Citation
East Boulder community center

Material Information

Title:
East Boulder community center
Creator:
Kalotay, Peter P
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
approximately 150 pages : charts, maps, color photographs, folded plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Community centers -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Boulder ( lcsh )
Community centers ( fast )
Colorado -- Boulder ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Peter P. Kalotay.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
15695134 ( OCLC )
ocm15695134
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1986 .K34 ( lcc )

Full Text
ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING auraria library


Date Due







The Thesis of Peter P. Kalotay is approved.
Committee Chairman
Principle Professional Advisor
University of Colorado at Denver
December 19, 1986
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I


EAST BOULDER COMMUNITY CENTER
//
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and and Planning University of Colorado at Denver, in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Degree of Master of Architecture.
Peter P. Kalotay
/
Fall 1986


SUMMARY
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This Masters Thesis design examines a variety of design issues relating to the design of public facilities. The East Boulder Community Center will bring together a recreation center, a branch library, and a senior center facility in one complex of approximately 60,000 square feet.
The project would be located on the future site of the East Boulder Community Park south of Baseline Road and east of 55th Street in Boulder Colorado.


THESIS STATEMENT
1
Good architecture is instilled with meaning that speaks to the
culture which created it. The great cathedrals of Europe are an
ideal example of this. They are more than just a shelter for worshippers. They are landmarks for the surrounding community. They were the highest structures in town, serving as a constant reminder of the Church. *
The steeple and belfry would call the worshippers to prayer. The interior seemed to rise toward the heavens not only to glorify
God, but to put man in his place as a small and insignificant j
part of the universe. The stained glass windows provided warm
colorful light to the cool stone interior and illustrated scenes from the Bible to educate those who could not read or did not own a Bible.
These buildings clearly spoke to the people of that time and still speak to us. We consider them to be timeless works of architecture and preserve them as treasures.
All well designed buildings speak to their culture. They represent the aspirations and dreams of the society even if they are unrealistic or unattainable. The modern era has given designers greater freedom from the bounds of the strict styling rules of the past. Floorplan arrangements are no longer strictly governed by a requirement for facade symmetry just because it is the current trend for example. And yet, even with this greater freedom, our architecture seems to be more homogeneous and express less than that of the past. Hot dog stands do not have to be in the shape of giant hot dogs, but design must begin with a clear idea of what the building is to "say". The designer must develop a physical vocabulary for the architecture which is clearly understandable by the culture that will use it.
This language must state both the intrinsic characteristics of the function that the structure contains (ie. "I am a hospital.") as well as those characteristics which the designer wishes to express. (ie. "I am a place to get well.")


To the designer each emotion he wants to communicate, each sentence he wants the building to convey, is a design hypothesis. These hypothesis are a challenge and become the criteria which will shape the design and provide a way of judging its success.
The City of Boulder, Colorado has been examining the feasibility of combining three capital improvement projects, a recreation center, a branch library, and a senior citizens center annex into one complex on the 50+ acre future site for the East Boulder Community Park.
The motivation for such a merger is to reduce the duplication of spaces which could be shared by all three facilities, such as office space, conference rooms, circulation space, toilet rooms, and even mechanical equipment space. Locating the facilities on a single site would reduce the total amount of land required; reduce the total number of parking spaces required; and create-synergetic benefit by bringing people together to what could be come a community node.
The challenge of this masters thesis is two fold. First, a program must be designed which will maximize the efficiency of the shared multi-purpose facilities without over-programming them to the point that they serve no purpose well. Second, is to design a structure which will convey each of my design hypothesis.


The recreation center should clearly say;
"I am a recreation center, a place to have fun."
Although every observers opinion of what evokes the emotion of fun is likely to be somewhat different, design can create a sense of excitement which encourages people to "let go" and enjoy themselves. Spaces should have a dynamic quality and catch the eye. Color, light, volume, sculptural form and even sound can be used to create a fun environment.
Tabor Center Shops in downtown Denver is an excellent example of a fun environment. The colors, banners; the exposed steel framework; the visual connection to the street; views up and down all work to make this mall a success. This sense of fun should be expressed on the exterior of the structure also. Shapes, materials, and colors should all communicate interior functions.
Recreation centers in Europe and Canada are designed for families to spend a whole day at such a facility. Many are equipped with spa pools, wave machines, waterslides, and massage rooms.
Some of these public baths are housed in grand, monumental structures and lavishly decorated to make their visitors feel like kings.
I believe this sense of luxury is an appropriate design feature for a public facilities which is paid for by public taxes. Everything does not have to be covered with gold to convey this sense of luxury. Let the structure; layout of certain spaces; and use of materials heighten this sense of formality where it is desired. Careful selection and even the frugal use of costlier materials can eliminate the warehouse image of most recreation centers and give the public a facility which they can enjoy and take pride in.


I am also an arena of sport for competition and training.
There Is a the growing trend In the design of recreation centers to emphasize leisure, there Is still the need for such facilities to fulfill the role of an arena of sport. There will still be swim meets and volleyball tournaments which must be accommodated. There is a need to design a facility which will say "fun" while meeting the functional requirements for various sports. The facility should serve both the athlete and spectator.
Like the gymnasium at Yale University, which seems to glorify the endeavour of the human body with its grand cathedral gothic architecture, this facility should also glorify the athlete and the discipline required in competitive sport.
Some elements of the buildings design could be more whimsical while other areas should be more orderly and formal to glorify and encourage the athletes and their endeavors. The use of symmetry, linearity, or the repetition of elements are just some of the means which may help achieve this objective.


"I aa shelter for activities which at times could be better performed outdoors"
The building should evoke a strong sense of shelter in the winter. This sense of shelter from the outdoors must be both physical and psychological if people are to feel at ease and put on bathing suits to go swimming in the middle of winter. In the summer the same structure could feel restrictive so the design should have a less enclosing feeling This could be done either with physical alteration of the structure or design flexibility which would change the users psychological perceptions of the space and or the degree of enclosure. Movable walls, and roofs are costly and frequently a maintenance problem but the careful location of glazing, balconies, and/or solid elements of the structure will allow the facility to minimize itself. The careful selection of materials as well as the degree of access to the outside can convey a sense of continuity of the external environment to the interior of the structure.
Recreation center facilities are heavy energy users. There is a need not only to heat the pool water and provide hot showers but also to provide a variety of comfortable environments or temperature zones for each activity, year round. The desire for sunny interiors and grand views to the outdoors must be compromised with the potential problem of summer overheating and a higher cooling load. The structure must therefore be energy efficient and respond to both to the summer and winter climate of the area.


The branch library should clearly say;
"I am a public place, a place to explore and enjoy the world through books and other media"
A good library is not just a storehouse for books, but a meeting place for people and information The library must serve a variety of people, from the senior citizens who will perhaps make the reading area an extension of the senior center's lounge, to the children who come to the story-telling hour. The library therefore calls for a diversity of spaces and uses which may not function well side-by-side. The design must create appropriate physical and/or acoustical boundaries to maximize efficient use by all its patrons. This requirement must be balanced with the need for clarity in the layout of spaces to encourage self-sufficient use and exploration by young and old. Information should be easy to find and browsing should be encouraged.
To make the library a place which is enjoyable and encourages exploration it must be a comfortable place. Some patrons will come to do research while others come to relax or even sleep. Some want to be seen by others, and some will seek out a remote private corner. The design should reflect this need by creating a diversity of spaces, some open and public, some hidden and unique. The use of exposed structure, color coding, and variations in the volumes of spaces can create a diversity of spaces and cue the explorer to what is around the next corner.


The senior center annex should clearly say;
I am home away from home."
A senior center Is a one stop shopping facility for services for seniors. These services include counseling, legal aid assistance, and information on almost anything seniors may need. A second and equally important role of these centers is to provide a place to gather with other senior citizens for companionship and support.
A senior center should provide both recreational and intellectual opportunities for their members.
A center must be designed to recognize the diversity of needs of various generations of seniors. Some are brought to the center every weekday instead of placing them into a nursing home. For them a center is a daycare facility. At Boulder's main senior center this group is somewhat resented by more able-bodied seniors and are therefore are removed from some areas of the senior center. The design must address this problem by providing both shared and separated areas for the various groups.
Our homes have living rooms for the family to gather together and bedrooms for individual privacy The senior center must also provide a similar gradient of public and private spaces which will allow the users to control their level of participation with others in the larger group. The interior should be flexible and adaptable to the various needs given the diverse and extensive activity programs which take place. Furnishings should be sturdy but movable to give an added degree of control over the environment.
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The senior center should be like a home. Home is the place we know well and feel most secure in. The senior center should reflect these qualities of home. It should have a non-institutional appearance, like home . Spaces should be laid out clearly to instill
confidence in the members and encourage them to make use of all the facilities. There must be no physical hazards which could reduce freedom of movement. Changes in materials, colors, or
direction could all be work as cues to ones location or destination
as well as making a more interesting diverse environment.
Like a home the senior center should be comfortable. The design should use materials, equipment, and decor that is residential in character wherever possible. A bright, even level of illumination is important for the elderly to be able to use the center safely and with confidence. Daylighting should be used to reduce the facilities overall energy requirements for lighting and the resulting cooling load and to create a more cheerful environment.


"I am a recreation center, a senior center, and a branch library, three leisure functions interwoven in one community
center."
The motivation for the City of Boulder to have the three facilities together is primarily economic. Senior center spaces, for example are seldom used in the evenings or weekends. At those times meeting rooms or multi-purpose spaces would be available for use by the staff or patrons of the library and recreation center or the surrounding community.
The community will have three facilities conveniently located together. The East Boulder Community Park and Community Center will have something to offer every member of the family, be it ice skating, leisurely reading or dance classes. The facility can become a public node, a gathering place for the community, like the public square or plaza in front of city hall in many small towns throughout America. The design of the exterior of the structure and the site can reinforce this image of community square in the way that the building relates to the site and forms outdoor spaces.The vocabulary of civic architecture, with elements such as colonnades, fountains, and clock towers can be utilized to reinforce the image of community node. Although the facility will be used by visitors coming by automobile it should provide pedestrian amenities to the local community.


The building should express each of the functions contained within it on its exterior but must also have some common threads to unify the elements into one complex. Materials, colors, a common form used throughout, or landscaping are just some of the potential unifying elements which can be considered.
The interior spaces must also serve the community. Spaces which can be shared by all three facilities or fulfill community functions should act as the physical link in the complex. The design of area adjacencies can be based on the need for such a central common space. The design of access and circulation boundaries should then provide a way of joining the spaces. For example, duri the day a multi-purpose room may be the exclusive territory of the senior center. In the evening by simply closing off one
corridor and opening another the same area can become a public meeting room that is accessible from the lobby while the senior center remains secure and undisturbed.


"I am architecture that is appropriate for its site a park, surrounded by a residential neighborhood."
The approximately 52 acres of future park land that is the site for the East Boulder Community Center will become a form of nature as interpreted and designed by man. The architecture of the Center should neither dominate or be dominated by its surroundings. The careful selection of materials and the ways they are combined can make an architecture that will fit well into the site. Smearing the boundaries between the exterior and interior and planning the views in and out can contribute to the success of this "fit".
The massing of large volume spaces, such as gymnasiums or the pool area must also be reduced or broken down to a scale that is appropriate in the typical single family residential neighborhood which will surround it.
It is obvious that there are many ideas I wish to experiment with many things I want this structure to "say". Some of these goals or hypothesis may be inappropriate or contradictory. Design is therefore the process of setting goals; finding the solutions to achieve them; and combining those solutions which will work together. Throughout this process one must constantly re-evaluate the original goals and their relative importance as a design parameter. Unlike the individual hypothesis or goals set at the beginning of the design process, the finished product must be a logical unified whole, only then will the building speak to and serve its users well.


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS/EXISTING FACILITIES
Numerous capital improvement projects are currently being considered by the City of Boulder. These include Police, Fire, Parks and Recreation, Library, and Human Services facilities.
The Parks and Recreation Master Plan (1980) for the City of Boulder sets a standard of 1.5 acres of community parkland per 1000 population. The East Boulder Community Park would serve approximately 21,000 residents in its one and a half mile service area. The Master Plan calls for the construction of recreation centers in community parks because of the complimentary recreational opportunities provided by the community park and the ease of access which should be present.
The Plan states that based on present use there should be one recreation center per 40,000 population. The population of Boulder has grown approximately 20% since the construction of existing facilities in North and South Boulder in the early 1970's. The use of these existing facilities currently exceed designed capacities by 50%, therefore an East Boulder Recreation Center is needed. Existing pools are scheduled 100% of the time with many requests for additional time. Existing gymnasiums are scheduled for structured activities 95% of the time only 5% of the time for open play. Requests for community meeting space cannot be accommodated at existing centers.
CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS


The motivation for the City of Boulder to have the three facilities together is primarily economic. Senior center spaces, for example are seldom used in the evenings or weekends. At those times meeting rooms or multi-purpose spaces would be available for use by the staff or patrons of the library and recreation center or the surrounding community.
The community will have three facilities conveniently located together. The East Boulder Community Park and Community Center will have something to offer every member of the family, be it ice skating, leisurely reading or dance classes. The facility can become a public node, a gathering place for the community, like the public square or plaza in front of city hall in many small towns throughout America. The design of the exterior of the structure and the site can reinforce this image of community square in the way that the building relates to the site and forms outdoor spaces.The vocabulary of civic architecture, with elements such as colonnades, fountains, and clock towers can be utilized to reinforce the image of community node. Although the facility will be used by visitors coming by automobile it should provide pedestrian amenities to the local community.


The use of the library system in Boulder has also grown significantly. Since 1980, children's circulation has increased 56%, adult circulation is up 63%, general reference questions are up 23%, volumes added to circulation are up 120% and media circulation is up 423%. Although doubling existing library space at the Main Library with construction of a 38,000 square foot addition, library services are far below the minimum standards of the American Library Association.
The East Branch Library as a part of the East Boulder Community Center would provide localized basic library services to the 21,000 residents in its service area. By distributing library services throughout the city, access by the public (especially children) is enhanced. Alternate forms of transportation would also be encouraged with resultant energy savings.
The existing Senior Center at 9th Street and Arapahoe Avenue in Boulder was built in 1979, but does not provide enough space for present program requirements or expected future community needs. Additional meeting space is needed for seniors' organized groups which have grown from 6 to 16 in number. Office space is needed to accommodate staff levels which have grown from 10 to 20 since the Center was built.
The dining room has a capacity of 72 people while the average daily attendance for lunch is about 130 people. Projections are that the 60+ population will grow 70% (from 10,000 to 17,000) by the year 2000. As our life expectancy increases additional services are needed to support wellness, health and fitness, and to allow the growing senior population to remain independent.


The design of the existing senior center does not allow major on site expansion. On April 21, 1986, the Division of Human Services proposed that only $250,000 be allotted for expansion and improvements to the existing facility. They also requested that the senior center be considered a high priority for future bond issues, preferably in the framework of a long-term, on-going capital improvements program. This will give the Senior Citizens Advisory Committee time to develop a masterplan for providing future senior services. Alternatives which may be considered include the construction of a new facility, with double the 14,000 square feet of the original Center to be built on a new site. Satellite facilities, similar to the branch library concept, are also being considered. The incorporation of an approximately 8000 square foot senior center facility into the East Boulder Community Center is also an alternative and will be used for the purposes of this project .
I believe that providing satellite facilities is preferable to having a single large facility. The existing facility is used on average by approximately 500 seniors each day. It seems to me that larger facilities would have so many daily visitors that the comfortable atmosphere at the existing Center would no longer flourish. Satellite facilities, while being redundant in the services they must provide, would form smaller social groups. These local facilities would be closer to seniors' homes thus reducing transportation costs and reinforcing the center's concept of being a home away from home.
Locating a senior center together with a recreation center and a branch library also provides seniors with greater opportunity to use these facilities. Senior centers programs for general and highly flexible space. There could be a substantial savings in the sharing of meeting rooms and other areas by all three facilities. Seniors, who often get shut out of our society, would have the opportunity to participate in many activities integrated with other generations if they so wished.


MASTER PLAN
The Master Plan developed for the East Boulder Community Park by Winston and Associates, Planning and Landscape Architecture, of Boulder, Colorado, will be used in this design project.
The Master Plan was developed with the intention of providing a site only for the recreation center. Since the Community Center also include a branch library and a senior center, changes in building layout; parking lot location and the number of spaces provided; and the location of the "Court Games Mall" may have to be reconsidered.
NOTES ON MASTER PLAN
All vehicular access to the Park should be from 55th Street. Recommend four, 11 foot wide lanes (1 for parking, one for traffic each way) separated by a 10 to 12 foot wide planted median centered on the northern boundary of the property.
(81'right of way) Access road and site design should discourage use of this road as a short-cut from Baseline Road to South Boulder Road. Also provide paved east/west pedestrian bike path through the north side of the property. Service roads should be a minimum of 12 feet wide.
Locate the structure out of floodway and above floodplain level, adjacent: to lake. Locate the structure as far east as possible to maximize views of the mountains to the west.
Court Games Mall: Hard surface area with 4 tennis courts, 6 racquetball, 1 platform tennis, 4 volleyball courts and a children's play area.


OMAHA PI ACE
CITY OF BOULDER PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMEN BOULDER. COLORADO ...
WINSTON ASSOCIATE
ASTER PLAN
CITY of PUPI.PER
SCALE tOO--O'


PARKS & RECREATION FACILITIES


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ZONING
The site for the East Boulder Community Park is presently zoned suburban residential and rural residential The Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan designates the area as Zone 2A, meaning that annexation into the city of Boulder is planned within the next three years.
When annexation is completed, the zoning would be changed to a Public Established Zone (PE). Although the site has been purchased by the City, it is not a legal building site at this time because it is outside of the six minute response time zone of the nearest fire station. Connection of 55th Street north and south of the park as well as improvements in emergency communications should reduce the response time to allowable limits. Eventual development of the site would probably occur through a Planned Unit Development (PUD) process.
Parking requirement for PE zone: 1:300
(This would probably not be sufficient for the program)
Maximum height of structure without review
by planning board: 35 feet
Maximum height of structure with review
and approval 55 feet
Street trees will be required every 40 feet


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SITE
LOCATION: South of Baseline Road East of 55th Street
AREA: 53.4 acres
ELEVATION RANGE: 5303.7 feet at the northeastern corner 5319.3 feet at southern corner.
PRESENT LAND USE: Agricultural. Irrigated and hayed twice each year. Cattle graze the site each autumn.
WETLAND AREAS: Wetlands are located primarily on the east side of the site. Law now requires the replacement of lost wetlands due to construction if over one acre in area. Such replacement may occur on another site. Total area 12.8 acre or 21% of site.
SOILS: Niwot Series (SCS 1975b). Pierre Shale formation below site.(USGS 1961) Somewhat poorly drained clay loam that is shallow over gravelly sand. Soils have moderate permeability. Expected bedrock depth 18-20 feet.
SOIL PROFILE: (typical) Depth (inches) Description 1-0 Organic 0-4 Oxidized 4-16 Gleyed 16-25 Gravel 25+ Water table (2/12/86)


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SITE ANALYSIS


VISITATION:
HYDROLOGY:
WILDLIFE:
GRAVEL:
Predominantly tall prairie grasses.
Six typical plant communities sedge-moss sedge rush
Prairie cordgrass Cattail
upland mesic grass
The eastern boundary of the site has some cottonwood trees along South Boulder Creek.
Typical water table height 3-4 feet below grade but with a possible seasonal high of 6-18 inches. (See well test results.)
Not designated as a critical wildlife habitat. The corridor along South Boulder Creek has been designated in the County Environmental Resource Plan. Three somewhat rare (at least for Boulder County) species have been found in the corridor, red-headed woodpecker bobolink johnny-darter
It is believed that there are valuable gravel deposits on the site which could be mined to create the recreational lake; provide income ($50,000 to $100,000) to the city; and reduce the site grading requ i red.


South Purcol
Figure 2
WETLANDS
Eaet Boulder Community Perk Site
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o 100 200 400 F
Wetlands Upland*
----- Ditch
Fence
THOHNE ECOLOGICAL INSTITUTE
WETLANDS


DITCHES:
LAKE:
ADJACENT DEVELOPMENT:
There are a number of irrigation ditches on or near the site;
Howard Ditch, east end of the site. Superphostical Ditch, through center of site. Dry Creek #2 Ditch, on the west property line. There is also a number of laterals associated with these ditches, one to Burbank Jr. High. (See DRAINAGE map)
Ditch companies would prefer that the ditches be left as they are, but would probably agree to relocating them into new concrete channels or underground pipe if:
engineered properly,
a maintenance easement is granted for ditches, and if city does maintenance of piping.
The purchase of three shares of Howard Ditch water rights would be needed to supply 24 acre feet of water to replenish evaporation from the planned 8 acre lake. Going to Water Court also seems to be necessary to force the sale to occur. Estimated total cost for water rights and court costs $150,000. Time in court: 2-3 years.
There is residential development (single family) west, northwest and south of the site. Zoning will allow future residential development along and to the northern property line. The Planning Department will encourage these new houses to face front or side yards toward the park access road along the northern property boundary. Property to the east is City Open Space Land.


HISTORY
The Park will be situated on land north west of the Coal Fields that was originally devoted to farming and ranching. The plains, prior to settlement, were the wintering grounds for the Southern Arapahoe and Cheyenne Indians in the late 1700's to mid 1800's.
William Hake owned the eastern section of the site He was born in 1833, and in 1896, founded the town of Superior. At the time, he was one of Boulder's leading citizens.
James B, Viele, Sr. owned the other half of the property (approx. 133 acres). Establishing his ranch in 1872, it was one of the first ranches in that part of the county (Sec 3, Twsp 1 S 70).
Source: Winston & Associates EBCC Background Information
The City of Boulder purchased the property for the development of a community park after voters approved the sale of bonds for the purchase in 1981.


LEGAL DESCRIPTION
A11 that portion of the West 1/2 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 3 and all that portion of the East 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 4, Township 1 South, Range 70 West of the 6th P.M., described as follows:
Commencing at the Southwest corner of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 4, thence North 00o10'19" East, 2376.80 feet along the West line of the East 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 4 to the Southernmost corner of the West line of that tract of land described by deed recorded in Book 866 at Page 192 of the Boulder County, Colorado Records and the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING;
Thence South 59025'4r East, 2004.70 feet along the Southwesterly line of said tract described in Book 866 at Page 192;
Thence South 0004'55" East, 17.01 feet to the true point of beginning of that existing fenceline described by deed recorded on Film 1254 as Reception No. 551501 of the said Boulder County Colorado Records;
Thence North 7212l46" East, 852.68 feet along said existing fenceline described as Reception No. 551501;
Thence North 0112,16" East, 1065.03 feet along said existing fenceline described as Reception No. 551501 to a point on the North line of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 3;
Thence South 8918'30 West, 1232.11 feet to the East 1/4 corner of said Section 4;
Thence South 8941,39" West, 869.99 feet along the North line of the East 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 4 to a point on the North line of said tract described in Book 866 at Page 192;
Thence South 8845'19" West, 457.69 feet along the North line of said tract described in Book 866 at Page 192 to the Northwest corner of said tract described in Book 866 at Page 192;
Thence South 0010'19" West, 259.17 feet along the West line of said tract described in Book 866 at Page 192 to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING.




EAST BOULDER COMMUNITY PARK
TEST 2/85 3/85 4/85 5/85 6/85 7/85 8/85 9/85 10/85 11/85 12/85
1 2.33 3.81 2.84 2.60 3.50 3.91 4.00 3.00 3.92 3.33
2 2.41 3.09 1.59 1.09 2.25 2.93 1.59 1.67 3.42 2.75
3 2.41 4.92 3.59 2.34 3.50 4.50 4.16 0.09 4.66 3.58
4 2.25 1.51 AG AG 1.00 1.34 0.33 AG - AG
5 3.00 2.67 0.42 0.50 1.51 2.67 0.42 0.17 - 2.08
6 1.16 2.00 AG AG 0.50 1.84 AG 0.17 - -
7 4.41 3.68 pipe out - - -
Water readings indicate distance from finished grade to top of water in pipe. See attached map for test hole locations. See "D" in elevation.
WATER TABLE


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DRAINAGE
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FLOOD CONTROL
The Community Center may not be located in the "flood way".
Parking lots may be located in the flood way.
Construction may occur in the "flood plain" where waters will be less than two feet of depth, provided the first floor elevation will be two feet above the 100 year flood level and a qualified engineer certifies that the portions of the structure below this level are capable of withstanding the force of such a flood.
The floodplain is any area area where;
waters are less than 24 inches deep
the channel velocity is less than 2 feet per second
no obstruction will raise the floodplain by more than 6 inches
otherwise the area is a part of the floodway.
Boulder Flood Control Office recommends there be no construction in the flood plain.
See Title 9 Land Use Regulation, Boulder Revised Code.


TOPOGRAPHY/FLOODPLAIN


SOILS DATA December 1986
David Nasiatka
Charles Bowman and Associates Consulting Geotechnical Engineers
As of December 1986, a final detailed soils report has not been prepared for the East Boulder Community Park site. Available information should not be used for final foundation design.
Due to high ground water on the site soils engineers recommend crawl space construction combined with drainage systems below, instead of slab on grade wherever possible.
Structural fill to elevate the floor levels a minimum 24" above the 100 year flood plain should be fully compacted. A one foot penetration into virgin ground and below the frostline is
recommended.
The site has sandy and gravelly soils below the organic top layers. There is no expansive soils therefore spread footing foundations are advisable. Maximum soil bearing pressure is approximately 1500-2000 psf.
Bedrock can be expected at 18-20 feet below the grade. Caisson foundations can be used if necessary. End bearing pressure can go up to 20,000 psf. Friction bearing value is 10% of the end bearing. Drilled piers should penetrate bedrock from 6 to 10 feet to avoid silt pockets.


UTILITIES
WATER
Willi Duchow of Boulder Public Works outlined water information for the site as follows:
Zone 2 Node 2089 Elevation 5295 (print out)
Hydraulic Grade Line Elevation
1. 1983 A.D. 5605.9 134.8 p.s.i.
2. 1983 Maximum Hour 5490.2 84.6 p. s. i . (Low)
3. 1983 Maximum Day 5565.6 117.4 p.s.i .
4 . 1997 Replenish 5609.7 136.4 p. s. i . (High)
I
I
Pressure will fluctuate between high and low pressures shown above. Future plans call for the continuation of the line at the ends of 55th Street north and south of the park site. At that time higher pressures can be expected.
Service to the community center would tap into this 8" line.
SEWER
A 30" sewer line runs along the eastern border of the site.
ELECTRICITY, NATURAL GAS, TELEPHONE
These services are available in the area but their routing has not been determined yet pending a final decision on the routing of 55th Street.


WATER


SEWER




VAlMONT ;RO.L'
..... ON STREET EXISTING
m. OFF STREET EXISTING mm ON STREET PROPOSED ....... OFF STREET PROPOSED
\
BIKEWAYS


VALMONT ROAP
-*---l-
/ / '
0
5
10
5 MINUTE FREQUENCY 10 MINUTE FREOUENCY 15 MINUTE FREOUENCY
PRIMARY TRANSIT ROUTES, YEAR 2000


iiiiiinniii
AR A PAH Of ROAD
MUNICIPAL
gol r
COURSE
FIGURE 9
HI
lilllll
EXPRESSWAY
PARKWAY
PRINCIPAL ARTERIAL MINOR ARTERIAL MAJOR COLLECTOR
I






Boulder is located on the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains nestled tightly against steep foothills. The climate is characterized by light precipitation,surprisingly mild temperatures, and light winds punctuated by occasional very strong Chinook winds.
The average monthly temperature varies from 33 degrees F in January to 74 degrees in July. Average winter temperatures are relatively warm due to occurrences of warm chinook winds. Boulder averages more than 80 inches of snow annually, but prolonged snowcover is unusual. March is by far the snowiest month. The average annual precipitation is about 18 inches. Light afternoon thunder- showers occur frequently throughout the summer, but May is the wettest month. (Colorado Climate Center 1982)
Warm, dry winds from the south and southeast are prevalent in the summer in the Denver/Boulder area. The wind "roses"in this section show the percentage of occurrences of four wind speed ranges. 0-7 mph, 8-12 mph, 13-24 mph, and over 24 mph. The thickness of the band indicates the percentage of occurrence for the month. The scale is 1/4 inch equals 1%. The number on the perimeter of the rose are the average wind speed from that direction
for that month.
The strongest average velocities and highest percentage of winds over 24 miles per hour come mainly from the west to northeast from November through March. Strong winds out of the west funnelled by the mountain valleys west of Boulder have resulted in damaging winds of over 100 mph velocity. These winds, which descend
rapidly from the higher elevations can raise the air temperature 25 to 35 degree F within a short period of time, thus moderating the average temperatures.
Portions from Olson, 1983.
ATE


DESIGN IMPLICATIONS
The typically low relative humidity in this region provides a high temperature swing between day and night Insulated interior mass as a part of the passive solar design of the facility would help temper the affect of these fluctuations.
The high percentage of clear days make active and/or passive solar heating of space and water possible and should be incorporated into the design. Such strategies would reduce the high energy costs associated with recreation centers.
The structure should be oriented primarily along the east-west axis, with openings to the south to take advantage of the sun and breezes out of the south in the summer. At the same time the building must be provided with summer shading to reduce undesirable heat gains. Low emissivity double glazing systems should be considered to control heat loss and gain.
Sundecks and patios should be provided with some protection from the west winds with the use of walls,landscaping,etc.
Winter storms flow primarily from the north to northeast. Entrances which must be located on the north elevation must be protected from the cold winds and possible drifting snow.


TEMPERATURE
LU
I-
<
BOULDER, COLORADO
ELEV. 5360 LAT. 40 1, LON. 10515
70
50
30
81.6 ann. snow
18.1 ann. precip.
I
M
M
N
D
REL. HUMIDITY %


DEGREE DAYS 165F base)
2200
2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
5540 ann. heat
842 ann. cool
J
F M A M J
J A S
0 N D
SOLAR RADIATION
hemispheric [btu/s.f./dayl


AUVflNVr
rv. o\
CLIMATE/WIND
b OI O Zl


<=\o
OCTOBER
JULY


altitude angles


CODES
Applicable Building Code: Uniform Building Code 1982
The City of Boulder currently uses the 1979 Uniform Building Code but is in the process of adopting the 1982 edition. The design of this project will be based on the 1982 edition.
The Life Safety Code, 1976, can take precedence over the UBC in Boulder. This code has been checked for consistency with the UBC requirements.
Fire Zone Designation: (throughout Boulder) Zone 1
OCCUPANCY
Table 5A
Recreation Center/Gymnasium
Senior Center
Library
A-2.1, A-2 with stage
A-3
A-3
OCCUPANCY SEPARATION FOR MIXED OCCUPANCY BUILDINGS none required
Table 5B
CONSTRUCTION TYPE & ALLOWABLE AREA
Table 5C
Type I : unlimited
Type II Fire Resistant for A-2.1
for A-3
29.900 s.f.
29.900 s.f.
CODES


AREA FOR BUILDINGS OVER 1 STORY
505b
twice the areas shown in Table 5C, any single story not exceed the area permitted for 1 story building
AREA SEPARATION WALL 505e
Separated portion shall be considered a separate building if wall is a min. 4 hour fire resistive rating for Type I, II F.R. Openings shall not exceed 25% of wall length and min. 3/4 hour construction. Parapit min. 30" above roof.
ALLOWABLE AREA INCREASES 506(3)
Separation on all sides, 5% increase for each foot of separation over the min. width of 20 feet. Max. increase 100%
AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER SYSTEM 506(c)
areas in Table 5C may be tripled for single story doubled for more than one story if sprinkled throughout .
Section 10-5 of the Boulder Revised Code allows a one hour reduction in the fire ratings of various construction elements if the structure is fully sprinkled.
The Community Center can therefore be constructed in Boulder with Type II noncombustible construction with no fire rating if it is fully sprinkled and the three facilities are separated by a one hour automatic fire door.
See 511


LIGHT, VENTILATION, SANITATION
Type A 605
Provide natural light through exterior glazing min. 10% of floor area, natural ventilation by operable exterior openings min. 5% of total floor area or artificial light and mechanical ventilation system with min. 5 cu.ft. of outside air and min. 15 cu.ft. per minute total air movement per occupant. Min. register velocity 10 ft./sec. Register min. 8 ft. above floor.
U.S. Health Department regulations require that pool water shall be potable.
Toilet room must have min. 3 s.f. window or 100 square inch vertical duct or mechanical exhaust system. Min 4 air changes per hour.
One lavatory for each 2 water closets. Min. 1 drinking fountain on each floor.
WATER CLOSET STALLS
Water closet space minimum 30 inches wide.
Clear space in front of toilet min. 24 inches.
HANDICAPPED STALLS
Minimum doorway width, 32 inches at end, 34 inches at side. Minimum 42" by 48" clear space in front of toilet.


FIRE RESISTIVE PROTECTION IN HOURS Table 17A
Ext. Bearing Wall Type I 4 Type II 4
Int. Bearing Wall 3 2
Ext. Non-bearing Wall 4 4
Structural Frame 3 2
Permanent Partitions 1 1
Shaft enclosure 2 2
Roofs 2 1
TYPE I FIRE RESISTIVE BUILDINGS Chapter 18
Openings shall be min. 3/4 hr. construction 1803(b)
where less than 20 feet from an adjacent property line, street centerline, or public space.
No openings allowed if less than 5 feet from property line
Firestops or non-combustible material must be used 1804
for laying wood flooring on wood sleepers. Except for gymnasium with floor at or below grade level.
Stairs and stair platforms shall be of non- 1804
combustible material.


Where roof structural steel framework is between 18-25 feet above floor, roof construction shall be protected by min. 1 hr. ceiling.( Exception for sprinkler ?)
When roof structure is over 25 feet high, no fire protection for framework is required.
For Heavy Timber, see 2106
Fire Protection Systems, see Chapter 38
For Type II construction non-bearing walls fronting on streets or yards having a with of at least 40 feet may be unprotected non-combustible construction.
1806
1903


OCCUPANCY LOAD FACTOR
Table 33A
Min. 2 exits if
occupancy over: square ft./occupant
Bleachers * - 3 s f. or
less
Conference
Lounge
Gymnasium 50 15
Library Reading Room 50 50
Locker Room 30 50
Mechanical Equipment Room 30 300
Classroom 50 20
Lobby for Assembly Area 50 7
Swimming Pool 50 50
Pool Deck - 15
Vocational Room 50 50
* for Bleachers see 3323
Stages and Platforms, see Chapter 39


EXIT WIDTH
Total occupancy divided by 50, In feet Min. exit corridor width: 44 inches
Min. door width: 36 inches
EXIT DISTANCE
Max. exit distance: 150 feet
Distance may increase to 200 feet if sprinkled. Distance may increase 100 feet if last 150 feet is within corridor complying with 3305.
ARRANGEMENT OF EXITS
see 3303(c)
EXIT THROUGH ADJOINING ROOMS
Rooms may have one exit through an adjoining or intervening room which provides a direct and obvious, unobstructed means to travel to an exit corridor, exit enclosure, or until egress provided the allowable total exit distance is not exceeded.
3303(b)
3305(b)
3304(e)
3303(d)
3303(e)


STAIRWAYS, RAMPS, ETC.
MINIMUM STAIR WIDTH:
for occupancy >49
MAXIMUM RISER MINIMUM TREAD
STAIRWAY LANDINGS
Min, Max. width: length required for straight run:
Max. vertical distance between landings:
HANDRAILS
Min. height:
GUARDRAILS
Min, . height:
RAMPS
Handicapped access ramp max. slope:
Handrail at least is over 1:15.
36 inches 3306(b)
44 inches
7.5 inches 3306(c)
10 inches
3306(g)
same as stair 4 feet
12 feet 3306(1)
3306(j)
30-34" above nosing 42 inches 1711
1:12
3307(c)
side if slope


UNIFORM AND CONCENTRATED LOADS
Assembly Area with movable seating: 100 psf
Exit Facilities: 100 psf
Library Reading Room 60 psf
Stack Room 125 psf
Office 50 psf
Bleachers 100 psf
Classroom 40 psf
Light Storage 125 psf
Special loads, see Table 23B Minimum roof live loads, see Table 23C
DESIGN WIND PRESSURE FOR SITE:
35 psf
Table 23A


FIRE LANE REQUIREMENTS
* Fire Marshall will require a 45 foot radius cul-de-sac or a 35 foot radius T-turn for a non-continious access road over 200 foot long.
* Buildings three stories or greater in height must be provided with ready access on legal, unobstructed fire lanes on at least two sides of the building from which rescue can be made.
* The location and configuration of all fire lanes shall be approved by the chief of the division of fire prevention.
* Fire lanes shall be at least 16 feet wide at building and no less than 12 feet wide at all other locations.
* The center of fire lanes at buildings shall be no more than 30 feet nor less than 20 feet from the building, and all such lanes shall have an unobstructed outside turning radius of no less than 22 feet.
* There shall be no overhead obstructions lower than 15 feet on fire lanes or side obstructions closer than 5 feet from the outer edges of fire lanes.
From Boulder Revised Code 10-8-2
FIRE ACCESS


UNIFORM PLUMBING CODE
MINIMUM PLUMBING FACILITIES
Type of Building or Occupancy' Water Closets (Fixtures per persons) Urinals" (Fixtures per males) Lavatories (Fixtures per persons) Bathtubs or Showers (Fixtures per persons) Drinking Fountains', (Fixtures per persons)
Office or Public Buildings Male Female 1:1-15 1:1-15 2:1635 2:1635 3:36-55 3:36-55 4:56-80 4:56-80 5:81-110 5:81-110 6:111-150 6:111-150 Over 150, add 1 fixture for each additional 40 persons Male Female 1:1-15 1:1-15 2:16-35 2:16-35 3:36-60 3:36-60 4:61-90 4:61-90 5:91-125 5:91-125 Over 125, add 1 fixture for each additional 45 persons 1 per 75"
Office or Public Buildings For employee use Male Female 1:1-15 1:1-15 2:16-35 2:16-35 3:36-55 3:36-55 Over 55, add 1 fixture for each additional 40 persons 1 per 50 Male Female 1 per 40 1 per 40
Restaurants, Pubs and Lounges" Male Female 1:1-50 1:1-50 2:51 150 2:51-150 3:151-300 4:151-300 Over 300, add 1 fixture for each additional 200 persons 1:1-150 Over 150. add 1 fixture for each additional 150 males Male Female 1:1-150 1:1-150 2:151-200 2:151-200 3:201-400 3:201-400 Over 400, add 1 fixture for each additional 400
persons


EAST BOULDER COMMUNITY CENTER
Shared Common Areas Center Offices
Snack bar/Restaurant Childcare Staff Lounge Toilet Room (all) Circulation
Recreation Center Entry (in circulation)
Reception/Staff Office
Lounge
Gameroom
Concess ion
Locker Room
Pool Area
Gymnasium
Auxiliary Gym
Racquetball Courts
Multi-purpose/Areobics
Meeting Room
Exercise Room
Pool Mechanical
Towel Laundry
Storage Rooms
Mech/Circulation
FINAL
* 1500
1800 sf 3000
500 800
* 1170
* 1120
in library
2300 + 7590
*
1050 sf 1440
* 690
500 -
200 70
1800 2500
12000 13100
9000 8200
(4000) -
3200 4220
1500 1292
1200 -
1200 864
400 493
80 in office
600 496
5156
36730
38521


Library
Entry (in circulation) *
Circulation Desk 200 sf 320
Staff Office 200 140
Workroom 800 800
Catalogue Area 150 400
Reference Area 500 400
Book Stacks 2000 1280
Reading Room 2400 1600 +
Periodicals Browsing - -
Informal Reading - 840
Children's Library 2000 1800
Multi-purpose Room 1200 -
Conference Room 260 in shared
Media Area 500 400
Janitor Closet 2nd floor expansion Circulation/storage Central lounge 80 2900 3490 1200
10290
15570


Senior Center
Entry/Reception (in circ .) * -
Quiet Lounge (in circ.) 700 sf
Noisy Lounge 1500 2356
Multi-purpose Room /etc. 3600 4732
Clubrooms/Classrooms 900 1000
Staff Offices 1200 1408
Counseling Offices 600 600
Craftsrooms/storage 1600 + 2330
Darkroom 300 255
Health Monitoring 400 in off!
Circulation/storage/dock 6490
10250 19171
Total 59570 58126
10% Circulation/Mech. 5957 15136
TOTAL 65527 sf 73262
(not including *)
FINAL 20% mech/circulation ("street")
As the Community Center is designed, individual rooms or areas may be eliminated or joined with another space as various functions are integrated.
* Area will vary based on final design.
An estimated 75% of the Centers total area should be located on the ground level for easy access.


Consider an ENTRY COURTYARD with;
Trees, planters Benches
Climbing rocks Fitness path trailhead Flags
Clocktower/sun dial Amphitheater Shaded outdoor space Ice rink rest area Fountain(s)
Art work Bike racks
NOTE: Orientation is critical to success of this area. Mitigate
northside negatives.
Site design must consider:
Service access routes.
Trash storage & disposal Drainage of run-off Snow removal/disposal Emergency vehicle access General lighting Signage
Landscaping/Micro-climate Grounds maintenance facilities Future expansion


CHECKLIST
SHARED
SPACE:
AREA:
ACTIVITIES:
EQUIPMENT/
FURNISHINGS:
NOTES:
ADJACENCIES:
Community Center Offices
Will vary depending on degree of integration of various facilities.
Centralized office for: Building custodian(s)
Building administrators Mail delivery/distrib.
Mail sorting area, slots for areas Desks, chairs, file cabinets Partition system
Individual department administrators must be in close proximity to their areas and staff, (probably retain separate offices)
Public area, preferably close to entrance.
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi -public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandlbility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ High
CLIMATE Normal
CONTROL Special


SHARED
SPACE: Snack Bar/Restaurant Space
AREA: Kitchen 300 s.f Dining 1500 s.f (Re-assess in design)
ACTIVITIES: Food preparation Sale of pre-packaged food/drink Dishwash or clean-up Eating in dining area Socializing
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Snack bar or salad bar counter, self serve Tables and chairs and or booths Commercial kitchen equipment Refrigerators etc.
NOTES: An informal restaurant, deli sandwich shop space could be leased to independent operator to provide food service for the entire community center. Most likely self-service. Encourage it. Make flexible Incorporate this with the linked or central lobbies of all three facilities. Kitchen design by leasers consultant. Consider food/supply delivery route. Make eating area cheerful, fun, consider link to outdoor eating space. Some separation from lobby circulation required. Food services are an important way of bringing seniors together. This area must substitute for senior center dining if not provided.
ADJACENCIES: Lobby, toilet rooms, delivery access. Multi-purpose space, visual connection to other areas or outdoors
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


SHARED
SPACE: Childcare (not full daycare!)
AREA: 500 s.f. (minimum)
ACTIVITIES: Care for facility users' children, infants, toddlers, Children play Diaper change Limited eating
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Childrens gym toys Chalk, tack boards Sleeping mats, Play pens Music system Refrigerator Low counter with sink Childrens scale furniture
NOTES: Make this area a colorful, bright space. Use easy to clean, low maintenance finishes Encourage discovery, fun Possible connection to children's library Possible extension to inclosed outdoor play area. Visual connection to other facilities desirable
ADJACENCIES: toilet room, entry lobby, outdoor space.
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibllity Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


SHARED
SPACE: Staff lounge
AREA: ? (Share with other facility staff)
ACTIVITY: Staff lounge/break Eating Small staff gatherings Possible changing clothes (rec. center staff)
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Possibly with locker/shower area Kitchenette w/ cabinets, refrigerator, sink, micro-wave oven. Dining table (seat 6-8 people) Chairs, sofas Coat closet
NOTES: Monitoring of pool area by lifeguard staff needed. Should be centrally located, possibly 2nd floor. Rec. Center typically has 10-12 volunteer swim staff plus exercise staff. Space should encourage mixing of departments.
ADJACENCIES: Staff toilet room ?, Link to staff work area
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible 0 Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr
SHARED Senior Ctr Library Community
SPACE: Toilet Rooms ZONE Public
Semi-public Restricted
AREA: Design according to occupancy requirements of Uniform Plumbing Code. (approx 300 s.f.) FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility
None
ACTIVITIES: SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Exhaust fan Floor drain VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
Handicapped stalls VIEW IN Desirable
Trash receptical/Hand dryer(s) Optional
Easy to clean .impervious materials None
but not sterile white ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate
NOTES: Access should be monitorable Special Flexible
No operable windows in library. Natural
Possibly shared with other facilities NOISE CONTROL Required
Other public toilet rooms may be required None
depending on occupancy and travel distance. VENTILATION/ High
Easy handicapped access vital, no heavy doors CLIMATE Noraal
CONTROL Special
ADJACENCIES: Centrally located, easy to find


RECREATION CENTER
SPACE: Entry
AREA: ? (shared with other facilities, min. 200 s.f. )
ACTIVITIES: Welcoming Remove heavy coats etc.
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS Telephones Information kiosk or board Handicapped operable doors
NOTES: Airlock entry needed if outside access. This is also queueing area for reception counter, consider circulation routes.
ADJACENCIES: Reception, lounge, toilet room
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright
Moderate
Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required a None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


RECREATION CENTER
SPACE:
AREA:
ACTIVITIES:
EQUIPMENT/
FURNISHINGS:
NOTES:
ADJACENCIES:
Reception Staff Office
Class registration office: 80 s. f.
Cash office (book-keeping) 100 s. f.
Director's office 120 s. f.
Asst. Director/employee work area/custodian's desk 500 s. f.
Reception counter 250 s.f.
Information/reception Cashier Locker/Towel distribution 1050 s. f .
Class registration Administration
Reception counter (storage below)
Cash register Lost & found bins Typewrlter/ID card Polaroid File cabinets
Computer terminal for registration (2) Coat closet
Directors office with window preferred, consider courtyard/2nd floor location.
Maximize monitoring capability to reduce number of staff required.
Centrally accessible short-term typing station required for staff.
Provide ample counter and storage space, information display space.
Operated by many volunteers & part-timers
Entry, lounge, locker room, toilets, towel laundry, connection to shared staff lounge.
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


RECREATION CENTER
SPACE: Lounge, Observation, Waiting Area
AREA: ? (can be shared by all three facilities)
ACTIVITIES: Parents waiting for children. Conversation, informal gathering. Observation/spectator area for pool, gym, or racquetball courts. Rest after exercise. Eating
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Comfortable sofas, chairs, & coffee tables Possible stair- step spectator seating Dining table? Plants Fireplace? Drinking Fountain
NOTES: Provide a variety of seating arrangements, some more private, some more public. Area should be comfortable, living roomlike. Consider link to other facilities, food service area. Area should be centrally located but not disturbed by Center circulation flow.
ADJACENCIES: Entry, concessions, reception, visual connection to activities and outdoors, Toilet rooms.
The final design led to several lounge spaces along the primary circulation street element of the Center.
CHECKLIST
USER o Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible
Natural
NOISE CONTROL 9 Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


RECREATION CENTER
SPACE: Game Room
AREA: maximum 500 s.f.
ACTIVITIES: Pinball Video games Billiards?
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Various games Billiard table (coin operated ?) Card table & seating ?
NOTES: Some acoustic separation required. Consider link to senior center.
ADJACENCIES: Concession area, reception
THIS AREA WAS DELETED FROM THE DESIGN. NOT A DESIRABLE ELEMENT NEXT TO THE OTHER PROGRAM FUNCTIONS.
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


RECREATION CENTER
SPACE: Concession Area
AREA: 200 s.f.
ACTIVITIES: Purchase of food and drink from machines.
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Food/drink machines Plumbing for machines ? Drinking fountain Dollar bill changer Wall outlets/electrical hook-up
NOTES: Share with other facilities.
ADJACENCIES: Lounge, game room, storage for non-perishable stock.
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


RECREATION CENTER
SPACE: Locker Rooms
AREA: 1800 s.f. (1000 s.f. men, 800 s.f. woman)
ACTIVITIES: Locker storage Shower & toilet room Drying area
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Lockers (approx. 12"x 12"x 36",keyless?) Bench seating (min. 4' clear circulation space) Toilets, urinals, lavatories, scale Hair dryers, towel & coat racks Floor drain strips Vandal proof shower heads, soap dispensers
NOTES: Busy area, efficient circulation vital. Attractive, inviting appearance important. Screen entrances for privacy. Use moisture resistant, easy to clean finishes. Separate wet and dry areas, and toilet areas. Provide one wet area toilet for pool users. Subdivide locker areas for some privacy. Vary color schemes in locker groups. Approximate room temperature 82-85 degrees Use slip resistant flooring/carpeting. Locate shower along circ. path to pool Use warm colors Handicapped accessibility vital
ADJACENCIES: Reception, pool, sauna
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required
None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


CHECKLIST
RECREATION CENTER SPACE:
AREA:
ACTIVITIES:
EQUIPMENT/
FURNISHINGS:
NOTES:
Pool Area 12,000 s.f.
Recreational swimming (82-85 degrees F) Lap/competitive swimming Swim classes Diving
Sauna, spa pool (100-105 degrees F) Therapy pool swim (92-97 degrees F) Lounging, sunbathing
Lifeguard chair (2)
Life safety, first aid equipment
Lane markers, bouys, kayaks?, & storage
Pool maintenance, covering equipment (hidden)
Deck furniture/built-in seating
Recreational slide, diving boards
Pool ladders, handicapped ramps
Spa pool, sauna
Min. 25 meter pool, 6 lane.
Make this a fun, festive environment See thesis statement.
Humidity, acoustical control required.
Ceiling height: 16-24 feet.
Pool area should be bright (glare free) and warm (82 degrees F)
Low HVAC velocity but high air change required, (consider air to air exchangers)
Consider moisture & condensation affects.
Pool should be centrally located, highly visible, link to lounge as possible spectator
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ High
CLIMATE Normal
CONTROL Special
area.


NOTES:
ADJACENCIES
Plants in pool and spa area do well, attractive. Long-life lighting system required, easy to change over pool.
Consider Kalwall and other daylighting techniques to reduce lighting load.
Pool mechanical, especially spa pumps should be located close to pools.
Pools should be out of water table if possible, wells to lower water table required during pool draining.
50 meter competitive pool option would require approximately 27,000 s.f.
Locker room, storage, pool mechanical room, outdoor sundeck, lounge. Visual connection to rec.center reception area.


CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr
RECREATION CENTER Senior Ctr Library Community
SPACE: Gymnasium ZONE Public Semi-public
Restricted
AREA: 9000 s.f. FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility
None
ACTIVITIES: Basketball (1 regulation, 2 Volleyball Ping-pong, indoor tennis small courts) SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
Aerobics, dancing Assemblies Spectator viewing VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Retractable backboards VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
Wall padding as needed Tennis & Volleyball nets & stands ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate
Exercise mats Spectator seating (link about 200 people. to lounge ?)for Special Flexible Natural
P/A .sound system Scoreboard NOISE CONTROL Required None
Dividing curtain ? Floating wood floor VENTILATION/ CLIMATE High Normal
CONTROL Special
NOTES: Min. ceiling height 24 feet.
Make this an attractive space, not a warehouse. Large volume, consider temperature stratification problem.
Approximate air temperature, 72 degrees Consider daylighting to reduce lighting load. Must be glare free, should not overheat. Exterior volume must be broken down.
ADJACENCIES: Locker room, equipment storage room,
Visual connection to reception area, lounge.


RECREATION CENTER
SPACE: Auxiliary Gymnasium (optional)
AREA: 4000 s.f.
ACTIVITIES: (same as primary gymnasium) Provide 2 small basketball courts Possible use as part-time gymnastics area.
NOTES: A second gymnasium would be very desirable due to the level of programming in the first. This gym would provide space for public basketball court space.
ADJACENCIES: Primary gymnasium, equipment storage
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandlbllity Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


CHECKLIST
RECREATION CENTER Racquetball Courts (4 § 800 s.f.) USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
SPACE: ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
AREA: 3200 s.f. FLEXIBILITY Expandlbility Versatility None
ACTIVITIES: Racquetball Handball Modified squash SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
Instruction/classes VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
EQUIPMENT/ VIEW IN Desirable
FURNISHINGS: Glass back wall for 1 court Glazed observation balcony for all courts Optional None
Wall, ceiling panel system P/A for teaching (wireless) ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate
Special Flexible Natural
NOTES: Light fixtures should be cost effective for frequent on/off cycling. NOISE CONTROL Required None
Visual connection to lounge or observation VENTILATION/ High
area for at least 1 court. Provide seating CLIMATE Normal
for teaching. Court size: 20' x 40' with 20' ceiling. CONTROL Special
ADJACENCIES:
Locker rooms, drinking fountain


RECREATION CENTER
SPACE: Multi-purpose Room/Aerobics Room
AREA: 1500 s.f.
ACTIVITIES: Smaller Aerobics classes Dance classes Fitness and Yoga
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Wood floor or resilient rubber Exercise mats Bench seating Dance bars & wall mirror Sound system (lockable) Piano?
NOTES: Should be a bright, comfortable space. Consider view out & connection to private outdoor space.
ADJACENCIES: Lockers, drinking fountain, equipment storage
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandlblllty Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr
RECREATION CENTER Senior Ctr Library Community
SPACE: Meeting room/Multi-purpose room ZONE Public
Semi-public Restricted
AREA: 1200 s.f. FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility
None
ACTIVITIES: Public meetings (max. 120 capacity) SUPERVISION Required
Classroom space (max. 50 capacity) Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: A/V capability Optional None
Sound system, PA. VIEW IN Desirable
Low platform stage (movable) Optional
Chairs & tables ? with storage None
Kitchenette (cooking classes possible) ILLUMINATION Bright 0 Moderate
NOTES: Consider as shared space with other facilities Special Flexible
may be eliminated if redundant. Natural
Consider use as non-intensive crafts room. NOISE CONTROL Required
None
ADJACENCIES: Central lobby, toilet room. VENTILATION/ CLIMATE High Normal
CONTROL Special
THIS ROOM WAS FOUND TO BE REDUNDANT GIVEN THE AVAILABILITY OF SENIOR CENTER MULTI-PURPOSE SPACES AND THE STAFF CONFERENCE ROOM AND THEREFORE ELIMINATED FROM THE DESIGN.


RECREATION CENTER
SPACE: Exercise Room (Weight Training Room)
AREA: 1200 s.f.
ACTIVITIES: Weight training with machines Weight training with free-weights Exercise on stationary bicycles Warm-up & stretching
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Weight machines, Nautilus Free-weights Exercise bikes Wall mirrors Rest benches Exercise mats Trainers desk or station Tack board
NOTES: Staff or trainer monitoring is required for safety and to prevent equipment theft. Provide natural light. Possible link to outdoor exercise area with privacy wall. Impact resistant durable finishes required. Acoustic buffering may be required. Consider concentrated loads of heavy equipment Try to provide interesting view for bike users, perhaps onto gym.
ADJACENCIES: Storage, reception area or trainer's office, locker room, drinking fountain.
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibl11ty Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright
Moderate
Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


CHECKLIST
RECREATION CENTER USER Recreation Ctr
Senior Ctr
SPACE: Pool Mechanical Room Library Community
ZONE Public
AREA: 400 s.f. ? Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility
ACTIVITIES: - Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required
EQUIPMENT/ Filtering systems (1 for each pool) Heating systems Pumps Moderate None
FURNISHINGS: VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
Ozone purifier Clorinator (separate room, outside access) VIEW IN Desirable Optional
None
NOTES: For diatomaceous earth filtration system ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate
filters must be below pool water level for gravity flow. Outside access for service desirable. Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required
ADJACENCIES: Pool area, outside access/service road None
VENTILATION/ High
CLIMATE * Normal
CONTROL Special


RECREATION CENTER
SPACE: Towel Laundry
AREA: 80 s.f.
ACTIVITIES: Washing & drying of rental towels Towel Storage
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHING: Sterilizing washer? Washers/Dryers (2 each) Folding Table Soiled Towel Bin Detergent storage Floor drain Exhaust fan
NOTES: Provide plumbing & electrical hook-up
ADJACENCIES: Staff/Reception area
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public
Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandlbl11ty Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional o None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright 0 Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL 0 Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High mNormal Special


RECREATION CENTER
SPACE: Storage Rooms (3 § 200 s.f.)
AREA: 600 s.f.
ACTIVITIES: Storage for exercise, sports equipment
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Minimum 4 foot wide door swing.
NOTES: Some gymnastics equipment storage if auxiliary gym is included. Make this room 10'x 20'. Provide double-doors.
ADJACENCIES: Gym, exercise room, multi-purpose room
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibllity Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


LIBRARY
SPACE:
AREA:
ACTIVITIES:
EQUIPMENT/
FURNISHINGS:
NOTES:
ADJACENCIES:
Entry
Introduction to the library space, Possible gallery functions
Slip resistant floor Coat rack ?
Pay phones
Air lock if access to outside Handicapped operable doors Anti-theft security system ?
Preferably one entry only. Must be visible from circulation desk. Additional entries alarm linked.
Design to function with security system. Building layout and circulation should be clearly comprehendable from this area.
Coat room; visual connection to circulation desk; automobile book drop, toilet rooms, phones.
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibillty Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


LIBRARY
SPACE: Circulation Desk Area
AREA: 200 s.f.
ACTIVITIES: Information Book check out & return Library administration/reception Central security
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Multi-height combination book counter and work desk Ample and varied space for equipment, under counter Space for shelving carts Quiet telephones
NOTES: Activity should not distract reading areas Should have maximum unobstructed visibility to and from this area Design should establish logical circulation flow and queue lines
ADJACENCIES: Librarian's office, sorting area or work room
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibi1ity Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


LIBRARY
SPACE: Staff office (for 6 full time equivalents)
AREA: 200 s.f. (Space for 3 desk work areas)
ACTIVITIES: Staff office work
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Desks & Chairs File cabinets Possibly office partition system Additional seating for visitors
NOTES: Office and Workroom could be together. Area should be flexible for growth or change. Visual monitoring of library desirable. Design should provide space for volunteer staff. Provide one workstation for 1 full-time custodian.
ADJACENCIES: Workroom, circulation desk
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibl11ty Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


LIBRARY
AREA: Workroom
SPACE: 800 s.f. (rec. 150 s.f./staff)
ACTIVITIES: Sorting of returned books Limited book repair/processing Periodical storage
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Book storage stacks Book cart storage Counter with sink Door(s) 4' with kickplate Lots of counter & table work/sorting space Package wrapping equipment/area Bulletin Board
NOTES: Provide 50 100 fc lighting. Monitoring of other areas from this room is desirable. Book drop bin into this area with Halon gas, fire extinguishing system.
ADJACENCIES: Staff office, toilet room, loading area?
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr oLibrary Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr
LIBRARY Senior Ctr Library
Community
SPACE: Catalogue area ZONE Public
Semi-public
AREA: 150 s.f. Restricted
t FLEXIBILITY Expandibi1ity Versatility
ACTIVITIES: Library material search None
SUPERVISION Required o Moderate
EQUIPMENT/ None
FURNISHINGS Stools and writing tables VIEW OUT Desirable
Computer terminal spaces for PAC system Optional
(2 min.) at standing height one for kids None
too VIEW IN Desirable Optional
None
NOTES: This area can be noisy, isolate from study ILLUMINATION Bright
areas. Moderate
Area should be easy to locate Special Flexible Natural


ADJACENCIES: Circulation desk NOISE CONTROL Required
None
VENTILATION/ High
CLIMATE Normal
t CONTROL Special
>


LIBRARY
SPACE: Reference Area
AREA: 500 s.f.
ACTIVITIES: Storage of frequently used reference materials Ie. phone books, encyclopedias, government publications, etc. Study and work area
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Book stacks and racks Individual study carrols and larger tables with chairs. Task lighting ?
NOTES: Area should be visible from circulation desk
ADJACENCIES: Reading area
CHECKLIST
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibility Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright * Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special


CHECKLIST
LIBRARY SPACE:
AREA:
ACTIVITIES:
EQUIPMENT/
FURNISHINGS:
NOTES:
Book Stacks
2000 s.f. (for 30-35,000 volumes, storage space for 2/3 of this & expansion space)
Book storage
31-0" typical shelf section modules (16" deep 42, 60, or 72 inches tall) (Assume 150 volumes/3 ft. section, 7 shelves high, or 10-15 books/s.f.)
Structural column spacing should coincide with 3 foot module.
Recommended aisle width 4'-6"
Design load 120 psf.
Provide maximum flexibility in shelf arrangement Avoid "seas of stacks"
Use large graphics to show call numbers Lighting should be shadow free, possibly bounced fluorescent 25-70 fc.
USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
FLEXIBILITY Expandibillty Versatility None
SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
VENTILATION/ High
CLIMATE Normal
CONTROL Special
ADJACENCIES:
Visual connection from circulation desk


CHECKLIST
LIBRARY Reading Room USER Recreation Ctr Senior Ctr Library Community
SPACE: ZONE Public Semi-public Restricted
AREA: 2400 s.f. total FLEXIBILITY Expandibllity Versatility None
ACTIVITIES: Informal study Reading People watching SUPERVISION Required Moderate None
EQUIPMENT/ FURNISHINGS: Sleeping VIEW OUT Desirable Optional None
Variety of furniture,comfortable chairs, sofas, coffee tables, Fireplace ? VIEW IN Desirable Optional None
ILLUMINATION Bright Moderate
NOTES: Make this area warm and comfortable, residential in character. Provide approx. 5 seats/1000 pop. served Special Flexible Natural
NOISE CONTROL Required None
(15 s.f./reader seated at table. 10 s.f. at chair) Glare free, natural light desirable here supplemented by full spectrum artificial light Possible individual task lighting Separation from children's area and circulation area is desirable. VENTILATION/ CLIMATE CONTROL High Normal Special

ADJACENCIES: Periodicals, some connection to stacks, toilet rooms,