Citation
Winter Park town center, phase III

Material Information

Title:
Winter Park town center, phase III a mixed-use development for Winter Park : Winter Park, Colorado
Creator:
Lee, Yng-Shing
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
89 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, charts, maps, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Central business districts -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Winter Park ( lcsh )
Shopping centers -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Winter Park ( lcsh )
Central business districts ( fast )
Shopping centers ( fast )
Colorado -- Winter Park ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 87-88).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Architecture and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Yng-Shing Lee.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
16733930 ( OCLC )
ocm16733930
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1986 .L43 ( lcc )

Full Text
WINTER PARK TOWN CENTER PHASE III
A MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT FOR WINTER PARK WINTER PARK, COLORADO
ARCHITECTURAL THESIS
PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF DESIGN & PLANNING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
IN PARTIAL FULLFILLMENT
OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE
BY YNG-SHING LEE MAY 1986


CONTENTS
PAGE
I. THESIS STATEMENT
II. HISTORY Background Downtown Revitalisation Study Community Activities
III. SOCIOLOGY
IV. ECONOMICS Economic. Analysis
V. SITE Site Location Vicinity Map Site Description Site Plan Contours Photogr aphs Transportati on Utilities Existing Facilities
VI. CLIMATE General Climatic Description Climatic Data Sunpath Diagram
VII. SOILS Foundation Considerations Location of Exp1aratory Soils Diagram Soi1s Legend
VIII.CODES AND ZONING Zoni ng Uni-form Building Code Colorado Handicapped Code Colorado Energy Code
IX. PROGRAM Introduction Spaces And Square Foot Allocations
XI. CONSULTANTS





THESIS STATEMENT




















THE LANGUAGE OF M3DERN 90CTETY IS BOIH SCIENCE AND RCMANCE, BOTH FACT AND BELIEF, AND TEAT THE TWO MUST BE WEDDED IN ONE STATEMENT. LOUIS SULLIVAN
PROJECT:
WTinter Park CenterA retail, restaurant and office in Down Town Winter Park, Colorado.
STATEMENT:
The Winter Park Ski Area is one of the nation's largest and best, but the lack of a cohesive, high quality downtown has prevented the area from developing the first class resort reputation of other Colorado mountain communities. The Town of Winter Park has adopted an aggressive downtown redevelopment plan which it is currently implementing through an Urban Renewal Authority. Winter Park Town Center is the cornerstone of this redevelopment which is planned to include a Holiday Inn, Hilton, numberous shopping facilities, parks, and an all events center.
The Winter Park Center is a bustling retail, restaurant, and office complex which composes the heart of Downtown Wniter Park, one of Colorado's fastest growing resort areas. The Center's innovative design will be incorporated brick, stained glass, banners, and courtyards to create a warm, friendly marketplace which is a feature attraction to the tourists visiting Winter Park.
As my thesis, the design of this mixed-use project for Winter Park provides me with the oportunity to cultiminate the architectural skills that I have developed up to this point. There are some major principals inherent in the nature of this project, which my thesis must respond to.
The following response to the environment will serve as a source for the contectural generators of design image:


SURROUNDINGS
A BUILDING SHOULD AFFEAR 10 GROW EASILY FROM IIS SHE AND BE SHAPED ID HARMMZE WTIH IIS SURROUNDINGS.
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
Mountain area has a beauty of its own and we should recongnize and accentuate this natural beauty, its quiet level. Hence, low proportions, gently sloping roofs, and quiet sky lines.
Architects must learn to understand humanity better so that they can create an environment that is more benefical to people, more rewarding more pleasant to experience.
SINCERE
BUILDINGS LIKE FEDFLE MET FIRST EE SINCERE, MUST EE TRUE AND THEN WTIHAL AS GRACIOUS AND LOVABLE AS MAY BE.
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
SPACE
In drama, the play is the thing; the stage, the scenery, and the lighing are important, but they serve a subordinate purpose. In architecture, space is the thing and architects must be careful to overemphasize elements that should be subordinate to space, such as structure, materials, light, or color.
SHARED SPACE
The concept of shared space is based on the human desire for a release from confinement. If more than one thing is happening in a space, if you can look out from one area and be conscious of other activities going on it gives you a sence of spiritual freedom.


MOVEMENT
Different architectural spaces create different emotional response. When people move through a building their journey should be orchestrated. Architects should articulate the journey into a sequence of spaces, ranging from tight enclosures to large volumes. They should understand how different special volumes relate to the individual, not only in a static but also in a dynamic way. There should also be places that produce a neutral emotional effect, that is places of transition, from outdoors to indoors or from one kind of space to another.
Space should allow to flow in such a way that you can see from one place to another.
ORDER
Order creats a sense of comfort and well-being. But the mind craves variety at the same time that it requires order. But too much order becomes something the mind abhors. What is need is an order strong enough to permit variety and informality without losing the integrity that creates a harmonious environment.
PROPORTION
Relations between notes in music, colors in painting and elements of space in architecture bring pleasure if they satisfy mans instinct of proportion.
SCALE
A large interior must be expressed as frankly as a small one, and a unit planned for crowd should have a different scale from one planned for an individual, so that the scale of architecture must allow for a certain flexibility.


ORNAMENT
Subordinated to order, proportion and scale are the problems detail and ornament. A detail expresses the richness and refinement of form, and in its maturity every movement in architecture should express these qualities by the use of detail.
DECORATION IS DANGEROUS UNLESS YOU UNDERSTAND IT THROUGHLY AND ARE SATISFIED THAT IT SCMEIHING GOOD IN THE SCHEME AS A
WHOLE,.....MERELY THAT TT "LOCKS RICH" IS NO JUSHFTCATECN
FOR THE USE CF ORNAMENT.
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
LIGHT
BOIH NATURE AND AKITFTCIAL LIGHT IS CNE CF THE IMPORTANT ELEMENTS IN THE DESIGN OF AND BUNDING. THE AMBIENT LIGHT IN A SPACE CAN CHANGE THE WHOLE PERSONALITY OF AN ENVIRONMENT, THE FLAY OF NATURAL LIGHT IS ALWAYS MOVING AND CHANGING BECAUSE OF THE WEATHER OR THE TIME OF DAY OR YEAR.
JOHN FORIMAN
WE HUNGER FOR FOEIRY NATURALLY AS WE DO FOR SUNLIGHT, FRESH AIR AND FRUITS, IF WE ARE NORMAL HLMAN BEINGS.
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
Use natural light to create warmth.
By use light to bring space to life, and it should reinforce the volume and awareness of space.
WATER
Water can be used in architecture to evoke memories of the natural environment: a brook, a fountain, a waterfall, or a lake. People respond to water. They put their hands into a sheet of water to see what will happen. It is one of the elements that can transform a building from a static object to a dynamic environment.


Finally, as a result of all these interactions, the building and it's site must achieve a composure, and the building is sensitive to its users and its surrounding environment. The user should enjoy the building and feel that it is there for them, the vacationer or skier.
There are benefits if the building functions properly. It will serve as a focal point in the relationship between the town and the ski area. It will be inviting as a circulation core and as an exciting place in its own right. If all of the above succeeds, it will be financially successful for developer and the retailers.


AMOiSIH II


BACKGROUND
Winter Park is located in Grand County, 67 miles from Denver in the north-central part of Colorado. The Winter Park ski area, opened for skiing in 1940, was adopted as a recreation area and a part of the Denver Mountain Parks System. The remainder of the ski area is located in the Arapahoe National Forest. The Mary Jane ski area, was opened in 1975. Vasquez is scheduled to open in the late 1980s.
In 1975, when the Winter Park Ski Area opened the Mary Jane expansion, Winter Park became one of the premier ski areas in the Rocky Mountains. This expansion was the initial step in the transformation of Winter Park from a primarily Denver weekend area to a full service destination resort. Today, Winter Park is one of the top four areas in terms of skier days in the State of Colorado and has a "pillow count" of over ten thousand. Upon the completion of the proposed Vasquez addition, Winter Park's capacity will increase 70% making it the largest ski area in North America.
Summer tourism has been historically dependant on Highway U.S. 40, the main access from Denver to Rocky Mountain National Park, which runs through downtown Winter Park. This route carries three to four million motorists every summer who have the potential to become customers of the business community. Additionally, an increasing number of destination tourists are enjoying high mountain summers of Winter Park which offer championship golf, hiking, fishing, and rafting in unsurpassed beauty.


DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION STUDY
In 1980, shortly after Winter Park became an incorporated town, The new Trustees intiated a "Downtown Revitalization Study" to ascertain the commercial needs of the Winter Park area and to what extent those needs were being satisfied. The Town Council appointed a Downtown Revitalization Committee comprised of local businessmen and commercial property owners to study the problem in conjunction with professional consulatants.
The Market Analysis portion of the Study revealed that indeed Winter Park was perceived by tourists as one of Colorado's premier ski areas in an exceptionally beautiful and conventient location. On the other hand, the Study indicated that the "leakage" of retail dollars was very severe. It revealed among other things*:
1. The tourist traffic in Winter Park could support up to 351,000 square feet of commercial space when in actuality only 161,000 square feet, were in existence.
2. Approximately 60% of the Winter Park skier days were by destination skiers.
3. The existing commercial developement in Winter Park was substandard and unattractive. Furthermore, the product and service selection were inadequate to support a quality resort area.
After careful review of the Marketing Study, the consulatants and committee designated an area in which to contruct the Winter Park Town Center(as Figure 1) This area was to consist of brick or masonry buildings, between two and five stories in height, inner-connected by pedestrian sidewalks which would provide a downtown mall environment along the scenic Vasquez Creek. Public improvements were to included a 500 car parking structure and transportation center; an all events center including a convention facility and ice rink; and additional paved roads, sidewalks, and landscaping.
* Etewntcwn Revitalization Plan/Winter Park Transportation plan, July 1981.


FIGURE 1
Wmtmf Par* Dr,* / Bridge RR Trails
Watar Sawar
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT PLAN
WINTER PARK COLORADO
CONSOLIDATED MARKET MG SERVICES INC. / RONALD A STRAKA FAIA


WINTER PARK TOWN CENTER
The Winter Park Revitalization Plan identified the need for and proposed the location of a Town Center(as Figure 2), a symbolic place where people can come to meet, to see, and to be seen.
The Town Center should be "everybody's turf." It should become the resident business center, and as such should include activities such as the post office, town hall, office space, and other supporting daily business and community activities.
It should become a tourist center as well where information, rest, food, and entertainment are clearly available.
It should become an 18- to 24-hour-a-day activity center which accommodates activities ranging from early morning breakfasts to shopping, concerts, outdoor exhibits, entertainment, and areas for casual relaxing.
This plan is designed to implement the Town Center by:
acquisition and development of a Town Center Plaza;
development of the Vasquez Creek Linear Park;
development of a joint-use parking structure(s) and allowance for developers to "buy in" to the structure;
zoning incentives which encourage mixed use and pedestrian-oriented development;
less restrictive parking requirements for mixed use and larger scale developments;
site-specific design guidelines which describe appropriate setbacks, bulk, use, view corridor, and pedestrian amenities;
. design and maintenance of the pedestrian circulation system.


COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES
A resort is only as strong as its people and Winter Park shines in this area. Long known as "Colorado's Friendliest Resort", Winter park residents have enthusiastically embraced the effort to create first class facilities and activities. Numberous community service organizations have formed over the past serval years.
Results of the various community groups include:
-The Winter Park Jazz Festival
-A "Downtown Festival Atmosphere" including flags, banners, flowers, and architectural lighting.
-A Council on Arts and Humanities which will sponsor a summer long artisans market as well as seminers and classes.
-A new Town Park constructed with donations and voluntary labor.
-A first class summer Rodeo series.
-A wood sculpture program designed to create a walking tour of larger than life figures.
-A professional quality community theater.


A901QI3Q3 III


THE WINTER PARK SKIER
The following is a summary of statistical data for the Winter Park Ski Area. Age:
The largest single group are those between 20 and 29 years of age,
42 percent. The 30 to 39 category is second with 22 percent. Those over 40 and those under 20 split the remaining percentage. Those under 12 years of age comprise less than 1 percent of the total ski population.
Sex:
According to the data males comprise nearly 65 percent of the skier population. However, this information was gathered at the ticked sales area where males are the traditional ticket buyers. When applying this dats caution must be used.
Education:
Over 50 percent of the skier population have at least a undergraduate education, with 21 percent having done post graduate work. Of the remaining 50 percent 26 percent have had some college.
Party size:
The following data describes the percentage of persons skiing in groups. This information should be useful in the apportionment of seating in res restaurant. *
IN-STATE OUT-OF-STATE
One 16.7 10.5
Two 26.7 22.0
Three 18.2 7.2
Four 16.7 16.1
Fiye 8.5 10.5
Six 3.6 7.2
Seven+ 5.7 14.2
* Base Facilities for Winter Park, By ROBERT E, LESNICK, 1982.


TOTAL VISITORS
Tourism activity has geen forecast in "visitor days" (1 visitor for 1 day). These types of visitors have been projected:
-downhill overnignt skiers
-Colorado "day" skiers
-"local" skiers
-winter, non-skier visitors
-cross -country overnight visitors
-spring, summr, and fall overnight visitors
Each type of visitor has been estimated separately because each has
a different expenditure profile. Total downhill skiers for Winter
Park have been estimated and are displayed in the table that follows.
ESTIMATED SKIER DAYS BY TENURE: 1981-82 TO 1989-90
Winter Park and Ski Idlewild
Ski Season C1 .Total Skier aavs Overnight Day Local/Passes
1981-82 780,471* 63.0% 29.5% 7.5%
1982-83 775,889* * 64.0% 29.5% 6.5 %
1983-84 860,469 65.0% 28.0% 7.0%
1984-85 895,067 66.0% 26.8% 7.2%
1985-86 931,060 67.0% 25.5% 7.5%
1986-87 958,892 68.0% 24.5% 7.5%
1987-88 987,558 69.0% 23.5% 7.5%
1988-89 1,007,413 70.0% 22.5% 7.5%
1989-90 1,027,668 71.0% 21.5% 7.5%
SOURCE: Vasquez Environmental Assessment, WPRA *Actual.
^^Significant volume of canplimentary passes.


IV. ECONOMICS


ECONOMIC BASE
The economic base of the Winter Park is summarized by describing current and projected estimates for these economic variables:
-population
-employment
-retail sales
-skier and other overnight visitors POPULATION AND EMPLOYMENT.
The Town of Winter Park contains approximately 500 permanent residents; it is situated within East GRand County which also includes the communities of Fraser, Tabernash, Granby, and portions of unincorporated Grand County.
The population in 1983 for East Grand County is estimated at 6,625 perma-e nent residents.
To understand the growth potential of East Grand County, a simplified economic base model was developed as part of the Vasquez Environmental Assessment. This economic base model projects total employment, given projections for each "basic" sector that functions within the economy.
Other variables, such as population and households, are then estimated using these total employment projections.
The results of this model are summarized below. The following major assumptions were used to develop the model*:
1. Employment and tourism continues to grow proportionally with projections of total visitors within the area.
2. Employment and tourism-related construction follows the same trend.


3. Agricultural, mining, and federal government employment grow very modestly.
A. Given Historic trends within the County, a basic-to total employment multiplier of 1.6 was estimated for 1982; the employment multiplier continues to increase slowly as the economy diversifies.
5. The employment to population ratio applied in the analysis for 1982 is estimated at 0.59; this estimate decreases slowly to 0.55, which is comparable to mature resort economies.
6. Average number of persons per household is estimated at 2.51 in 1982 and is forecast to decrease slowly to 2.3.
Given these assumptions, total employment, total population, and total houdeholds for 1980 through 1990 are presented in the table below and are described more completely in the ?asquez Environmental Assessment.
EMPLOYMENT, RESIDENT POPULATION, AND RESIDENT HOUSEHOLDS:
EAST GRAND COUNTY 1980 1990
Year Total Employment Total Resident Population Total Resident Households
1980 3,154 5,345 2,130
1981 3,349 5,676 2,271
1982 3,557 6,029 2,421
1983 3,842 6,625 2,671
1984 4,152 7,158 2,898
1985 4,449 7,671 3,118
1986 4,721 8,282 3,380
1987 4,962 8,705 3,568
1988 5.216 9,151 3,766
1989 5,465 9,758 4,032
1990 5,725 10,224 4,242
SOURCE: Vasquez Environmental Assessment,
Winter Park Recreational Association
^Winter Park Development Authority Down Town Plan, 1985


RETAIL SALES
Total retail sales for Winter Park has increased at an average annual rate of 13 percent over the last 4 years; during this same interval, the state of Colorado retail sales increased at an average annual rate of 12 percent per year, as described in the table below.
RETAIL SALES IN WINTER PARK, GRAND COUNTY AND STATE OF COLORADO
(millions of dollars)
Year -Town 8£ntfi?ter Park" $ % Change -Grand County- $ miL -State of $ Coloradi -Annual %Change
1979 $15.4 $68.7 11% $21.3
1980 $18.5 20% $76.4 11% $27.5 29%
1981 $20.4 11% $82.2 8% $31.2 13%
1982 $22.5 10% $87.0 6% $32.2 3%
1983 $25.4 13% $98.0 13% 34.1 6%
Avg. Anl Change 13%
SOURCE: Colorado Department of Revenue
Retail sales in the Town of Winter Park are dominated by tourist activity; 80 percent of total retail sales are within four tourist-oriented classifications, as described below.
PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF REAIL SALES: WINTER PARK AND STATE OF COLORADO (1982 distribution)
Eating and Drinking Miscellaneous Retail Lodging
Finance, Insurance and Real Estate
Town of State of
Winter Park Colorado
24% 6%
28% 10%
16% 2%
16% 1%
All Other
15%
81%


SKIER EXPENDITURES
Skiers in Colorado spend an average of $80 per day, excluding travel to the ski site(as displayed in the table that follows). If this average had been applied to the total skier visits at Witner Park/Mary Jane and Ski Idlewild in the 1981-82 ski season, then the Winter Park area should have experienced retail sales of approximately $62.4 million during the sli season alone.
SKIER VISITS RETAIL SALES: Winter Park and other selected ski area
Retail Sales: October 1983-March 1982
1981-82Skier
Visits
Retail Sales** Per Slier Visit
Winter Park +Fraser + WP Ranchi Beaver vill.*
$21,949,620
780,471
$28
Breckenridge
$33,379,873
627,540
$53
Vail
$96,2097031
1,125,605
$85
Steamboat
Springs
$61,240,875
613,354
$100
Aspen + Snov mass Village
$128,505,74:
977,166
$131
*Winter Park Ranch and Beaver Village estimated.
**Average retail sails per skier visit is $80
SOURCES: Colorado Department of Revenue: Colorado Ski Country
This differential between Winter Park and the other ski areas is somewhat exaggerated because some other ski areas (particularly Steamboat Springs and Aspen) have a larger proportion of permanent residents who also increase retail sales.


SUMMER TOURISM
Based on lodging occupancy estimates, approximately 21 percent of total visitor days in the Upper Fraser Valley are in the spring, summer, and Fall. The more seasoned resort communities of Vail, Aspen, and Steamboat Springs typically experience 30 percent of their total visitors in the spring, summer and fall.
As summer visitor opportunities expand and are promoted, a significant increase may be achieved in spring, summer, and fall tourists alone. Inn large measure, these visitors will increase retail sales on a per square foot basis without necessarily increasing demand for total retail space.
Spring, summer, and fall overnight visitors are estimated to total 224,330 visitors in 1987, this estimate is expected to increase at 11.4 percent per year to an estimated 310,100 spring, summer, and fall visitor in 1990.


BACKGROUND
Winter Park is located in Grand County, 67 miles from Denver in the north-central part of Colorado. The Winter Park ski area, opened for skiing in 1940, was adopted as a recreation area and a part of the Denver Mountain Parks System. The remainder of the ski area is located in the Arapahoe National Forest. The Mary Jane ski area, was opened in 1975. Vasquez is scheduled to open in the late 1980s.
In 1975, when the Winter Park Ski Area opened the Mary Jane expansion, Winter Park became one of the premier ski areas in the Rocky Mountains. This expansion was the initial step in the transformation of Winter Park from a primarily Denver weekend area to a full service destination resort. Today, Winter Park is one of the top four areas in terms of skier days in the State of Colorado and has a "pillow count" of over ten thousand. Upon the completion of the proposed Vasquez addition, Winter Park's capacity will increase 70% making it the largest ski area in North America.
Summer tourism has been historically dependant on Highway U.S. 40, the main access from Denver to Rocky Mountain National Park, which runs through downtown Winter Park. This route carries three to four million motorists every summer who have the potential to become customers of the business community. Additionally, an increasing number of destination tourists are enjoying high mountain summers of Winter Park which offer championship golf, hiking, fishing, and rafting in unsurpassed beauty.


CURRENT RETAIL SPACE
Currently, there are approximately 129,000 square feet of retail space in the Town of Winter Park, as described below.
RETAIL SPACE IN WINTER PARK
Type of Good or Service Square Feet
Food Stores 8,690
Service Stations 704
Apparel and Accessories 585
Home Accessories 1,150
Restaurant/Bar 68,590*
Liquor Stores 1,664
Sporting Goods 22,393
Drug Stores 6,938
Jewelry/Gifts 5,050
Miscellaneous Retail 13,120
TOTAL 128,884
*21,000 square feet of this total is directly associated with the Winter Park/Mary Jane ski mountain and is used only during ski season.
This square footage comprises approximately 85 percent of the total retail square footage in the Upper Fraser Valley.
Approximatly 25,000 square feet is used only during the ski season; this includes 21,000 square feet of restaurant and bar space.


RETAIL DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL
Although the Winter Park does attract and can lodge a significant number of overnight visitors, it has not succeeded in encouraging them to spend money on retail goods, entertainment, and other services in the local area. This "leakage" of potential revenues from the existing base of vistor traffic is significant.
For these reasons, the demand analysis show current retail space requirements
support current potentil ex penditures to be more than two times actual space.
PROJECTED RETAIL, RESTAURANT Winter , AND "OTHER" EXPENDITURES Park
Season, Visitor Visitor Days Expenditures Per Visitor Day Expenditures 11983 $)
1982-83
Downhill Overnight Skier 539,476 $86.00 $46,394,936
DaDay and Local Skier 279,320 $12.50 $3,491,500
Other Winter Visitors & Cross-Country Overnight 64,498 $53.00 $3,418,394
Spring/Summer/Fall 145,659 $48.00 $6,991,632
Permanent Residents 5,676* $2000.00/year $11,352,000
TOTAL $71,648,462
1989-1990
Downhill Overnight Skier 792,644 $86.00 $68,167,384
Day and Local Skier 305,023 $12.50 $3,812,787
Other Winter Visitors & Cross-Country Overnight 94,172 $53.00 $4,991,116
Spring/Summer/Fall 309,131 $48.00 $14,838,288
Permanent Residents 10,224* $2000.00/year $20,448,000
TOTAL $112,257,575
*Annual Estimates
SOURCES: Winter Park Development Authority Downtown Plan,1985


CURRENT OFFICE SPACE
Currently, in the Town of Winter Park, there are approximately 47,000 square feet of office space, distributed as follows:
OFFICE SPACE IN WINTER PARK *
Tenant Type Square Feet
Real Estate, Property Management, 17,862
Reservations
Finance, Insurance 9,690
Law, Accounting 9,072
Publications 3,440
Medical 2,100
General Office and Other 5,000
TOTAL 47,164
This estimate understates the total square footage of office space used, since many lodge and retail business owners maintain offices within their facilities and a number of professionals within their homes.
As is the case in many mountain resorts, the quality of office space in Winter Park and the Upper Fraser Valley is uneven. A number of offices are situated in space that has been converted from retail or residential use to office space, Of this total volume of office space, there is only approximately 15,000 square feet of Class A space.*
* Winter fork Development Authority Downtown PLan, 1985


OFFICE DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL
Additional first class rental or condominium ownership office space in the Town can probably be filled with a combination of current office tenants, situated in inferior space, and new businesses locating in Winter Park.
Future demand estimates indicate a need for between 50,000 and 65,000 square feet of office space in 1986, and between 70,000 and 100,000 square feet of space by 1996.


SITE.


MASTER PLAN & SITE DESCRIPTION
The site was chosen on the basis of Winter Park Development Authority Plan (As Figure 2 on Chapter II), which was done in 1983 by the Consolidated Marketing Services Incorporate.
The proposed site is bounded by 7-Eleven Store in the North, Vasquez Creek on the West, Winter Park Lake on the East, and Vasquez Road on the Southeast. Site area is about 84,750 square foot. Dimensions for the site are illustrated in Figure 3.
The chosen site has a slight slope (as Figure 4) with about 8' drop in elevation from Southwest to Northeast over a distance of 300'. As a result, no problems due to excessive slope are anticipated, including potential problems resulting from unstable soils and hydrological analysis.


To Slwmbool Spring!
LOCATION MAP
: aft _ vi
DENVER hsr 'j $K MOUNTAIN . ^ X^x d L\ f
------ I- rKT, P V *i* . ^1-J: W 1 V 1
WlCf .*''* \1^11I X/7' . >/ fK>n,jO_--.UKlpf.
\ ,;J0C ' Shawtm 3 -^Sja'Hy ; g_,- Pme %|. H|i
AREA
K*SIW*ii A Gr,r,a Vr
LouviefJ Y V
>\ H PIKE 4- \ ^ O V GAL AS ^ Hilltop J |at.onal SeCahXjon 3'| / l--..;*
ry^V FOHEST / * _ - /
to Colorado Springs
FIGURE 1


VICINITY MAP

s&y, v,
f h
. rf i:-/gy* \ "..................... '".....................'' *-# j
f tT-pi ( *0~n_T< V /-__________j j f]| vastjuez rt*d U ' K
(* S *- ^ J ' * j 7^* 9 -.* > MbflT Mnt *.
FIGURE 2


SITE AREA
(350+450)x90+(4 50+300)x130 = 84,750 sq.ft
FIGURE 3


ACCESS
VEHICULAR ACCESS
The majority of visitors to the area travel by automobile, the area is a 67 mile drive from Denver. It takes about one and half hour driving by taking Highways 1-70 and U.S.40. There is a 500 cars Town Center Parking Structure on the southeast of the site which is used mainly for visitors andsome for employee parking.


PEDESTRIAN ACCESS
The current main pedestrian route is along the U.S.40 and Cooper Creek Way. After the Winter Park Town Center is completed, there should be more visitors arriving to the area and park in the Town Center Parking Structure and coming from the parking structure to the center.
The design solution for the project will take into consideration such pedestrian pathways, and will try to strengthen their routes.


VISITATION
The vegetation currently on the some aspen trees averaging 5-10
site is composed feet in height.
of everygreen trees and
ROAD
FIGURE A


UTILITIES
Utilities for the site include:
-Electricity, supplied by Mountain Parks Electric.
-Telephone, supplied by Mountain Bell.
-Natural gas, supplied by Public Service Company of Colorado. -Water, Supplied by Winter Park Water District.
-Sewage, handled by Winter Park Sanitetion District.
All of the above are located along the Cooper Creek Way.




J J J




VI. CLIMAT


TEMPERATURE
General Climatic Conditions for Winter Fkrk, Colorado Latitude: 3954' North Longitude: 10546' West Elevation: 9060 feet MSL
^Winter Park is located in a High Mountain Climatic Zone.
'One will feel comfortable during the daylight hours while remaining in the sun. At night or during periods of cloud cover the climate is harsh. ^Temperatures typically range from cold in winter to cool in summer.
Maximum temperatures rise into the comfort zone from June through September.
"-Nighttime minimum timperatures are below freezing from September to June. -High temperature swings between day and night occur in both winter and summer.
LATITUDE N 40 16 GRAND LAKE 1NW, Co.
AVERAGE DAILY TEMPERATURE


HEATING & COOLING DEGREE DAYS
*'Base on 65 F ^Cooling degreedavs 0
^Annual Average Heating Degree Days 12879
Max. Heating Degree Days ------ 12016
Min. heating Degree Days ------ 10653
FRASER, CO. LATITUDE 3957
MAX.
AVE.
MIN.
JAN FEB MAR AFK MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC


SNOWFALL
^Snowfall occurs in Aug. through June, with the largest amounts falling in December. (Max. 95.0 inchs)
*Snow exists 190 days out of the year (Average)
*Heavy snow loads on roofs.


PRECIPITATION
* Rainfall is generally small.
* Maximum amounts occur in the Spring (Average).
* Average annual precipitation 27.12", Max. 38.64, Min. 20.80.
INi JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DBS
Min.


WIND
* The Prevailing winds are from the northwest with occasional strong south west winds.
* Maximum wind speeds are from the northwest.
* Rare winds are from the east.
U.S.Dcpt. of Cummtrcf XXXMXrtXXrtXXttX FRASER* COLORADO STATION NO. 93006 FREQUENCY of occurrence Direction* By Speed Croupe APRIL 1965 MARCH 1966 ANNUAL SURFACE WINDS JOB NO. 8824
Station Name Period
Station y E A R M 0 N T t \Speed Dir\ 1-3 knot! 4-0 knot* 7-10 knots ii-n knot* 17-37 knot* 20-40 knot* 41 and over Total 4 knot* and over Total No. of Observation*
% Ob*.
N 90 101 101 64 5 271 8.3 361
NNE 42 60 49 5 l 115 3.6 157
KE 22 55 23 4 82 2.4 104
ENE 16 16 12 1 29 1.0 45
E 19 18 18 18 3 57 1.8 76
ESE 15 25 19 16' 13 73 2.0 88
SE 21 41 31 18 7 97 2.7 118
SSE 31 70 35 19 10 134 3.8 165
S 60 92 28 14 4 138 4.6 198
ssvr 25 39 18 8 5 70 2.2 95
sw 40 73 15 9 3 l 101 3.2 141
WSW 104 149 13 15 7 184 6.6 288
w 95 114 46 41 21 222 7.3 317
WSW 25 22 20 21 8 l 72 2.2 97
sw 68 127 164 143 41 3 478 12.6 546
forsr 17 38 55 45 10 148 3.8 165
CALM 31.5 1390
TOTAL S A 1390 690 1040 647 441 138 5 2271 100.( 4351


VII. SOILS


Project No- 3378 May 2, 1983
SOU AND FOUNDATION INVESTIGATION
Proposed Cooper Creek Retail/Office Building
Phase II Vasquez Road
Winter Park, Grand County, Colorado
Prepared For: Mr. Jeff Cagle
P-0. Box 1356
Winter Park Colorado 80982


Project No- ; 5378
May 2, 1983
TABl.F OF CONTENTS
Conclusions Page 1
Scope Page 2
Proposed Construction Page 2 .
Field Investigation Page 2
Laboratory Investigation Page 3
Subsurface Conditions Page 3
Discussion Page
Design and Construction Details Page 5
Construction Inspection Page 7
Test Boring Location Plan Figure No- 1
Test Boring Logs Figure No. 2
Perimeter Drain Details Figure No. 3


kJ
3015 pennsylvomo Colorado springs colorodo 80907 (303) 475-7380
12687 west cedor suite 220 lokeuuood' colorodo 80228 (303) 989-5400
Soil & foundation engineering
Hay 2, 1983
RE: Soil and Foundation Investigation Proposed Cooper Creek Retail/Office Building Phase II Vasquez Road
Winter Park, Grand County, Colorado
Project No- 3378 (3197) S-83-3-1-D
Conclusions
1) In our opinion, the proposed structure should be supported by
CONVENTIONAL SPREAD FOOTING FOUNDATIONS- THE FOUNDATIONS MAY BE DESIGNED FOR A MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE BEARING PRESSURE OF 3000 PSF-
IT WILL NOT BE NECESSARY FOR THE FOUNDATIONS TO CARRY A MINIMUM DEAD LOAD PRESSURE-
IF FOUNDATIONS WILL EXTEND TO DEPTHS GREATER THAN NINE (9) FEET
BELOW EXISTING GRADES, THE FOOTINGS MAY BE DESIGNED FOR A MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE SOIL BEARING PRESSURE OF 4000 PSF- HOWEVER, DUE TO GROUNDWATER CONDITIONS (SEE TEST PlT LOGS), EXCAVATIONS TO DEPTHS OF NINE (9) FEET MAY NOT BE PRACTICAL, AS FURTHER DISCUSSED IN THE TEXT OF THIS REPORT-
2) Below a layer of old fill material, the test pits encountered
PRIMARILY MEDIUM DENSE TO DENSE SAND AND GRAVEL DEPOSITS WITH
COBBLES AND BOULDERS-
3) The groundwater conditions in this area could fluctuate significantly DURING VARIOUS SEASONS OF THE YEAR- FOR THIS REASON, IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT A PERIMETER DRAIN TILE SYSTEM BE INSTALLED AROUND ALL BASEMENT AND/OR GARDEN LEVEL AREAS- THE PERIMETER DRAIN TILE SYSTEM SHOULD BE CONNECTED TO A PUMPED SUMP FOR PROPER ACCUMULATED WATER DISCHARGE-
4) Due to the presence of cobbles and boulders within the subsurface
PROFILE, EXTREME CARE SHOULD BE TAKEN TO AVOID DISTURBANCE TO THE BEARING STRATUM DURING FOUNDATION EXCAVATION- THE SURFACE OF THE EXCAVATED AREA SHOULD BE COMPACTED IN"PLACE WITH A HEAVY PIECE OF
CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, PRIOR TO FOUNDATION CONSTRUCTION- UNDER-
CUT AREAS SHOULD BE BACKFILLED WITH A RELATIVELY FINE GRANULAR MATERIAL (THREE INCH MINUS) COMPACTED TO AT LEAST 951 OF MAXIMUM
Standard Proctor Density, per ASTM D-698-70-


Project No- 3378
May 2, 1983
Page 2
Scope
Presented herewith ARE THE RESULTS of a Soil and Foundation
Investigation conducted AT THE SITE OF THE PROPOSED Cooper Creek
Retail/Office Building, Phase II, to be LOCATED ON Vasquez Road,
Winter Park, Grand County, Colorado.
The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the existing
SUBSURFACE CONDITIONS AT THIS SITE AND TO FORMULATE APPROPRIATE FOUN-
DATION DESIGN CRITERIA FOR THE PROPOSED STRUCTURE*
Proposed Construction
It is understood that a retail/office building will be constructed at this site- The proposed structure will be three (3) stories
high. It is understood that the ground floor will be constructed at
"GARDEN level" OR APPROXIMATELY FOUR (4) TO FIVE (5) FEET BELOW PRESENT SITE GRADES.
The ground floor will be a concrete slab-on-grade.
This will be a steel frame building and loads are expected to be
LIGHT-
Field Investigation
Two (2) test pits were excavated with a backhoe at the locations approximately shown on the Test Pit Location Plan, Figure No- 1* Samples of the various subsurface strata encountered during the test


Project No. 3378
May 2, 1983
Page 3
PIT EXCAVATION WEF^E OBTAINED FOR REVIEW BY THE PROJECT ENGINEER AND POSSIBLE LABORATORY TESTING-
The logs of the test pits are presented on Figure No. 2, attached. Laboratory Investigation
All recovered samples were taken to our Denver Laboratory- No
laboratory tests were performed as part of this investigation.
Subsurface Conditions
Subsurface conditions at this site are fairly uniform.
Based on the inspection of the subsurface profile exposed by the test pit excavations, the site is covered by a layer of possible fill
materials extending to depths OF ONE (1) TO TWO (2) feet below present site grades- The fill consisted of silty to slightly clayey sand and
GRAVEL WITH COBBLES AND BOULDERS, AND WAS IN A RELATIVELY LOOSE CONDITION.
Below the old fill layer, the test pits encountered a stratum of
MEDIUM DENSE TO DENSE SAND AND GRAVEL WITH COBBLES AND BOULDERS-
The groundwater table as encountered by the test pit excavations,
AS INDICATED ON THE TEST PlT LOGS, FIGURE No. 2-
Discussion
The natural stratum of sand and gravel with cobbles and boulders
ENCOUNTERED BY THE TEST PITS IS A NON~EXPANSI VE MATERIAL AND HAS A


Project No. 3378
May 2, 1983
Page 4
MODERATE SUPPORT CAPACITY- THEREFORE, IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT THE PROPOSED STRUCTURE BE SUPPORTED BY SPREAD FOOTING FOUNDATIONS PROPORTIONED FOR A MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE SOIL BEARING PRESSURE OF 3000 PSF
Because the sand and gravels are non-expansive, it will not be
NECESSARY FOR THE FOUNDATIONS TO CARRY A MINIMUM DEAD LOAD PRESSURE-
Generally, the bearing capacity of a granular material increases
WITH INCREASED DEPTH BELOW THE GROUND SURFACE- HOWEVER, DUE TO THE PRESENCE OF THE GROUNDWATER TABLE AT DEPTHS OF APPROXIMATELY SIX (6) TO SEVEN (7) FEET BELOW PRESENT SITE GRADES (SEE TEST PlT LOGS), EXCAVATIONS BELOW THE FIVE (5) FOOT LEVEL ARE NOT RECOMMENDED-
IT IS CAUTIONED THAT THE GROUNDWATER LEVEL IN THE AREA COULD FLUCTUATE CONSIDERABLY DURING VARIOUS SEASONS OF THE YEAR- THE WATER LEVEL COULD RISE DURING PERIODS OF HEAVY PERCIPI TATI ON AND/OR SPRING RUN-OFF-
Construction equipment working on granular materials just above
THE WATER TABLE COULD CREATE A "PUMPING" CONDITION WHICH COULD ADVERSELY AFFECT THE BEARING CAPACITY OF THE GRANULAR SOILS- THEREFORE, THE EXCAVATIONS SHOULD BE MINIMIZED TO A LEVEL APPROXIMATELY TWO (2) FEET ABOVE THE WATER TABLE AT THE TIME OF CONSTRUCTION- SINCE EXCAVATIONS SHOULD NOT EXTEND BELOW DEPTHS OF FIVE (5) FEET, THE RECOMMENDED BEARING CAPACITY OF 3000 PSF SHOULD BE ADHERED TO FOR DESIGN PURPOSES, REGARDLESS OF THE DEPTH OF THE FOUNDATIONS BELOW EXISTING OR FINISHED
EXTERIOR GRADES-


Project No- 3378
May 2, 1983
Page 5
Design and Construction Details
1) Silt layers and lenses (if any) should be subexcavated from
BENEATH FOUNDATION AREAS* EXCAVATION INSPECTIONS SHOULD BE CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE NEED FOR SUCH UNDERCUTTING AND TO VERIFY THAT THE SILT LAYERS HAVE BEEN REMOVED*
2) IT MUST BE EXPECTED THAT DISTURBANCE TO THE BEARING STRATUM WILL BE EXPERIENCED DURING FOUNDATION EXCAVATION* ALL DISTURBED MATERIALS SHOULD BE COMPACTED IN"PLACE WITH A HEAVY PIECE OF CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, PARTICULARLY BENEATH FOUNDATION AREAS*
3) Undercut areas should be backfilled with a granular material
HAVING A MAXIMUM PARTICLE SIZE OF THREE (3) INCHES* THE GRANULAR MATERIAL MUST BE COMPACTED TO AT LEAST 95% OF MAXIMUM STANDARD
Proctor Density, per ASTM D-698-70* The foundations may then be
SUPPORTED BY THE UNDISTURBED NATURAL GRANULAR SOILS OR THE NEW COMPACTED STRUCTURAL FILL*
A) AS PRESENTED IN THE "CONCLUSIONS" OF THIS REPORT, IT WILL BE
NECESSARY TO PLACE A PERIMETER DRAIN TILE SYSTEM AROUND THE GARDEN LEVEL AREA OF THE PROPOSED STRUCTURE* THE DRAIN TILE SYSTEM
(see Figure No* 3) should be connected to a pumped sump* It is
EXPECTED THAT THE DRAIN TILE SYSTEM WILL NOT ACCUMULATE ANY WATER UNLESS THE GROUNDWTER TABLE EXPERIENCES A RISE DUE TO HEAVY RAINFALL AND/OR RUN-OFF CONDITIONS.
5) If THE GROUNDWATER TABLE AT THE TIME OF CONSTRUCTION IS PRESENT
AT OR JUST BELOW EXCAVATION LEVELS, RELATIVELY SEVERE "PUMPING"


Project No* 3378
May 2, 1983
Page 6
CONDITIONS COULD DEVELOP- If THIS CONDITION DOES OCCUR, WE SHOULD BE NOTIFIED IMMEDIATELY IN ORDER THAT APPROPRIATE SITE INSPECTIONS CAN BE CONDUCTED AND RECOMMENDATIONS MADE-
6) The exterior foundation wall backfill should be compacted to at
least 95% of Maximum Standard Proctor Density, per ASTM D-698-70-
7) The old fill present on this site should be removed from within
THE AREA OF THE PROPOSED STRUCTURE AND FROM AREAS WHICH WILL
RECEIVE PAVING OR CONCRETE FLATWORK- THE OLD FILL MATERIALS,
EXCLUSIVE OF TRASH, RUBBLE AND OTHER DELETERIOUS MATERIALS, MAY
BE REUSED AS A NEW COMPACTED FILL- ALL FILL SHOULD BE COMPACTED
TO AT LEAST 95% OF MAXIMUM STANDARD PROCOR DENSITY, PER ASTM
D-698-70.
8) The ground surface should be given a positive slope away from the
BUILDING ON ALL SIDES TO CONTROL SURFACE WATER RUNOFF-
Construction Inspection
The analyses and recommendations submitted in this report are
BASED UPON THE DATA OBTAINED FROM THE TWO (2) TEST PITS PERFORMED AT THE LOCATIONS INDICATED ON THE LOCATION DIAGRAM- THIS REPORT DOES NOT
REFLECT ANY VARIATIONS WHICH MAY OCCUR BETWEEN THESE TEST PITS- THE NATURE AND EXTENT OF SUCH VARIATIONS BETWEEN THE PITS MAY NOT BECOME EVIDENT UNTIL DURING THE COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION- FOR THIS REASON, IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT THE SOIL ENGINEER INSPECT THE OPEN EXCAVATION- IF VARIATIONS THEN APPEAR EVIDENT, IT WILL BE NECESSARY TO RE'EVALUATE


Project No. 3378
May 2, 1983
Page 7
THE RECOMMENDATIONS, CONTAINED IN THIS REPORT, AFTER PERFORMING ON"SITE OBSERVATIONS DURING THE CONSTRUCTION PERIOD AND NOTING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF ANY SUCH VARIATIONS-
This report has been prepared in order to aid in the evaluation
OF THIS PROPERTY AND TO ASSIST THE ARCHITECT OR ENGINEER IN THE DESIGN
OF THIS PROJECT- In THE EVENT THAT ANY CHANGES IN THE DESIGN OR LOCA-
TION OF THE BUILDING AS OUTLINED OR PRESENTED IN THIS REPORT ARE PLANNED, THE CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS CONTAINED IN THIS REPORT SHALL NOT BE CONSIDERED VALID, UNLESS THE CHANGES ARE REVIEWED AND THE CONCLUSIONS OF THIS REPORT MODIFIED OR APPROVED IN WRITING BY THE SOIL
and Foundation Engineer.
Respectfully submitted,
THOMAS E. SUMMERLEE &
ASSOCIATES, INC-
Thomas E* Summerlee, M.S., P-E-President
2 COPIES SENT
2 cc: Braun/Vanderlip/Fulton Architects 1 cc: Noel Vargl, Building Official, Town of Winter Park


Project no. 3378
TEST PIT LOCATION PLAN
Cooper Creek Development Phase 11
Winter, Park, Grand County, Colorado
Test Pit
No. i
f
y
Property Line Vasquez Road
Indicates Test Pit Location
Test Pit
No. 2
Figure No.i


ELEVATION-FEET
Project No. 3378
TEST pit I nos
Cooper Creek Development Phase II
Winter Park, Grand County, Colorado
100
95
90
85 L_
Test Pit No i
*
Test Pit No. 2
m
ViP.-jYL
m
o-Oo.-;p
:5>.
LEGEND
90
85
POSSIBLE FILL
SAND AND GRAVEL, SILTY, SLIGHTLY CLAYEY, WITH COBBLES, LOOSE. MOIST, DARK BROWN.
SAND AND GRAVEL SLIGHTLY SILTY TO SILTY, MEDIUM DENSE TO DENSE, MOIST TO SET, BROWN, WITH COBBLES AND BOULDERS.
Indicates groundwater level at time of excavation.
NOTES
i) The test pits were excavated with a backhoe on March 19, 1983.
2) The logs show approximate boundaries between the various strata at the date and locations indicated and it is not
WARRANTED THAT THEY ARE REPRESENTATIVE OF SUBSURFACE CONDITIONS AT OTHER LOCATIONS AND TIMES.
Figure No.2
ELEVATION-FEET


Project No. 3378
Pf'RIMl H R DRAIN [OR STRUCTURE ON SPRFAO FOOTING FOUNDATION
BOTTOM OF FOOTING LEVEL
Figure No. 3
Revised 12/01/82


VIII.CODES AND ZONING


ZONING CHECK
LOCATION: Winter Park, Colorado
APPLICABLE ZONING ORDINANCE: Zoning regnlations of Town of Winter Park
SECTION PAGE ITEM PROPOSE USED: Winter Park Town Center (retails, offices, resturants)
7-3-1 7-3-2 PRESENT ZONING CLASSIFICATION: Destination Center
7-5B-2 7-5B-2 APPLICABLE ALLOWABLE USES: 1. Motels, hotels and lodges 2. Multi-family dwelling units 3. Professional offices 4. Real estate offices 5. Commercial parking lots or structure 6. Restaurants, gift shops, jewelry shops, bookstores, banks, art galleries. 7. Malls, plazas and related pedestrian open space 8. Private civic, cultural and related pedestrian open space
7-5B-2 7-5B-2 ZONE CHANGE REQUIRED? Not required.
7-5B-3 7-5B-3 MINIMUM LOT SIZE: AREA: No minimum lot area in the D-C(Destination Center) District provided the development is served by public water and sewerage facilities. WIDTH: The minimum lot width as measures along the principal right-of-way shall be 50'.


SECTION PAGE
ITEM
7-3-19-4 7-3-19-5 MINIMUM YARD REQUIREMENTS
REAR: Bufferyards shall be located on the outer perimeter of a lot or parcel, extending to the lot or parcel boundary line.
SIDE: Bufferyarks shall not be located on any portion of an existing or dedicated public or private street or right-of-way.
7-3-6-C 7-3-7 ALLOWANCES FOR OVERHANGS:
Unenclosed porches, terraces or pools without roofs may project not over 3' into the required front and side yards, and not over one-half the distance of the required rear yard.
7-5B-4 7-5-6 MAXIMUM HIGHT: 55 feet
7-9-1 7-9-1 0FFSTREET PARKING
REQUIRED SPACES BY USE:
1. OFFICES: 1 space per 400 square feet of gross floor area.
2. RETAIL SALES: 1 space per 400 square feet of gross floor
area excluding areas devoted exclusively to storage and building maintenance.
3. EATING AND DRINKING ESTABLISHMENTS:
1 space per 100 square feet of gross area.
7-3-19-2 7-3-19-5 OPEN SPACE REQUIREMENTS: 0
7-4B-5 7-4B-5 LANDSCAPING REQUIREMENTS:
The first 10' of any setback area from the edge of any str street or road right-of-way shall be used as a landscaped area.
7-3-10 7-3-11 FENCES: Fences shall not exceed 3'.


SECTION
6-2-7-7
7-3-5-
7-3-17
PAGE ITEM
6- 2-7-7 SIGN RESTRICTIOSN:
1. Commercial Signs:
Time Period Maximun Area
Year 1 through year 3 30 square feet
Year 4 and thereafter 25 square feet
2. Each activity shall be authorized one wall sign per building frontage and shall not exceed the maximum sign area.
3. Business activities in multi-story are encouraged to share wall space for their sign.
7- 3-7 OTHER SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
No outdoor storage of trash is permitted in any front yard.
7-3-18-2 Access road ways for fire apparatusAll weather driving surface of not less than 20' of unobstructed width. Minimum of 13'-6" of vertical clearance.


BUILDING CODE CHECK
PROJECT NAME: Winter Park Town Center Phase III LOCATION: Winter Park, Colorado
SECTION PAGE ITEM
OCCUPANCE CLASSIFICATION
PRINCIPLE: Retail stores Group B, Division 2 OTHERS(SPECIFY): Offices Group B, Division 2
Restaurant Group B, Division 2
1801 91 CONSTRUCTION TYPE: Type I (Fire Resistive)
Table
5-B A0 OCCUPANCY SEPARATIONS REQUIRED: n/a (b-2 to B-2) CHANGES IN OCCUPANCY: None
Table
#5-C 41 MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA: unlimited
605(a) 32 IF ADJACENT TO OPEN AREA ON TWO OR MORE SIDES: The floor areas may be increased by one of the following:
1. SEPARATION ON TWO SIDES. Where public ways or yards more than 20 feet in width extend along and adjoin two sides of the building, floor areas may be increased at a rate of li percent for each foot by which the minimum width exceeds 20 feet, but the increase shall not exceed 50 percent.
2. SEPARATION ON THREE SIDES. Where public ways or yards more than 20 feet in width extend along and adjoin three sides of the building, floor areas may be increased at a rate of 5 percent for each foot by which the minimum exceeds 20 feet, but the increase shall not exceed 100 percent.
3. SEPARATION ON ALL SEDES. Where public ways or yards more than 20 feet in width ectend on all sides of a building and adjoin the entire perimeter, floor areas may be increased at a rate of 5 percent for each foot by which the minimum exceeds 20 feet. Cuch increases shall not ecxeed 100 per-
cent .


SECTION PAGE
ITEM
505(b) 30 IF OVER ONE STORY:
The total combined floor area for multistory buildings may be twice that permitted by Table No. 5-C for one-story buildings, and the floor area of any single story shall not exeed that permitted for a one-story building.
506(b) 32 IF SPRINKLERED:
The area of any one- or two-story building of Group B shall not limited, if the building is provided with an approved automatic sprinkler system throughout, and entirely surrounded and adjoined by public ways or yards not less than 60 feet in width.
INCREASES FOR FIRE SEPARATIONS: None.
Table
#5-D 42 MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE HEIGHT: Unlimited.
(by Zoning regulations of Town of Winter Park, maximum allowable height is 55')
504(a) 29 LOCATION WITHIN CITY/L0CATI0N ON PROPERTY:
Buildings shall adjoin or have access to public way or yard on not less than one side. Required yards shall be perma-ently maintained.
For the purpose of this section, the center line of an adjoining public way shall be considered an adjacent property line.
Eaves over required windows shall be not less than 30 inches from the side and rear property lines.
705 48 WINDOWS REQUIRED IN ROOMS:
All enclosed portions customarily occupied by human beings shall be provided with natural light by means of exterior glazed openings with an area equal to one tenth of the total floor area of such portions.


SECTION
PAGE ITEM 705 48 VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS:
Natural ventilation by means of exterior openings with an openable area not less than one twentieth of the total floor area of such portions, or shall be provided with artificial light and a mechanically operated ventilating system. The mechanically operated ventilation system shall be capable of supplying a minimum if 5 cubic feet per minute of outside air with a total circulated of not less than 15 cubic feet per minute per occupant in all occupied portions of the building.
MINIMUM CEILING HEIGHTS IN ROOMS: n/a
Table
17-A 89 MINIMUM FLOOR AREA OF R00SMS: n/a
Table 17-A 89 FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS:
Exterior bearing walls 4 hours. Interior bearing walls 3 hours. Exterior non-bearing walls 4 hours. Structural frame 3 hours.
Permanent partitions 12 hours. Vertical openings 2 hours.
Floors 2 hours.
Roofs 2 hours.
1803(B) 91 Exterior doors & window 3/4 hours; when they are less than
1716 87 20 feet from an adjacent propery line or the of a public way. Inner court walls n/a hours* Mezzanine floors (area allowed) 1 hours. center line
3202(b) 708 50 Roof coverings: Fire-Retardant roofing. Boiler room enclosure 1 hours.
1802 91 Framework 2 hours.


SECTION PAGE
ITEM
1805
1084
1806
92 Stairs shall be constructed of reinforced concrete, iron
or steel with treads and risers of concrete, iron or steel. Brick, marble, tile or other hark noncombustible materials may be used for the finish of such treads and risers.
91 Floors: Where wood sleepers are used for laying wood flooring on masonry or concrete fire-resistive floors, the space between the floor slab and the underside of the wood flooring shall be filled with noncombustible material or fire-stopped in such a manner that there will be no open spaces under the flooring which will exceed 100 square feet in area and such spaces shall be filled solidly under all permanent partitions so that there is no communication under the flooring between adjoining rooms.
92 Roofs and their members other than the structural frame more than 25 feet above any floor, balcony or gallery may be of unprotected noncombustible materials.
Partitions: n/a.
Table
33-A 582 Occupancy Area(ft2) Basis(ftJ) Actual Load
Basement 20
Retail Ground FIs 30
Upper FIs 50
Storage Dinning Room 300
Drinking 15
Establishments 15
Commercial Kitchen 200
Locker Rooms 50
Offices 100
Mechanical Equipment Room 300


SECTION PAGE
ITEM
3303(a) 556 NUMBER OF EXITS REQUIRED:
Every story or portion thereif having an occupant load of 501 to 1000 shall have not less than three exits.
Every story or partion thereof having an occupant load or 1001 or mort shall have not less than four exits.
The number of exits required from any story of a building shall be determined by rsing the occupant load of that story plus the percentages of the occupant loads of floors which exit through the level under consideration as follows:
1. Fifty percent of the occupant load in the first adjacent story above and the first adjacent story below, when a story below exits through the level under consideration.
2. Twenty-five percent of the occupant load in the story immediately beyond the first adjacent story.
3303(b) 557 MINIMUM WIDTH OF EXITS:
The total width of exits in feet shall be not less than the total occupant load served divided by 50. Such eidth of exits shall be divided approximately equally among the separate exits. The total ecit width required from any story of a building shall be detemined by using the occupant load of that story plus the percentages of the occupant loads of floors which exit through the level under consideration as follows:
1. Fifty percent of the occupant load in the first adjacent story above and the first adjacent story below, when a story below exits through the level under consideration.
2. Twenty-five percent of ther occupant load in the story immediately beyond the first adjacent story.
3303(c) 557 EXIT SEPARATION ARRANGEMENT:
If only two exits are required, they shall be placed a distance apart equal to not less than one half of the length of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served measured in a straight line between exits.


SECTION
3303(d)
3303(d)
3304(f)
3304(b)
3304(h)
3305(b)
3305(b)
PAGE ITEM
557 MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE TRAVEL DISTANCE TO EXIT: 150 feet.
WITH SPRINKLERS: 200 feet.
558 EXIT SEQUENCE (through adjonining or accessory areas)
Rooms may have one exit through an adjoining or intervening room which provides a direct, obvious and unobstructed means of travel to an exit corridor, exit enclosure or until egress is provided from the building, provided the total distance of travel does not excees that permitted by other provisions of this code. In other than dwelling units, exits shall not pass through kitchens, store rooms, rest rooms, clostes or spaces used for simil similar purposes.
EXIT DOORS
559 Minimum width: 3 feet.
Minimum height: 6 feet 8 inches.
Maximum leaf width: 4 feet.
Width required for number of occupants:
Total occupant load/50.
558 Swing: Exit doors shall swing in the direction of exit travel when serving any hazardous area or when serving an occupant load of 50 or more.
560 Change in floor level at door:
There shall be a floor or landing on each side of a door. When access for the physically handicapped is required, the floor or landing shall be not more than inch lower than the threshold of the doorway. When such access is not required, such dimension shall not exceed 1 inch.
561 EXIT CORRIDORS 561 Required width:
Every corridor serving an occupant load of 10 or more shall be not less than 44 inched in width.


SECTION
3305(c)
3305(h)
PAGE ITEM
561 Required height:
Corridors and exterior exit balconies shall have a clear height of not less than 7 feet measured to the lowest projection from the ceiling.
Dead end corridors length <20 feet.
562 Openings:
When corridor walls are required to be of one-hour fire-resistive construction, every door opening shall be protected by a tight-fitting smoke- and draft-control assembly having a fire-protection rating if not less than 20 minutes when tested in accordance with U.B.C. Standard No. 43-2. The door and frame shall bear an approved label or other identification showing the rating thereof, the name of the manufacturer and the identification of the service conducting the inspection of materials and workmanship at the factory during fabrication and assembly. Doors shall be maintained self-closing or shall be automatic closing by actuation of a smoke detector.
3306(a)
3306(c)
3306(c)
3306(d)
563 STAIRS
Min. width: 44 inches Occ.load of 50 or more
536 Maximum riser allowed: No greater than 7"
536 Minimum tread allowed: No less than 11"
536 Winding and spiral stairs not allowable.
Circular stairways may be used as an exit, provided the minimum width of run is not less than 10 inches and the smaller radicus is not less than twice the width of the stairway. The largest tread width or rider height within any flight of stairs shall not exceed the smallest by more than 3/8 inch.


SECTION
3306(e)
3306(o)
3306(h)
3309(a) 3306(p) 3306(j)
3308(a)
PAGE ITEM 563 Landings:
Every landign shall have a dimension measured in the direction of travel equal to the width of the stairway. Such dimension need not exceed 44 inched when the stair has a straight run.
563 Stair to roof rqd.?
In every building four or more stories in geight, one stairway shall extend to the roof surface, unless the roof has a slope greater than 4 in 12.
565 Stair to basement restrictions:
When a basement stairway and a stair way to an upper story terminate in the same exit enclosure, an approved barrier shall be provided to prevent persons from continuing on into the basement.
566 Stair enclosure rqd.? Yes, shall be of not less than one-
hour fire-resistive construction.
565 Stair headroom: No less than 6'-6".
564 HANDRAILS
Rqd. at each side? Yes.
Intermediate rails rqd.? if width exceeds 88 inches.
Max. openings in rails: 6 inches.
Height above nosing: No less than 30 inches or no bigger
than 34 inches.
Extension of railing: No less than 6 inches beyond top &
bottom.
Projection from wall: No less than li inches between wall
and handrail.
Exceptions: Stairways less than 44 inches wide.
566 HORIZONTAL EXIT REQUIREMENTS
A horizontal exit shall not serve as the only exit from a portion of a building, and when two or more exits are required, not more than one half of the total number of exits or total exit width may be horizontal exits.


SECTION PAGE
3307(b) 565
3307(c) 565
3307(d) 565
3307(e) 566
ITEM
RAMPS
Width as required for stair ways
Maximum slope: Not steeper than 1 vertical to 12 horizontal. Landing: Ramps having slopes steeper than 1 vertical to 15 horizontal shall have landigns at the top and bottom.
Handrails:
Ramps having slopes steeper than 1 vertical to 15 horizontal shall have handrails as required for stairways, except that intermediate handrails shall not be required. Exit signs rqd.: When occupant load 250.




PROGRAM
There are three major parts of the Winter Park Center, Phase III:
The retail, offices, and restaurants.
RETAIL:
The retail is the major part of the building which will coonsist of ski rentals ans sales, jewelry/gift shops drug store, and anchor retail store. The gift shops will offer merchandise to introduce visitors to colorful Colorado and to the beauty of the mountains and surrounding Winter Park area.
RESTAURANT & FOOD SERVICE:
Winter Park lacks high quality dining facilities. The restaurants will of offer a gracious atmosphere, where visitors and skiers can sit down and enjoy their food, have a momint of peace over-looking other's activities after/or vefore they enjoy their exciting dynamic exercise. This area must have nice views to see people walking outside or skating on the skating rink.
OFFICES
The office will be located in the upper floor of the building, including rental or condominium ownership office space. Space will be provided for: Low, Accountiing, Medical office, Real estate, property management and general office and meeting space.


PROGRAM SUMMARY
Program Totals -------------- 60,000 (square feet)
Retail Stores --------------- 32,900
Restaurant/Food Service ------ 7,100
Offices --------------------- 20,000
o
* Parking space will buy-in the Town center Parking Structure
RETAIL
Number NSF Total NSF
Anchor Retail Stores 2 2 8.000 16,000
Jewelry/Gift Shop 1 1,200 1,200
Ski Rental & Sales 1 2,400 2,400
General Retail 10 1,000 10,000
Drug Store 1 1,200 1,200
Loading 1 300 300
Storage 5 160 800
Mechanical Room 2 200 400
Hydropulse 2 300 600
Total 32,900
RESTAURANT AND FOOD SERVICE
Number NSF Total NSF
Large Dining Room 1 3,000 3,000
Small Dining Room/Cafe 1 1,000 1,000
Kitchen(Large) 1 800 800
(Small) 1 300 300
Service/Food Preparation 1 200 200
Bakery 1 500 500
Food Storage(Large) 1 300 300
(Small) 1 100 100
Wine Cellar 1 100 100
Loading 1 300 300
Public Restroom 2 200 400
Janitor 1 100 100
Total
7,100


OFFICE
Management Office Conference Room (Large) (Small)
Law Office Accounting Office Medical Office Real Estate Property Management General Office Mechanical Room Restrooms
NSF Total NSF
400 400
1,100 1,100
500 500
1,000 1,000
1,000 1,000
1,000 1,000
1,000 1,000
1,000 1,000
1,200 12,000
300 600
200 400
Number
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
2
2
Total
20,000


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Moderate
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GUIDELINES NOTES
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7


Winter Park opens today with $S million in new ski lifts, trails
By DEBQRAH FRAZIER
RuCKy Mountain News Staff Writer
Winter Park ski area, the Grand County resort owned by the city and county of Denver, opens for its 4?th season today bigger and belter with $9 million in new lifts and trails.
Although only one run and a lift Will be open, aduit lift tickets will sell for $12 through Sunday.
Hopefully by the weekend, .we ll be opening another two lifts and another two runs, said Winter Park spokesman Kiki Woodard.
We had about 20 inches of fresh snow last weekend
Winter Park added $9 million in capital improvements over the summer, including a high-speed quad chairlift to serve the new Vasquez Ridge. When Winter Park opens all its runs, the ski area will have 96 trails compared with 63 last season and 300 acres of new terrain, Woodard said.
More than a dozen of the new trails are in the Vasquez Ridge
area, served by the high-speed quad, and 20 trails have been added to the Mary Jane area, which comprises about half of the Winter Park resort When completed, Vas quez will have 50 trails, she said.
During the season, lift tickets will sell for $24, Woodard said, but early-season skiers will pay only $20 through Dec. 19.
With about one more foot of snow, we could open up most of Winter Park, she said. We have an 18-inch man-made base.
Also open for the 1986-87 ski season are Copper Mountain, Keystone, Loveland and Berthoud.
Breckenridge is scheduled to open Peak 9 on Saturday with two lifts and four trails. Lift tickets will cost $15 until Nov. 27. Colorados other ski areas will open as conditions permit.
A decision is expected by the end of December on whether the Winter Paik/Mary Jane ski area should be exempt from property taxes in Grand County.
The ski areas are owned by the
city and county of Denver but operated by the Winter Park Recreational Association, a non-profit group that puts the ski areas earnings back into the facilities.
Under Colorado law, cities dont pay property taxes. Attorneys for the association claim the city-owned resort, which opened in 1950, should be exempt.
In 1985, the Colorado Roard of Assessment Appeals ruled unanimously that the Winter Park Recreational Association should pay property taxes, which would amount to $300,000 a year.
The association appealed the decision to Grand County District Court, and Judge Claus Hume is expected to rule by December,
WINTER RARK RESOhT
said Grand County Attorney Jacl DiCola
Grand County first challenger the tax exemption in 1984 Although tiie association doesn'i pay property taxes, the grouf gives the county payments in Iicl of taxes for law enforcement road maintenance and other ser vices.




SECOND FLOOR FLAN


MAGE


:




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