Citation
Colorado School of Mines student housing

Material Information

Title:
Colorado School of Mines student housing design report
Creator:
Miles, Paul
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
70 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, charts, maps, plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Student housing -- Colorado -- Golden ( lcsh )
Buildings ( fast )
Student housing ( fast )
Colorado -- Golden ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 70).
General Note:
Cover title: Colorado School of Mines student dormitory.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Paul Miles.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09449602 ( OCLC )
ocm09449602
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1980 .M546 ( lcc )

Full Text
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES
STUDENT DORMITORY
DESIGN REPORT PAUL MILES
1
i
y
B
ARCHIVES
LD
1190
A72
1980
M54&
ARCH STUDENT PROJECT


1
1.
I
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES STUDENT HOUSING
. .. yv ? .

* . >. S-* ~ ..
* DESIGN REPORT
PAUL MILES
GRADUATE THESIS PROJECT UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO at DENVER
7 MAY 1980
1


TABLE OF CONTENTS
lo Introduction History Advisors
20 Goals
Project Goals
30 Facts
Existing Facilities Requirements User Description Site Selection Site Analysis Climate Analysis Zoning Regulations Building Codes
4o Concepts
Priorities
Program
Space Relationships 5o Needs
Space Requirements Parking Requirements
60 Problem Statement Design Problem
7o Solution
Building Design
80 Bibliography





Located 13 miles west of Denver, Golden, Colorado is the home of Colorado School of Mines. The school was founded in 1869 and established under Territorial control by an act of Governor Samuel Elbert in 1874. In its early years the school's primary concern was mineral development, as miners in the area were having difficulty recovering the precious metals which had brought them to the state. With statehood in 1876, Colorado School of Mines came under state control and granted its first diploma in 1882.
In recent years, the concern of Colorado School of Mines has been in providing a wide ranging engineering education. This education has taken on new urgency in view of the energy crisis, mineral shortages, and environmental concerns. CSM has committed itself to an engineering education which will reduce our dependance on foreign fuel imports and provide direction to the development, production, and use of scarce mineral resources. In addition to this, the school is emphasizing the need for environmental safeguards in its mining and engineering projects.
Currently, the school has a total enrollment of 2800 students from the U.S. and throughout the world. These students are exposed to a varied curriculum and are receiving degrees in 10 engineering disciplines.


i
Advisors
Mr. William Gordon Scott
Vice President for Business Affairs Colorado School of Mines
Mf. Carl A. Fawcett
Director of Student Housing and Student Center Colorado School of Mines
Mr. John Anderson
John Anderson Associates Architects Denver, Colorado
Mr. Ron Mason
John Anderson Associates Architects Denver, Colorado
Faculty Advisors
University of Colorado at Denver Mr. Robert Kindig
Mr. Davis Holder


TO BOULDER.
to o-Jer&JLlg



*CXDs BUSINESS DISTRICT
WASHINGTON AVENUE
)46
TO DENVER
kZ -*
TO BOutDER
CAMPUS GUIDE
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES Golden, Colorado
Qjck Copv Center) Research Center,
: Jrs Center)
KEY TO FACILITIES
1 Guggenheim Hu Aj'- srat
2. Berthoud Ha!1 G*-. g.
Humanities, Resource Commute,
3. Arthur Lakes Lip'S'*
4. U5.G.S. Offices Labors:.- es 5 Russell H. Vo;k C* mr.as.um
6. Field House
7. Power Plant
8. Coolbaugh Ha Chem.st'.
9 Chauvenei Ha! V r Bas : Ek "eer ng)
10. Stratton Hall
11. Cecil H. and Ida G'uduite u'C Professional Center (Geoph.s cs M -e'ai E: ~ cs, Computing Ceric' Ear:*- Mechanics Institute, Environmental Sc encesl
12 Nathaniel P H.i Ha Meta -gv 13. Engineering Ha Mathematics)
14 Publications Cer ter
15 Paul Meyer Hai: Posies)
16 Unit Operations LaPorator\
17. Alderson Hal! (Perceum 18 Alpha Tau Omega
19. President s Home
20 Site of Geo'ge R B'.*-Ha "c*
Mining and Bas.: E-i. -.9-21. Ben H. Parker St-aer: Center
22 Dining Hall
23 Randall Hall
24 Bradford Hall
25 Thomas Hall
26 Morgan Hall 27. Plant Facilities
28 Infirmary
29 Military
30 Plant Facilities
31. Warehouse
32. Tennis Courts
33. Brooks Field
34. CSM Research Institute
35. Rocky Field (Intramural F e>d 36 Sigma Nu 37. Kappa Sigma
38 Beta Theta Pi
39 Sigma Alpha Epsilon
40 Sigma Phi Epsilon
41. Nils A Swenson Intramural F eia *
42. Tennis Courts
43 Prospector Village
44 Prospector Park
45 Alpha Gamma Delta
46 CSM Foundation Inc (1800 Jackson Sfeet, G ide-
47. New Dormitory
48 Colorado Energ-. Research I'*?: lute
(2221 East Street. Golden not shown on mip)
AREA
MAP
(OVER)
TO MINES S*RK
*
8-06*0886





In 1975 Colorado School of Mines began an expansion program. This involved an evaluation of the school's facilities and the campus master plan, along with a proposed increase in the student population from 1600 to approximately 3000. Like many college campuses across the country, CSM was faced with a severe housing problem even without the student body increase. Up to this time, the school had arrangements with the Golden Ridge Apartments and the Quaker Square Apartments to house many students. This arrangement came to an end in 1976 when these two complexes converted their units to condominiums. Along with the expansion plans, this created a serious situation for CSM. Housing in the surrounding community was becoming very scarce and expensive and students were forced to find housing wherever possible, often far removed from the college. Administrators and students alike felt strongly that any expansion plans must include a new student housing facility.



At the time expansion was being studied, CSM's housing was inadequate in number and, in most cases, run-down and out-dated. Many students were housed miles from the campus itself. An important element of the CSM evaluation was the creation of a cohesive campus; a campus in which student life and activities play an important role. The best means of achieving this is to house students on the campus. The students themselves supported this goal. The engineering curriculum at CSM is demanding and the students felt a need for greater access to the school's facilities. By providing additional on-campus housing and eliminating long drives to and from campus, the problem is solved to some degree.
Another factor in the housing situation is the school sponsored summer conferences and seminars for postgraduate study and research. In the past, providing housing for the participants of these sessions has been difficult. Often entire families will come to Golden and stay through the summer while involved in the programs. Administrators felt it would be to their advantage if they could provide a housing alternative to these individuals. This could make the summer activities more attractive to the participants and the school could derive some income from the residence halls during months when they are normally vacant.


While the CSM administrators were making their evaluation, Mr. HIDEO SASAKI was studying the campus master plan. He found the campus to be discontinuous and chaotic; meaning the campus was not a clearly defined area and there was no order to the building uses. Mr. Sasaki saw the need to create a border to the campus. This could be achieved with the new student housing facility. It was agreed upon that the boundary would be established beyond which the school would not expand. Any future construction would be infill development within the borders, enhancing the intimacy of this small college community.




EXISTING FACILITIES
At this time, Colorado School of Mines had a student population of approximately 2200 students. The school had 4 residence halls housing 400 students. In addition, the school had 75 married student apartments and 250-300 students living in fraternities and sororities. Outside of these facilities, the students were forced to find their own accommodations in the limited and expensive housing market of Golden. Housing is available in the Denver area, but this creates problems which the administration of CSM would like to eliminate.


CAMPUS GUIDE
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES Co Wen, Colorado
KEY TO FACILITIES
1. Guggenheim Hill (Aar- n in: an. Quick Copy Center)
2 Berthoud Hall (Geclogv Research Center,
Humanities. Resource Communication' Center)
3 Arthur Lakes Library
4 U5.G5. Offices and Labo'-aior es
5 Russell H Volk Gymnast"
6 Field House
7. Power Plant
8. Coolbaugh Hall (Chem.st'Y
9 Chauvenet Hall (Min.r.g. Ba>: Engineer ng)
10. Stratton Hall
11 Cecil H. and Ida Greer- G'aa-i.e arc P'jfessional Center (Geophysics M -e-a* E: .~'orr. cs.
Computing Center, Earth Mec-ancs Institute, Environmenul Sciences)
12 Nathaniel P. Hill Hal Meta -'gs
13 Engineering Hall (Mathe^a: :s
14 Publications Center
15 Paul Meyer Hall (Pluses:
16 Unit Operations Laboratory
17. Aldersor Hall (Petro>eu"~
18. Alpha Tau Omega
19 President 's Home
20 Site of George R B' Hi Mining and Basic E^j c 3
21 Ben H. Parker Studen; Ce-:'
22 Dmmg Hall
23 Randall Hall ~~ ifaSord HST)
I
I
iant Facilities
28 Infirmary
29 Military
30 Plant Facilities
31 Warehouse 32. Tennis Courts
33 Brooks Field
34 CSM Research Institute 35. Rocky Field (Intramural F eid)
36 Sigma Nu
3Z KinniSitmi
MBeta Theta Pi
Sigma TTpTT *Epsilo
41. Nils A. Swenson Intramu-ai F eid 42 Tennis Courts 43 Prospector V illage 44. Prospector ^ark 4$ Alpha Gamma Ue'td 46 CSM Foundation, Inc
(1800 Jackson Street. G- 'Oe-47 New Dormitory
4& Colorado tnergs Research l-s; tute
(2221 East Street, Golder not shown on map)
TO IDAHO SPRIMCS
AREA
MAP
(OVER)
TO MINES PARK
EXISTING HOUSING
8-06-0886


The school's recommendation to the Board of Trustees was an increase in enrollment to 3000 by 1980. The school's housing facilities could handle only 800 students, roughly. It was concluded the school should construct a new housing facility for 500 students. This project would be divided into two phases. Phase One of the project has been completed and occupied in September 1979. This facility accommodates 244 students.
The new facility has proved extremely successful as the housing situation in Golden has become more serious. The residence halls at CSM are currently 100% occupied, with 150 students on a waiting list. As enrollment continues toward the 3000 goal (currently 2850), the need for Phase Two of the housing facility is obvious.


USER DESCRIPTION
The primary users of the residence hall will be single students at Colorado School of Mines. These students would be both male and female, from varying backgrounds, of various ages, and with varying interests. Generally, it can be concluded that these users will be between the ages of 18 and 25.
The secondary users will be the participants in the summer meetings at CSM.
These people are difficult to classify, but in the past, CSM has found them to be young professionals, many of them married and some with families. It is hoped that the new facility can accommodate people with this lifestyle with comfort and privacy.


Mr. Hideo Sasaki, in evaluating the CSM campus, made the following recommendations concerning the master plan. Of prime importance to Mr. Sasaki and the Board of Trustees was establishing a border to the campus and creating a sense of "community". The potential sites for the residence hall were evaluated as to how they would effect these goals along with other considerations.
REVISED MASTER PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS
1. vacate Maple street from 16th to 18th
2. establish 19th and Elm as second principle campus entrance
3. proposed "super green block" along water ditch between 16th and 19th
4. proposed diagonal replacement of street between Maple and Elm to
respond to existing diagonal of Student Center Building
(see revised master plan)




TO DENVER
TO BOULDER
CAMPUS GUIDE
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES Golden, Colorado
KEY TO FACILITIES
1 Guggenheim Hall {Administration, Quick Cops Center)
2 Berthoud Hall (Geology, Museum, Research Center, Humanities, Resource Communications Center)
3 Arthur LaVes Library
4 U.S.G.S. Offices and Laboratories
5 Russell H Volk Gymnasium
6 Field House 7. Power Plant
8 Coolbaugh Hall (Chemistry)
9 Chauvenet Hall (Mining, Basic Engineering)
10 Stratton Hall
11. Cecil H. and Ida Green Graduate and Professional Center (Geophysics, Mineral Economics,
Computing Center, Earth Mechanics Institute, Environmental Sciences)
12 Nathaniel P. Hill HaJI (Metallurgy)
13. Engineering Hall (Mathematics)
14 Publications Center
15 Paul Meyer Hall (Physics)
16 Unit Operations Laboratory
17 Alderson Hall (Petroleum)
18 Alpha Tau Omega
19 Presidents Home
20 Site of George R Brown Hal1 (new Mining and Basic Engineering Building)
21 Ber H. Parker Student Center
22 Dining Hall
23 Randall Hall
24 Bradford Hall 25. Thomas Hall
26 Morgan Hall
27 Plant Facilities
28 Infirmary
29 Military
30 Plant Facilities
31 Warehouse
32 Tennis Courts
33 Brooks Field
34 CSM Research Institute 35. Rocky Field (Intramural Field)
36 Sigma Nu 37. Kappa Sigma
38 Beta Theta Pi
39 Sigma Alpha Epsilon
40 Sigma Phi Epsilon
41 Nils A. Swenson Intramural Field /
42 Tennis Courts
43 Prospector Village
44 Prospector Park
45 Aipha Gamma Delta
46 CSM Foundation. Inc
180C Jacksor Street, Golden'
47 New Dormitory
48 Colorado Energy Resea'cr Institute (2221 East Street. Golden not shown on map)
TO IDAHO SPR sCS
AREA
MAP
(OVER)
TO MINES PARK
a 06 -0886
'
SITE ANALYSIS


SITE ANALYSIS
The Board of Trustees, Mr. Sasaki, and members of John Anderson Associates Architects undertook an extensive site evaluation of the campus area. Four sites were studied and evaluated against the revised master plan, existing facilities, and location, along with other items. Following are the results of their analysis
SITE A
T7~ established campus edge along 19th street
2. minimum land acquisition
3. farthest site from academic buildings and existing utilities
4. highest score on matrix
SITE B
1. site too small to effectively deal with parking and the building
2. favorable distance from academic buildings and utilities
3. scored 3rd on matrix
SITE B1
1. strong relationship with proposed street diagonal and student center
2. provided immediate "sense of campus"
3. favorable distance
4. land acquisition problems involved
5. scored 2nd on matrix
SITE C
T7~ very expensive to relocate existing power substation
2. too much density with buildings on that area
3. site too isolated from remainder of campus community
4. easy access to library
5. scored 4th on matrix


COMMENTS OF MR. SASAKI
1. Site B1 good but unrealistic in terms of land acquisition
and it does not establish campus edge.
2. Very important to create campus edge at site A.
3. Prefer not to consider any additional sites except A.
4. Site A should be investigated further in terms of first
phase housing being located at west side of ditch with expansion of second phase to north or east.
RECOMMENDATIONS OF MR. SASAKI
First phase housing should begin on the block between 18th and 19th Streets and Elm and Maple Streets.
Second phase housing to be between 18th and 17th Streets and Elm and Maple Streets.
These were the recommendations accepted by the Board of Trustees in 1976. This established the site for the residence hall; Phase One already being completed, Phase Two being the subject of this project.
y


I
[
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I
PHASE TWO
V SITE A



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RECOMMENDED SITE


TO DENVER

TO BOULDER
CAMPUS GUIDE
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES Golden, Colorado
KEY TO FACILITIES
1 Guggenheim Hall (Administration, Quick Copy Center) 2. Berthoud Hal! (Geology, Museum, Research Center, Humanities, Resource Communications Center)
3 Arthur Lakes Library
4 U.S G.5 Offices and Laboratories 5. Russell H. Volk Gymnasium
6 Field House 7. Power Plant
8 Coolbaugh Hal! (Chemistry)
9 Chauvenei Hall (Mining, Basic Engineer.ng)
10 Stratton Hall
11. Cecil H. and Ida Greer Graduate and Professional Center (Geophysics, Mineral Economics.
Computing Center, Earth Mechanics Institute, Environmental Sciences)
Nathaniel P Hill Hall (Metallurgy)
Engineering Hall (Mathematics)
Publications Center Paul Meyer Hall (Physics)
Unit Operations Laboratory Alderson Hall (Petroleum)
Alpha Tau Omega /'
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26 2" 28 29 3C
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
4~
48
Presidents Home
Site of George R Brown Hal! (new Mining anc Basic Engineer ng Bunding)
Ber H Parker Student Center Dining Hall Randal! Hall Bradford Hall Thomas Hall Morgan Hall Plant Facilities Infirmary Military Plant Facilities Warehouse Tennis Courts Brooks Field CSM Research Institute Rocky Field (Intramural Field)
Sigma Nu Kappa Sigma Beta Theta Pi Sigma Alpha Epsilon Sigmi Phi Epsilon Nils A. Swenson Intramural Field Tennis Courts Prospector Village Prospector Park Alpha Gamma Delta CSM Foundation, Inc (180C Jackson Street, Golden,
Ne* Dormitory
Colorado Energy Research Institute
(2221 East Street, Golden not shown or. map)
TO \ti\E5 C4RK

b-06-0886


SITE PLAN
t
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MAP US- *r
c'5
=5eie
502^
£LM
SITE PLAN


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i r

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901 <5

SITE PLAN


LVJIWI l UL>o
(Table Revised 1968. Base Period for Climatological Normals: 1931-1960)
e i Temperature * >- Precipitation Relative humidity Wind 4> C c Mean sky cover sunrise to sunset Mean numhi ol days
Normal Extremes 6 tJ 0) 0) "5 0 ~K E o z Maximum monthly - Minimum monthly w 4> > Maximum in 24 hrs. Year Snow. Sleet 5 AM S t M( 1 1 AM anC me X'N- * *5 * 3 O JC C TJ II A O' C = -c o |f CX X Fastest mile 3 > -Q s 8. ~o V a. unrise lo unset Precipitation 01 inch or more ti C o -/-d is CO to Thunderstorms j Heavy log T*mpe Max. ratures Min.
i Daily j maximum Daily minimum Monthly Record highest >- Record lowest ST TJ E o Z * o c 8 5 Maximum monthly "0 *> >- § 2 E -e 3 5 5 E A 1 i a to Direction % Year <0 m U Partly cloudy Cloudy 90 and above TJ 5 $ _2 n -O TJ S8 n jO S 0 1 X o
(a) (b) (b) (b) 8 8 (b) (b) 33 33 33 33 33 33 7 7 7 7 i 15 1 8 1 8 1 8 19 33 33 33 33 33 33 27 7 7 7 7
J 42.1 14.8 28.5 65 1 966* -25 1963 1132 0.55 1.44 1948 0.01 1952 1.02 1 962 8.7, 23.7 1 940 12.4 1 962 60 43 47 61 9.6 S 41 NW 1951 73 5.4 10 10 1 1 6 3 0 1 0 6 3C 5
F 44.6 18. ) 31.5 76 1 963 -18 1 962 938 0.69 1.66 1960 0.03 1949 1 .01 1953 8.3 10.3 1 960 9.5 1 953 67 45 46 66 9. 7 S 49 NW 1953 71 5.8 0 9 11 6 3 2 0 5 26 2
M 49.9 22.8 36.4 83 1963 - 4 1 962 887 1.21 2.89 1 944 0. 1 3 1945 1.48 1 959 12.6 29.2 1961 16.3 1 952 68 42 91 64 10.3 S 53 NW 1952 71 5.9 8 1 1 12 8 4 1 0 4 26 t
A 60.5 32.3 46.4 04 1965 1 3 1966 558 2.11 4.17 194? 0.03 1963 3.25 196 7 9.3 20. 3 1935 1 7. 3 1 957 65 35 31 56 10.6 s 56 NW 1960 65 6.1 6 1 1 1 3 9 3 1 1 0 1 4 0
M 70.5 41.8 56.2 91 1964 26 1967 288 2.70 7.31 1 957 0. 34 1966 3.29 1957 1.7 13.6 1950 10.7 1 950 68 37 36 58 9.8 s 43 SW 1 964 64 6. 3 6 1 2 1 3 10 6 1 1 0 2 0
J 02.0 51 .0 66.5 96 1963 40 1961 66 1.44 4.69 196 7 0.10 1940 2.77 1 965 T 0.3 1951 0. 3 1 951 75 42 4C 66 9. 3 s 47 S 1956 70 5.1 9 1 3 8 9 0 10 1 4 0 0 c
J 89.4 57.4 72.9 99 1 963* 48 1961 6 1.53 6.41 1 965 0.17 1939 2.42 1965 0.0 0.0 0.0 71 36 36 59 8.7 s 56 SW 1965 72 4.9 9 16 6 9 0 1 1 1 7 0 0 0
A 86.8 56.2 71.5 100 1962 41 1964 9 1.20 4.47 1951 0.06 i960 3.43 1951 0.0 0. J 0.0 69 37 36 59 0.5 s 42 sw 1962 72 4.9 10 14 7 8 0 8 1 9 0 0 0
S 79.0 47.0 63.0 97 1960 29 1 961 1 1 7 1.13 4.67 1961 r 1944 2.44 1 936 1 .6 21.3 19 )t 19.4 1936 71 40 36 62 0.4 s 47 NW 1955 75 4.3 1 3 1C 7 6 3 1 2 0 1 0
0 66.6 36.2 51.4 87 1967* 19 1964 428 1.01 3.41 194 7 0.05 1962 1 .71 1 94 7 2.9 11.8 1 959 $ 2 1 942 59 30 30 54 8.3 s 45 NW 1950 76 4.2 1 3 10 0 5 1 1 1 0 0 7 0
N 51.7 23.6 37.7 74 19674 - 2 1961 019 0.69 2.97 1 946 0.01 1949 1 .00 1 946 7.4 39.1 1946 15.5 1 946 67 42 4 9 64 8.9 s 48 W 1962 6 6 5.2 1 1 10 9 5 2 1 0 2 25
0 45.2 18.0 31 .6 71 1 964 -16 1961 1035 0.47 1.50 1960 0.04 1946 0. 70 1 941 5.8 17.8 I960 8.6 1 954 65 44 51 64 9.3 s 51 NE 1953 68 5.2 1 1 10 10 5 2 0 1 0 5 30 3
AUG. JAN. MAY SEP. AUG. NOV. SEP. JUL.
VR 63.9 35.0 49.5 100 1962 -25 1 963 6283 14.01 7.31 1957 T 1944 3.43 1951 58.3 39.1 1946 19.4 1936 67 39 40 61 9. 3 s 56 sw 1965* 70 5.3 114 1 36 I 1 5 07 1 8 41 1 1 32 23 162 1 1
d For period August 1960 through the current year.
Means and extremes in the above table are from the existing and comparable locations. Annual extremes have been exceeded at other lbcations as follows:
Highest temperature 105 in August 1878; lowest temperature -30 in February 1936; maximum monthly precipitation 8.57 in May 1876; minimum monthly precipitation 0.00 in December 1881; maximum precipitation in 24 hours 6.53 in May 1876; maximum monthly snowfall 57.4 in December 1913; maximum snowfall in 24 hours 23.0 in April 1885; fastest mile of wind 65 from West in May 1933.
O'
NORMALS, MEANS AND EXTREMES
(Table Revised 1975. Base Period for Climatological Normals: 1941-1970)
Means and extremes above are from existing and comparable exposures. Annual extremes have been exceeded at other sites nifrlnitaMJ^rntone lLln }878; |owest temperature *30 in February 1936; maximum monthly precipitation 8.57 in
"tion 0.00 in December 1881; maximum precipitation in 24 hours 6.53 in May 1876; maximum monthly snowfall 57.4 snowfall in 24 hours 23.0 in April 1885; fastest mile of wind 65 from West in May 1933.
in the locality as follows: May 1876; minimum monthly in December 1913; maximum
REFERENCE NOTES APPLYING TO TABLES APPEAR ON THE PAGE FOLLOWING LAST TABLE.
(Caution: Letters and symbols may have different meanings in 1941-1970 tables than in earlier tables. See notes.)
0


SOLAR ALTITUOE ABOVE HORIZON 90*
o
80
o
.70
SUN GLARE BECOMES VISUAL f'sQd... M WITHOUT CAP OR HAT
SUN GLARE BECOMES VISUAL PROBLEM TO CORNER OF EYE WITH PERSONS HEAD TURNED 90* TO SUN
SURFACE REFLECTION BEGINS FOR GAMES REQUIRING DOWNWARD VISION
60
SECTION
0e$£R*ATJ0N3 OF DIRECT SUNLIOHT AT VARIOUS ALTrTUOCS WITH DETRIMENTAL BLARE PROPORTIONAL IN MAGNITUDE TO THE LENGTH OF EACH ARROW.
SOLAR ALTITUOC ano SUNLIGHT CLEAR SKY FIG.


PERSON!: rAC!N0 >> THi. .RE r-OF THE Sw NS HAY WllL : direct sunlight proportional
IN MAGNITUDE TO THE LENGTH OF ARROW.
CHART CONSIDERS DETRIMENTAL SUNLIGHT OCCURRING WHEN SOLAR ALTITUDE IS BELOW 45.
\\ /r-rH-kV-f.
: v,\ : \ : j \
,2o ioa o 74* J R
SOLAR ALTITUDE and AZIMUTH
SUMMER 40N I FIG.
TRUE
NORTH
EVENING
MIT DAY
MORNING


TRUE
NORTH
-*0 DEGREES SOlAR ALTITUDE
EVENING
MID DAY
PERSONS rAC'NG IN TDIRECTION
CP r : f*s rays w; l eyerie;vce
L.RLC' u-N. jriT PRC r OR T: 1 ^ AL IN MAGNITUDE TO THE LENGTH OF ARROW.
CHART CONSIDERS DETRIMENTAL SUNLIGHT OCCURRING WHEN SOlAR ALTITUDE IS BELOW 45*.
SOLAR ALTITUDE and AZIMUTH
MORNING
SOLAR
FALL 40 N j FIG.


TRUE
NORTH
EVENING
MID DAY
MORNING
r rj s '* ::wg in T^r r won
OF TnE SuNS RAYS Wlu. EXPERIENCE DIRECT SUNLIGHT PROPORTIONAL IN MAGNITUDE TO THE LENGTH OF ARROW.
CHART CONSIDERS DETRIMENTAL SUNU3HT OCCURRING WHEN SOLAR ALTITUDE IS BELOW 45V
SOLAR ALTITUDE and AZIMUTH
SOLAR
WINTER 40 N I FIG.






ZONING REGULATIONS
The following are city of Golden recommended zoning ordinances applicable to this project. It is hoped that builders will conform to these regulations but they are NOT binding.
Zoning Classification: R-3
Building Height Limits: 35 feet
Minimum Front Yard: 15 feet
Minimum Side Yard: 5 feet
Minimum Rear Yard: 5 feet
Minimum Lot Area: 10,500 square feet
Off-Street Parking Requirement: 1.5 per 3 occupants
Curb-Cut Requirements: enter or depart from public traffic ways at approximately 90
minimum width 10' maximum width 24'
eight foot buffer strip


BUILDING CODE
PROJECT:
LOCATION:
APPLICABLE BUILDING CODE:
FIRE ZONE DESIGNATION:
OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION: CONSTRUCTION TYPE:
OCCUPANCY SEPARATION REQUIREMENTS: EXTERIOR WALL FIRE RATING:
EXTERIOR WALL OPENING LIMITATIONS:
FLOOR FIRE RATING:
ROOF FIRE RATING:
PARTITION FIRE RATING: STRUCTURAL FRAME FIRE RATING: MAXIMUM FLOOR AREA:
MAXIMUM HEIGHT:
NUMBER OF EXITS:
Colorado School of Mines Student Housing
Golden, Colorado
1976 Uniform Building Code
3
R1
Type 1
Not applicable
1 hour FIRE ZONE
3 not permitted less than 3 feet protected less than 5 feet
2 hour
2 hour 1 hour
3 hour
sprinkled unlimited unsprinkled unlimited sprinkled unlimited unsprinkled unlimited Minimum of two exits other than elevators
required when occupancy load is greater than 10.
Floors above the first story having occupancy load of more than 10 shall have not less than two exits.
The maximum number of exits required for any story shall be maintained until egress is provided from the structure
NUMBER OF STAIRS REQUIRED:
Two per floor as per exit requirements


BUILDING CODE (Continued)
DOOR WIDTH REQUIREMENT: Every required exit doorway shall be of a size as to permit the installation of a door not less than 3 feet in width and not less than 6'-8" in height.
STAIR WIDTH REQUIREMENTS: Stairways serving an occupancy load of more than 50 shall be not less than 44 inches wide. Trim shall not reduce the required width by more than 3%". Handrails may project from each side of a stairway a distance of 3V into the required width.
CORRIDOR WIDTH: Every corridor shall be not less in width than 44 inches This width shall be unobstructed.
TRAVEL DISTANCE/ DEAD END CORRIDOR LIMITS: The maximum distance of travel from any point to an exterior exit door, horizontal exit, exit passageway, or an enclosed stairway in a building not equipped with an automatic fire-extinguishing system throughout shall not exceed 150 feet or 200 feet in a building equipped with an automatic fire-extinguishing system throughout. Dead end corridors shall not exceed 20'.
STAIRWAY LANDING REQUIREMENTS: Every landing shall have a dimention measured in the direction of travel equal to the width of the stairway. Such dimension need not exceed 4 feet when the stair has a straight run. Landings when provided shall not be reduced in width by more than 3V' by a door when fully opened.
There shall be not more than 12 feet vertically between landings.


BUILDING CODE (Continued)
DOOR SWING REQUIREMENT:
STAIR & BALCONY RAIL REQUIREMENTS
RAMP REQUIREMENTS:
Exit doors shall swing in the direction of travel when serving any hazardous area or when serving an occupant load of 50 or more.
Stairways shall have handrails on each side.
Handrails shall not be placed less than 30 inches nor more than 34 inches above the nosing of the treads. They shall be continuous the full length of the stairs and, except for private stairways, at least one handrail shall extend not less than 6 inches beyond the top and bottom risers.
Handrails projecting from a wall shall have a space of not less than 1^ inches between the wall and the handrail.
Balcony rails shall not be less than 42" in height.
Open guardrails or stair railings shall have intermediate rails or an ornamental pattern such that a sphere of 9 inches in diameter cannot pass through.
Main exits from buildings requiring egress by the physically handicapped shall be usable by individuals in wheelchairs and be on a level that would make the elevators accessible where provided.
The width of the ramp will be the same as the stairway.
Ramps shall not exceed a slope of one vertical to ten horizontal.
The surface of ramps shall be roughened or shall be of nonslip materials.


BUILDING CODE (Continued)
RISER/TREAD LIMITS:
VERTICAL OPENING LIMITS AND FIRE RATINGS:
EXIT LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS:
The rise of every step in a stairway shall not exceed 7% inches and the run shall be not less than 10 inches.
Openings extending vertically through floors shall be enclosed in a shaft of 2 hour fire resistance.
Where a floor of any story is located more than 75 feet above the highest grade, one of the required exits shall be a smokeproof enclosure.
In other than Group I occupancies, an enclosure will not be required for openings which serve only one adjacent floor and are not connected with openings serving other floors and which are not connected to the building structure.
Every opening into a shaft enclosure shall be protected by a self-closing fire assembly and have a fire protection rating of one hour for openings through one hour walls and one and one-half hours for openings through two hour walls.
Shafts housing elevators and extending through more than two stories shall be vented to the outside.
The area of vents shall be not less than 3H% of the area of the elevator shaft, with a minimum of 3 square feet per elevator.
Exits shall be illuminated at any time the building is occupied with light having an intensity of not less than one Footcandle at floor level.
Exit lighting shall be provided with separate circuits or separate sources of power


*
BUILDING CODE (Continued)
EMERGENCY LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS CEILING HEIGHT MINIMUMS:
MEZZANINE RESTRICTIONS:
FURNACE AND BOILER ROOM RESTRICTIONS:
Stair shaft and vestibule must be provided.
Habitable rooms or areas shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7'-6". Other rooms or areas have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet measured to the lowest projection from the ceiling.
Mezzanine floors may be of wood or unprotected steel except that in Fire Zone 1 they shall be of noncombustable materials as approved for one-hour fire-resistive construction.
Not more than two mezzanine floors shall be in any room of a building.
No mezzanine floor or floors shall cover more than 33-1/3% of the area of any room.
Every room containing a boiler or central heating plant shall be separated from the rest of the building by not less than a 1 hour fire-resistive occupancy separation.
Any room containing a boiler or central heating plant must be provided with two means of egress when the following conditions exist:
1. room area exceeds 500 square ft.
2. largest piece of fuel-fired equipment exceeds 400,000 BTUH.


BUILDING CODE (Continued)
LIGHT & VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS
ROOF ACCESS REQUIREMENTS:
PENTHOUSE LIMITATIONS:
SPRINKLER REQUIREMENTS:
All habitable rooms within a dwelling unit shall be provided with natural light by means of exterior glazed openings with an area not less than one-tenth of the floor area of such rooms with a minimum of 10 square feet. All bathroom water closet compartments, laundry rooms and similar rooms shall be provided with natural ventilation by means of openable exterior openings with an area not less than one-twentieth of the floor area of such rooms with a minimum of lh square ft.
All guest rooms, dormitories, and habitable rooms shall be provided with natural ventilation by means of openable exterior openings with an area not less than one-twentieth of the floor area of such rooms with a minimum of 5 square ft.
In lieu of required exterior openings for natural ventilation a mechanical ventilating system may be provided. Such system shall be capable of providing two air changes per hour.
In every building 4 or more stories in height, one stairway shall extend to the roof surface unless the roof has a slope greater than 4 in 12.
The aggregate area of all penthouses and other roof structures shall not exceed 33-1/3% of the area of the supporting roof.
Are required in every story, basement, or cellar of all buildings except Groups R, Division 3, and M occupancies when floor area exceeds 1500 square feet and there is not provided at least 20 square feet of


BUILDING CODE (Continued)
SPRINKLER REQUIREMENTS (Continued)
DRY STANDPIPE REQUIREMENT:
WET STANDPIPE REQUIREMENTS:
opening entirely above the adjoining ground level in each 50 lineal feet or fraction thereof of exterior wall in the story, basement, or cellar on at least one side of the building.
There shall be a dry standpipe outlet connection at every floor level landing above the first story of every required stairway and on each side of the wall adjacent to the exit opening of a horizontal exit. Outlets at enclosed stairways shall be located within the enclosure.
Wet standpipes are not required in buildings equipped with an automatic fire-extinguishing system.
When required, wet standpipes shall be located so that all portions of the building are within 30 feet of a nozzle attached to 100 feet of hose.


Code Applications and Interpretations
UNIFORM BUILDING CODE
(All Interpretations are based on the 1976 editions, unless otherwise specified)
Section 1711 (b) and (c)
The following are illustrations of the toilet room facilities requirements contained within Section 1711 (b) and (c)of the 1976 Uniform Building Code:
s

DIAMETER OF 60' MUST BE PROVIDED IN EACH TOILET RM DOORS MAY ENCROACH 12".
FIGURE #1
ON TWO SIDES OR ONE SIDE & REAR MOUNT 32" TO 34" ABOVE & PARALLEL TO FLOOR BARS MUST BE SECURELY ANCHORED.
FIGURE #2
DOOR SWING THUS NOT ALLOWED
ENTRY DOORS SHOULD BOTH SWING IN THE SAME DIRECTION ONLY ONE DOOR MAY ENCROACH IN THE 44' MIN CLEAR SPACE
FIGURE #5
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UlLDINC STANDARDS. MAY-IUNE, 1979


TABLE 7.21.2 *
MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR FACILITIES 2,3,6
TYI'K OK Hinr.DiNO OCCUPANCY Water Closets Urinals Type of Fixture Lavatories' Bathtubs or Showers Prinking Fountain5 6 Ot her Fix t ures
\ssembly Maces o£ iVorship No. of No. of Persons Fixtures 1-150 Women 1 1-300 Men 1 add 1 ea-b. for each additional 150 women ^and 1 for each T5*0 men over 2i0. No. of No. of Persons Fixture* 100 Men' 1 i lw r
Assemblyother ban places of vorship (audito-iums, theaters, invention halls) No. of N<. of Persons Fixtures 1-100 1 101-200 2 201-400 3 Over 400. add 1 fixture fr each additional 500 men and 1 for each 300 women No. of No of Persons Fixtures 1-2no 201-400 2 401-600 3 Over 600. add 1 fixture for ea h 3 no men'. Nm. of Persons Fixtures 1-200 1 201-400 2 401-750 3 over 750. add 1 fixture for each p.-rsons. 1 for ea. 300 pc rsons r c 0 ne -slop Jp sink. ^ o
Dormitories School or labor, ilso nstltutional Men: 1 for ea 10 persons. Women: 1 for ea. 8 persons. 1 for ea. 25 m*n. Over 15>. add l fi x t ure fur t*a h 50 men*. 1 for each 12 persons, tSeparate d r.t:il lava-t"rn>. should be i r. v :. 1 *-^I in ii.iuunity toilet i Merits. A ratio o( l dei.t. 1 lavatory 11 rat h w I'flv'MM Is 1 "lllint lldeil ) l for each 8 persons. For womens dormitories, additional bathtubs should t>e installed at the ratio of 1 for each 30 women Hum 1j0 persons add 1 fixture fm ;* It 2u persons 1 Tor each 75 persons. "rennurry trays. 1 for each 30 persons. Slop sinks, 1 for each ^ Iho persons. X
dwellings )ne and two amily. 1 for e.ii h dwelling unit.* 1 f er ea h dwelling unit.* 1 for each dwelling unit.* Kitchen Kink & Laundry Tray or Trap > 1 for each !~ dwelling- unit.
)we!lf ngs Multiple or \ partmen t i 1 for eaol) dwelling hnit* or apartment. 1 fur ca< i TABLE 7.21J2
MINIMUM STANDARD FOR FACILITIES 2,2, (Coatd.)
TYPIC OF HUII.DINC >CCUPANOY Water Closets Urinals Type of Fixture Lavatories4 Bathtubs or Showers 9 Drinking* Foun tains Other Fixtures
rklng men porary title* 1/30 working men 1 /HU working men 1 ;::o working men 1 fixture or equivalent for each 10U working men.
cellaneo u.s ces which die uses or gregate.s Fat ill- Sc* pa rate ties Men Women 2 ea. and 2 ea. and 1 ea. 1 ea. addnl. addnl. 5i or 50 or Same as Public lildgs. tabtive) Separate for ea. sex. 1 each 5b or fraction
or Camps See standards for labor camps; effective August 1968.
-.oral all .upanciea Uaurant ;chen or :tary See Restaurant Sani ta t ion CRS. l!5:i fhapter 68 and Pules and Regulations Item 6 I enc h Sec F11S 1953 bapter 68 Rules And Regulations Item 8
All places that have employees oC both sexes sball provide toilet facilities for each sex
1. Where urinals are provided frtr the women, the same number shall be provided a.', for men.
2. Recommend* d.
3. The figures shown are based upon one fixture being the minimum required for the number of persons indicated or any fraction thereof.
4. Twenty-four lin*-al inches of wash sink or 18 Indies of a circular basin, when pmvid-.l will, water outlets for such space, shall be considered equi valent to one lavatory. When there is exposure to skin contamination with poisonous, infectious, or irritating: materials, provide one lavatory for each five persons.
3. Prinking fountains admit :. t In* Installed In toilet rooms. . .
6. GeneralIn applying this schedule of facilities, consideraten must be given to the accessibility of the fixtures. C. formity purely on a num* ri.-al basis may n.t result in an installation suited to the pihmI of the individual establlshmen For example, .schools .should be provided with tidier facilities' on tat h floor having classrooms.
T. If water closets to individual putiert room or ward room replace centiailzed facilities, enclosed water closets shall be directly connected to not it.ore than cu. (21 patient rooms or ward rooms, serving not more than a total of four (4) bcJ--.
c Mubb1 2 3** frt,intain hail n< *.onne*fr.i <> a water faucet or lavatory.
wel nit j near roon roup oms d w c d\v anc ing le h "Me u-'* ** th
laclliiics which a r- used or tntetiu* m be u>*u for ......... ale' cue...... l ti 1
*- - - i -* ... i n 1 ii rt <
*verv
COLOHADO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH


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Administrators and members of John Anderson Associates Architects had many discussions concerning the type of housing facility they wanted to create. It was decided early in these meetings that some alternative to the standard college dormitory was needed. The four older dormitories on the CSM campus are typical double loaded corridor gang bathroom arrangements. Administrators are not happy with this plan and do not feel it meets their goals. After much evaluation it was decided a suite configuration better satisfied the desire for an attractive housing alternative on campus for both the students and the people who would use the facility in the summer months.
This suite arrangement creates a more intimate living unit. The preferred concept is a unit consisting of 8-10 sleeping rooms (single and double occupancy), shared bathrooms and a common lounge for each suite. The suites are unified by a common lounge shared by all the residents.


Another important concept expressed by this engineering college was its commitment to the nation's energy crisis. The college feels strongly that the housing facility provides an excellent place to take a stand and make a statement concerning this problem. The college has recommended that solar energy be incorporated into the design. The engineering community and CSM's relationship with the Solar Energy Research Institute makes this an excellent place to evaluate solar systems as an energy alternative.
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LimBOLOTY


PROGRAM
1. STUDY/SLEEPING ROOMS
suite arrangement
carpeting important
takable, hangable walls and ceilings
draperies
more electrical outlets bigger closets
2. COMMON SPACE
in each suite fi replaces intimate space
3. RESIDENCE HALL DIRECTORS OFFICE/APT.
on ground floor two bedroom unit kitchen not required
4. CONTROL DESK
manned 24 hours security important easy monitoring/survei 11 ance minimize number of outside doors
5. MEETING ROOMS
for residence gatherings, seminars, organizations various sizes study rooms
able to subdivide for parties, movies, etc. 6
6. RECREATION ROOMS
television, ping pong, games, sauna, library, vending machines


PROGRAM (Continued)
7. LAUNDRY ROOMS
room to study while washing tables for sorting, folding
8. BIKE STORAGE
inside room preferred
9. MISC.
elevators
good trash disposal system
exterior spaces and landscaping important
better control of mechanical system
more storage
larger windows
bigger rooms
carpeting
larger beds
telephones
This program was developed in meetings with architects, students, and college administrators.


SPACIAL RELATIONSHIPS


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Phase Two of the student housing project calls for a facility housing approximately 250 students. Minimum space requirements are specified by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. These standards were exceeded in the Phase One building and the college has expressed the need of having the rooms larger still. The CCHE requirements follow:
1. SINGLE OCCUPANCY DORMITORIES
Living Quarters 108 SF
Toilets, washrooms, showers 12 SF
Recreational and Service 28 SF
TOTAL 148 SF
DOUBLE OCCUPANCY DORMITORIES
Living Quarters 190 SF
Toilets, washrooms, showers 28 SF
Recreational and Service 50 SF
TOTAL 268 SF
The CCHE recommends a minimum building efficiency of 65%.


Parking Requirement as stated in the City of Golden Planning and Zoning Regulations: 1.5 parking spaces for each 3 occupants 125 parking spaces are required


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HfiiMif Ir^lJ T
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r
The problem as outlined in this report is the design of a 250 bed (approximately) student residence hall at Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colorado. The administrators have studied various housing alternatives and have concluded that a suite type arrangement better suits their goals. The suites are to consist of 8-10 sleeping/ study rooms (both single and double occupancy), bathrooms, and a common lounge. "Livability", "privacy", "community" are important concepts which the college wishes to emphasi ze.
The site is located to the southwest of the main campus between 17th and 18th Streets and Elm and Maple Streets. This second housing facility should blend with the Phase One structure but shall have its own character. The context of the surrounding neighborhood shall be carefully considered. Solar energy systems have been encouraged by the college.
t


ILQJTOQRO


SITE PLAN
19th STREET
Colorado School of Mines STUDENT HOUSING
Golden Colorado


Colorado School of Mines STUDENT HOUSING
Golden Colorado


SCALE 1/16"*r-0
Colorado School of Mines STUDENT HOUSING
Golden Colorado


Colorado School of Mines STUDENT HOUSING
Golden Colorado


I
EAST ELEVATION
SCALE 1/16"* l'-0"
WEST ELEVATION
SCALE 1/16 '= I-CT
Colorado School of Mines STUDENT HOUSING
Golden Colorado


SUMMER SUN ANGLE
73'
HOT MR EXHAUST SOLAR COLLECTOR
CHMNEY EFFECT
WMTER SUN ANGLE
AJ27'
WINTER HOT MR DRAW-DOWN DUCT
UASONRRY THERMAL MASS WALLS ANO BALCONCS
CORRIDOR ACTS AS COLLECTOR
OPERABLE SHADING DEVICE

BEDROOM TOCETS
LOUNGE GREENHOUSE
HOT AR EXHAUST SUMMER CHMNEY.. EFFECT
CORROOR ACTS AS BUFFER
ROOF DECK
SUN POCKET
WITH BRICK PAVER SURFACE
SUMMER SUN ANGLE
73-
WHTER SUN ANGLE
X)!r
MASS WALL
BEDROOM
SCHEMATIC SECTIONS
Colorado School of Mines STUDENT HOUSING
Golden
Colorado


INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE
EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE
Colorado School of Mines STUDENT HOUSING
Golden Colorado


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19 SEPTEMBER 1979
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meeting with John Anderson background information
18 OCTOBER 1979
meeting with W. Gordon Scott background information site visit
7 DECEMBER 1979
meeting with Carl Fawcett i nformation site visit
Jefferson County Building Dept, zoning information
Golden Zoning Dept, zoning information
8 DECEMBER 1979
conversation with Ron Mason background information


SOURCES
1. COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES
STUDENT HOUSING/STUDENT CENTER #
DESIGN REPORT
JOHN ANDERSON ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS AUGUST 1977
2. COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES BULLETIN 1980-81
3. 1976 UNIFORM BUILDING CODE
4. CITY OF GOLDEN, PLANNING AND ZONING REGULATIONS
5. COLORADO COMMISSION ON HIGHER EDUCATION
"Guidelines for Selection, Long Range Facilities Master Planning, and Facilities Program Planning." 1975
6. William Pena, "PROBLEM SEEKING",
copy 1977, CBI Publishing Company
7. Tony Birks, Michael Hoi ford, "BUILDING THE NEW UNIVERSITY"
copy 1972, David and Charles Publishing Company