that I have been presenting my judgements as to the potential of the Val Moritz ski area. I am not an employee; nor am I part of its management. 1 feel satisfied that the potential for success is real, in the context of the ski area's role in the total development concept. I should add, in my brief association with its principals, I am also satisfied that they are alert, perceptive, experienced, and, perhaps best of all, wholly coirmitted to the project. On that basis alone, I give it a good chance for success.
1 appreciate your endurance.
SincereJy yours,


SITE DATA & ANALYSIS
Topography........................
Legal Description..................
Natural Elements..................
Soils and Geology, Hydrology. Vegetation, & Wildlife
Climate...........................
Temperature, Precipitation, Solar Data,
& Wind
Views and Access..................
Utilities.........................
Water, Electricity and Telephone, Sewage Treatment, Fire Protection
Site Objectives...................
.31
33
34
38
46
49
.50


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THE INN at Val Moritz

I c 12C H 326 5 52
Thesis Preparation Report December 1981
Master of Architecture Thesis
May 1982
k
Emmy Ruth Jenson University of Colorado at Denver College of Environmental Design


TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION..................1
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
FEASIBILITY DATA.............19
SITE DATA AND ANALYSIS ZONING AND CODES....
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS.....
DESIGN INTENTIONS........
THESIS SCHEDULE & ADVISORS CREDITS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY.
THESIS PROJECT


I. 'TPODUCTIOi' 1
Preface
Colorado history embodies my own history. Denver in the 1870's saw the arrival of waves of immigrants. My Swedish great grandmother Ida first opened her eyes here. Idaho Springs was the birthplace of Grandpa Floyd and Denver is his resting place. Mom and Dad "honeymooned" here. As long as I can remember, my father has called Colorado "God's Country."
Colorado has been my home for only five years. 'I find it difficult to follow the amazing transformations in the state which have occurred in this short time, much less in the past century. A tremendous surge of growth has occurred as people from many places converge on the Rocky Mountains for reasons ranging from business to recreation.
As a new architect in Colorado, I will be challenged to respond to the growth; not just in urban areas, but particularly in the mountains. Preservation of some of the most unique and beautiful country in the world will be a monumental task. Growth is unavoidable, therefore, good planning is essential to minimize the impact of expansion. My study of the development of a new mountain community provides me with a great opportunity to learn more about mountain development as well as the history and future of Colorado.


INTRODUCTION
Preface...................... ....1
Project Statement.................2
Location..........................4
Project Participants..............6


2
Project Statement
Val Moritz is an 11,000 acre planned development for a new ski resort community in the Rocky Mountains northwest of Denver. The community will include residential, commercial, and recreational facilities for year round living. The owners anticipate a maximum of 11,000 dwellings in the final scheme which will be complete by the year 2000.
A ski area with an initial capacity of around 2,500 people will open for a limited 1982-83 season. The initial support facilities will include a 300 room resort hotel to be built on a 16 acre site near U.S. 40 at the entrance to the Val Moritz development. The first phase of the hotel will include approximately 100 rooms plus facilities such as a lounge, bar, restaurant, coffee shop, ski rental, retail sales, exercise club, racquet-ball courts, and a swimming pool. All elements are to be designed in a flexible way to allow for additional rooms and services such as a convention center.
I propose to develop a scheme for the first phase of the hotel.
The land has not yet been developed except for two small existing buildings near the entrance. I will therefore have the opportunity to create a new aesthetic that could act as a prototype for future construction.

The hotel offers a variety of design issues to be explored, including public areas, retail sales, recreational activities and


3
living spaces. I will address the problem from the viewpoint of function, economy, energy, and architectural aesthetics.
In addition to the specific information I have gathered for the hotel, I have also collected a broader range of information concerning the entire Val Moritz development, neighboring communities, and the mountain region. Some of this information is contained here in summary form when it is pertinent to the development of the hotel. The remaining information is being held in a reference file. i


4
Location
Val Moritz is located in the Fraser River Valley in Middle Park.
Middle Park occupies an extensive natural depression surrounded by high mountains. The area is bounded on the west by the Park Range, on the east by the Never Summer Mountains and Front Range, on the north by the Rabbit Ears Range, and on the south by the confluence of the Park Range and the western part of the Front Range.
The Fraser River begins at the Continental Divide near
Berthoud Pass. It flows northwesterly from the Pass, dropping into a broad sweeping valley bounded on the west and southwest by the Vasquez Mountains and elsewhere by portions of the Front Range. The river flows about 30 miles through a 300 square mile watershed varying in elevation from 11,200


Granby
^SnaA/mol
BLM.'Open
School
Family^-; ^
gle Family
yj^fOpen Space Jiti -Family
Horses^--
Hotelir^
Entrance
Mul
US. 40
Iti-Family
3 SINGLE FAMILY MULTI-FAMILY ] COMMERCIAL WATER OPEN SBACE BLM LAND
To Denver
VAL MORITZ DEVELOPMENT PLAN
5
feet to 8,000 feet at the confluence of the Fraser River with the Colorado River near Granby.
The site of the Val Moritz development begins about three miles south of Granby to the east of U.S. Highway AO. It is approximately 90 road miles from Denver.
Near the entrance to Val Moritz is an open, south facing, gently sloping 16 acre site which is planned to hold a 300 room hotel. This is the site I will be working with.


Project
PROJECT
Participants
The Inn at Val Moritz Grand County, Colorado
OWNERS
Val Moritz Development Val Moritz, Colorado
ARCHITECTS
LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECT
Braun, Vanderlip, and Fulton Architects Denver, Colorado
Gary Roessler, A.S.L.A.
Boulder, Colorado
INTERIOR
DESIGNERS
Spectrum III, Inc. Denver, Colorado
STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
J.R. Haney Associates Englewood, Colorado
MECHANICAL 4 James Burke Associates
ELECTRICAL Grand Junction, Colorado
SOILS
ENGINEER
Thomas E. Summerlee 4 Associates, Inc. Colorado Springs, Colorado




HISI'JPJ-JAL B/VX-jPOUr'l' 8
The Indians
CHIEF OURAY
The ancestors of the American Indian were the first settlers in the Middle Park area. Remains of campfires, bones, and stone projectile points indicate that humans existed in the area as long as 12,000 years ago. The earliest humans were basically of the hunter/nomad tradition. The Indians of central Colorado apparently had a way of life similar to what is called the Desert Culture. They hunted small game and foraged for wild plants and seeds. As time passed, the culture of the Plains Indians influenced the Desert Culture as did the Basketweaver traditions of the Southwest.
The Utes were the first identified tribe of Indians to live in the Grand County area. They travelled the mountain areas to follow game animals during good weather. During the winter, they settled .into sheltered valleys. They also traded with the Indians to the south for maize and other agricultural products.
After the explorations of Coronado in 1540, the Spanish began to settle in southern Colorado. Trade between the Indians began to include metal objects such as knives and horses. French trappers explored the area in the 1700's. The large and beautiful valley known as Middle Park ('pare' is French for enclosure) was largely untouched by outside influence until white hunters and trappers appeared in the mid-1800's. The meadows, mesas, and forests were populated with great herds of deer, antelope, elk, buffalo, bear, and mountain sheep. The streams were filled with trout. The valley was prized by the Utes for its abundance and its glorious climate in the summer months. It was also the site


9
for many battles. The remains of an Indian fort were found a short distance from Granby, possibly on the Val Moritz site.


10
MIDDLE PARK 1810-1859
Early Settlers
Europeans often visited Middle
Park in the mid-1800 's to con-
duct hunting expeditions and to
explore the area. Sir George
Gore, after whom the Gore Range
was named, was one of these
visitors. Hundreds of game
animals were killed for sport
and taken from the valley during this time.
The first settlers homesteaded in the area now known as Hot Sulphur Springs. According to legend, a party of Ute warriors were camped by the Spring. The younger warriors set out to battle with the Plains Indians although an old chief advised the small party not to go. The old chief was left to wait for their return. The young warriors never returned and the old man died grieving by his campfire near the spring. The Utes believed it was the old chief's campfire which heated the waters of the spring and


IDLEWILD STATION
JUNCTION HOUSE RANCH
11
his devotion which gave the spring its healing properties. The Utes made many pilgrimages to the site although they were supposedly restricted to reservations. The mineral springs also attracted many aching white men.
Settlers came to the valley over the Rollins Pass road and later over the Berthoud Pass road. Stations were built along the Berthoud Pass road from the pass to Hot Sulphur Springs. These early stagecoach stations have become the towns of Winter Park, Fraser, Tabernash and Parshall.


MIDDLE PARK 1883
12
In the late seventies and early eighties, Grand County became a part of the Colorado mining boom. After the initial influx of miners, it soon became apparent that the disparity between costs and yields of the mines was causing a quick demise to the boom. One problem was the lack of a railroad for transporting people and minerals. Attempts to build a railroad were thwarted until private investors became involved at the turn of the century.
With the bust of the mining industry, Middle Park settled down to being sparsely populated ranch country. The area is surrounded on all sides by mountains and is therefore somewhat isolated. The natural beauty of the valley made it a popular recreation spot, however, even in the early days. Grand Lake survived the mining bust mainly because of its resort industry.



SUMMER
SKIING 1912
WEST PORTAL MOFFAT TUNNEL 1923
13
The Railroad
Finally in 1902 a railroad to the valley was begun through the efforts of David H. Moffat who sank his personal fortune into a project to extend a railroad from Denver to Salt Lake City. The railroad crossed the Continental Divide at Rollins Pass. The town of Granby came into being when the railroad was a vast improvement over the steep, rutted coach roads, but it was still hampered by violent winter weather and often did not run.
In 1923, a six-mile tunnel was begun which took six years to build. When it was completed in 1928, it eliminated the hazardous, though scenic trip over Rollins Pass. The completion of this tunnel expedited travel to and from Denver and made an enormous change in the lives of the residents of the valley.


14
In the years since the tunnel was completed, growth in Middle Park has mainly been due to the development of recreational facilities. The area around Grand Lake provides excellent summer facilities and the opening of the Winter Park ski area in 1940 provided a winter economy. Resorts generally attract tourists and visitors however, and the permanent population of the area has remained fairly small.
GRAND COUNTY 1913


15
Val Moritz History
In the late 1960's, a Chicago psychiatrist named Dr. Sinkovich began to carry out his dream of building a first class, year-round resort community. He wanted to make an Austrlan-style village complete with horse-drawn sleighs. He purchased five ranches in the Upper Fraser River Valley with plans to combine this land with approximately 6,000 acres of Bureau of Land Management lands to make a total of around 11,000 acres.
He lacked the expertise to carry out his plans, however, so he approached Del E. Webb, a development firm he had done work for. Del Webb suggested bringing in World Life Service, a Fort Worth insurance firm, as a third party to help with the financing.
In 1972, a master plan was developed by Lietch-Kiyotoki Associates, a California affiliate of Del Webb. In the same year, Grand County approved the development, allowing a total density of 11,839 dwelling units in the form of condominiums, single family housing and duplexes as well as proposals for ski runs and other recreational facilities.
The physical work began in 1973. Sno-Engineering of Glenwood Springs designed 100 acres of runs for the ski area. The site was surveyed by Wright Engineering of Denver and roads were cut. Approval was given to dam Ten Mile Creek to form a 55 acre lake. Water rights were changed from agricultural to domestic. Four 24" cased wells in the river alluvium were drilled which yield 2,800 gallons per minute. It was determined that the


16
diversion of 405 acre/feet would supply water for people, irrigation, and snow making. Approximately $11,700,000 was spent on the preliminary work.
Unfortunately, Dr. Sinkovich died in 1973 and his young German widow did not wish to continue her husband's interest in Val Moritz. The insurance company that was financing the development had overextended itself and was not able to give the widow her share. Del Webb, whose involvement was mainly advisory, was more concerned with their developments in California. The project was doomed. It took several years (until 1977) for the legal disputes to be settled. The widow got her share, Del Webb pulled out entirely, and World Life Service held the complete title.
The land became marketable again in 1977 and an oil man named John King made an offer in 1978. He never closed the deal, apparently because he was incarcerated at the time.
Kelly Klancke and Bud Gettle became interested in Val Moritz accidentally. Klancke sold a condominium to some friends who were associated with World Life Service. They went snow-mobiling on t,he Val Moritz site and through casual conversation, Klancke and Gettle learned the Val Moritz story. They made an offer and bought the property in December 1980, even though there was a cloud on the title due to the fact that John King had never relinguished his offer. A title insurance company has since covered the cloud. Klancke and Gettle were already partners for several projects including Winter Park Place close to


17
Winter Park and Twin Rivers in Fraser. Dave Sheppard went in with them to become the third general partner for Val Moritz Development.
VAL MORITZ


18
The new owners are currently beginning work according to the original master plan. Because all the groundwork was laid and accepted by the county in 1972, the development can proceed as long as the master plan zoning is followed. The owners are tremendously excited about their acquisition. Bud Gettle, who serves as general manager for the project, anticipates a 20-year building program that will be valued in excess of a billion dollars when completed. Gettle has expressed the attitude of the partners by saying "We're not in a great big rush. We want to do it (the project) slowly, do it surely, and do it well. We will take the time to do justice to the project and maintain the integrity of the project."
When Val Moritz was first conceived, Grand County didn't have much to offer in the way of amenities to attract destination tourists. Winter Park was a small day skier area that was not well known. When Winter Park added the Mary Jane section of the mountain, the area received accolades for its top notch ski runs. Tourists poured into the area as construction boomed and real estate escalated. The future of the area appears to be bright. The owners of Val Moritz feel that their year-round development will help all of eastern Grand County. Val Moritz is located between Grand Lake, the most popular summer resort in the state and Winter Park, the second most popular ski area in Colorado. As Klancke stated, "We should be the catalyst to tie two ends together...".


FEASIBILITY DATA
Existing Facilities.........
Location and Transportation Recreational Facilities
Market Analysis........
Growth Objectives Val Moritz Potential


FEASIBILITY DATA_____________________________20
Existing Facilities
The Fraser Valley has many unique attributes which enhance the viability of development projects. The most significant demand forces are the valley's location near a major population center, the variety of access transportation and the capacity of the area to provide year-round recreational opportunities.
Location and Transportation
The demand for recreation areas combined with the energy crunch makes the Fraser Valley a prime location for development. The valley is located on the western slope of the Continental Divide and is readily accessible from the Denver Metropolitan area which is approximately 70 miles away. Several transportation alternatives are available:
AIR: Stapleton International Airport is the eighth busiest airport in the country. Connections to Denver can be made from all major U.S. cities as well as other countries. A local airport built by Dr. Sinkovich (the original owner of Val Moritz) exists near Granby. This airport does not have capabilities for future expansion, but a site for the development of a large airport (up to a 10,000 foot runway) is set aside just west of U.S. 40 between Fraser and Tabernash. The proposed air facility could provide one of the key items necessary to support recreational, commercial, and industrial development in Grand County. Isbill Associates, airport consultants from Denver have pointed out several positive aspects of the airport site including


I
21
good visibility, limited obstructions, excellent highway access and only moderate wind velocities.
BUS: Continental Trailways offers daily connections between Stapleton and the Fraser Valley. Six bus companies also offer chartered bus service for groups.
LIMOSINE: Several limosine carriers offer services for 10 to 15 people to and from Denver as well as sightseeing services to anyplace in Colorado.
AUTOMOBILE AND CAR RENTALS: Access by car is achieved by
traveling Interstate 70 and U.S. Highway 40. These roads are easily used during good weather, but winter storms can make the area around Berthoud Pass very dangerous. Unfortunately, there are no plans for improvements to U.S. 40 in the near future. The limits of this road could seriously constrain future growth unless other alternatives are seriously explored.
RAILROAD: Last, but not least, the completion of the Moffat
Tunnel in 1928 provided rail service through the Fraser Valley. Denver, Rio Grande and Westerns "Main Line Through the Rockies" is a ski train from Denver. As the energy situation worsens, the undeveloped potential of the existing railway as a major means of transportation becomes increasingly valuable.


22
Recreational Facilities
Grand County is still the summer paradise the Indians enjoyed.
With the expansion of the ski industry, Middle Park has the potential to truly be a year-round recreation area.
Berthoud Pass is an excellent beginner ski area.
Ski Idlewild offers beginner and intermediate slopes.
Winter Park, along with Mary Jane and the future addition of the Vasquez Ski Area, is potentially the largest single ski area in the county. Winter Park also provides special programs and facilities for the handicapped.
Fraser Valley Winter Sports offers tubing (sliding down the slopes on an inner tube).
Devil's Thumb Ranch and Cross Country is a nationally recognized cross country training area. During the summer, they offer horses and typical guest ranch activities and the cross country trails become running tracks.
Rocky Mountain National Park and the Arapahoe National Forest offer more than a million acres of opportunities for camping, backpacking, mountain climbing, hunting, picnic-ing, jeeping, snow-shoeing, cross country skiing, sledding and hiking.
The Colorado River offers which water rafting trips and fishing.
Grand Lake, Shadow Mountain Lake, Monarch Lake, Granby Reservoir, Green Mountain Reservoir, Willow Creek Reservoir and Williams Fork Reservoir offer opportunities for fishing, swimming, camping, picnicing, boating, water skiing, sailing and ice skating.


23
RECREATION IN GRAND COUNTY


24
Market Analysis
As previously stated, growth in the Middle Park area was slow until the excellence of the Mary Jane ski area was reported. Since that time, construction has boomed and the profile of the typical skier has shifted. The increasing number and affluence of destination skiers have Created a strong market for development :
The annual number of skiers at Winter Park grew from 310,956 in 1969-80 to 886,358 in 1979-80.
As the capacity and attraction of the area develops, total peak day visitors (skiers and non-skiers) are expected to grow from 15,400 in 1979-80 to 42,400 in 2000.
60* of skiers now stay overnight compared to 40* ten years ago. By 2000, it is expected that 75* of all skiers will stay overnight while 25* will be day skiers.
I
Destination skiers have substantially higher incomes than instate skiers.
- 27* earn $25 to $50,000
- 11* earn $50 to $75,000
- 12* earn over $75,000
Over 60* of destination skiers stay 6 or more nights.
Condominiums are the most popular type of accommodation for destination skiers, but hotels run a close second.
- 41* stay in condominiums
- 36* stay in lodges, motels and hotels
- 12* stay with friends


25
As the capacity of the ski areas has grown, overnight visitors and therefore the demand for overnight accommodations has increased. It is estimated that the current demand exceeds supply by about 33%.' Some facts about the Winter Park area indicate current demands:
The number of skiers has increased from 106,000 to over 886,000 in the last 20 years.
Today, about 7770 peak day visitors (60% of all skiers) stay overnight, creating a demand for about 1675 dwelling units.
Ski area expansions and improvements will increase the current capacity of 14,850 to 32,100 skiers in 2000.
In 2000, 28,200 peak day visitors (75% of all skiers and 40% of non-skiers) are expected to stay overnight, creating a demand for 5720 dwelling units.
Approximately 400 more units are currently planned or under construction. An additional 900 are expected to be needed by 1985.
Nearly 1700 more.dwelling units will be needed between 1985 and 1990; and another 1500 will be needed by 2000.


26
Growth Objectives
The future of the Fraser Valley is destined to be dominated by the recreation industry, especially the skiing industry. Summer recreational and cultural activities must also be strengthened. The basis for economic growth and economic stability in the Valley lies in the demand by increasing numbers of recreational visitors for goods, services, and accommodation. At the same time, permanent residents and seasonal employees must be served.
If the community actively seeks growth, plans must be made to handle the capacity comfortably. Winter visitors will strain the limits of the Valley's services and facilities more seriously due to the heavy seasonal demand.
Based on the anticipated capacity of existing and future ski areas, day skiers will increase almost 200% by the year 2000 and total day visitors will increase by 280%. Destination visitors are expected to increase by 360%. The permanent population is expected to increase 270% by the year 2000 (based on current 4.89% annual growth rate). The population of the work force is also expected to increase about 270%.


27


28
Val Moritz Potential
In light of the growth projections I have summarized, it appears that a project such as Val Moritz definitely has a strong potential for success. According to Howard Moody (the director of planning for Grand County) one of the county's largest problems has been the seasonal shifting of employment and services from one part of the county to another. As Grand County develops into a year-round recreational area, Val Moritz can provide the tie between the Grand Lake summer activities and the Winter Park ski area by offering all activities as well as a base community for permanent residents.
The demand forces for Val Moritz are obviously strong. Area residents will definitely benefit from the project if the developers are sensitive to the capacities of the land and to the neighboring communities. Community sentiment in the Val Moritz area is currently not strongly for or against the project; most people have a "wait.and see" attitude. Val Moritz does however have a great potential for making a positive impact on the economics and lives of eastern Grand County residents.


ZONING AND CODES
Summary Information.............54
Zoning Requirements.............55
Building Code Requirements......60


jITE DhTm JnLfolS
Topography
The site is open, south-facing, and gently sloping. It drains to the east-southeast. There are no steep slopes or erosive-prone areas.
No potential dangers exist from avalanche, earthquake, wild fire or flooding. The 100-year flood plain only touches the extreme northwest corner of the site, well away from the proposed building.
Elevations range from 8,020 feet at the northwest corner to 7,988 feet at the northeast corner.
HOTEL SITE
VIEW TO THE SW FROM ROAD TO SKI SLOPES


TOPOGRAPHY


Legal Description
That portion of Section 8, Township 1 North, Range 76 the 6th P.M., County of Grand, State of Colorado, more larly described as follows:
33
West of particu-
Beginning at the Northeast corner of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 8; thence along the North line of Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 8; South 8632,57" West 1158.37 feet to the Northeast corner of that certain parcel of land described in deed recorded in Book 178, Page 708 records of said county; thence along the East and south lines of said described parcel the following two courses and distances South 0015'39" West 423.27 feet; thence North 8944'21" West
221.00 feet to the Southwest corner of said described parcel from which the West 1/4 corner of said Section 8 bears North 0700'39" East 414.97 feet said Southwest corner being on the West line of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 8; thence along said West line of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 South 0700'39" West 195.01 feet to the Southeast corner of that certain parcel of land described in deed recorded in Book 178, Page 709 records of said county; thence along the South line of said described parcel North 8944'21" West 124.87 feet; thence South 0700'39" West 413.50 feet to the Southwesterly prolongation of the North line of Village Road according to the recorded plat of Innsbruck-Val Moritz on file in the Office of the Clerk and Recorder records of said county; thence along said Southwesterly prolongation and the North line of said Village Road the following courses and distances North 7200'00" East 396.65 feet to the beginning of a tangent curve concave to the Northwest having a central angle of 2200,00" and a radius of
360.00 feet thence Northeasterly along the arc of said curve 138.23 feet to the end of said curve; thence tangent from said curve North 5000'00" East 1387.14 feet to the beginning of a tangent curve concave to the Sourtheast having a central angle of 0302'54" and a radius of
440.00 feet thence Northeasterly along the arc of said curve 23.41 feet to the end of said curve said end of curve being the point of beginning.
The above described parcel contains 16.041 acres more or less and is subject to all easements, rights of way and agreements of record. 1


Natural Elements
Soils and Geology
The soils are mainly alluvial deposits on top of Mesozoic rocks formed during the Lower Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic Periods (from 100 million to 225 million years ago). The underlying rocks are mainly shales and sandstones while the soils are primarily sandy clays.
Subsurface conditions are fairly erratic.
The topsoil varies from 12 to 30 inches in depth and is composed of organic silty clay.
Beneath the topsoil layer are stiff, silty clays with moderately high plasticity. The depth of this layer ranges from 3 to 7 feet below existing grade except for test boring #5 which extended 13 feet. The clays are moisture sensitive, i.e., they will shrink or expand with changes in moisture content.
Beneath the clay stratum are medium dense to dense, silty, clayey sands and gravels with occasional "floaters", which are relatively thin cobble size particles of rock.
Test borings encountered the claystone (shale) bedrock strata at depths from 8 feet to 16 feet below grade.
The ground water was encountered by all test borings. The groundwater could fluctuate at various times of the year depending on rainfall and irrigation. Excavations for utility lines may encounter the groundwater table.


ELEVATION IN FEET
GU
CLAY soft silty moist topsoil
SAND AND GRAVEL wet
iCLAf medium stiff silty moist H.CLAYSTONE very stiff
iCLAY stiff silt/ med moist
lCLAYSTONE(SHALE) bedrock
ND silty med dense wet
^GROUNDWATER
SOILS TEST BORINGS
35
The soil engineers (Thomas E. Summerlee & Associates, Inc.) have recommended spread footings to bear on natural clay soils and/or new fill. The maximum allowable soil bearing pressure is 3,000 psf. New fill should be compacted to 95% at maximum Standard Proctor Density and within 2% of optimum moisture content. Garden levels and basements are not recommended except with perimeter drainage. High ground-water may cause "pumping conditions during excavation. Conventional septic systems and leach fields are not suitable.


36
Hydrology
Middle Park is in the Pacific watershed and is drained by way of the Colorado River. The alluvium is the principal aquifer in Middle Park. It is recharged by infiltration of water from streams and by percolation of precipitation.
Ground water is discharged through wells, springs, and seeps.
i
As the park is a semiclosed ground water basin, little ground water moves out of it. The chemical quality of the water is generally good.
The Fraser River is a principal tributary of the Colorado River. Ten Mile Creek, which runs near the site, drains into the Fraser River.
Doubling or tripling the number of wells in Middle Fork should have no adverse effect on wells now in use. If the water upstream from the site (in places like Winter Park) is diverted, ground water supplies in the lower valley may be depleted.
Vegetation
Grass, in association with minor amounts of woody plants such as sagebrush, snowberry, and several forbs, accounts for most of the vegetative cover. This site is treeless, but trees are found in the general vicinity.
Dominant grasses are Idaho and/or Arizona fescue, slender wheat-grass, bearded wheatgrass, native bluegrasses, nodding brome,


37
mountain brome, Letterman's needle grass and pine needlegrass.
Lupine, geranium, groundsel, and bluebells are the principal forbs.
With range depletion, sage brush often becomes dominant.
Optimum ground cover is 35%. The following species are most likely to invade this site: cheatgrass, slim stem muhly,
three-awn, blue brama, rubberweed, broom shakeweed, tall rabbit brush, phlox, and nailwart.
The growing season is from early spring through summer during the frostfree period which can range from 30 to 100 days.
Wildlife
Although the area has long been used as grazing land for cattle, sheep, and horses, several species of wildlife inhabit the land.
The area provides excellent winter habitat for deer and elk as well as numerous small game animals such as rabbits and some species of birds.


Climate
Temperature
Middle Park is a broad valley surrounded by higher mountains with a relatively dry, cool and, in winter, often bitterly cold climate. The surrounding mountains cause entrapment, stagnation, stratification, and radiative chilling of cold air. Even in summer, nighttime temperatures often fall below freezing. Inasmuch as shallow thermal inversions accompany such chilling, the temperature near the ground is often several degrees colder than it is at higher elevations. Smoke and pollutants spread horizontally at these inversion times which generally occur in the early morning and evening.
Great diurnal variations in temperature also occur. A 50F range from daily low to daily high is not uncommon in winter or summer. The "thinness" of the air at high altitude contributes to the rapid nighttime loss of heat and the rapid surface warming in daytime under the intense radiation of the sum.
Summer temperatures can range from below freezing to around 95 F while winter temperatures can range from -50F to 55F.
Charts showing maximum and minimum monthly temperatures and heating degree days are on the next page.


39
110-
100-
90-
80-
70-
60-
50-
40
30
20-
10-
0-
-10-
-20
-30-
-40
-50
MAX
Ml

MIN
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
TEMPERATURE


40
Precipitation
Precipitation occurs in two forms: rainfall and snowfall. In
general, precipitation increases with altitude. But in the
Fraser Valley, which receives fairly constant precipitation throughout the year, the annual average is about the same as Denver which is considered a semidesert. Annual precipitation can vary from 11 inches to 30 inches with an average of about 18 inches.
Snowfall on the ski slopes of Val Moritz is comparable to the
Winter Park area which receives 280-400 inches annually. The hotel site however, is at a much lower altitude and therefore receives much less snow. The distribution of snow in the valley can also be very uneven due to wind patterns. The range for the
site is from 67 inches to 213 inches with an average of 140
inches.
Relative humidity is 55-60% in the valley. Higher relative humidity occurs over the mountains due to orographic cooling. Nighttime radiative cooling can raise the humidity to 100% near the ground, causing frost and dew.
Evaporation on the site exceeds precipitation, so the climate is considered semiarid, as is all of Colorado.


41







AVG~
MIN

H JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG I SEP OCT NOV DEC
PRECIPITATION
90
80
70
60
50
40

'

MAX'



h A/G-
V

MIN
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN bori AuG SEP ocr NOV DEC
IN.
SNOWFALL


SOLAR ACCESS
Solar Data 42
The site for the hotel is south-facing and open. There are no existing buildings or landforms which will shade the site. The latitude is approximately 4004'N so charts for 41N latitude will be applicable.
Conditions throughout the year are generally clear with most of the overcast days limited to the latter part of January and into February.
The sunrise will be later and the sunset earlier due to the mountains on the east and west. The sun must clear 18 when rising and will disappear when it goes below 12. An approximation of sunrise and sunset times can be made by adding or subtracting 5 minutes for each degree of altitude.
Average hours of daylight range from about 6-1/2 hours in December to 12-1/2 hours in June.


Azimuth angle
43
north
0
41 N
btuWIrage daily solar radiation


44
W 10 5 6
O' 7
z => 8
(/) 9
10
11
NOON
1
2
3
h 4
w 5
z a 6 7
JAN IhEB IMARIAFR IMAY I JUN I JUL AUGl SEP lOCT INCW I DEC
TIME
SUNRISE & SUNSET
10 12 11 10 Q



8 7 6 5 A




3 2 1 0



EFT Flb "TOr rFWJ UUN IJUL AUC3 SLP OCT NO/ OLC
HOURS
HOURS OF DAYLIGHT


45
Wind
The dominant wind direction on the site comes from the northwest and is strongest in winter. The high area on the northwest edge of the site will tend to deflect the wind up and over the building.
Wind
(IX
P-
m
speeds of the h.
range
time)
from
with
2 m.p.h. the most
(22%
of the time) to common speed between
50 m.p.h. 4 and 11
WNW,
WSW
N 8.3
NNE 3.6
NE 2.4
ENE 1.0
E 1.8
ESE ZO
SE 2.7
SSE 3.8
S 4.6
ssw 2.2
sw 3.2
WSW 6.6
w 7.3
WNW 2.2
NW 12.6
NNW 3.8
CALM _319
100.0%
NUMBERED RINGS INDICATE THE PERCENT OF TIME THE WIND BLOWS IN THAT DIRECTION
WIND ROSE


46
Views and Access
The hotel site Is in a large valley meadow with views available in all directions. Major views from the hotel will be to the east and southeast in the direction of the ski slopes.
When approaching the site from Granby on U.S. 40, the building will be mostly hidden until just before reaching the Val Moritz entrance. The hotel will be visible when approaching from the south.
The site is accessed from the south by the Village Road of the Innsbruck-Val Moritz Subdivision which joins U.S. Highway 40 0.2 miles to the west.


47
VIEW OF Q SKI RUNS n
CLOSE RANGE VIEW
ROAD TO SKI OOPE5
CLOSE RANGE VIE\AS CF BUILDINGS, MOUNTAINS^. HOTEL SITE
VIEWS & ACCESS


3TE 8006
'IEAR RIDGE 8480 Kberard DRAW
IOW PI OF SKI RIDGE 8560
CRElb< CAMPGROUND8468
AMOON CREEK ^OOQ
NM
s

m
m
n
NORTH FORK RANCH CREEK
NTINENTAL DIVIDEi2,ioo
SKYSCRAPER RESERVOIR '11221


49
Utilities
WATER An 80 q.p.m. well is located on the site, but due to the
mineral content, It Is difficult to treat. The hotel will be serviced Instead by a 600 q.p.m. well located approximately one-half mile away. The water from this well is considered potable.
ELECTRICITY AND TELEPHONE Mountain Parks Electric in Granby
will provide electric service. Natural gas will not be used. All telephone and electrical lines will be underground.
SEWAGE TREATMENT The Granby sanitation plan was recently
expanded to serve 5,000 persons, although there are only 1,200 in the district at the present time. Val Moritz plans to join the Granby system.
FIRE PROTECTION Water will be stored in a 50,000 gallon
underground tank and in an approximately 40,000 gallon swimming pool. Both will be available to mobile fire fighting equipment year-round.


50
Site Objectives
My goal is to develop an optimum fit between the requirements of a resort hotel and the existing physical conditions and. natural beauty of the site. In addition, a viable development must occur for the investors. A quote by Elizabeth Kendall Thompson in Apartments, Townhouses, and Condominiums illustrates this view:
"In resort areas, it is essential that the demand on land for development be reasonable, not excessive. Perhaps more than other kinds of places, the resort area needs protection if it is to continue as an attraction to people. Too many buildings sited with too little regard for the character and quality of the place are a modern counterpart to the old tale in which the goose that laid the golden egg was killed for its contents: the return ceases when the source is overused."
The site appears to be suitable for development in terms of access, water, sewer service, and aesthetic appeal. Beyond the apparent suitability for development, the Bureau of Land Management (which controls over 50% of the Val Moritz land) and the Grand County Board of Commissioners both have regulations concerning environmental impact.
The BLM has done an environmental analysis on the Val Moritz site close to the hotel site. Pros and cons of development are weighed in the analysis. Following is a summary of their findings.


51
Climate and air quality Noise and dust pollution will occur.
Vegetation and wildlife Loss of natural vegetation is to
be replaced in all disturbed areas. No threatened or endangered plants fish or wildlife species were identified. Increased human activity will have a moderate impact on the critical winter range of deer and elk.
Cultural features No known cultural sites were identified
within the area; subsurface cultural features could be destroyed however.
Visual, recreation and wilderness resources The site has an "A" scenic quality, high sensitivity, and foreground/middle distance zone. The area has no roadless and/or wilderness potential and does not qualify as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC).
Social and economic aspects The area may function as an open space and dispersed use area.
Land uses Plans do not conflict with any existing land use plans.
Flood plains and prime and unique farmlands There are no flood plains within this area, and no prime and unique farmlands.
Soils The soils are sandy loam, which is a deep, well-drained
soil on moderate slopes. Permeability is moderate and available water capacity is medium.
On the basis of analysis of the above information, the BLM approved an exchange of lands to be used for development. The
hotel site is similar and would evoke the same concerns.


52
In addition, Grand County is planning extensive changes to their subdivision and zoning regulations. These proposals include:
Restrictions on sloped development No development will be allowed on slopes greater than 40X with maximum ratios allowed for slopes less than 40%.
Trees A developer may only remove 30X of the trees from the building site.
Vegetation All disturbed areas must be revegetated; a
required bond wiil be held until the new vegetation takes root.
Wildlife Impacts on wildlife habitats must be mitigated.
i
Parking One third of the spaces may be for compact cars.
Runoff Runoff cannot adversely affect local streams and lakes.
Solar Buildings to be oriented to the south and streets
in subdivisions to be laid out east and west. Solar easements will prevent one building from shadowing the south wall of another on the shortest day of the year.
Noise Decibel levels to be set.
Pollution standards shall be determined.
Radiation No radiation may be emitted.
Waterways 30 foot setbacks (150 feet on slopes) will be
required. No building will be allowed in flood plains.
Bikeways and pedestrian paths will be required.
In proposing these guidelines, Grand County is taking positive steps towards responsible development. The results should be to minimize the effects of human impact on building sites.


PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Central Facilities............................74
Guest Rooms and Service Lobbies...............93
Exterior Amenities...........................$4


iuNir\j mMD codes

Summary Information
PROJECT TITLE The Inn at Val Moritz
OWNER/DEVELOPER Val Moritz Development
P. 0. Box One
Val Moritz, Colorado 80446
PRIMARY AUTHORITIES
ZONING GRAND COUNTY ZONING REGULATIONS
GRAND COUNTY SUBDIVISION REGULATIONS
GENERAL PROVISIONS FOR PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT IN GRAND COUNTY
BUILDING 1979 UNIFORM BUILDING CODE
1979 UNIFORM MECHANICAL CODE 1979 I.C.B.O. PLUMBING CODE 1981 NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE
NEW CONSTRUCTION BUDGET
CORE BUILDING APPROXIMATELY $60 PER SQUARE
FOOT FOR FINISHED COMMERCIAL SPACES AND $40 PER SQUARE FOOT FOR UNFINISHED SPACES. $1,050,000 TOTAL
RESIDENTIAL BUILDING APPROXIMATELY $45 PER SQUARE
FOOT.
FIRST PHASE 100 ROOMS =
39,000 N.S.F.
$1,755,000 TOTAL
EXTERIOR SITE WORK
AND UTILITIES APPROXIMATELY $700,000.
TOTAL BUDGET FOR
PHASE 1 ' $3,500,000


55
Zoning Requirements
PLANNING ZONE T. Tourist District
USES PERMITED
(1) One-family dwellings;
(2) Multiple-family dwellings, boarding and rooming houses, and rest homes;
(3) Schools, churches and hospitals;
(4) Medical and dental offices and clinics;
(5) Parks, playgrounds and golf courses;
(6) Farm and garden buildings and uses, provided commercial feed yards, fur farms, kennels, veterinary hospitals, and commercial riding stables are not maintained;
(7) Incidental buildings;
(8) Hotels, motels, lodges and resort cabins, including

incidental business within the principal buildings;
(9) Outdoor recreational areas and incidental facilities, provided all such uses retain natural environmental conditions, do not involve the storage of equipment outside of a building and are not obnoxious, offensive or objectionable because of excessive noise, odors, dust or vibration;
(10) Private riding stables;
(11) Restricted business uses, including but not limited to the following:
Automobile sales Banks


56
Barber and beauty shops Cleaning and dyeing qutlets
Clothing stores Drug stores Florists
Gasoline stations Grocery stores Hardware stores Laudries, self-service Outdoor sales facilities Places of amusement or recreation
Places serving food or beverages
Sporting goods stores Theaters, indoor Used car sales lot
provided all previous listed uses do not allow objectionable or obnoxious amounts of noise, odor, dust smoke, vibration or other similar causes to be disseminated beyond individual lot lines, and that all outdoor storage areas are completely concealed by a solid fence at least eight feet (8') in height;
(12) Reservoirs and dams engineered to contain one hundred (100) acre feet of water or less;
(13) Water diversion structures, ditches, and pipeline structures engineered to convey fifteen (15) cubic feet of water per second of time or less;


57
SPECIFIC SITE ALLOWANCES AND REQUIREMENTS
MINIMUM AREA OF LOT MINIMUM LOT WIDTH SETBACKS FRONT ..
one (1) acre
SIDE
REAR
150 feet 30 feet 10 feet 20 feet
LOT COVERAGE No restrictions except setbacks.
HEIGHT RESTRICTIONS Normally 35 feet, but a variance was
granted on October 29, 1981, which allows 40 feet to be measured from the high point of the grade at a distance of 5 feet from the building.
EASEMENTS Easements for utilities of not less than 20 feet shall be provided along all read lot lines and along certain side lot lines when necessary.
LANDSCAPING The area of construction disturbance shall be minimized to the greatest degree possible. All disturbed areas will be graded, revegetated and landscaped before a certificate of occupancy is granted.
PARKING Hotels require 1.5 spaces per unit
Restaurants require 1.0 spaces per 100 S.F.
Retail and Office uses require 1.0 spaces per 300 S.F. Parking areas must be set back 15 feet from all rights of way and 7 feet from adjacent properties and must be within 400 feet of the structure.
All areas shall be surfaced with asphalt, concrete, or treated compacted gravel with a maximum grade of 4%.


58
BICYCLE AND WALKING PATHS Are required along logical
routes. Walking paths shall be higher than roads by 7 inches and higher than bicycle paths by 6 inches. STREETS Collector streets 80 feet R.O.W., 40 foot surface width, maximum grade, 7%
Local streets 60 feet R.O.W., 30 foot surface, 7*
maximum grade.
Driveways 10 feet R.O.W., 20 foot surface, 7% maximum grade.
Sidewalks 10 feet wide for business, 4 feet wide for residential.
i
Intersections shall be as nearly at right angles as possible with no intersections designed less than 75 degrees
Access drives shall not exceed 5% grade within 50 feet of their entrance to a public right of way.
SIGNAGE Must be set back 30 feet from right of way 50 S.F. maximum for identification signs 35 S.F. maximum for advertising signs 6 S.F. maximum for directional signs
Signs may not be confused with official traffic signs. They may not have moving parts or blinking and flashing lights.
SOLAR EXPOSURE Solar access to the base of a south facing wall of a theoretical building from any adjacent building on December 21 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. shall be provided while conforming to lot sizes and setbacks.


I
59
WILDLIFE A suitable plan for the mitigation of adverse
impacts upon wildlife shall be submitted to the Colorado Division of Wildlife.
UTILITIES Sewer connections to Granby shall follow standards set by the Colorado State Board of Health.
Solid waste disposal sites are prohibited.
Water will be provided by on-site wells. Use is controlled by the Middle Park Water Conservancy District in Granby, Colorado.
HISTORIC DISTRICT REQUIREMENTS No known cultural sites within the site have been identified.
P.U.D. REQUIREMENTS The entire Val Moritz development was approved by Grand County in 1972 following recommended requirements.


60
Building Code Requirements
The 1979 Uniform Building Code Is applicable for this project. Type V 1 hour construction is assumed for all occupancies. Other codes are used for specific areas.
OCCUPANCY AND ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREAS
Occupancy types A-3, B-2, and R-l are applicable.
A-3 allows assembly rooms with an occupant load of less
than 300 without a stage.
Basic allowable area .................... 10,300 S.F.
Separation on two sides (50% increase).. 5,250 S.F.
Sprinkler system ......................... N/A______
Multi-story 15,750 S.F.
+15,750 S.F.
Total Allowable Area 31,500 S.F.
B-2 allows wholesale and retail stores, offices, drinking
and dining establishments with an occupant load of less
than 50, workshops using material not highly flammable or combustible, and storage and sales rooms.
Basic allowable.......................... 14,000 S.F.
Separation on two sides (50% increase).. 7,000 S.F.
Sprinkler system.......................... N/A______
Multi-story 21,000 S.F.
+21,000 S.F.
Total Allowable Area 42,000 S.F.


61
R-l allows hotels and apartment houses
Basic allowable........................... 10,500 S.F.
Separation on two sides (50% increase).. 5,250 S.F.
Sprinkler system........................... N/A______
Multi story 15,750 S.F.
+15,750 S.F.
Total allowable floor area
for each building 31,500 S.F.
MIXED-USE OCCUPANCY
Each portion of the building shall conform to the requirements for the occupancy housed therein. The area of the building shall be such that the sum of the ratios of the actual area divided by the allowable area for each separate occupancy shall not exceed one. See Section 503 and Table 5-B.
FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS
Type V 1 hour construction is assumed for all occupancies. Table 5-B and Table 17-A are guides.
Exterior bearing walls........... 2 hours less than 5 feet
for A-3, 1 hour less than
20 feet for B-2, 1 hour
less than 5 feet for R-l and 1 hour elsewhere.


62
Interior bearing walls.... Exterior non-bearing walls
Structural frame..........
Permanent partitions......
Shaft enclosures..........
Floors....................
Roof......................
Exterior doors and windows
Inner court walls (504c)
Attic draftstops and ventilation..............
1 hour
see exterior bearing walls 1 hour 1 hour
1 hour (see Section 1706)
1 hour
1 hour with parapet, 2 hour without parapet not permitted less than 5 feet and protected less than 10 feet for all occupancies
a property line must be assumed between the walls
see 3205(b) and 3205(c)
BUILDING HEIGHT
The U.B.C. allows 50 feet for Type V construction, but the Grand County Zoning Regulations allow only 40 feet at the high point of the grade. Type V 1 hour allows 3 stories for B-2 and R-l, and 2 stories for A-3. For 4-story buildings, Type II 1 hour construction must be used.


OCCUPANT LOADS
63
CORE BUILDING A-3 AREAS.
S.F. Occu- Two Hand!-
Occu- pant Exits capped
Area i pant Load Rqrd.? Access?
Lobby 2,000 S.F. 15 134 yes yes
Lounge 1,200 S.F. 15 80 yes yes
Bar 2,000 S.F. 15 134 yes yes
Kitchen 1,000 S.F. 200 / 5 no no
Dining 2,500 S.F. 15 167 yes yes
Coffee shop 2,000 S.F. 15 134 yes yes
Private dining 1,000 S.F. 15 67 yes yes
11,700 S.F. 721
11,700 S.F. total
31,500 S.F. allowable = .371
B-2 AREAS
S.F. Occu- Two Hand!-
Occu- pant Exits capped
Area i pant Load Rqrd.? Access?
Retail shops 700 S.F. 30 24 no yes
Ski rental 2,000 S.F. 30 67 yes yes
Manager offices 550 S.F. 100 6 no yes
Accounting 550 S.F. 100 5 no yes
Front desk 700 S.F. 100 7 no yes


B-2 AREAS (continued)
64
S.F. Occu- Two Handi-
Occu- pant Exits capped
Area pant Load Rqrd.? Access?
Storage 300 S.F. 300 1 no no
Time share
offices 3,000 S.F. 100 30 yes yes
Time share
waiting 1,650 S.F. 15 110 yes yes
Mechanical 1,200 S.F. 300 4 no no
Restrooms 1,300 S.F. 100 13 no yes
Exercise room 2,000 S.F. 15 134 yes yes
Locker rooms 1,000 S.F. 50 20 no yes
Employee lockers 500 S.F. 50 10 no yes
Laundry 1,200 S.F. 100 12 no yes
Linen storage 1,000 S.F. 300 4 no no
Maintenance 550 S.F. 300 2 no no
Storage 350 S.F. 300 1 no no
Ski lockers 700 S.F. 50 14 no yes
Racquetball
courts 1,600 S.F. 15 106 no yes
20,850 S.F. 583
20,850 S.F. total
42,000 S.F. allowable = .496
*
Core building occupancies .371 + .496 = .867 which is
less than one (See mixed use occupancy).


65
RESIDENTIAL R-l
S.F. Occu- Two Hand!-
Occu- pant Exits capped
Area pant Load Rqrd.? Access
25 rooms 400
S.F. 10,000 S.F. 200 50 no* yes
50 rooms i 525
S.F. 26,250 S.F. 200 131 no* yes
25 rooms 650
S.F. 16,250 S.F. 200 82 no* yes
52,500 S.F. 263
Two buildings (i.e. fire separations) are required because the allowable for one building is only 31,500 S.F. 2 exits would be required if a room held 10 occupants.
CONVENTION CENTER (OPTIONAL)
Approximately 7,500 S.F.; probably classed as A-2 or
A-2.1.
Allowable floor area 10,500 without increases.
At 15 S.F. per occupant, 500 is the occupant load.


66
EXIT REQUIREMENTS
NUMBER REQUIRED See Table 33-A and preceeding section.
The number of exits from any story shall be determined by the directions in Section 3302(a).
EXIT WIDTH The total width of exits in feet shall not be
less than the total occupant load divided by 50. See Section 3302(b). Exit doors shall be a minimum of 3'0" x 6'8" with 32" clear and shall open 90 degrees. No leaf can exceed 4'0". Landings shall be at least 5' long. Doors must be operable from inside without a key and must open in the direction of egress.
ARRANGEMENTS OF EXITS If only two exits are required,
they shall be placed a distance apart equal to not less than one-half of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served. See Section 3302(c).
DISTANCE TO EXJTS 150 feet maximum. See Section 3302(d).
EXITS THROUGH ADJOINING AREAS Exits shall not pass
through kitchens, storerooms, restrooms, or closets. See Section 3302(e).
CORRIDORS Shall be 44 inches wide minimum and at least
7'0" high. Dead end corridors shall not exceed 20 feet. Corridors shall be 1-hour construction with 20 minute rated smoke and draft control door assemblies. Other interior openings shall be fixed and protected by 1/4 inch thick wire glass in steel frames and shall not be greater than 25 percent of the wall area of the room which is separated from the corridor.


67
STAIRWAYS WIDTH 44 inch width for load greater than 50, 36 inch width for occupant load less than 50. Private stairways for less than 10 occupants may be 30 inches wide.
LANDINGS eqCial to width up to 4'0" for straight-runs. The door may swing 7 inches into landing when fully open. There shall not be more than 12 vertical feet between landings..
RISE AND RUN Rise min. = 4 inches
max. = 7-1/2 inches (8 inches for a private stair)
Run min. = 10 inches (9 inches for a private stair)
HANDRAILS shall be placed on each side between 30" and 34" above tread nosings. One side will extend 6" beyond the top and bottom risers.
GUARDRAILS are required for open stairs and landings. See Section 1716.
SPIRAL, CIRCULAR AND WINDING STAIRS See Section 3305(d), (e) and (f).
CONSTRUCTION Interior See Part V of U.B.C.
Exterior 1-hour fire resistive.
RAMPS Width shall be 44 inches.
Handicapped ramps shall be 1:12 max. slope; all others 1:8 max.
Landings for ramps greater than 1:15 shall be 5 feet long at the top and 6 feet long at the bottom. See 3306(d).
HORIZONTAL EXITS See Section 3307.


68
EXIT ENCLOSURES 2-hour fire resistive for 4 stories and
1-hour fire resistive for 3 stories. See Section 3308 and 1706.
SM0KEPR00F ENCLOSURES Not required.
EXIT SIGNS AND ILLUMINATION See Section 3312.
LIGHT, VENTILATION AND SANITATION
%
A-3 See Section 605.
I
B-2 See Section 705.
R-l See Section 1205.
See Section 1711 for specific toilet room requirements. Required toilet fixtures See 1979 I.C.B.O. Plumbing Code.
SPECIAL HAZARDS See Sections 608, 708 and 1212.
CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS
FLOOR LIVE LOADS assembly areas and corridors.... psf.
offices psf. 2000 psf
restrooms psf. concen.
retail psf. 2000 psf
units psf. concen.
ROOF LOAD 55 psf. (snow) BALCONIES 55 psf. (snow) STAIR LIVE LOAD 100 psf.


69
SOIL PRESSURE 3,000 psf.
DESIGN DEFLECTION live load and dead load/240 SEISMIC ZONE UBC Zone 1 WIND PRESSURE 25 psf.
More specific design standards will be used when the materials for building are determined.
ROOF COVERING Section 1704, Chapter 32; also see Table' 32A and 32B.
ATTIC ACCESS 3205(a).
DRAFT STOPS 3205(b).
VENTILATION 3205(c).
SMOKE VENTS 3206.
DEAD LOADS determined by actual materials used.
ROOF DRAINAGE 3207.
SKYLIGHTS 3401 and 5207.


70
HANDICAPPED PROVISIONS
Colorado Revised Statutes, Article 5, 1973 1979 U.B.C.
ACCESS RAMPS o see UBC 3302(f) and 3306
o maximum 1:12 slope
o handrail one side at 32" from surface o non-slip surface
o 5' x 5* platform if door swings onto o platform
o 3' x 5' platform without door swings o bottom landing 6'0" long o width 44 inches
o level space every 30' for rest and safety
ACCESS ELEVATOR o access must be provided to all floors
o uniform control buttons for blind o shall allow for wheelchair traffic DOOR SIZES o minimum of 32" clear opening, 3303(e)
TOILET REQUIREMENTS See 1711(b) and (c)
ACCESS TO BUILDING USES See section of this paper on occupant loads; also Table 33A CHANGES IN FLOOR ELEVATION 3303(i) and 3304(f)
HANDRAILS 3305(j)
LANDINGS 3303(1) and 3305(g)
TELEPHONES 1713 WATER FOUNTAINS 1712


71
PARKING AREA provide curb cuts and ramps
- provide 12' wide parking spaces
In addition, Timesaver, Standards for Building Types, Second Edition 1980 contains an excellent section on designing for the handicapped.
FIRE EXTINGUISHING SYSTEMS
Life Safety Code Handbook, Second Edition James K. Lathrop, editor. 1981 NFPA, Inc.
In general, an adequate fire alarm system and means of communication should be provided in all areas as well as provisions for portable fire extinguishers. U.B.C. section 1210 details requirements for fire warning systems. Automatic sprinkler systems and standpipes are not required for the anticipated occupancies.
FLAME SPREAD
Enclosed Verti- Other Rooms or
cal Exits Exits Areas
A-3 I II III
B-2 I II III
R-l I II III
where Class I is 0-25, Class II is 26-75, and
III is 76-200. See U.B.C. Chapter 42.


72
U.B.C. Chapter 43 lists fire-resistive standards and material assemblies in terms of fire ratings (i.e. 4-hour, 3-hour, etc.). Chapter 47 describes proper assembly of building materials on walls and ceilings to meet required standards.
ENERGY CONSERVATION
I
Buildings should be designed to comply with the requirements of the Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction.
Minimum insulation a)
b)
c)
floor R-19 walls R-19 roof R-30


DESIGN INTENTIONS
Response to Site and Energy...........
Function, Form, Economy, and Time Architectural Aesthetics..............


PPQGP AM PEQIJIPEMENTS
The hotel Is comprised of three main areas:
1) the central facilities
2) guest rooms and service lobbies
3) exterior amenities
For each area, the program is defined first with words, then with diagrams as necessary to identify relationships.
Central Facilities
USERS The central facilities will be used by hotel guests,
outside guests, potential time share buyers, hotel employees, 'retail sales employees, restaurant and bar employees and health club employees.
ACTIVITY AND SERVICE AREAS FOR 300 ROOMS
Lobby....;..................... 2,000 S.F.
Administration................... 2,100 S.F.
Lounge........................... 1,200 S.F.
Retail shops..................... 1,000 S.F.
Restrooms........................ 1,300 S.F.
Bar.............................. 2,000 S.F.
Restaurant....................... 2,500 S.F.
Kitchen......................... 1,000 S.F.
Private dining................... 1,000 S.F.
Coffee shop..................... 2,000 S.F.
Health club...................... 3,000 S.F.
Racquetball courts....;.......... 1,600 S.F.


ACTIVITY AND SERVICE AREAS FOR 300 ROOMS (continued)
75
Time share reception.............. 1,650 S.F.
Time share offices................ 3,000 S.F.
Ski shop and rental............... 2,000 S.F.
Ski lockers......................... 700 S.F.
Employee lockers.................... 500 S.F.
Laundry and linen storage......... 2,400 S.F.
Receiving and maintenance......... 1,500 S.F.
Mechanical........................ 1,200 S.F.
TOTAL 33,650 S.F.
* Add 2,000 2,500 S.F. for circulation.
Lobby
2,000 S.F.
Uses and activities
serves as entry focal point, access from vehicle
drop-off
generates a large volume of public activity
is a circulation hub, a point of transition to
other areas
Design objectives
strong positive image
spacious and light - use natural and artificial
light to create alive, inviting atmosphere
transitions to other areas should be highly
visible and smooth
information should be easily discernable
c hierarchy of public and private spaces important


76
comfortable atmosphere for people encounters
provide seating and waiting area
access to restrooms
Administration 2,100 s.f.
Uses and activities
manager offices and clerical 550 S.F.
accounting 500 S.F.
front desk, mail, keys, cashier, switchboard, bell captain 700 S.F.
restroom (private), storage, telephone and electrical closet 350 S.F.
Design objectives
functional space necessary for front desk, cashier, bell captain and switchboard
manager must be close to front desk and accounting
efficiency of operations is of prime importance
-security is necessary for all areas
private work spaces and offices need natural light
Lounge 1,200 s.f.
Uses and activities
social gathering place, a place to relax or wait
serves as overflow from lobby and other areas Design objectives
fireplace as focal point
quiet, comfortable and pleasant atmosphere


a combination of intimate areas and public spaces
natural light and views
easy accessibility from other areas
Retail Shops 1,000 S.F.
Uses and activities
sales of gif'ts, books, newspapers, sundries, etc.
to meet needs of hotel guests
storage areas for stock
Design objectives
high visibility and easy access for the public
location near lobby and lounge
access to restrooms
Restrooms 1,300 s.f.
Uses and activities
used by all visitors to the public areas
private lounge area Design objectives
durable; easy to clean
accessiblity from all dining areas and lobby
ventilation important
Bar 2,000 S.F.
Uses and activities
social gathering place


78
drinking and limited food service
dance floor
outdoor area for pleasant weather Design objectives
intimate, active atmosphere for entertainment
provide seating for around 100 people
"mood" lighting for night; natural lighting by day
provide access to terraces
requires controlled climatic conditions (ventilation)
close access to restrooms and health club
Coffee Shop 2,000 S.F.
Uses and activities
quick service dining for 110 people, limited menu
minimal kitchen and storage services
.outdoor terrace Design objectives
natural light, clean and casual atmosphere
family oriented
access to main circulation, restrooms and exterior
convenience to health club


79
o
OBBY ADMINISTRATION LOUNGE RETAIL SHOPS COFFEE SHOP BAR
RESTROOMS


80
Kitchen 1,000 S.F.
Uses and activities
food preparation, bakery, dry and wet storage, dishwashing, manager's office, garbage area, restrooms
Design objectives
efficient, functional space flow of work important
access to service docks and laundry
service to restaurant and private dining
Private Dining 1,000 S.F.
Uses and activities
used as additional restaurant space or as a separate meeting room for private gatherings
seating for 75
bar set-up
Design objectives
coordinate atmosphere of elegance with restaurant
quiet; privacy important
shape of room should allow for presentations at business meetings
access to kitchen, restrooms and main circulation
accessible from restaurant entry without passing
through restaurant; separate exit


Restaurant 2,500 s.f.
81
Uses and activities
full service dining for 180 guests and visitors
cocktail lounge
waiting and cloakroom areas necessary
Design objectives
low key elegance; use of quality materials
relaxing atmosphere for intimate dining
views tx> exterior
controlled lighting day and night
access to main circulation, restrooms and kitchen


Health Club 3,000 S.F.
82
Uses and activities
exercise room, sauna, whirlpool, steam room, men's and women's locker rooms
Design objectives
light and active environment
access to exterior exercise space, swimming pool, racquetball courts
proximity to bar and coffee shop
high degree of climate control necessary
Racquetball Courts 1,600 s.f.
Uses and activities
two racquetball courts
Design objectives
to be able to watch the players from either the bar or the coffee shop
access to health club and restrooms


83
TO GUEST ROOMS
TO LOBBY
BAR
HEALTH CLUB RACQUETBALL RESTROOMS EXTERIOR AMENITIES


84
Time Share Reception i.sso s.f.
J
, Uses and activities
reception, waiting, office, brochure
distribution, sales promotion and projection room
Design objectives
i
to project a strong positive image of Val Moritz
pleasant, light atmosphere
views to exterior and ski mountain
design in a flexible way to allow for future renovation game room, mini-cinema, etc.
Time Share Offices 3,000 S.F.
Uses and activities
intense sales in 80 100 S.F. offices
gift display and storage
clerical area Design objectives
need for privacy
exit for non-buyers
design in a flexible way for future renovation -expansion of retail areas


85
TO LOBBY
(TO GUEST ROOMS
TIME SHARE RECEPTION TIME SHARE OFFICES


86
Ski Shop & Rental 2,000 S.F.
Uses and activities
rental and repair of skiis, boots and poles
sales of ski accessories and clothing
Design objectives
high visibility and easy access from public areas especially direct circulation from exterior to facilitate handling of ski equipment
attractive, active space
logical progression from entry to exit to avoid congestion
access to restrooms
Ski Lockers 700 s.f.
Uses and activities
storage for skiis, clothes, etc. for hotel guests
4 benches to sit on while changing boots
Design objectives
close to exterior exit, public restrooms and ski rental


87
TO GUEST
SKI RENTAL SKI LOCKERS RESTROOMS EXTERIOR


88
Laundry & Linen Storage 2,400 s.f.
Uses and activities
laundry service for hotel to service rooms and dining facilities
I
optional laundry service for hotel guests Design objectives
accessible from all parts of the hotel
direct links to service docks
need for efficiency and high degree of climatic conditioning
Receiving & Maintenance 1,500 s.f.
Uses and activities
' receiving food, furniture, equipment, etc.
shop for maintenance of hotel physical plant
storage for furniture
lockers and restroom for employees Design objectives
ease of circulation is of prime importance
j
safety must be provided by design must be a controlled security environment


89
Mechanical 1,200 s.f.
Uses and activities
containment and operation of mechanical equipment Design objectives
central location with direct access to exterior
for repair and maintenance
safe and efficient operation
controlled access and security are important
Employee Lockers 5oo s.f.
Uses and activities
lockers for housekeeping employees
meeting/lunch area
restroom and kitchenette
Design objectives
locate out of the way but accessible to main circulation


90
RECEIVING MAINTENANCE LAUNDRY LINEN STORAGE EMPLOYEE LOCKERS


91
Central Facilities
ADJACENCY RELATIONSHIPS
HIGH NEED
MEDIUM NEED
LOW NEED
MIN. NEED


92
FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
*


93
Residential Building
USERS The residential building will be used by hotel guests and their outside visitors.
ACTIVITY AND SERVICE AREAS
Guest rooms Phase. 1 Phase 2 (x3)
25 @ 400 S.F. 10,000 S.F. 30,000 S.F.
50 @ 525 S.F. 26,250 S.F. 78,750 S.F.
25 @ 650 S.F. 16,250 S.F. 48,750 S.F.
52,500 S.F. 157,500 S.F.
Service lobbies 10,500 S.F. 31,500 S.F.
63,000 S.F. 189,000 S.F.
Guest Rooms
Uses and activities
sleeping, bathing, relaxing, eating, entertaining
storage
exterior views Design objectives
homey, comfortable atmosphere fireplace?
ease of access to central facilities and amenities
adequate storage
safety and security
flexibility to combine with other rooms to make
larger units


Service Lobbies
94
Uses and activities
minor focal point and point of transition
provides services to guests
contains stairs, elevators, housekeeping station, public restrooms, vending and mechanical equipment
Design objectives
"relief" from potential monotony of guest room corridors
views and access (controlled) to exterior
9 efficient collection point for housekeeping
services
a could be used as a distribution center for
mechanical and electrical equipment
Exterior Amenities
USERS All guests and, to a more limited extent, other visitors will use the exterior amenities.
ACTIVITY AND SERVICE AREAS Swimming pool Ice skating Tennis courts Pedestrian walkways Bicycle paths Parking