Citation
Meadow Park design development

Material Information

Title:
Meadow Park design development
Creator:
Kaehny, M. Karen
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
55 pages : illustrations, maps, plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Parks -- Colorado -- Lyons ( lcsh )
Recreation areas -- Planning -- Colorado -- Lyons ( lcsh )
Landscape architecture -- Colorado -- Lyons ( lcsh )
Landscape architecture ( fast )
Parks ( fast )
Recreation areas -- Planning ( fast )
Colorado -- Lyons ( fast )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (page 55).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Landscape Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
General Note:
Prepared for the Town of Lyons, Colorado.
Statement of Responsibility:
prepared by M. Karen Kaehny.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
08984824 ( OCLC )
ocm08984824
Classification:
LD1190.A77 1981 .K33 ( lcc )

Full Text
QW PARK DESIGN DEVELOPMENT
Hi


MEADOW PARK DESIGN DEVELOPMENT
PREPARED BY M. Karen Kaehny
Department of Landscape Architecture, Graduate School of Environmental Design
University of Colorado at Denver
Center for Community Development and Design
FOR
Lyons, Colorado
Spring, 1981
University of Cdorodo at Denver
College of Environmental Design


SUMMARY
This booklet records the design development of Meadow Park In Lyons, Colorado from problem definition through goal setting and analysis of the park site^to conceptual design.
The design is an extension of the guidelines proposed in the 1981 Lyons Valley Recreation Res6urce Study.
J


The Problem The Goals
The Site Analysis
Two Alternatives Final Design
page
section
i INTRODUCTION 1 THE PROBLEM
7 THE GOALS
9 THE SITE ANALYSIS
23 TWO ALTERNATIVES
29 THE FINAL DESIGN
34 The Entry
36 The Cultural Setting
37 The Kids' Train
38 Nature Walk
39 New Culvert
40 Playground Additions
45 APPENDIX
55 BIBLIOGRAPHY


Introduction
PURPOSE OF THE PROJECT
1. Fulfillment of thesis requirement for completion of work for Master's Degree In Landscape
Arch!tecture.
2. Development of a site design for Meadow Park in Lyons.Colorado to:
a. guide future park development
b. analyze the possibilities and problems of Meadow Park, Identify goals for improvement, and suggest design options.
c. serve as a background information document in negotiations to determine the future
of the park site property.
THANK YOU Town of Lyons
The Town of Lyons Committee for Recreation Plan Development
Mr. Ralph Leum, Department of Public Works
THE TOWN OF LYONS IN COLORADO'S FRONT RANGE
Meadow Park is located in the growing Colorado front range in the foothills town of Lyons.
The town was established as a base for a large sandstone quarrying operation which peaked in the early 1900's. Current population is about 1,200.
The town is located approximately M miles north of Denver on Highway 66/36, a major tourist route to Rocky Mountain National Park. The Roosevelt National Forest is just west of the town. Boulder and Longmont are expanding neighboring cities to the south and southeast.
Lyons is in the St. Vrain River Valley.
__________________________________________________J


INTRODUCTION:
MEADOW PARK IN THE TOWN OF LYONS
The Meadow Park site Is bounded on three sides by the North St. Vrain River in a loop of the river adjacent to Lyons'resident la 1 area. The park's 7.5 acres include a flat meadow which is flanked on three sides by massive stone outcrops.
The park site is owned by the Burlington-Northern Railroad.

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INTRODUCTION:
THE DESIGN PROCESS
The design process Is an organization tool.
A strong and suitable design Is the result of many small decisions based on an analysis of the park's setting and the established goals.
The goals In turn respond to the definition of the real problem needing design soulution.
PROCESS IS AN ORDERLY FORMAT FOR DESIGN.
The design process used In the redevelopment of Meadow Park follows:
1. PROBLEM definition
2. GOAL statement
3. ANALYSIS of the park's natural environment and cultural or social setting
l. ALTERNATIVES, possible solutions for tjie park design
5. The FINAL DESIGN meets the project goals for problem solution. It's the best alternative for the community and the park environment.
THE FINAL DESIGN IS A RESULT OF THE PROCESS. IT SHOULD ANSWER THE PROBLEM, MEET THE GOALS, AND RESPOND TO THE ANALYSIS INFORMATION. IT SHOULD BE THE BEST ALTERNATIVE.
THE DESIGN PROCESS:
This chart shows the design process as it progresses to find the facts and formulate a design.


The Problem


PROBLEM:
THE EXISTING USE OF MEADOW PARK IS NOT CONSISTENT WITH THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE LYONS VALLEY RECREATION RESOURCE STUDY.
The strong possibility of a doubled population in the next ten years prompted concerned citizens of Lyons to begin evaluation of their town's readiness to extend its services. The Center for Community Development and Design, based at the University of Colorado at Denver, was contacted and began a series of reports on the town of Lyons. In January, 1981, one such report, the Lyons Valley Recreation Resource Study, was published.
After studying the 5** square mile watershed surrounding Lyons, the study proposed a system of recreation featuring activity centers linked by a continuous access of roads and pathways on a regional and local level.
Special attention was focused on the town of Lyons where 5 major recreation activity centers were featured.
1 The ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, with a playground and ball field.
2 The OLD TRAIN DEPOT,,a registered historic building and a landscaped resting area.
3"The DISTRICT HIGH SCHOOL, a fine new building with football, track and gym facilities.
4BOHN PARK, adjacent to planned residential development, it includes baseball field, bleachers, and a tennis court. It is the only park owned by the Town of Lyons.
STUDY RECOMMENDS:major active sports use 5-MEADOW PARK,exceptiona1 natural setting, it
currently has a softball field, shelter, storage storage areas, playground and picnic facilities. STUDY RECOMMENDS:use for passive, relaxed rec; reat ion
J


PROBLEM:
MEADOW PARK IS NOT BEING USED TO ITS BEST RECREATIONAL POTENTIAL.
Meadow Park has been a recreational asset to the town of Lyons since the community's beginning. The cool combination of cliff and river provided refreshment and recreation for generations of Lyons citizens. There has been a gradual change. More and more park visitors come by auto, some from well beyond the town of Lyons. Increasing residential development has decreased the available open space and the park is now providing for many more people and vehicles than in the past. The rail spur which once hauled sandstone from the outcrop is now only on occasion in use but still demands a massive area at the heart of the park. A private residence in the area north of the park needs auto access and an irrigation ditch traverses the site.
Autos find their way deep in Meadow' Park bringing noise and dust.
The park entry Is uninviting, confusing, and not a source of civic pride for the town.
Train tracks dominate the heart of the park and fine recreational space is lost.


PROBLEM:
AN INCREASE IN POPULATION IS CHANGING THE TRADITIONAL SURROUNDINGS OF THE TOWN OF LYONS.
A dramatic increase in recreation demands Is predicted for Lyons when a planned 1*00 residence subdivision is developed In the open space between Bohn Park and the District High School.
As population increases, open space decreases. The shape and identity of the town go through a subtle change. Recreational development is a great opportunity to express the best of the town's local image and identity. Parks should be assets to the town." A park's open space preserves the town's
original setting and links it to its origins.
~ An attractive park entry is a source of community pride.
- Distinct signage marks the facility as a civic feature.
4
As growth and development occur, changing the town's traditional landscape; parks become valuable civic assets, preserving the town's original setting.
Attractive park entries and signage present a strong image of town vitality.


PROBLEM:
AN INCREASE IN POPULATION WILL DEMAND MORE RECREATION SERVICES FROM LYONS AND MEADOW PARK.
As population increases* recreational demand Increases. Existing park facilities can become overcrowded and eventually worn to a point of ruin.
The community is forced to make decisions about future recreation services. Existing parks are relieved of the extra burden of more users by annexing new land to the park site for enlargement or developing new parks on other sites to form a park system.
5
A recreation system
As a part of a park system, Meadow Park no longer must be "all things to all people." Meadow Park could be relieved of providing space for league sports and emphasize its natural setting with casual usages and informal field sports and softball games. Eventually, additional parks, supported by an increased population, could provide field space for all the major active sports.
THE RECOMMENDATION:
MEADOW PARK SHOULD BECOME ONE OF A SYSTEM OF LYONS TOWN PARKS. MEADOW PARK SHOULD EMPHASIZE ITS EXCEPTIONAL NATURAL ENVIRONMENT AS A PASSIVE PARK.
AN INCREASE IN POPULATION ^W4-Hr~DMAHD,M0RE RECREATION SERVICES,


PROBLEM SUMMARY
Meadow Park, a recreation site,is currently providing land for an access road, irrigation ditch, and a seldom used railroad spur.
A new design is needed to insure good recreation while honoring the sites legal responsibilities.
PROBLEM SUMMARY
The existing use of Meadow Park is not consistent with the recommendation of the Lyons Valley Refcreation'Resource Study.
Meadow Park is not being used to its best recreational potential.
An increase in population is changing the traditional surroundings of the Town of Lyons.
An increase in population will demand more recreation services from Lyons and Meadow Park.
problem situation:
MEADOW PARK NEEDS REDESIGN
A park design is needed now to establish suitable use habits on the Meadow Park site before anticipated growth accelerates the problems.


The Goals


GOALS:
The second step in the design process iooks at the problems and establishes a series of goals for their solution.
Goals for the design of Meadow were based on:
1. The Lyons Valley Recreation Resource Study which includes the 1979 recreation survey of Lyons.
2. Information gathered from the Lyons recreation committee and public works committee meeting in March, 1981.
3. Personal research, observations, and faculty advice.
PARK DESIGN goals:
GOALS FOR THE REDESIGN OF MEADOW PARK:
1. DESIGN MEADOW PARK FOR A PASSIVE ROLE IN THE PARK SYSTEM FOLLOWING THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE LYONS VALLEY RECREATION RESOURCE STUDY.
2. PRESERVE THE PARK ENVIRONMENT WITH DESIGN FOR SUITABLE USE TO MAXIMIZE THE SITE'S RECREATIONAL POTENTIAL AND MINIMIZE STRESS ON THE PHYSICAL SETTING.
3. DEVELOP A CONNECTION LINKING THE GROWING COMMUNITY TO ITS NATURAL AND HISTORIC ORIGINS, IDENTITY,
AND TRADITIONS.
h. MEET THE TOWN'S PRACTICAL RECREATION NEEDS.
8


The Site Analysis
9


ANALYSIS:
The s I te
hydrology, vegetation and special spaces
analysis:
Natural Setting
10
/The large scale natural environment of Meadow Park is the approximately 570 acre town of Lyons.in the St. Vrain River drainage corridor; a valley carved by an ancient river flowing through the surrounding red sandstone cliffs. The confluence of the North and South St. Vrain Rivers is near the center of Town. Meadow Park is on the edge of this large foothills drainage path. The park's form is the result of rushing river water and resistant rock.


ANALYSIS: NATURAL
GEOLOGY
The Meadow Park site lies on a massive red sandstone deposit geologists call the Lyons Formation. In the geologic history of the Meadow Park site, water draining from surrounding heights collided with hard sandstone formations which resisted the water's carving action and forced it into a circuitous channel around the unyielding rocks before resuming its path to the St. Vrain River and ultimately east to the Platte and Missouri-Miss-issippi watershed. Today the resistant rock is visible as the 3 "walls" of the park site.
Today the resistant rock of the Lyons sandstone formation is visible as the "walls" of the park.
SOIL
The ancient river's path through Meadow Park is marked by a trail of gravel debris from the ever eroding mountainsides at higher elevations. The soil surfaces overlaying the gravel and sandstone are; NIWOT, characteristic of stream terraces, and SIX MILE STONEY LOAM, found on steep ridges and associated with rock outcrops and cobbles.
HYDROLOGY
In the last 100 years the town of Lyons has had several memorable floods with Meadow Park's 3 sides of river edge flooding its banks to almost cover the park's low land. The site is in the designated flood plain and construction of permanent structures would be potentially hazardous.
THE SITE'S LACK OF SUITABILITY FOR MAJOR DEVELOPMENT MAKES IT IDEAL FOR CONSIDERATION FOR RECREATIONAL USE
VEGETATION
Vegetation on the 7-5 acre site includes 3 distinct types: riparian (riverside), plains grassland, and ponderosa pine.
At the riverside, especially in the shadowy waters along the cliff, shrubs along the bank are part of the riparian habitat for the German Brown Trout.
The flat land is a grassy meadow shaded by a canopyof silver maple planted about half a century ago.
The large outcrop with a southern exposure is grassy with scattered Ponderosa Pine dominating.


ANALYSIS NATURAL:
SPECIAL SPACES
The contrasts of cliff and river, sheltered shade and sunny expanse, running water and crumbling red outcrop; give Meadow Park a rich variety of textures and recreational experiences.
The NOOK or SWIMMING HOLE, features the "maid of the meadow" rock, a traditional jumping off spot for summer fun and refreshing dips in the town's swimming hole. It's a small world of its own in the shelter of the outcrop's cliff.
This special spot could be even better if the moblile homes on'the other side were less visible and the cars and trucks stayed away.
At the RIVER AND CLIFFSIDE, a feeling of peaceful shelter where the cool cliff meets the water's edge and the mature silver maples form a leafy canopy.
Sadly, holidays find this pleasant path shared with automobiles and campfires, no longer extending a peaceful shelter. The informal roadway
through the trees is commonly used by visitors and the private property owners at the end of the park.
Unfortunately, trees have been scarred, the ground compacted and the pedestrian has had to yield.


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i
/ N V
IN SUMMARY,
Meadow Park's natural setting is exceptional in the town of Lyons. The limitations of topography and flood plain make it ideally suited for recreation.
The park is a microcosm of the town's outcrop walls, open valley and flowing river. The site synthesizes the natural Lyons setting and if preserved, it can set the theme for the town as a physical expression of the Lyons' character and sense of place at a time when development continues to change the Lyons landscape.
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The adjacent PICNIC AREAS set back from the cliff and hillside along the river enjoy a longer view of the park's sheltering walls and the dappled shade of the large trees. Occasional fireplaces and some picnic tables add comforts to the picnic scene. Crossed by the roadway at this time, the "drive through" autos detract from this pleasant site. Elimination of most of the road use and additional picnic tables could strengthen the passive, restful refreshment of this area.
13


analysis:
Cultural Setting
The'/lar Lyons is on an established transportation corridor which includes Highway 36/66 and a spur of the Burlington-Northern Railroad.
The town began on the southern exposure slope north of the river in 1881 and more recently spread across to the area south of the river. New settlement is planned further south.
The Meadow Park site is in a natural setting. Its adjacent to but not surrounded by the community. The rock formation enclosed acreage has been a traditional recreation site since Lyons was settled.
14


ANALYSIS: CULTURAL
HISTORY
Meadow Park is the cornerstone of Lyons' recreation system. The remains of an informal tree lined passage of silver maples along the river path indicate early attempts to formalize the site as a town park. Succeeding generations have continued to develop the park and recreational activity has gradually become more intense.
A tree lined path of mature sugar maples along the river indicates an earlier attempt to create a park like atmosphere.
CENTENNIAL YEAR 1881-1981 ___________________________
15
The open area around the park's shelter Is a traditional picnic site. One photo of historic Lyons shows a l9l6 Mayday celebration with three maypoles set in Meadow Park. In those days the Sunday excursion train dropped passengers at the parkground for picnics and special outings.
The train would bypass the depot and go on to the end of the line to disembark alongside the sandstone shelter. |n l9^8 the tracks were cut back to their current end at the head of the out outcrop.
The outcrop on the park site has long been used for quarrying stone. Historically the presence of tracks in the park was not solely for recreation. On weekdays, the railroad tracks carried sandstone. The tracks in the park's central area were used for switching and stone loading. One loading area stood where the tracks bulge out.
Concrete remnants of the operation are still visible. On ocassion, the railroad continues to collect rip rap from the park outcropping.


at home in the park. Built with native stone they blend into their surroundings.
e~ ____ ~ ^ .... - - -.. X. ' -- --
RAILROAD TRACKS parallel the outcropping. They are occasionally used to transport stone from the outcrop.
16
Two SOFTBALL diamonds provide a favorite summer recreation opportunity.
J


J

The old RAILROAD DEPOT, now a registered historic building, is used as the town library. On its neatly landscaped lot it is an excellent transition area from town to park. It is not on the park site but its location directly across 5th Avenue gives a ciose sense of association.
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The CULVERTS are strong determinants of auto access.
17


ANALYSIS: CULTURAL
OWNERSHIP
Although Meadow Park is recognized as the town's traditional park, it is not owned by the town of Lyons. The entire river enclosed site just west of Fifth Avenue is owned by Burlington Northern Railroad and private parties. The town leases the major area, about 7-5 acres, from the railroad for a nominal sum. The frontage strip along Fifth Avenue, the acre at the southeast corner, and the parcel at the northwest "toe" of the park are in residential use. The latter requires auto access through the park.
It is the town's policy to attempt to acquire the railroad owned land. The town sets control of the future of Meadow Park as a high priority for recreation.
The private residence at the northwest "toe" requires auto access through the park.
18
ic fnc,sed.area. The irrigation ditch
s parked by the line of vegetation to the right of the tracks. Culvert crossing is just behind
IN SUMMARY
The cultural analysis showed Meadow Park has been a focus of Lyons recreation for over 75 years. In view of the vanishing open space within the town limits, preservation of the park site for recreational use must be pursued by the town through eventual ownership or control of its future development and the curbing of park use which diminishes the site's recreational assets.
_____________________________________________J


ANALYSIS: CULTURAL
USES
A look at Meadow Park's uses and activities must focus on the question of how much auto access is necessary.
By reducing the uses to a diagram format it becomes evident that only six uses demand direct automobile access. Further, five of the six couid be for limited or locked access only.
These five uses could be via controlled entry:
I .
2.
3.
1*.
5.
irrigation headgate maintenance storage house rest room faci1ity shelter house
private property drive way
Only the parking area needs continual open public availability. It follows then that most public access could be limited to the parking lot. To avoid inconvenience for large picnic groups or handicaped, individual needs could be accomodated by extending the shelter permit process already in use, or by requesting access at the Town Hall just across from the park on 5th.
use relationships
19


ANALYSIS: SUMMARY
This CULVERT over the irrigation ditch determines, automobile circulation.
SHELTER area improvements indicated: playground development restroom replacement
fence to keep blue trash container from view plantings to buffer view of private property
ANALYSIS MAP
This map summarizes the natural and cultural
fact finding.
1. PRIVATE PROPERTY and MAINTENANCE were the only uses which demanded unlimited access to the west end of the park.
2. IRRIGATION CULVERTS were noted as strong determinants of auto circulation.
3. Seldom used RAILROAD TRACKS at the heart
of the park, on barren, uneven ground should ideally be removed.
I*. The ENTRY needs to be improved to identify Meadow Park as a town feature.
5. The VIEW of the montane outcrop, pine hillside, and dramatic cliff should be seen from an improved setting.
6. The SPECIAL SPACES will better reflect the passive role of Meadow Park if the automobiles are excluded.
7. The SHELTER area could be revived with repair and a playground redesign.
8. The SOFTBALL area in a "passive" park should be kept informal, free of organized"regu1ation' type equipment. Metal fencing and signs should be kept minimal.



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21 ---------------------


ANALYSIS: SUMMARY
SPECIAL SPACES should be relieved of the need to give space for roadways. This river edge near the cliff could be a safer more attractive area without auto passage.
The VIEW of the park's rocky walls should be enjoyed from a finer setting than these barren railroad tracks.
The SOFTBALL field in a passive, nature..park setting shouldbe kept free of heavy fencing and signage.
IN SUMMARY
Meadow Park's exceptional natural setting is not being used to its full recreational potential.
A new design for the park is needed to establish suitable use habits on the Meadow Park site before anticipated growth accelerates the problems.


Two Alternatives
23



LEGEND
REGULAR PUBLIC ACCESS.
ALTERNATIVE
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24


ALTERNATIVE ONE:
CONCEPT: a shared heritage of use" CHARACTERISTICS:
1. Autos enter at shared ownership road.
2. Autos have access to parking lot and beyond to the far picnic area including the circular road and the culvert leading to the swimming hole nook.
3. The ditch is enclosed by a culvert to provide space for a parking lot.
k. One railroad track remains. It is
buffered by planting to hide it from view.
CONCEPT 1 ENTRY: (reading from left to right)
-the "shared" road is the main entry.
-a planter is set over the culvert enclosed i rrigation di tch.
-consistant with habit, autos enter south and exit north somewhat paralell with remaining track, alongside a plant buffer.
-only one track, the northernmost, remains.
PARKING CAPACITY: 80 +
POSITIVE FEATURES:
Auto access is easy.
The railroad retains its source of sandstone for rip rap.
The historic presence of the railroad remains. NEGATIVE FEATURES:
Sensitive natural environments receive wear and tear.
Valuable recreation space is lost to tracks.
Autos create hazards and break into the recreational mood.
The distractioh of the railroad must be tolerated.
CONCEPT 1: Cars have free use of circular road in shelter/picnic area.
CONCEPT
entry


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"\
REGULAR PUBLIC ACCESS.
CONTROLLED ACCESS VIA LOCKED CULVERT


ALTERNATIVE TWO:
CONCEPT: "a preservation response to changing use" CHARACTERISTICS:
1. Autos enter and are contained in public parking lot.
2. Auto use in west end of site is controlled by lock at existing culvert. Keys are held by Town of'Lyons and private property owner
3. All railroad tracks are removed.
i. A new picnic site is developed on old track
site. "Play train" is set at former track line.
5. A structural barrier directs traffic away from picnic area.
6. The culvert is removed at the crossing to the swimming hole.
POSITIVE FEATURES:
CONCEPT 2 ENTRY: (reading from left to right)
-the "shared" road leads to the locked culvert crossing used only by private property owner and park maintenance crews.
-the ditch remains in its existing state -autos exit on gravel road parallel to the ditch -a planter separates traffic and offers a setting for identification signage -the main entry is a simple right turn off Fifth Avenue, parallel with the outcrop
PARKING CAPACITY: 60 +
Limited "in park" auto use preserves environment, increases safety,and upgrades recreation in special natural areas.
Many square feetofland are released for recreation where tracks were removed and general auto use is limited. ^
Parking lot allows for more efficient parked auto arrangemen
NEGATIVE FEATURES:
Changing established vehicular use habits wi11 be difficult.
PRIVATE ^ I
CONTROU-tP IRRUSAnON PU&CIC. PARK
ACC .E-SS TO
BAKK DITCH EXIT
ENTER public Parkin* LOT
CONCEPT
2.
entry
27


ALTERNATIVES: SUMMARY
Step four In the design process offers alternative responses to the established goals and the conclusions of the analysis.
Two alternative designs are suggested. The characteristics common to both follow.
CHARACTERISTICS COMMON TO BOTH ALTERNATIVES
1. Auto access is eliminated along the cliff/ river walk.
2. Shelter area access is via a new culvert to be installed at the head of the outcrop.
3. General site improvements:
playground development
buffering unpleasant views
use of native materials
relate entry to depot park
provide space for casual field games
Auto access through these silver maples is eliminated. The path along the river and cliff is for pedestrian and bike use.

28
A new culvert is added across the ditch at the head of the outcrop, (arrow)
ALTERNATIVE TWO preservation"
best met the Meadow Park design goals.
2^
DESIGN MEADOW PARK FOR A PASSIVE ROLE IN THE LYONS RECREATION SYSTEM.
PRESERVE THE PARK ENVIRONMENT.
CONNECT THE COMMUNITY TO THE PARK AND ITS NATURAL SETTING.
MEET LYONS PRACTICAL RECREATION NEEDS.


The Final Design


FINAL DESIGN: FEATURES
The final design is the culmination of the design process. The most fitting design features are selected and included.
The design features meet the Meadow Park development goals and offer solutions to the park's problems.
final design features:
1. All railroad tracks are removed.
2. The entry identifies Meadow Park as a civic feature of Lyons, Colorado.
3. The parking lot accommodates more than 60 autos.
4. Former track space is reclaimed for recreation as a new picnic area.
5. Vehicles can use a new culvert to reach the shelter area, making a no vehicle nature walk preserve possible in the river/cliff area.
6. Suggestions for playground development offer opportunity for new and old community members to work together.
30


31


design solutions
GOAL: DESIGN MEADOW PARK FOR A PASSIVE ROLE IN THE PARK SYSTEM FOLLOWING THE RECOMMENDATION OFTHE LYONS VALLEY RECREATION RESOURCE STUDY.
DESIGN SOLUTION:
Train and auto use no longer will dominate the park area. The track area becomes a relaxed, natural picnic setting and the interior of the park has limited auto passage. The path at the river and cliffside is closed to cars.
Further play field development will be informal, emphasizing open field for play rather than major sport field development which will occur in other Lyons Recreational System parks to be developed ?n:the future.
passive role
32
environment preserved
GOAL: PRESERVE THE PARK ENVIRONMENT WITH DESIGN FOR
SUITABLE USE TO MAXIMIZE THE SITE'S RECREATIONAL POTENTIAL AND MINIMIZE STRESS ON THE PHYSICAL SETTING.
DESIGN SOLUTION:
The natural systems, especially vegetation and drainage,wi11 have a chance to regenerate when the railroad tracks and auto passage no longer dominate the site. The elimination of the auto from the cliff and river walk by introducing a new culvert crossing the irrigation ditch at the head of the outcrop to allow access to the shelter area.preserves a space with exceptional recreation value. Likewise, the area at the swimming nook will benefit from the removal of the culvert now allowing auto entry.
J


historic connection
GOAL: DEVELOP A CONNECTION LINKING THE GROWING
COMMUNITY TO ITS NATURAL AND HISTORIC ORIGINS, IDENTITY AND TRADITIONS.
DESIGN SOLUTION:
In a broad sense, the entire design's preservation of the natural setting, the red cliffs, rushing water and open valley, offers a connection to the town's physical origins and a sense of identity for a town losing its familiar landscape to the geometry of new development.
The design tangibly relates the park entry to the historic train depot, it repeats the use of redsandstone -B-, silver maples,-A-, and junipersTC-, found in the landscaping of the depot immediately accross the street from the Meadow Park entry.
Native materials, especially the Lyons sandstone help reinforce the identity of the town,
GOAL:MEET THE TOWN'S RECREATON NEEDS.
DESIGN SOLUTION:
The use of the Meadow Park site as a recreational asset is a primary goal. This design will serve as a document for background information and negotiation with Burlington-Northern in discussions about the future use of the site.
Park improvement suggested Ln this document could dramatically enhance the park as a civic feature.
The playground development suggested could be a wonderful catylst for social interaction between old and new citizens of Lyons.
The community's safety would be served in the elimination of auto -pedestrian conflict within the park site.
meet needs
j


FINAL DESIGN: FEATURES
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This structural barrier protectes the newly reclaimed
pic"'c T;. (.
PARKING LOT Oi>.4*.xl___

entry
ENTRY
. .............. .*.* ,
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The park's central area Ts currently aominated by the
The
train corridor. The removal of all tracks from the park will bring more land into an ecological balance. In the parking lot, more than 60 cars will find efficient parking. The entry clearly defines direction and solid pole barriers direct traffic and serve as a barrier to protect the new picnic area.
Beginning at the entry, this design establishes a relationship ,to the small landscaped area at the historic depot across Fifth Avenue. The entry design repeats the materials; red sandstone,si1ver maples, and junipers to link the two recreational resources, the depot and the park. The entry offers a location for signage to identify Meadow Park as a civic feature of the town of Lyons.
34


entry
Large wood letters bolted to the entry sign boldly identify Meadow Park. The sign is within the large sandstone traffic divider which features silver maples and junipers complimentino the denot landscape across Fifth Avenue.
A


FINAL DESIGN: FEATURES
new picnic area
The picnic area reclaims the old railroad track area for recreational use. The central location provides easy access to parking, the river cliff path, and the softball field.
Parking is convenient but it doesn't intrude on the picnic atmosphere. The sturdy barrier of poles of various heights blocks the view of automob?les.
36


FINAL DESIGN: FEATURES
A special attraction for the new picnic area: the kids' train. It's a playtime reminder of former railroad activity. Situated right over the former rail line, the plywood and foetal drum train is on 2 x Vtracks." The seats in the engine and cars provide a safe and fun make-believe journey back to old Lyons.
37


. FINAL DESIGN: FEATURES
Protected from auto use, the river walk becomes a nature trail and its mood reflects the park's passive role. Pedestrians and cyclists will use the relaxed path through an exceptional site for picnic, and relaxation.
nature walk
38


FINAL DESIGN: FEATURES
PRIVATE PROPERTY
SWIM
.* ''-JO".. J
* V.* ijf
The new culvert at the head of the outcrop allows access to the shelter area and permits the closing of the river/cliff path to vehicular use. The culvert providing entry to vehicles at the swimming hole nook has been removed to maximize recreational enjoyment of the swimming hole and create a safer environment.
new culvert
The shady stretch near the river, along the private property fence is a shady area, close to activity, yet free of pedestrian activity which would lend itself to development of a horshoe pit.
Some of the flatter areas formerly used for roadway will lend themself to volleyball. Net poles set in old tires could be stored nearby In an area fenced to keep the blue trash bin out of si^ht.
The playground offers exciting opportunities for major improvement.
39



FINAL DESIGN: FEATURES
playground
additions


5
see-ZZI saw1i

slide
J swing |<
1 4l
n
>
rra^
j Qi
KT
Meadow Park Playground Scale: about 1=20*


FINAL DESIGN: FEATURES
PLAYGROUND ADDITIONS
1 EQUIPMENT: OVERHEAD LADDER
PLACEMENT: Joined to the combination play structure USE: kids begin at post cluster, go hand over hand to play structure slide tower.
2 EQUIPMENT: KIDDIE SLIDE AND HIDING PLACE PLACEMENT: west end of big swing
USE: kids can climb up one end and go down slide, (sand pile would be handy at base)
Slide existing in disrepair at northwest of shelter could be used here.
Entry under slide to "hiding place" under platform.
3 EQUIPMENT: COMBINATION PLAY STRUCTURE, SLIDE
TOWER, RAMP, STAGE AND TIRE SWING
PLACEMENT: Big existing slide remains in place. Ladder is moved to back of play structure. Stage and swing are built on to slide tower. Overhead "ladder" connects to play structure at east side next to "old" slide ladder.
USE: Kids arrive via ramp, overhead ladder, or "old" slide ladder. It's great for group activity fun. The "stage," about 4' high and 9' long has an extension as a first floor of the slide tower.
Both slides have grips for support when getting on slide.
Post groupings are placed to direct kids' traffic patterns and give the playground a sense of unity by repeating materials throughout.


FINAL DESIGN: FEATURES
4 EQUIPMENT: TODDLER SWINGS
PLACEMENT: Attached to east side of the "big swing".
USE: Little kids can be safe and happy next to the exciting big swing. Climbing posts next to the swing set give toddlers an easy climb and visually connect this part of the play ground to the main structure.
5 EQUIPMENT: BALANCE BEAM
PLACEMENT: North of See-saw.
USE: Kids have fun developing coordination and it's a good place to wait for friends on the see-saw.
6 EQUIPMENT: SANDBOX enclosed by railroad ties
PLACEMENT: North of tree (the nearest one south of the merry-go-round)
Sandbox is under the tree to enjoy the shade and coolness for the sandbox set. Sandbox has one open side to direct toddlers away from road and busy merry-go-round. Posts enclose sandbox on three sides for safety and visual connection with the whole play area.
Paint all metal equipment parts forest green for a clean unified playground look and easy maintenance. Well maintained play equipment 1s less apt to be vandalized.
Basic repairs and a coat of forest green paint will relate the equipment near the storage house to the larger playground. It is a pleasant alternative play space.


FINAL DESIGN
design additions
PLANTINGS:
NATURE WALK AND ADJACENT PICNIC AREA
Occasional Redbuds or American Plum Trees would add spring color.
OUTCROP
The area at the southern foot of the area parallel and south of the outcrop could be naturalized extending the appearance of the rocky Ponderosa Pine vegetation.
SHELTER AREA
Shrubs or trees could work here to buffer the view of the long fence the opening into the private property and the trash container.
PARKING LOT
Plantings at the entry and behind the "post walls" which direct the parking lot circulation reinforce them as visual traffic indicators and soften the appearance of the heavy post barriers.
STRUCTURES
All new park structures relate to traffic control. A new culvert at the end of the outcropping.
POSTS AND CABLES
To enclose the parking area and bar entrance to the river/cliff passage south of the soft-ball field.
GROUPING OF LARGE POSTS
First, about 180' into the entrance, a post barrier directs traffic to jog right.
Then, about 450' in at the end of the lot, autos are directed to make the turn which reverses their direction and puts them on course to exit.
implementation
Implementation phases -
LONG TERM
1. Procurement of property from railroad.
2. Track removal.
3. Partial land reclamation.
IMMEDIATE
1. Close river south road.
2. Limit access west half of site (cable and post).
3. Remove culvert access to swimming hole.
4. Remove trash pile. Turn branches to wood chips
5. For a temporary entry use ditch headwall. Develop plantings at ditch headwall and replace sign to mark interim entry.
6. Replace "no dump" sign with less distracting notice.
COMMUNITY PROJECTS
1. Begin playground additions. Work through school contacts. Suggested first effort -sandbox.


/"Appendix
A MEADOW PARK INVENTORY INCLUDING:
46 Existing Facilities
47 Geology/Soils
48 Hazards
49 Hydrology
50 Microclimate
51 Ownership
52 Slope
53 Topography
54 Vegetation/Wildlife




GEOLOGY / SOILS
north
corlcM nleval ol <0 teel
LEGEND
A sandstone outcrop, Lyons Sandstone. Soil: Sixmile Stoney Loam; 20% outcrop, erosion.
Bed of river carried gravel. Soil: Niwot Series; surface of sandy clay loam to loam.


HAZARDS
WORTH- _____________
cortou rlefval ol 40 feel fnfT"L,
LEGEND
Auto / pedestrian conflict. High cliff.
Broken play equipment
Steep hillside and reported rattlesnakes
Possible water hazard for unattended toddlers.
48



HYDROLOGY carton rlerval d 40 feet 1 tl 2d o
LEGEND
INTERMEDIATE FLOOD LEVEL Average high water flood line. Used In matters of liability and legal 1ty.
mi
STANDARD FLOOD LEVEL
This is the maximum high water
flood anticipated.
IRRIGATION DITCH
Water rights belong to Lyons.
Drainageway to low land in Meadow Park.
49



' MICROCLIMATE NORTH ccrtou itefvat d 40 feel i
LEGEND
Open and unprotected from hot sun
Winter sun, summer shade.
Riverside area of cliffside. shady protection.
Sunny open


LEGEND
I I 11 Major land area of 7-5 acres
is owned by Burlington-Northern _____ and leased by the city of Lyons.
51


-
. SLOPE ccrfcv rterval ol 40 teel i JTj m "i,
LEGEND
Extreme slope or drop. Cliff.
**5 to 90 degree angle.
Definite hill. 10 to ^5
degree angle of slope.
%
Flat to the eye with some gentle slope. 0 to 10 degree angle.


LEGEND
1A0'
Hi
IUO'
Ml
ru&K
5600 elevation. High cliff wall faces park in southwest corner.
5^0 elevation. High point of sandstone outcrop in northeast portion of Meadow Park.
5360 elevation.
Low point in Meadow Park.
53


/--------------------------\

VEGETATION / WILDLIFE txrtour rterval c< 40 (eel i J72> in
LEGEND
Riparian, river vegetation.
German Brown Trout habitat.
Meadow Land, natural grasses, introduced Silver Maple, Ash.
Montane, mountainlike Ponderosa Pine Association. Small mammals.
Compacted, graveled. No vegetation.
Irrigated
54


^Bibliography
55
Alexander, Christopher, A Pattern Language. New York, Oxford University Press. 1977.
Boulder Comprehensive Plan. Boulder County Planning Department.
Chronic, John and Haika, Prairie, Peak and Plateau, Colorado Geological Survey, Bu11-ition 32. 1972
Colorado Department of Natural Resources,
Nature's Building Codes, Special Publication J 2-1979 -
De Chiara, J.,and Koppleman,L., Site Planning Standards, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York,
T97^
Department of Water Resource, State of Colorado, Hydrologic Investigation of St.
VraiiV Creek Drainage. Preliminary Report.
1979.
Department of Housing and Urban Development,
A Playground for Ai1 Children. United States Government Printing Office. T976
Lyons Master Plan. University of Coloradoe at Denver.
Nelson, Ruth Ashton, Handbook of Rocky Mountain PlarttS, Skyland Publishers, Estes Park. Colorado. 1969.
U.S, Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, Floodplain Information, Upper St. Vrain Creek. 1972. ~~
Whitaker, Ben, Browne, K., Parks are for People. New York:Schocken Books. 1973.