Citation
Curtis Mall, Denver, Colo.

Material Information

Title:
Curtis Mall, Denver, Colo.
Creator:
Hasegawa, Ryuzo
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
69 leaves : illustrations (some color), maps ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
City planning -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Architecture ( fast )
City planning ( fast )
Curtis Mall (Denver) ( lcsh )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 69).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Ryuzo Hasegawa.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09473371 ( OCLC )
ocm09473371
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1979 .H38 ( lcc )

Full Text
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CURTIS STREET SUMMER 1978


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CURTIS STREET SUIN/irviER 19"7Q
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SPECIAL ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:
I would like to say a very special thank you to the following:
1. JOHN M. PROSSER, PROJECT INSTRUCTOR at U.C.D. during June, 1978 to December, 1978 for your pushing lazy student (Ryuzo) to proceed with all research and designwork.
2. GENE BENDA, PROJECT INSTRUCTOR at U.C.D. during March, 1979 to May, 1979 for your proper advice for finishing up my project.
3. DAN YOUNG, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT for your interest and time during your very busy schedule since I was not a landscape architecture student.
4. BILL CHAFEE, DOWNTOWN DENVER, INC. for your interest and so many excellant suggestions for my urban design project.
5. FRIENDS surrounding me for the help you gave me in making the model and carrying the model because of the huge model which I made.
MAY 15 1379


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CONTENTS
8 INTRODUCTION
9 Chapter 1.
9 Chapter 2.
PRETHESIS STUDY PROGRAMMING
METHODLOGY
GOAL
BACKGROUND
PRELIMINARY DESIGN CONCEPTS Chapter 3. ANALISIS OF DOWNTOWN DENVER C.B.D. AREA
1. DENVER'S SOWNTOWN
2. MAJOR DISTRICTS
3- GENERAL LAND USE PATTERN
4. LAND USE k DENSITY
5. TRANSPORTATION
6. DESIGN & STREETSCAPE
Chapter k. DOWNTOWN DENVER CIRCULATION PLAN STUDY
1. PLAN CONTEXT
2. LAND USE
3. STREET NETWORK
4. PLANNING OBJECTIVES
5. LAND USE k DENSITY CONCEPT
6. TRANSPORTATION CONCEPT
7. THE RECOMMENDED CIRCULATION PLAN
41
Chapter 5. SKYLINE URBAN RENEWAL PLAN


Chapter 6. CURTIS STREET MALL DESIGN
1. ACTIVITY k LINKAGE MAP AROUND CURTIS STREET
2. PROTO SURVAY BUILDING FACADE
3. PHOTO SURVAY STREET-SCAPE
k. POSSIBILITIES k LIMITATIONS(TABLE)
5. FINAL DESIGN CONCEPTS
6. FINAL DRAWINGS
BIBLIOGRAPHY k DATA




INTRODUCTION
In today's rapid development of downtown Denver, we should consider what is the important factor for people's activity, what is the peoples amenity in the downtown area.
I was interested in learning these points during my studying architecture in Japan. Fortunately I had a chance to try design a certain area which contains so many important elements I should learn as a urban design student.
Therefore, I began to collect data and Denver planning office's proposals for downtown Denver because I was not familiar with downtown Denver and because downtown Denver contains complicated physical, social and economic factors like other big cities. In the limited school period, it seemed difficult to me to cover all categories by myself.
I cited analysis and proposals of downtown Denver, C.B.D. area from Downtown Denver Development by the Denver Planning Office, Downtown Denver, Inc. and also cited circulation plan study from downtown Denver circulation plan by R.T.D.
I 1




1. PRETHESIS STUDY SEE CHAPTER 3,4 5 B
ANAYLSIS OF ACTIVITIES IN DOWNTOWN DENVER CIRCULATION STUDY OF DOWNTOWN DENVER
PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY OF CURTIS STREET BY PHOTO SURVEY
2. PROGRAMMING
METHODLODGY
Site (Curtis Street) is not isolated in downtown. It relates so many factors that analysis of downtown Denver was the most important study at the first stage for proceeding this project.
GOAL
Creation of a people-oriented enviroment that stimulates participation in the activity on the Curtis Street between 17th Street (business core) to D.C.P.A. (Denver Center for Performing Arts) through the 16th Street Mall (retail core).
BACKGROUND
Curtis Street should be the principal linkage between the bus terminal, the 17th Street business core, the 16th Street retail core, the Denver Center for Performing Arts, Convention Center and the Auraria Higher Education Center. This street should be the important spine for linking actvities in the downtown area.
PRELIMINARY DESIGN CONCEPTS Phase 1
Volume of vehicles on Curtis Street between 14th to 17th Streets will



be low enough to permit some narrowing from the current 54 foot width to two moving and some parking lanes for streetscaped linkage.
Phase 2
Developing three surface parking lots along Curtis Street provides amenity and chance of activity for people.
* 1(1


CHAPTER


ANALYSIS OF DOWNTOWN DENVER
3.
Central Area Neighborhood Boundaries Denver Planning Office Neighborhood Planning Section
DENVERS DOWNTOWN
Denvers downtown already has the essential qualities of a good city center:
An excellent mix of activities including retailing, office space, banking, hotels, government offices, convention facilities, education, entertainment, museums, performing arts, and residential.
All of these activities located in a compact and walkable area.
A high density commercial core, with parallel shopping and office districts, providing downtown's central attraction and activity.
Public buildings and government office buildings closely adjacent to the commercial retail and office core.
Major parking facilities located generally outside of the core area.
Numerous tourist attractions such as the U.S. Mint, the State Capitol, Civic Center, the City and County Building, the Denver Art Museum, the Colorado Heritage Center, and Larimer Square.
Steady growth in terms of building floorspace, employment, and public investment.
Efficient transit operation supported by the linear, high density retail-office core.
The largest retail center in the region.
Continuing investment in public facilities including Currigan Hall, the Art Museum, the State Heritage Center, the Performing Arts Center, and the Auraria Higher Education Center, all of which serve both Denver and the region.
Adjacent neighborhoods providing a wide range of housing types and walk-to-work capabilities.
Planning for downtown must recognize the related land use development of adjacent areas. Downtown and adjacent neighborhoods should be mutually supportive of each other. Denvers central area has the advantage of having substantial residential areas close to downtown. Many adjacent areas have the potential for additional housing development, with related commercial activity, as does downtown itself. Downtown planning and development should assist recent trends toward the preservation of nearby neighborhoods and special historic districts, the reuse of older structures for residential development, and the increasing interest for living in and near downtown.
! 1 *


DOWNTOWN AND THE REGION
i
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BOULDER
COUNTY*]
Boulder
Brighton
Nonhglenn
Commerce
City
Arvada
Golden
Aurora
Lakewood
ARAPAHOE
COUNTY1
fj Englewood Littleton
JEFFERSON s' COUNTY
DOUGLAS
COUNTY#
DOWNTOWN DENVER
COUNTY
Downtown, the hub of the Denver area commercial, governmental, and cultural activity since the city's beginnings in the mid-1800's, is located near the center of an urbanized region of 1,500,000 population. Downtown provides a vital resource for the City and County of Denver and an urban focus for the region. Downtown continues to attract a significant share of regional growth and investment during a time of swift urban expansion away from the center and ever-increasing mobility for area residents. Downtown is a place of employment for over 80,000 people or 11.7% of the metropolitan area work force. An additional 82,000 people come to downtown daily for business, shopping, conventions, entertainment, education, and other purposes. Downtown provides about 12% of the taxable property valuation of the City and County of Denver on less than 1% of Denvers land area.
12


THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
Denvers downtown is designed and built in increments. Each decision for change, made either by a building developer, a governmental agency, an investor, an architect, or a business manager, becomes a part of the composite structure which is downtown. Given this type of on-going decision-making and development process, and the desire for downtown to evolve into a more unified and vital city center, the major issue in downtown Denvers future is how to coordinate or influence this process to build a city center more responsive to the needs of the people who work, visit, live, shop, or invest in downtown.
With the existing large number of businesses, property owners, and public agencies in the decision and development process, it is not possible or desirable to hold downtown to a pre-established overall design. However, accepted development concepts for land use, building density, transportation, pedestrian movement, and street design can guide and influence on-going decisions toward achieving a more interesting, efficient, and economically vital downtown. Accepted development concepts also provide a framework for future detailed analysis of specific areas, functions, urban design opportunities, and development regulations.
The key questions concerning downtowi development are:
SWhatmakes a good downtown? What gi' interest, activity and economic vitality?
How can Denvi arrangement, a
intial to
leverm
magnetii
low can the separate actions of numerous developers, property owners, managers, architects, and government agencies become more unified to S add or reinforce those things which provide attraction and activity, in downtown
DOWNTOWN QUALITIES
Vital downtowns have certain unifying characteristics. The best downtown areas have a combination of urban qualities that people find satisfying. Good downtowns serve not only the business and commercial needs of the city, but also as an expression of urban living: the cultural hub and psychological center of the region. People are attracted to them as special areas of the city because of their mixture of stores, theaters, offices, restaurants, museums, and public buildings. Good downtowns are stimulating in their density and diversity of activities, and their variety and contrast of building ages, sizes, and styles. They are interesting places for people to be because of their unique combination of urban spaces, architecture, and intense human activity.
13


MAJOR DISTRICTS
AURARIA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER
The Auraria Higher Education Center provides shared facilities for the Community College of Denver, Metropolitan State College, and the University of Colorado at Denver. This center will provide a wide range of educational programs in a downtown location, central to the region. All of the land for this center is owned by the State of Colorado and is zoned R-5 for public use. Major buildings in the center are connected by a walkway system which minimizes conflicting auto movement and provides an auto-free zone in downtown. Preservation and re-use of existing buildings include: the Ninth Street Park developed by Historic Denver, Inc., Tivoli Brewery, Emmanuel Shearith Israel Chapel, St. Cajetans Church, and St. Elizabeths Church. The Auraria Center is expected to serve about 35,000 students each day by 1985.
14
B-5 ZONE
Most of downtown is within the B-5 zone district. This zone permits the citys highest density of building development, allowing a building to be constructed with a total square footage ten times its lot size, and providing premiums of added allowable square footaae for building designs having either plazas, arcades, or upper-level setbacks. Off-street parking, within this zone, is required for new apartment construction and for new buildings in the Skyline urban renewal area. The trend of development in the B-5 zone is to cluster new high density buildings in the linear core area reinforcing the advantages of a compact, walkable, downtown commercial area. The B-5 zone is presently built to roughly one-third of its zoned floorspace capacity and ample opportunity exists for new development within the existing B-5 boundaries.


t
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GENERAL LAND USE PATTERN
Denvers downtown has a favorable arrangement of land use, building floorspace density, and employment density. The compact central core area of offices, stores, and hotels is bordered by adjacent districts of public buildings. These districts include the Civic Centeq city and state office buildings, museums, and main library; the convention-exhibition hall and the developing performing arts center; and the federal office buildings. The Auraria Higher Education Center adds to the vital function of higher education in downtown.
The Lower Downtown area includes older commercial and warehouse buildings, now being renovated for office, retail, and residential uses under the recently adopted B-7 zoning provisions. This area has the potential for developing into a unique district, providing architectural contrast to the larger new structures being added in the adjacent Skyline Urban Renewal project. Downtown has the advantage of having residential areas nearby. The adjacent Capitol Hill, North Capitol Hill, and Lincoln Park neighborhoods now fulfill a variety of central Denver housing needs and provide a walk-to-work opportunity for many downtown employees.

15


LAND USE AND DENSITY
The area between 14th and 18th Streets, Larimer, Colfax, and Lincoln Streets, should continue to become aj^tig^sL
The major new buildings 'being added to this core area, together with the renovation of older office buildings, and the upgrading of many of the stores, provides a trend that should be encouraged by private investors and public agencies. The core area activities of retailing and high employment density furnish the support for the development of other downtown activities and for improved transit service.
Keeping the core area a compact, high density commercial district benefits downtown, its employees and visitors, in a number of ways:
A compact core provides for easy pedestrian movement between businesses and keeps the various districts economically supportive of each other.
High employment density within the core area provides better support for increased transit usage.
Continuous building frontage without the interruption of driveways provides more walkway activity and more visual interest for pedestrians.
Conflicts between vehicles and pedestrians can be minimized as parking facilities are located mostly on the perimeter of the core area and emphasis is placed on pedestrianizing the high density linear core.
The strong retail-office core is the anchor for the other interrelated activities which make up downtowngovernment offices, hotels, convention facilities, residences, performing arts, museums, entertainment, restaurants, and education.
18


iir.vwi un i / k tu\
Downtown access is provided by various types of movement systemsautos and parking facilities, bus transit, pedestrian walkways, delivery trucks, bicycles, and internal bus serviceeach serving a certain function. The objective of these combined transportation systems is not the unlimited movement of vehicles, but rather to provide people with appropriate access to downtown places.
As shown on the concept diagram, arrival to downtown should be by means of:
Internal movement downtown should be by means of:
Shuttle transit between transfer points serving a 16th Street pedestrian mall.
Express bus service to downtown transfer points at both ends of the core area, with internal transit shuttle to final downtown destination.
Regular local bus service primarily on 14th, 15th, 17th, California and Stout Streets, with most routes having stops at the downtown transfer points.
Internal downtown bus service connecting the employment and activity centers and the transfer points.
Inviting walkways and improved sidewalks with the added amenities of planting, seating, lighting, and information signs.
Auto movement from arterials at the periphery of downtown to long term (2 hours or more) parking facilities at the edge of the core area, or to short term (less than 2 hours) smaller parking facilities within the core area.
Bicycle routes to and within the core area.
On-street loading zones should be consolidated on the named streets, where the block length is greater, to minimize conflict with auto and bus movement. Redevelopment of downtown core area properties should bring about the removal of those alleys which are inefficient as loading areas, or their redesign for safe pedestrian use.
! I i i i i \ i
TRANSIT TRANSFER POINTS
FUTURE TRANSIT O TRANSFER POINT
INTERNAL TRANSIT AND PEDESTRIAN SHUTTLE SERVICE
A MAJOR TRAFFIC -3 c ARTERIALS
------SERVING PERIPHERAL
PARKING FACILITIES
J TRANSIT ACCESS ^ TO TRANSFER POINTS
17


The core area should be extensively pedestrianized to provide a streetscape comfortable for people walking. This requires improving the walkway surfacing, lighting, public signs, business signs, seating areas, trees and planting, and the coordination of all of these items of street furniture.
DESIGN AND STREETSCAPE
Ease of pedestrian movement is critical to the vitality of downtown. Walkways are the 'lifelines enabling people to move between buildings, transit stops, and parking facilities. Denvers downtown core area, specifically, has a definite need as well as a unique potential for becoming an appealing area for people on foot because of its numerous attractions all within a compact and walkable area.
The major pedestrian areas and their interconnection should continue to develop as shown. The downtown core area, the Civic Center park and governmental district, and the Auraria Higher Education Center, are the major areas of pedestrian movement. The requirements of people walking within and between these areas, provides the basis for the design of downtown streets, walkways, and open spaces.
Major pedestrian linkages should be established between the Auraria Center, the commercial core area, and the Civic Center public buildings. Additional linkages should emphasize walkway connections to the performing arts center, the federal office center, the bus terminal, the Skyline residential area, and the neighborhoods adjacent to downtown.
Downtown sidewalks, plazas, and thru-block walkways function as extensions of building lobbies and retail floors. These public walkways should be better designed to serve this vital interconnecting role, with greater attention to detail, human scale, and interest for people.
Downtown street design must respond to the higher standards of environmental design being established by newer, single ownership commercial centers.
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(" ~) MAJOR DOWNTOWN
---- FUNCTIONAL AREAS
III! INTENSIVE PEDESTRIAN SYSTEM WITHIN FUNCTIONAL AREAS
PEDESTRIAN LINKAGES BETWEEN MAJOR FUNCTIONAI AREAS
SECONDARY PEDESTRIAN LINKAGES BETWEEN ACTIVITY CENTERS
PEDESTRIAN GATEWAYS TO ADJACENT NEIGHBORHOODS
18


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4. DOWTOWN CIRCULATION PLAN STUDY
THE PLAN CONTEXT
Today, downtown Denver is the center of the region, both physically and economically, providing an urban focus for many of the services and amenities required by the area. Unlike many urban centers, where central business districts are encountering massive blight, deterioration, and an exodus of commercial and business vitality, downtown Denver remains an attractive and economically viable center of regional activity.
In 1975, the Central Business District (C.B.D.) was the place of employment for over 72,000 people, or 12 percent of the metropolitian area work force. An equal number of people come to the central business district daily for business, shopping, entertainment, education, and other purposes. At an overall density of approximately 50,000 square feet per gross acre, downtown provides over 10 percent of the total property valuation in the City and County of Denver with little more than 0.7 percent of the Denver land area.
LAND-USE
The Denver CBD consists of a central core of high-density development, the redeveloping lower downtown area, and two urban renewal areas: The Auraria Higher Education Center and Skyline Urban Renewal Area.
The CBD economy is vital. While it is broadly based, office and retail land-uses account for almost 85 percent of the non-residential development. Since 1975, it is estimated that CBD office space has increased by 22 percent to over 16 million square feet.
STREET NETWORK
In 1955, the downtown street network was changed from two-way operation


THE PLAN CONTEXT
Today, downtown Denver is the center of the region, both physically and economically, providing an urban focus for many of the services and amenities required by the area. Unlike many urban centers, where central business districts are encountering massive blight, deterioration, and an exodus of commercial and business vitality, downtown Denver remains an attractive and economically viable center of regional activity.
In 1975, the Central Business District (C.B.D.) was the place of employment for over 72,000 people, or 12 percent of the metropolitian area work force. An equal number of people come to the central business district daily for business, shopping, entertainment, education, and other purposes. At an overall density of approximately 50,000 square feet per gross acre, downtown provides over 10 percent of the total property valuation in the City and County of Denver with little more than 0.7 percent of the Denver land area.
LAND-USE
The Denver CBD consists of a central core of high-density development, the redeveloping lower downtown area, and two urban renewal areas: The Auraria Higher Education Center and Skyline Urban Renewal Area.
The CBD economy is vital. While it is broadly based, office and retail land-uses account for almost 85 percent of the non-residential development. Since 1975, it is estimated that CBD office space has increased by 22 percent to over 16 million square feet.
STREET NETWORK
In 1955, the downtown street network was changed from two-way operation
I
27


to the one-way system which has been in effect, with little change, since then.
This network has been integrated with the surrounding North- South grid network of streets while at the same time permitting around-the-block circulation within the CBD.
PLANNING OBJECTIVES
The existing transportation infrastructure is in many ways straining to respond to current demands. With increasing activity brought on by imminent and projected growth in the CBD, more autos will be conflicting with more pedestrians and buses for the limited street space within which the existing CBD transportation network must operate. Unless significant steps are taken to reduce these conflicts in order to maintain a high level of convenience and accessibility, the vitality of the CBD will be adversely affected.
LAND-USE AND DENSITY CONCEPT
Denver's downtown development program should build on the activity and strength of its commercial core the area bounded by 14th Street, Larimer Street, 18th Street, Lincoln Street and Colfax Avenue. Future development of this core area should increase its compactness, density and "walkabi1ity".
The design of new buildings should respect the pattern of street activity and transit service as it keeps pace with the higher numbers of people using the area daily.
Downtown should continue to accomodate its share of the Denver metropolitan area growth, in the form of new large buildings clustered in the core. However, these buildings should be designed to contribute to street-level ped-estrial activity and interest. New projects in this critical core area, whether a new building, a renovation, a roadway or a transitway, should be judged on how well they assist the core area to attract, interest, and accomodate people.
28


Current projections indicate a steady increase in central business district floor space with a total of almost 35 million square feet by 1980. The number of CBD employees is expected to increase in a similar manner, reaching 92,500 by 1980.
TRANSPORTATION CONCEPT
The strong retail district on 16th Street parallel to the solid office and finance district on 17th Street serves as the vital linear, high density commercial core provides an ideal arrangement for transit service.
The 16th Street shopping district must be improved by keeping and increasing the pedestrial-oriented facilities at street level and by rebuilding the street as a pedestrian mall with shuttle transit service for shoppers.
In accordance with the downtown development plan, auto access and parking facilities should be made more convenient for drivers by routing most incoming traffic around the core area. Long-term parking space should be located at the perimeter of the downtown core. Short-term parking spaces should be provided within the core for shoppers, visitors and others who park for limited periods of time.
As building floor space continues to increase and generate more employees in the downtown area, transit service should become more available.
The trips by transit to the high activity core should be made as direct as possible, with express bus service to transfer points at both ends of the core area. An internal transit shuttle service should move people from the transfer point to final destinations. The dominant modes of movement within the downtown core area should become walkways, shuttle vehicles on the 16th Street Mall, add transit buses. On-street truck loading zones should be consolidated on the downtown's "named" streets in order to use the longer blocks to better advantage.
2$
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THE RECOMMENDED CIRCULATION PLAN
The Circulation Plan recommended for implementation will have the following major attributes:
1. Improved CBD access from the East and South.
2. More direct lines between the North South and diagonal street grids.
3. One-way operation on all major streets.
4. Adequate capacity to serve current levels of traffic at a quality of service equal to or better than that which now exists, despite the conversion of 16th Street to a mall.
5. Buses operating on essentially four CBD streets.
6. Potential to reduce overall delay to traffic on the downtown street system.
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EXISTING STREET NETWORK
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doWNTOWN dENVER ciRCulATlON STudy
LINK TRAFFIC VOLUMES: P.M. PEAK HOUR
19


CITY & COUNTY
STATE CAPITOL
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doWNTOWN dENVER CIRCuIaTION STudy
EXISTING BUS CIRCULATOR ROUTES /


doWNTOWN dENVER dRCllATioN STljdy
16TH STREET MALL
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on-street aus lanes NEW street or widening
CONSTRUCTION
TRAFFIC DIRECTION CHANGED
TRAFFIC DIRECTION RETAINED
OTHER PROPOSED STREET IMPROVEMENTS
INITIAL CIRCULATION CONCEPT
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CAPACITY DEFICIENCY
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IMPROVED CBD ACCESS
MODIFIED ALLEY ACCESS
NO EXCLUSIVE PEDESTRIAN SIGNAL PHASE
WIDENING ON ONE OR BOTH SIDES OF STREET


TRAFFIC CIRCULATION ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES INITIAL CIRCULATION CONCEPT
16


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RECOMMENDED CIRCULATION PLAN


doWNTOWN dENVER Cmcul-ATION ST
ASSIGNED TRAFFIC LINK VOLUMES: A.M. PEAK HOUR
39


doWNTOWN dENVER ciRCulATION STudy
ASSIGNED TRAFFIC LINK VOLUMES: P.M. PEAK HOUR
Figure 23




>
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
910 Sixteenth Street, Denver, Cclo 30202 303/623-7114
July 14, 1978
SKYLINE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT SINCE SPRING, 1977
DENVER SKYLINE CENTRE
Skyline Blocks 10 & 17
Developer.... First Hawaiian Development Partners Contact.....Paul Noel or Ernest Hixson
Address.....Suite 2400, Pacific Trade Center, 190 South King
Street, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
Phone.......(808) 531-0485
ESTIMATED COST____$85 Million
PROJECT...640-room luxury Sheraton Hotel; 465,000 sq. ft. office; banquet facilities; 50,000 sq. ft. retail
VOA RESIDENCE
Skyline Block 01
Developer....Volunteers of America
Contact......Jack Digman
Address......Sunset Park Apartments, 1800Larimer Street, Denver
ESTIMATED COST____$4 Million
PROJECT...100-unit residence for Senior citizens
ONE DENVER PLACE
Skyline Block 31
Developer.... Stellar Enterprises, Ltd.
Contact......Fred Jaremchuk
Address......#900, 703 6th Avenue, S.W., Calgary, Alberta T2P 0T9
Phone........(403) 264-3103
ESTIMATED COST___$55 Million
PROJECT UNDER CONSTRUCTION... 590,000 sq. ft. office;
50,000 sq. ft. retail
LARIMER PLACE
Skyline Block 05
Developer....L. C. Fulenwider, Petry Construction, L. C. F. Associates
Contact......John Whitney
Address......Prudential Plaza, 1050 17th Street, Denver
Phone........825-3071
ESTIMATED COST____$15.8 Million
PROJECT...168-unit luxury condominium residence with underground parking for 322 cars
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AGENCY
41


ENERGY PLAZZi
Skyline Block 16
Developer.... Same as SKYLINE TERRACE above
Contact......John Whitney, as SKYLINE TERRACE above
ESTIMATED COST____$38 Million
PROJECT UNDER CONSTRUCTION...490,000 sq. ft. office
with restaurant
WRITER SQUARE
Skyline Block 09
Developer.... The Writer Corporation
Contact......George S. Writer or William Nollsch
Address......7 605 South Trenton Drive, Englewood, Colorado 80110
Phone........771-2870
ESTIMATED COST____$13.5 Million
PROJECT...42 luxury units of townhouses; 82,000 sq. ft.
office; 70,000 sq. ft. retail; possible RTD transit/mall terminal underneath complex
BARCEL PLAZA
Skyline Block 28
Developer....Barcel Properties, Inc.
Contact......Jose Font
Address......270 Terminal Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia,
Canada V6A 2L6 Phone........(604) 683-9358
ESTIMATED COST____$48 Million
PROJECT...345,000 sq. ft. office tower; 163,500 sq. ft.
of professional office space; 131,500 sq. ft. of retail; and, 117 units of luxury residential condominiums
42




DENVER URBAN RENEWAL AUTHORITY
SKYLINE PROJECT SUMMARY OF DEVELOPMENTS
COMPLETED JULY 20, 1978 Floor Area (Thousands of Sq. Ft.) Resid. No. of Units Hotel No. of Rooms Development Cost
Block No. Name Developer Type Office Comm/Rot Other Opened
26-A Prudential Plaza Prudential Insurance Company of America and Del E. Webb Corporation Office and retail SOO.O 100.0 $ 23,000,000 2/72
2-B Skyline Park Apt*. Urban Housing Associates, Ltd., Denver 144 units of moderate and low rent housing (FIIA 236) 144 2,000,000 10/71
18-F Park Central Central Bank Building Corporation Rio Grande Industries, Inc. Leavell Enterprises, Inc, Banking and office 532.0 28.0 " 23,000,000 2/73
13-D Sakura Square Tri-State Buddhist Church Apartments Inc. Japanese cultural-retail center; 204 apartment units (FHA 236) ; remodeled Temple 35.0 204 4,000,000 5/73
2,12-E Sunset Park Volunteers of America Center for single, elderly, low-income people; 242 housing units (FHA 236) 19.0 242 4,900,000 5/73
12-0 Tramway Cable Building Tramway Cable Building Venture Remodeling of restaurant, offices 19.0 19.0 600,000 5/73
18 16,17 Skyline Park Phase 1 Phases II and III DURA DURA Public park Public park 40.0 80.0 610,000 1,060,000 10/73 11/76
15-J Fire Station City and County of Denver Fire station 7.7 -- 400,000 3/74
12-P Financial Center 0. Wesley Box Rehabilitation for condominium offices 31.0 " 750,000 10/74
29-T Denver Bus Center Four States Realty (Continental Trailways and Greyhound Bus Lines) . Bus terminal, restaurant, parking 150.0 7,000,000 4/76
7-M DrSvo Plaza Central Development Group Office and retail 100.6 20.0 12,000,000 4/77
27-G Denver Service Center Mountain Bell Offices Metro Denver Service Center 750.0 37,000,000 12/76
22,2J.S 32,33 Denver Center for the Performing Arts City and County of Denver Symphony hall, theaters, retail, galleria, off-street parking facility 50.0 (4,400 seats) 40,420,000 78-80
SUB TOTAL 1951.6 402.0 127.7 590 0 5156,740,000
VND EP co: .TPACT/CONSTRUCTION
1-U Sunset Park (Addition) Volunteers of America (VOA) 118 units, elderly housing plus nutritional center 118 2,720,000 1980
10,17-C Denver Skyline Centre First Hawaiian Development Partners Major hotel, convention facilities, office building 475.0 -- 640 84,000,000 1980
31-H One Denver Place Stellar Enterprises, Ltd. Office tower, retail space 250.0 65.0 - 28,000,000 1980
16-Y Energy Plaza Energy Plaza Associates (Fulenwider/ Petry/L. C. F. Associates) Office tower, restaurant 460.0 5.6 38,000,000 1979
5-1 Larimer Place Larimer Club Associates (Fulenwider/ Petry/L. C. F. Associates) 168-unit condominium residence 171 . 15, 000,0 0 0 1980
9-N Writer Square * The Writer Corporation 42-unit condominium residence, office building, retail space, RTD terminal 82.0 70.0 42 13,500,000 1981
28-V Barcel Plaza Barcel Properties, Inc. 118-unit condominium residence, office tower, retail 680.0 45.0 lie 48,000,000 1981
SUB TOTAL 1947.0 185.6 0 449 640 $229,220,000
GRAND TOTAL 3898.6 587.6 127.7 1039 640 $385,960,000


CHAPTER





l 2 3 4 5
o D & P T0,:>'EB o ARCH OF D.C.P.A. oSEQUENCE TO SKY- o BETWEEN 2 ACTIVE- NORTH SIDEJ
LINE PARK TIES(DEPARTMENT
> STRONG LAND- ~i STRONG LAND- STORE & RESTATE- OPEN SPACE WITH
MARK MARK o FACE TO NEAT RANTS) SOUND SCULPTURE
> PLEASURE OF FACADE OF FEDERAL
FORMAL IMAGE O LOW PRESSURE FROM RESERVE BANK & | o BREAKING STRAIT SOUTH SIDE (
n THE HEIGHT OF CENTRAL BANK BLDG . STREET PATTERN
w o 16TH MALL BLDG. (ROOFLINE) (POCKET SQUARE) o STRONG IMPACT
FROM ARCH
U ) STRONG RETAIL o LOW VOLUME OF * POSSIBILITY OF o THEATER(CHANGING
(0 ACTIVITY PASSING VEHICLES LINKAGE TO SCENE) o neat facade of
LARIMER SQUARE MT. BELL
in OPEN SPACE--PARK:- o 3 OPEN SPACES o WALL PAINTING
wrm ING LOT (PARKING LOTS) SANKEN PARKING BEHIND OPEN-
___ L0T( 4' -0" ) SPACE
IH| o NO PRIVATE OFFICEo SKYLINE PROJECT
BLDG. AROUND THIS * CLOSE TO LARIMER
AREA '> RESIDENCE SQUARE
1 (RELATION TO
MOUNTAIN VIEW PEOPLES AC- FACE TO RETAIL
-4 TIVI TIES) SHOP OF BROOKS
TOWER
m O NEAT FACADE OF
III BLDGS.
Ifl FEDERAL RE-
SERVE BANK
FISHERMAN'S
COVE
MT. BELL BLDG.
* PRUDENCIAL
PLAZA BLDG.
NORTH SIDE OF
BROOKS TOWER


FINAL DESIGN CONCEPTS
1. Winding street pattern
* Different street image from l6th street mall
* Sequence of different view for pedestrians
* Provide the exaggerated activities on the widened side walks
* Break the formal image
* Vehicles lane reduction to two lanes k loading zone
2. Curtis plaza *0*500 sq. feet
* providing the relaxation space for shoppers at l6th street mall
* Contains two main charactors: 1. Extend the formal image from Arapahoe street. To Champa street. 2. Relaxation space can be used for entertainment, relaxation and skate in winter time
3. Hill park 55*100 sq. feet
* 4' high structure above the sunken parking lot
* Provide retail shops, it makes the linkage from Curtis street mall to Larimer Square
* Behind shops, landscaped garden and the neat facade of Federal Reserve Bank provide the softened feeling and the different image in the downtown area
**. Curtis square 14,400 sq. feet
* New retail activity combined with theater
* Provide the image of pocket park in New York
47





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BIBLIOGRAPHY, DATA
1. Downtown Denver Circulation Plan, Denver, Colorado. The Regional Transportation District. September, 1977.
2. The Transitwa.y Mall, A Transportation Project in the Central Business District of Metropolitan Denver. I.M. Pei & Partners. 'Architects and Planners. November, 1977.
3. Downtown Denver Development Plan. Denver Planning Office. Downtown Denver, Inc.
4. Skyline Urban Renewal Plan, Denver, Colorado. Denver Urban Renewal Authority. February, 1969.
5. Downtown Denver Planning Data. Denver Planning Office, Central Area Section. April, 1977.
6. For Pedestrians Only. Planning, Design and Management of Traffic-Free Zones. Roberto Brambilla and Gianni Longo.
7. Recycling Cities for People, The Urban Design Process. Laurence Stephen Culter, AIA, RIBA and Sherrie Stephens Cutler, AIA, RIBA.
8. Exterior Design in Architecture. Yoshinobu Ashihara.
9. Cities. Lawrence Halprin.
10. Architectural Delineation. Ernest Burden.
Architectural Graphic Standard.
11.


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