Citation
Son Vida hotel casino

Material Information

Title:
Son Vida hotel casino
Creator:
Kusak, Albert A
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
76 unnumbered leaves : charts, maps, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Hotels -- Designs and plans -- Spain -- Son Vida ( lcsh )
Casinos -- Designs and plans -- Spain -- Son Vida ( lcsh )
Casinos ( fast )
Hotels ( fast )
Spain -- Son Vida ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 65).
General Note:
Cover title: Son Vida hotel casino, Spain.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Architecture and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Albert A. Kusak.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
16721560 ( OCLC )
ocm16721560
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1987 .K97 ( lcc )

Full Text
KftSAK
SON VIDA HOTEL
CASINO
SPAIN


Son Vida Hotel Casino
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture.
Albert A. Kusak Spring 1987


Albert A. Kusak
The Thesis of
is approved.
Joe Poli, Principal Advisor
University of Colorado at Denver Spring, 1987 r


TABLE OF CONTENTS.
1. Thesis Statement.
2. Background Information.
3. Maps.
/f. Codes.
5. Zoning.
6. Climate.
7. Program.
8. Guest-room layout.
9. Public Space.
10. Casino.
11. Administration.
12. Service.
13. Additional information. U*. Bibliography.
15. The Design.


1. THESIS STATEMENT


THESIS STATEMENT
Imagine yourself sipping a strawberry daquiri on the terrace of the club house after having played a round of golf. The view to the fairways and the green surroundings on this cool summer evening are soothing. It is 8 O'clock and the sun is going down over the bay. Yesterday you were two hours away by plane in some large European city with noise and crowds all around you, worrying about your last business deal, but now you have left your worries behind to go to the Island for a holiday for the weekend. You take another sip of the drink and the idea that you don't have to drive feels wonderful. Just 200 feet away is your Hotel. In a few minutes you will be showering in the beautiful tiled bath of your luxurious room. Faintly in the background you can hear what you came to this beautiful oasis of pleasure for. The coins tinkle and you hear the cries of a lucky winner, could that be you?, the lights glitter and...
Pleasure, the feeling of sensual pleasure is what Hotels are all about. The vacationer of today has different expectations than the traveler of the past. He is more discerning and looks for higher quality in a Hotel. He wants to leave his worries behind. A Hotel will become his house for a few days, or a few weeks and if we want him to return we must make sure his stay was a pleasureable one.
In the past a Hotel was just a place to stay, today that will not do. A guest expects to be pampered. A blend
t
of relaxation and amenities must be at hand to keep a guest satisfied. A hotel is more than just a sleeping area. Regardless of its size it has become a small city within itself.
It has great rooms, superb dining and service and a variety of amenities; nightclubs, golf, tennis, swimming, gambling.


Hotels are pleasure merchants, but this is not sufficient to make it succesful. Quality is the most important aspect of life and Design. Anybody can design a place with rooms, a night-club a bar and tennis courts, but this does not guarantee succes. Quality must be also present. There are some places that exude this feeling; it is a feeling that touches our very soul. Quality sets the whole feeling and mood of the space. Pirsig in "The Art of Motorcycle Maintanenance" describes this feeling:
"Reaching from mystery into deeper mystery, it is the gate to the secret of all life.
Quality is all-pervading.
And its use is inexhaustible!
Fathomless!
Like the fountainhead of all things...
Yet crystal clear like water it seems to remain.
I do not know whose Son it is.
An image of what existed before God.
...Continuously, continuously it seems to remain. Draw upon it and it serves you with ease...
Looked at but cannot be seen... listened to but cannot be heard... grasped at but cannot be touched... these three elude all our inquiries and hence blend and become one." p227.
My design idea is a very simple one; QUALITY. It is a very subjective notion, but once it is present it can be felt by almost anyone.
My proposal is to create a quality design with a unique architectural image that will stand apart, yet in harmony with its surroundings. The fifty room Hotel-Casino will be a first class hotel that will emphasize relaxation and the pleasures of life.


2. BACKGROUND INFORMATION


BACKGROUND INFORMATION.
SON VIDA is just three miles north-west of Palma de Mallorca. The site is adjacent to the golf-club house with a lot size of 12641 m2 (136,015 ft2).
Thirty years ago Son Vida was a estate for a rich noble of the area. When he sold the property the casttle was converted into a grand-luxury hotel. An 18 hole golf-course, a tennis hotel and equestrian center were built. The resort which is about 1000 acres has lots which are a minimum size Of 1/2 acre. The zoning which allows only for 1/3 of the lot area to be built has created a community of large houses with lots of green spaces around them.
Son Vida is located on the foothills so that one half of the lots have views to the city of Palma and most of the bay.
The site is located on the flat part of the resort so that the views from it are mainly to the golf course. The winds are predominantly from the north, but they are not severe because the foothills act as a barrier.
Vegetation consists mainly of pines and brush, Although if properly watered most any plant will grow. The houses around the site have an almost tropical landscape. Use of Palm trees is encouradged.
The resort is in a quiet area so the casino which will surely generate a good deal of noise will have to be soundproofed
The context is very limited, the original building was the casttle built of masonary and with a typical tower. The club-house which is right next to the site, and other residences surrounding the area are built in a vernacular mediterranean style. Most of them have pitched roofs with tiles, unlike other mediterranean style which tends to have flat roofs and white walls.


Ten years ago gambling was legalized in Spain. The Island of Mallorca which gets most of its revenues through tourism needs a luxury hotel and casino. While it may be true that there are already two hotels in Son Vida, these cater to a different market. The casttle hotel is a peaceful, quiet place which attracts the older european crowd. The Racquet-club hotel caters mostly to golf players. With Palma only a few minutes away Son Vida would be the prime location for a casino hotel. The casino would attract both the local people (Palma has a population of 500,000) and the tourists.
My objective is to produce a fine architectural design that will have a unique image and at the same time will blend well with the local architecture. Due to lot size limitations the maximum buildable are will be !f5,000 ft2 which will house a 50 room hotel, and a 10000 ft2 casino. The hotel will have to be extremely luxurious in order to stay competitive with the area.
The quality of the spaces will be of upmost importance.
I propose to equally design architecture, landscaping and interior spaces. Attention to detail and the extra amenities that make a hotel special will be incorporated into the design.




} f
3. MAPS.





Zf. CODES.


BUILDING CODES
1932 UNIFORM BUILDING CODE2
JCCUF'ANCV CLASS IFI CAT I QMS
HOTEL: R 1
RETAIL: B-2
RESTAURANT: B-2
PARKING GARAGE: B-3
CONSTRUCTION CLASSIFICATIONS
HOTEL: I
RETAIL: I I
RESTAURANT: I I I
PARKING GARAGE: I I
ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA
AREAS OF BUILDINGS OVER ONE STORY
The total combined twice that permitted
Tor multistory buildings may be story buildings, and the -floor area of any single story exceed that permitted -for a one-story building.
f1oor area for one-shal1 not
BASEMENTS *11 owab 1 e story nor
- A basement need not be included in the total area, provided such basement does not qualify as a exceed the area permitted for a one-story building.
MAXIMUM HEIGHT OF BUILDINGS
The height of the building is the vertical distance above grade to the highest point of the structure. The measurement i taken from the highest ground surface within a five foo horizontal distance of the exterior wall of the building, when such ground surface is not more than 10 feet above grade. The maximum building height is unlimited.
The clear height of a parking tier shall be not less than 7
f eet.
Structures with open sides three-fourths of building perimeter may be increased 1 tier in weight. Structures with sides open around entire building perimeter may be increased 1 tier in height.
Open parking garage constructed to height less than the maximum may have individual tier areas exceeding those otherwise permitted, provided the gross tier area of the structure does not exceed that permitted for the higher structure.
r+- in


ROOM DIMENSIONS
CEILING HEIGHTS Habitable space shall have a ceiling height o-f not less than 7 -feet 6 inches except otherwise permitted in this section. Kitchens, halls, bathrooms and toilet compartments may have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet measured to the lowest projection from the ceiling. Where exposed beam ceiling members are spaced at less than 48 inches on center, ceiling height shall be measured to the bottom of these members. Where exposed beam ceiling members is not less than 7 feet above the f1oor.
If any room in any building has a sloping ceiling, the prescribed ceiling height for the room is required in only one half the area thereof. No portion of the room measuring less than 5 feet from the finished floor to the finished ceiling shall be included in any computation of the minimum area thereof.
FLOOR AREA Every dwelling unit shall have at least one room which shall have not less than 150 square feet of f1oor area. Other habitable rooms except kitchens shall have an area of not less than 70 square feet. Habitable rooms other than a kitchen shall be not less than 7 feet in any dimension.
FIRE RATINGS
Occupancies more than two than 3000 square feet of floor be not less than one-hour fire r
stories in height or having more area above the first storv shall esistive construction throughout.
Storage or laundry rooms that are within Group R, Division 1 Occupancies that are used in common be tenants shall be separated from the rest of the building by not less than one-hour fire-resistive occupancy separation.
Every hotel three stories or more in height or containing 20 or more guest rooms shall have an approved fire alarm system as specified in the Fire Code.
Every guest room in a hotel used for sleeping purposes shall be provided with smoke detectors conforming to U.E>.C. Standard No. 43-6. In dwelling units, smoke detectors shall be mounted on the ceiling or wall at a point centrally located in the corridor or area giving access to rooms used for sleeping purposes.
EXIT FACILITIES
Every sleeping room below the fourth story shall have at least one operable window or exterior door approved for emergency excape or rescue. The units shall be operable from the inside to provide a full clear opening without the use of separate tools.
All escape or rescue windows from sleeping rooms shall have a minimum net clear opening of 5.7 square feet. The minimum net


clear opening height dimension shall be 24 inches. The minimum net clear opening width dimension shall be 20 inches. Where windows are provided as a means of escape or rescue they shall have a -finished sill height not more than 44 inches above the f1oor.
LIGHT. VENTILATION AND SANITATION
LIGHT AND VENTILATION All guest rooms shall be provided with natural light by means o-f exterior glazed openings with an area not less than one tenth o-f the -floor area of such rooms with a minimum of 10 square feet. All bathrooms, water closet
compartments, laundry rooms and similar rooms shall be provided with natural ventilation by means of openable exterior openings with an area not less than one twentienth of the floor area of such rooms with a minimum of 1.5 square feet.
A1 1 guest rooms shal1 be provided with natural v ent i1 ati on
by means of openable exterior openi ngs with an area of not less
than one twentieth of the f1oor area of such rooms with a minimum
of 5 squar e feet.
I n lieu of required ex teri or open ings for natural
ventilation, a mechanical ventilating system may be provided. Such system shall be capable of providing two air changes per hour in all guest rooms. One fifth of the air supply shall be taken from the outside. In bathrooms, water closet, compartments, laundry rooms and similar rooms a mechanical ventilation system connected directly to the outside, capable of providing five air changes per hour, shall be provided.
For the purpose of determining light and ventilation requirements, any room may be considered as a portion of an adjoining room when one half of the area of the common wall is; open and unobstructed and provides an opening of not less than one tenth of the floor area of the interior room or 25 square feet, whichever is greater.
Required exterior openings for natural light and ventilation shall open directly onto a street or public alley or yard or court located on the same lot as the building.
SANITATION Every building shall be provided with at least one water closet. Every hotel or subdivision thereof where both sexes are accommodated shall contain at least two separate toilet facilities which are conspicuously identified for male or female use, each of which contains at least one water closet.
HEATING Every dwelling unit and guest room shall be provided with heating facilities capable of maintaining a room temperature of 70 degrees farenheit, at apoint 3 feet above the floor in all habitable rooms.


YARDS AND COURTS
YARDS Every yard shall be not less than 3 feet in width -for one-story and two-story buildings. For buildings more than two stories in height, the minimum width of the yard shall be increased at the rate of 1 foot for each additional story. For buildings exceeding 14 stories in height, the required width of yard shall be computed on the basis of 14 stories.
COURTS Every court shall be not less than 3 feet in width. Courts having windows opeining on opposite sides shall be not less than 6i feet in width. Courts bounded on three or more sides by the walls of the building shall be not less than 10 feet high unless bounded on one end by a street or yard. For buildings more than two stories in height, the court shall be increased 1 foot ih width and 2 feet in length for each additional story. For buildings exceeding 14 stories in height, the required dimensions shall be computed on the basis of 14 stories.
Adequate access shall be provided to the bottom of all courts for cleaning purposes. Every court more than two stories in height shall be provided with a horizontal air intake at the bottom not less than 10 square feet in area and leading to the exterior of the building unless abutting a yard or public space. The construction of the air intake shall be as required for the court walls of the building, but in no case shall be less than one-hour fire resistive.
ACCESS TO BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES
Buildings containing more than 20 guest rooms shall be accessible to the physically handicapped by a level entry, ramp or elevator. The number of guest rooms accessible to the
physically handicapped shall be not less than the fallowing:
21 through 99 one unit
100 and over one, plus one for each additional 100 units
or fraction thereof
To determine the total number of accessible units, more than one structure on a building site shall be considered as one building. Habitable rooms, bathrooms, toilet compartments, halls and utility rooms in units that are required to be accessible to the physically handicapped shall be accessible by level floors, ramps or elevators, and doorways to such rooms shall have a clear unobstructed width of not less than 32 inches.
TYPE I FIRE RESISTIVE BUILDIMGS
DEFI PI ITION The structural elements in Tvpe I fire resistive buildings shall be? of steel, iron, concrete or masonry.


Walls and permanent partitions shall be of noncombustible f i r e-resi st i ve construction except that permanent nonbearing partitions of one-hour or two-hour -fire resistive construction, which are not part o-f a shaft enclosure, may have fire-retardent treated wood within the assembly.
OPENINGS* IN WALLS -All openings in exterior walls shall be protected by a fire assembly having a threefourths-hour fire protection rating when they are less than 20 feet from an adjacent property line or the center line of a street or public space.
m
FLOORS Where wood sleepers are used for laying wood flooring on masonry or concrete fire-resistive floors, the space between the floor slab and the underside of the wood flooring snail be filled with noncombustible material or fire-stopped in such a manner that there will be no open spaces under the flooring which will exceed 100 square feet in area and such space shall be filled solidly under all permanent partitions so that there is no communication under the flooring between adjoining rooms.
STAIR CONSTRUCTION Stairs and stair platforms shall be constructed of reinforced concrete, iron or steel with treads and risers of concrete, iron, or steel. Brick, marble, tile or other hard noncombustible materials bay be used for the finish of such treads or risers.
ROOFS Roofs and their members other than the structural frame more than 25 feet above any floor, balcony or gallery may be of unprotected noncombustible materials.
AUT0NATIC 5FF:INKLER SVSTEIj When provided, the automatic sprinkler system shall be designed using the parameters set forth in the U.B.C. Standard No. 38-1 and the following: Shutoff valves and water flow device shall be provided for each floor. The sprinkler riser may be? combined with the standpipe riser.
OCCUPANT LOAD
determining occupant load, all portions of a building presumed to be occupied at the-same time.
EXITS REQUIRED Every building or usable portion thereof shall have at least one exit, not less than two exits and additional exists as required by this section.
For purposes of this section, basements and occupied roots shall be provided with exits as required for stories.
The second story shall be provided with not less than two exits when the occupant load is 10 or more. Occupants on floors
I n
shal1 be EXITS


above the second story and in basements less than two separate exits -from the f! story or portion thereof having an occuf shall have not less than three? exits, thereof having an occupant load o-f 1001 less than -four exits. The number of story of a building shall be determine! load of that story plus the percentage t floors which exit through the level foilows:
1. Fifty percent of the occup; adjacent story above and the below, when a story below exi consi derat i on.
2. Twenty-five percent of the c
WIDTH The total width of exits in fe the total occupant load served divided by 50. Such width of exits shall be divided approximately equally among the separate exits, The total exit width reouired from any story of a building shall be determined by using the occupant load of that story plus the percentages of the occupant loads of floors which exit throught the level under consideration as follows :
1. Fifty percent of the occupant load in the first adjacent story above the first adjacent story below, when a story below exits throught the level under consideration.
2. Twentyfive percent of the occupant load in the story of a building shall be maintained.
shal 1 have ac cess t o not
oor or b as ement. Every
lant lo ad of 5 01 to 1000
Every story or por t i on
or mor e sha 1 I have not
>x its r equi r ed f r om any
1 b y u s i ng th e occ upant
if the occup an t 1 oad s of
li nder cons i d eration as
int load i n the first
' firs t ad j a cent story
. through th 1 evel Linder
upant 1 oad .i n the story
j acent st or y
shal 1 be n ot 1 ess than
ARRANGEMENT GF EXITS If only two exits are required, they shall be placed a distance apart equal to not less than one half of the length of the maximum overall diagonal dimension of the building or area to be served measured in a straight line between exits. When three or more exits are required, they shall be arranged a reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes blocked the others will be available.
DISTANCE TO EXITS The maximum distance to travel from any point to an exterior exit door, horizontal exit, exit passageway or an enclosed stairway in a building not equipped with an automatic sprinkler system throughout shall not exceed 150 feet, or 200 feet in a building equipped with an automatic sprinkler system throughout. These distances may be increased by 100 feet when the last 150 feet is within a corridor.
DOORS This section shall apply to every exit door serving an area having an occupant load of 10 or more, or serving hazardous rooms or areas.


( Ex it doors s hall s w i ng i n
vi ng any haza rdous ar ea or
DC cupan t 1oad of 5 0 or mor e.
Double-acti ng doors shal 1
th e fol lowing corid i t i on s e xits:
1. The occup ant load serve
The door is part of a f
* The door i s part of a s
4. Panic har dware is r equi
A double-act ing door shal 1
no t less than 200 squ are in
the direction of exit travel when when serving an area having an
of
100 or more.
asseinbl y.
CORF: I DORS AND EXTERIOR EXIT BALCONIES
This section shall apply to every corridor required exit -for an occupant load o-f 10 or more.
servino
as
WIDTH Every corridor serving an occupant load o-f 10 or more shall be not less than 44 inches in width. Regardless o-f the occupant load, corridors in Group R, Division 1 Occupancies shall have a minimum width of 36 inches.
HEIGHJ Corridors shall have a clear height of not less than feet measured to the lowest projection from the ceiling.
ACCESS When more than one exit is required;, they shall be arranged that it is possible to go in either direction from point in a corridor to a separate exit, except for dead ends exceeding 20 feet in length.
7
so
any
not
stairway;
Every s building or p this section.
load of 49 i F'r i vate stai i
wa y h a v i ng two or more ri ser s np er vi ng any
on thereo f s hall n 0 mj -u orm to th e requ i r ernent s of
i s ervi ng an occupant 1oad of 5 0 or more shal1 be
i n ches in wi dth. St airways s ervi ng an occupant
es s shal1 be not 1 ess than 36 i nches i n width.
S servi ng an 0 n n -tpant load of 1 ess t h an 10 shal1
30 i nches i n width. '
se of every step in a stai rwav shal 1 be not less
than 4 inches nor greater than 7.5 inches. Except as permitted, the run shall be not less than 10 inches as measured horizontally between the vertical plances of the furthermost projection of adjacent treads. The largest tread run within any flight of stairs shall not exceed the smallest by more than three-eighths of an inch. The greatest riser height within any flight of stairs shall not exceed the smallest by more than three-eighths of an inch.


AND I NG8 Every landing shall have a dimension measured in the direction of travel equal to the width of the stairway. Such dimension need not exceed 4 -feet when the stair has a straight run. A door swinging over the landing shall not reduce the width of the landing to less than one half its required width at any position in its swing nor by more than 7 inches when fully open.
BASEMENT STAIRNAYS When an upper story terminate barrier shall be provided into the basement.
a basement stairway and a stairway to the same e:: i t enclosure, an approved to prevent persons from continuing on
DISTANCE BETWEEN LANDINGS There shall be not more than 12 feet vertically between landings.
HANDRAILS Staiways shall have handrails on each side, and every stairway required to be more than 88 inches in width shall be provided with not less than one intermediate handrai1 for each 88 inches of required width. Intermediate handrails shall be spaced approximately equally across with the entire width of the stai rway.
RAMPS
Ramps used as exits shall conform to the provisions of this sect i on.
WIDTH The width of ramps shall be as required for stairways.
SLOPE The slope of ramps shall be not steeper than 1 vertical to 12 horizontal. The slope of other ramps shall not be steeper than 1 vertical to 8 horizontal.
LAND I NG ; g - Ramps h a
hor i z on t al shal 1 h a
1 east one i ntermed i a
of r i s t? Top 1 an d i
d i men si on measur ed i
5 f ee t. Landi ng s at
in th e (dir ect i on or r
ving slopes steeper than 1 vertical ve landings at the top and bottom, te landing shall be provided for each ngs and intermediate landings shall n the direction of ramp run of not le the bottom of ramps shall have a di amp run of not less than h feet.
to 15 and at 5 feet have a ss than men si on
Doors in any position shall not reduce the minimum dimension of the landing to less than 42 inches and shall not reduce the required width by more than 3.5 inches when fully opened.
HANDRAIL5 Ramps having slopes steeper than 1 vertical to 15 horizontal shall have handrails as- required bor stairways, except that intermediate handrails shall not be required.


OPEN PARKING GARAGES
DEFINITION An open parking garage is structure of Type I or II construction which is open on two or more sides totaling not teas than 40 percent of the building perimeter and which is used exclusively for parking or storage of private pleasure cars- For a side to be considered open, the total area of openings distributed along the side shall be not less than 507. of the exterior area of the side at each tier. The area of openings may be reduced below the minimum 507. for 40/1 of the perimeter, provided the percentage of the preimet.er in which the openings are contained is increased proportionately.
Open parking garages are further classified as either ramp-access or mechanical-access. Rampaccess open parking garages are those employing a series of continuously rising floors or a series of interconnecting ramps between floors permitting the movement of vehicles under their own power from and to the street level. Mechanical-access parking garages are those employing parking machines, lifts, elevators or other mechanical devices for vehicles moving from and to street level and in which public occupancy is prohibited above the street level.
AREA AMD HEIGHT In structures having a spiral or sloping floor, the horizontal projection of structure at any cross section shall not exceed the allowable area per parking tier. In the case of a structure having a continuous spiral f1oor. each 9 feet 6 inches of height or portion therof shall be considered as a tier.
The clear height of a parking tier shall be not less than 7 feet, except that a lesser clear height may be permitted in mechanicalaccess open parking garages when approved by the building official.
AREA AND HEIGHT INCREASES In structures with sides open three-fourths, the building perimeter may be increased 25 percent in area and one tier in height. Structures with sides open around the entire building perimeter may be increased 50 percent in area and one tier in height.
Open parking garages constructed to heights less than the maximum established may have individual tier areas exceeding those otherwise permitted, for the higher structure. At. least three sides of each such larger tier shall have continuous horizontal openings not less than 30 inches in clear height extending for at least 80 percent of the length of the sides, and no part of such larger tier shall be more than 200 feet horizontally from such an opening. In addition, each such opening shall face a street or yard accessible to a street with a width of at least 30 feet for the full length of the opening, and standpipes shall be provided in each such tier.
Type II-0ne hour construction, with all sides open, mav be unlimited in area when the height does not exceed 75 feet. For a side to be considered open, the total area of openings along the


side shall be not less than 50 percent of the exterior area of he side at each tier, and such openings shall be equally distributed along the length of the tier- All portions of tiers shall be within 200 feet horizontally from such openings.
ST AI F:5 AND E X lTS Where persons other than parking attendants are permitted, stairs and exits shall meet the requirements of Chapter 33, based on an occupant load of 200 square fee?t per occupant. Where no persons other than parking attendants are
permitted there shall be not less than two stairs 3 feet wide. Lifts may be installed for use of employees only, provided they are completely enclosed by noncombustible materials.
ROOF DESIGN
Roofs shall sustain, within the stress limitations of this code, all "dead loads" plus unit "live loads." The live loads shall be assumed to act vertically upon the area projected upon a horizontal plane.
DISTRIBUTION OF LOADS Where uniform roof loads are involved in the design of structural members arranged so as to create continuity, consideration may be limited to full dead loads on all spans in combination with full live loads on adjacent spans and on alternate spans.
UNBhLANCEP LOADING Unbalanced loads shall be used where such loading will result in larger members or connections. Trusses and arches shall be designed to resist the stresses caused by unit live loads on one half of the span if such loading results in reverse stresses, or stresses greater in any portion than the stresses produced by the required unit live load upon the entire span. For roofs whose structure is composed of a stressed shell, framed or solid, wherein stresses caused by any point loading are distributed throughout the area of the shell, the requirements for unbalanced unit live load design may be reduced 50 percent.
SNOW LOADS Potential accumulation of snow at valleys, parapets, roof structures and offsets in roofs of uneven configurations shall be considered. Where snow loads occur, the snow loads shall be determined by the building official.
Snow loads in excess of 20 pounds per square foot may be reduced for each degree of pitch over 20 degrees by R, as determined by the following formula:
Rs = S/40 -.5
where Rs = Snow load reduction in pounds per square foot per degree of pitch over 20 degrees.
S = Total snow load in pounds per square foot.


1) In every story or basement o-f all buildings when the floor area exceeds 1500 square feet and there is not provided at least 20 square -feet o-f opening entirely above the adjoining ground level in each 50 lineal feet or fraction thereof of exterior wall in the story or basement on at least one side of the building. Openings shall bave a minimum dimension of not less than 30 inches. Such openings shall be accessible to the fire department from the exterior and shall not be obstructed in a manner that fire fighting or rescue cannot be accomplished from the exterior.
v.
When openings in a story are provided on only one side and the opposite wail of such story is more than 75 feet from such openings, the story shall be provided with an approved automatic sprinkler system, or openings as specified above shall be provided on at least two sides of am exterior wall of the story.
If any 75 feet basement
portion of a basement is from openings required in shall be provided with an
sprinkler system.
located more than this section, the approved automatic
2) At the top of rubbish and linen chutes and in their terminal rooms. Chutes extending through three or more floors shall have additional sprinkler heads installed within such chutes at alternate floors. Sprinkler heads shal1 be accessible for servicing.
GROUP A OCCUPANCIES (nightclubs) An automatic sprinkler system shall be installed in rooms primarily used for entertaining occupants who are drinking or dining and unseparated accessory uses where the total area of such unseparated rooms and assembly uses exceeds 5000 square feet. For uses to be considered as separated, the separation shall be not less than as required for a one-hour occupancy separation. The area of other uses shall be included unless separated by at least a onehour occupancy separati on.
BASEMENTS An automatic sprinkler system shall be installed in basements classified as a Group A Occupancy when the basement is larger than 1500 square feet in floor area.
EXHIBITION AND DISPLAY ROOMS An automatic sprinkler system shall be installed in Group A Occupancies which have more than 12,000 square feet of floor area which can be used for exhibition or display purposes.


5. ZONING.


AYUNTAMENT DE PALMA.^
Revisio del pla general DJOrdenacio Urbana.
K-Zone.
Description. These are Hotel zones located in tourist areas or low density resorts.
Building heights are low with a great use of landscaping and green areas.
Zones. K-2 is only used for Hotels, while K1 includes Hotels and other uses.
Minimum requirements. K-l.
Minimum area* 8000 (86080 ft2)
Minimum width. ffO m. (131 ft.)
number of floors max. l+,
minimum number of floors. 2.
maximum height. 12m. (39 ft)
total maximun height. 13.5m (1+1+ ft)
maximum floorplate 20%
building coeficient. .33 m2/m2.
minimum setback to public roads. 10m. (32ft)
minimum setback to other 5m. (16ft)


6. CLIMATE.


WORLD WEATHER RECORDS
k
SPAIN NMO 08301 39 26N 02 13E 28 M
APR mat JJN Jlil AUG SEP CCT NOV OEC MEAN
I4H !. 1 13.6 16.9 19.1 23.6 23.2 21.3 16.9 12.9 9.9 15.7
'.2 13.3 17.2 21.1 23.1 23.7 22.3 20.6 16.6 12.0 16.6
>.0 16.9 17.6 21.2 23.9 26.2 22.7 18.2 12.8 11.8 16.9
..3 16.6 i.6 21.6 26.1 29.6 22.8 16.2 16.3 10.6 16.7
tti 16.3 19.8 23.8 29.6 26.3 23.1 19.3 16.8 13.1 17.6
.6 16.0 17.7 20.9 23.7 26.7 23.6 20r 0 13.9 10.7 17.1
..c 15.2 17,7 23.1 26.1 26.9 22.6 18.5 19.6 10.6 17.3
1.6 13.2 1 0 21.6 22.8 29.1 22.0 19.3 19.6 12.6 17.2
1.7 15.8 17.0 22.9 29.6 23.7 26.9 19.6 19.9 12.2 17.8
2.2 13.9 18.3 23.6 26.7 26.6 22.8 19,6 16.3 10.6 17.9
M/JU*2.3 13.0 17.7 21.8 26.3 26.8 22.8 18. 16.9 11.3 17.0
2.1 12.8 19.9 21.3 26.1 23.7 23.0 17.6 19.0 12'. 2 16.5
3.7 16.8 1*.0 23.6 29.8 25.2 21.7 19.9 16.2 11.8 17.3
1.3 15.3 19.2 21.1 26.6 26.9 23.5 18.9 19.9 13.7 17.2
2.8 13.6 17.3 22.0 23.1 23.3 22.9 18.8 19.9 13.7 16.9
I. 5 13.1 l 7 22.0 29.6 23.2 22.0 18.2 16.6 16.0 17.7
2.2 16.0 17. 20.2 23.9 23.7 23.6 17.7 11.9 19.2 17.0
3.3 16.5 16.3 20.6 26.9 26.9 22.7 18.1 13.9 11.1 16.8
3.1 13.8 l.3 22.2 26.0 25.6 26.1 18.2 13.9 13.5 17.5
3.7 16.1 17.7 21.3 29.3 26.7 23.2 17.9 13.6 12.0 17.3
9.1 16.1 16.1 20.6 21.3 22.6 19.9 17,9 16.7 9.5 16.0
2,7 16.6 17.7 21.6 26.2 2 6.6 22.6 11.3 16.3 13.1 17.0
9 17.0 19.6 22.8 29.2 23.1 29.1 18.7 16.2 12.2 17.9
.1.3 13.9 17. 20.8 29.9 26.0 26.1 19.7 12.3 8.8 16.8
i 1 6 16.2 16.8 21.9 29.9 23.3 22.1 18.1 19.9 11.0 16.6
12.5 16.6 20.1 23.2 26.7 26.6 29.0 18.3 16.7 11.1 17.3
12.8 15.0 l*.l 22.8 29.6 23.6 21.9 19,8 19.1 12.8 17.6
12.1 16.9 18.5 22.6 26.1 23.3 23.6 19.1 12.3 11.9 17.7
13.9 16.9 1 9 21.0 26.0 23.9 23.7 21.1 16.3 10.9 17.9
12.9 16.1 !.* 21.5 29.8 29.3 23.9 20.6 19.3 12.6 18.0
11.5 15.3 19. - ?0 9 26.9 29.6 22.6 18.9 16.6 10.8 17.6
11.* 16.8 i.2 23.3 29.2 23.8 26.9 18.6 19.9 11.0 17.7
12.5 15.3 1.6 22.0 29.9 29.6 23.9 19.3 16.6 11.3 17.5
C.Of 12.2 16.6 17.3 21.6 26.0 26.3 22.9 18.6 16.3 11.8 16.8

it APR NA* JUN JUl AUG SIP CCT NOV OEC TOTAL
[40 67.5 >1.1 38.V 6.3 66.8 T 29.1 162.1 31.3 22.6 667.9
11.3 27.0 70.1 16.0 T 33.6 168.7 101.9 16.7 62.3 533.0
20.5 13.3 T 32.3 13.0 2.0 190.5 90.2 61.6 162.5 596.5
36.0 22.1 6.1 6.9 T 19.8 166.6 69.6 69.9 68.8 667.1
11.1 8.1 96.8 1.8 1.3 23.9 23.6 90.1 19.9 56.5 372.6
60 7* 8 2 8 6 92 71 99 66 555
2* 26 67 9 6 T 122 90 77 36 693
63 56 20 23 18 1 6 69 37 96 *2
3 62 58 78 28 T 13 110 61 19 50 50*
1/^39.! 36.5 61.9 13.5 9.8 11.0 19.9 76.9 92.9 56.3 685.6
14 H 66 15 97 2 * T 2 29 60 28 366
28.3 69.7 31.3 28.2 T * 1.9 37.1 21.3 39.1 6.3 331.0
6.6 17.0 13.6 52.3 9.1 22.9 63.6 26.9 T 11. 289.5
29.5 11.3 119.6 10.9 23.6 23.6 6.9 129.1 99.9 6.6 564.0
38.8 32.2 79.J 93.3 1.9 87.8 61.2 77.6 62.1 65.7 706.0
37.1 31.8 68.0 T T T 163.1 26.6 60.1 7.1 *61.0
26.6 15.7 131.9 8.5 13.9 6.6 3.7 30.9 26.9 218.) 383.9
86.2 62.5 91.2 11.1 36.9 T 102.1 79.9 33.9 125.0 627.3
19.1 16.2 27.6 2.1 1.6 T 19.0 109.2 98.7 18.0 639.2
36.7 8.6 6.1 36.1 26.8 6.2 66.6 190.3 99.9 *5.1 556.7
A'/**, 18.8 36.0 99.9 26.3 10.9 16.9 53.3 70.2 90.3 59.2 *90.9
i*6 86.9 68.3 2.9 .3 36.7 2.0 66.7 66.7 56.5 508.6
22.8 10.9 29.3 69.6 2.9 T 156.3 79.9 30.1 63.9 63i.
6.,.2 91.1 36.3 12.6 2.6 17.0 69.9 18.7 9.0 39.7 502 .%
6. J 26.3 23.6 1.0 9.8 16.6 92.6 79.2 91.3 636.1
101.1 6.1 i .7 96.8 T 6.8 77.6 66.9 82.7 30.8 669.5
,;.6 61.6 10.1 9.2 20.3 T 31.3 67.0 199.9 41.7 666.6
. 5 T 66.6 9.0 T f 67.0 67.0 90.1 30.0 631.9
7 8..5 10.9 T 1.3 T 99.9 67.0 69.3 27.9 627.0
* oi.T *7.7 99.9 69.7 30.2 506.J
EUROPE
303
OALIA/eALfJRIC ISLANDS NOTEs on .-AGE 290
PRECIPITATION mm TEA* jan
1931
1932
1933 193a
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939 19A0
MEAN
1951
1932
1953
:93A
1955
1936
1937
1958
1939
I960
15.1
16.7
61.7
58.8
62.3
38.8 19.7
16.3 5.5
75.0
F FB
16.3
36.0
21.1
60.1
.0
16.8
>6.5
15.5
32.1
MAB
29.9
31.1 28.8
66.7 36.3
36.7
10a.9
39.9
16.1
36.8 27.8 64.6
1961 76.1 32.6
1962 26.0 26.0
1963 9.3 67.7
1966 T 1*6.6
1965 61.9 5.1
1966 57.6 1.7
1967 39.1 36. 1
1966 69.5 82.6
1969 20.0 21.8
1930 *6.6 6.6
MEAN 36.6 *0.6
2.6
26.1
111.9
11.7 3.9
73.8
17.1
15.0
36.2
51.1
36.7
A9.7
A9.6
30.3 73.0
75.3
25.6
66.2
17.5
16.5 63.
20.6
10.7
6.7
65.3
61.6
78.6 52.8
30.3
30.3
33.6
66.1 16.9
13.2
65.3
102.0
12.6
63.6
9.9
APR "AT JUl A JC
12.6 5.1 .5 .8 T
5.8 11.6 39.a 16.1 31.6 103.9 31.1 T 66. T
66.6 10.9 7.8 T 79.'
10.1 36.5 T T T
10.9
20.0
53.9
2a.6
ScP
26.1
36.6
113.6
193.7 66.9
OCT
66,6
60.1
17.9
33.0
66 > a.
176.5
.1
30.9
16.9
76.0
9.6
5.7
66.6
26.9
86..
27.5
SC.3 8.7
15.9
16.9 26.7
3.9
32.6
36.9
32.9
72.6 25.%
25.5 26.6
MEAN *2.5 33.1 30.7
1961 33.0 T T
i 9-62 2.6 68.0 61.0
i63 26.9 8.5 6.7
1966 15.8 20.7 36.1
.965 32.2 18.6 11.6
i960 86.6 5.0 29.6
;9i7 16.9 *3.1 15.7
1968 1.7 66.3 11.2
:69 96.1 10.8 26.8
1970 38.0 6.6 35.5
"C AN 36.8 26.3 23.0
:Ino 36.6 33.8 36.7
29.7
78.0
16.3 79.9
8.2
17.5
72.3 33.%
5.0
10.6
36.9 20.6
66.2
16.2
3.6
> 9
89.5
.2
13.5
16.Q
2%.i
1C. 3 6.0 11.6
5.8
32.5
23.7
96.9
7.9
23.3
28-1
29.7
75.J
.5
1.7
16.5
30.9
7.3
22.2
13.3
22.6
21.7
27.6
7.8
8.6
7.6
12.2
19.5
2.9
23.8 37.2 3i.j
55.8 36.J
78.J I 3
63.0 138.0 128,3
2 86,6 35,3
10.3
78.6 T
32.6
T
3.0
12.8
9.3
11.3
32.1
16,7
21.6
68.3
108.7
12.5
.2 T 8.3
6.3 1.7 56.9
3.6 19.2 19.9
6.0 1.6 28.6
T T 37.6
13.5 2.3 21.8
6.9 8.1 6.6
T .3 22.9
*.2 . 6 20.;
13.9 10.9 1.9
29. 7 T 87.3
T 2.0 6.5
30.1 T T
6.3 T T
32.7 2.6 6.2
39.0 T T
15.9 2.6 1*4.9
60,7
19.6
11.6 90.5
37.9
25.6
85.8
192.6
25.3
102.1
92.5
3.1
35.1
31.2
NOV OEC
73.2 75.1
76.7 113.8
217.1 135.6
71.7 56.1
*9.6 *2.7
.
26.1 39.7
-
- _
20.9 1.6
75.9 66.6
51.0 *0.7
63.3 30.2
20.2
27.7
67.6
61.3
8.7
38.1
1.0
60.9 76.3 61.1
5.
52.0
10.8
30.2
81.3
38.6
53.6 66. 7
68.9 608.
MEAN
319.1 519.8
707.6
660.1
372.6
523.7
336.8 39%.7 368.3 601.6
163.6
605.9 672.8 397.2
360.6 *03.2
56.6 32.1 52.8
36.0
62.6
27.7
1.7
3.7 132.9
89.0
69.3
6.3
62.7
73.8
26.9
20.6
103.2
210.0
169.5
115.7
53.6
37.1
52.5
15.1 60.3
10.1
122.6
86.6
99.6
16.8
16.5
25.6
33.7
10.1
51.8
56.6
27.3
69.4
26.9 66.3
87.7
695.6
609.5 267. i 13.8 628.4
601.8
606.6
3§0.7
669.0
650.0
,J'C 51.3
4,*3 632.1
.3
7.8 3.0
1.8
23.6
T
9.
18.
199.9
76.9
8.7
69.5
6 8
127
16 i
1C7,
82.
50.9
159.3
66.1
20.8
8.8
1C. 7 10.3
16.3 7
36.3 .2
13.1 3.6
1.2 .1
11.2 2.7
20.2 3.8
3.6
62.'
81.3
127.3
3.9
2,
10,
21.
63.
2.
* 39.0 109
J 16,
7 7.7 26.
i *0.3 98.
* 6.7
16.1
26.0
60.6
59.o
69.
72.3
76,9
72.9 38 60 65
17
7.8
1 16.7
9 80.3
9 68.6
3 67.1
53.1
36.1
30.3
52.9
230.6
?15.4
361.3
37;.i 252.2
609.1
218.2
316.2
375.2 290.4
373.6
653.9


632
World-Climates 5
Koppens reformed classification
Class of climates Description: mean monthly air temperature
A tropical climates: over 17 C all months
C subtropical climates: over 9 C 8-12 months
D temperate climates: over 9 C 4-7 months
E subarctic climates: over 9 C 1-3 months
F polar climates: over 9 C no month
B dry climates: evaporation exceeds precipitation
dryness limit: RB = 20. (t 10 + 300. RS/R) in mm
desert limit: RW = 10. (t 10 + 300. RS/R) in mm
t: mean annual air temperature in C
R: mean annual precipitation in mm
RS: mean summer precipitation in mm
If R is less than RB the climate is a steppe climate BS
if R is less than RW the climate is a desert climate BW
or a marine desert climate BM
Main Climates
Universal Thermal Scale
Ar tropical rain climate Thermal conditions of a
Am tropical monsoonal rain climate mean monthly temperature
Aw tropical summer rain climate of C are tcrmed-coded
As tropical winter rain climate 35 to severely hot 1
Cr subtropical rain climate 28 to 34 very hot h
Cw subtropical summer rain climate 23 to 27 hot a
Cs subtropical winter rain climate 18 to 22 warm b
DO temperate oceanic climate 10 to 17 mild 1
DC temperate continental climate 0 to 9 cool k
EO subarctic oceanic climate -9 to -1 cold 0
EC subarctic continental climate -24 to -10 very cold c
FT tundra climate -39 to -25 severely cold d
FI ice climate -.. to -40 excessively c
BS steppe climate cold
BW desert climate
BM marine desert climate
The climate formula
According to Koppen the climate of a place can shortly he described bv using the corresponding letters of its main climate. This formula is prefixed by a G (mountain climate) or H (high mountain climate) if the height is at least 500 m or 2500 m. Indicating the thermal conditions ol the hottest and coldest month by coding its mean temperature according to the universal thermal scale the climatic formula can be completed in adding the two letters.


Spain
4. Climatic area: Balearic Islands
4.1. Subtropical Winter Rain Climate Cs
4.2. Summer hot, winter mild.
4.3. Summer: generally dry and sunny, sometimes showers and cloudy. Winter: partially variable, partially sunny periods.
4.4. Wind: occasional gales.
143
Mahon/Mcnorca
latitude: 3952'n longitude: 4 I6'e height: 59 m
Csal 014-1 1 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
tx 18 18 20 22 26 31 33 33 30 26 22 18 34 C
t 10 10 12 14 15 21 24 24 22 18 14 12 17 C
(n 3 3 4 7 9 13 17 17 15 10 7 4 2 C
clothing n n n n n s t t s s n n ~
stress o f r o o -
P 60 44 48 34 30 21 4 22 72 133 92 77 637 mm
dp 6 4 7 6 6 4 1 1 4 5 6 6 56 days
sunshine 126 147 183 209 276 305 354 305 213 167 139 107 2531 hours
% 42 48 50 52 62 68 78 72 57 48 47 37 56%
if: Palma de Mallorca
k; latitude: 3936n longitude: 242 e height: 45 m
1 Csal 014-12 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
tx 18 19 21 23 27 31 33 33 31 27 22 19 34 C
t 10 10 12 14 17 21 24 24 23 18 14 12 17 C
tn 2 2 3 6 9 13 16 16 14 9 6 3 0C
T- clothing n n n n s s t t t s n n -
r. stress o 0 f f f o -
P 39 33 36 28 14 19 5 26 61 74 60 52 447 mm
jfc. dp 6 5 5 4 3 2 1 2 4 7 7 7 53 days
5'-. sunshine 153 174 204 229 297 310 356 332 239 195 168 141 2798 hours
u % 51 57 55 58 67 69 78 78 64 56 56 48 63%
Ibiza
latitude: 3852n longitude: : l22e height: 7 m
f: Csal 014-13 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
tx 19 19 21 23 26 30 31 32 31 27 22 20 33 C
t 11 10 13 15 18 22 24 25 23 19 15 12 17 C
tn 2 1 3 6 9 14 17 18 14 10 6 3 0C
sV. clothing n n n n $ s t t t s n n -
stress 0 o f f f o -
P 42 35 25 22 13 22 5 12 34 85 102 47 444 mm
dp 6 6 6 5 3 3 1 1 4 8 10 8 61 days
sunshine 170 170 210 237 311 318 353 334 236 197 162 162 2860 hours
% 56 56 57 60 70 71 78 79 63 51 54 55 64 %


6
i (Majorca) 33 ft (10 m) 3933' N 239' E 27 years
SPAIN
K'. Temperature rF Temperature C Relative humidity Precipitation
BCghest ptorded Average daily Lowest recorded Highest recorded Average daily Lowest recorded 0700 hours 1300 hours Average monthly Average no. days with 0.004 in + (0.1 mm +)
max. min. max. min. % % in mm
71 57 43 27 22 14 6 -3 83 72 1.5 39 8 J
73 59 44 25 23 15 6 -4 82 70 1.3 34 6 F
74 62 46 30 24 17 8 -1 81 69 2.0 51 8 M
79 66 51 33 26 19 10 1 77 66 1.3 32 6 A
88 71 55 40 31 22 13 5 77 67 1.1 29 5 M
98 79 62 47 37 26 17 8 70 65 0.7 17 3 J

k 101 84 67 54 39 29 20 12 70 65 0.1 3 1 ' J
[ 99 84 68 52 37 29 20 11 75 65 1.0 25 3 A
[ 94 80 65 40 35 27 18 4 79 69 2.2 55 5 S
L 88 73 57 34 31 23 14 1 83 71 3.0 77 9 O
[ 78 65 50 33 26 18 10 1 83 72 1.9 47 8 N
74 59 46 31 24 15 8 -1 82 72 . 1.6 40 9 D
415




PROGRAM
GUESTROOMS.
Kings 21 units at 45 m2 = 945m2
Doubles 27 units at 45 m2 = 1215m2
Suites 5 units at 60 m2 = 300ra2
Handicap 1 unit at 45 m2 = 45m^
Total 54 units- 2505m2
LOBBY.
Flow area 92 m2
Seating 18 m2
w.c. 18 m2
1 m2

ADMINISTRATION.
Telephone operator 8
Front Desk 14 m2
Manager 11 m2
secretary 9 m2
Accounting 9 m2
Other 10 m2
Storage 9 m2
Bellman Storage 14 m2
Safe Deposit 3 m2
Total 97 m2


FOOD PREPARATION
Kitchen 70m2
Room Service Dry food storage Refrigarated storage Beverage storage Glass-plates Total 7m2 15m2 9m2 10m2 9m2 120m2
RECEIVING AND STORAGE.
Loading Dock 18m2
Receiving 24 m2
Trash 1 4 m2
Store /4.6 m2
Total 102m2
EMPLOYEE
W.C. 18m2
Lounge 28m2
Total 46 m2
HOUSEKEEPING.
Linen Storage 18m^
Laundry 18m2
Total _36m2


FOOD AND BEVERAGE OUTLET
Restaurant 220m2
Bar 7^m2
Total 2 94 m2
CASINO.
Gaming + Offices 5 76 m2
Baccarat 32m2
Bar 1 12m2
Slot Repair 20m2
w.c. 55m2
Total 79Sm2
MEETING ROOMS.
Total 96 m2
GATE.INFO. SECURITY. Total 25m2
MECHANICAL+CIRCULATION.
Total 627m2
TOTAL PROJECT. * 4871 m2


8. GUEST ROOM LAYOUT?


a
ceiling: |pt| |
DOOR FRAME: [pt[~ BATH FLOOR: [ct[ |
£


0




Public space design
BALLROOM
FOYER
t>
TOILETS,
COATS
SALES
OFFICE
PROJECTION
BALLROOM
BANQUET
ROOMS
MEETING
ROOMS
EXHIBITION
HALL
THEATER
PROJECTION
STORAGE
KITCHEN
J
BACKOFHOUSE
AREAS
RECEIVING
FUNCTION ROOMS
ADMINISTRATION
FRONT DESK
RETAIL SHOPS
RESTAURANT
LOUNGE
LOBBY
GUESTROOMS
GARAGE
RECREATION
1































CASINO
w.c. 55m2
Coat Room 14m2
Slot Floor 270m2
Table Games 280m2
Bar 92m2
Baccarat 46m2
Cashier 23m2
Bank 14m2
Vault 9m2
Soft Count 9m2
Coin Count 14m2
Security 14m2
Slot repair 18m2
TOTAL 858m2
p
Slot machines 1.9 m per machine. Coin cashier every 50 machines.
1 Baccarat table.
1 High stakes Black Jack.
9 Black Jack.
2 Roulette.
1 Craps.


1 1 ADMINISTRATION.1 0


FRONT OFFICE
FRONT OFF. MGR
RESERV. MGR 1
1 J
RESERVATIONS 1

TEi

i * 1 h [ TELE EQUIP J L J
COUNT RM | 1 CASHIER |

SAFE DEPOSIT
RMS ASST MGR
WORK AREA
RECEPTION
ASST MGR
FRONT DESK



EXECUTIVE & SALES OFFICES
DIR. OF PUBLIC REL.
TOILETS 1

F&B ASST MGR
1
SECRETARY
|
GEN 'L MGR
_J
CONF. RM |
RECEPTION

SEC'Y
SALES & CATERINCl SECTS
SALES DIR.
SALES REPS
FUNCTION BK.
CATERING
MGRS
BANQUET MGR
CONV. SERV.


ACCOUNTING
ASSTCONTR
CONTROLLER
CREDIT MGR
COMP UTER 1
h
BOOKA [EEP'G |

RECEPTION |
STORAGE
PAT ROLL MANAGER
CASHIER
z\


[ faoiAaas *2i


Food preparation
AND STORAGE AREAS
! FOOD & BE V. | STORAGE I
t>
RECEIVING
H
TRASH
>[
EMPLOYEE
ENTRANCE
LOCKERS
ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL
ELECTRICAL
KITCHENS
EMPLOYEE
DINING
GENERAL
STORAGE
PERSONNEL
UNIFORM
ISSUE
HOUSEKEEPING
LAUNDRY
BALLROOM |
BANQUET | BANQUET k
ROOMS ( PANTRY |
PR E FUNCTION |
EMPLOYEE
DINING
TRASH
MAIN
KITCHEN
FOOD & BEV. STORAGE
RECEIVING
Z\ Z\
ROOM SERVICE h SERVICE |
AREA | ELEVATORS [
I .
COFFEE SHOP |
PANTRY 1
RESTAURANT
COCKTAIL
LOUNGE


Receiving, trash, and general
STORAGE AREAS
GENERAL STORAGE 1

RECEIVING
1
PURCHASING OFFICE

RECEIVING OFFICE
TOILET
LOADING
DOCK
TRi " |

COMPACTOR |
GARBAGE' CAN WASH
BOTTLE
STORAGE


Employee areas
KITCHEN
I LAUNDRY
1
h
,_l
1
UNIFORM
ISSUE
TIMEKEEPER/ SECURITY
OTHER
B.O.H.
EMPLOYEE
DINING
]
r LOCKERS

TOILETS
EMPLOYEE
ENTRANCE
H
PERSONNEL
DIR. OF PERSONNEL
INTERVIEW
TRAINING


Laundry and housekeeping
HOUSEKEEPER
I
4ssr
HOUSEKEEPER
LOST & FOUND
EQUIP STOR) MENT | 1G£ 1


HOUSEKEEPING |
Z\
LINEN
STORAGE
UNIFORM ISSUE
Z\

SOILED
LINEN
LAUNDRY

SUPPUES
STORAGE
LAUNDRY MGR
VALET
ENERGY
COMPUTER
ENGINEER
ELECTRICAL
SHOP
PLUMBING
SHOP
STOREROOM
CARPENTRY
SHOP
MECHANICAL/ ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING

PAINT SHOP
KEY SHOP
TV REPAIR


13. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION


i m ininfi-, tnoif*ji) diuk i'. hid moi
, ; . / I
TYPICAL I I j / |
-CUES r fioc AREA R v A
/ [ / Lx A
J y / y A
\' Z' <

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imm n ***
Scot grouping* around radangular and circular table*.
Commercial
RESTAURANTS AND EATING PLACES
Reitaurant Seating
I
banquette looting arrangement* and limiting Mention* Including tpace far accei* and *ervlca.
Medule
till aa
ir-ri
Frd lotion Mttfouronf Manning and Dttign, The "*ite I Module
-4 ttllea |l-n-L>* till aa Ift'.l*)
BOOTH SEATING


Commercial
I
-"t
-f-
tmmmf n
Mm n W
MiMirn l*ii Mxt
RESTAURANTS AND EATING PLACES
Restaurant Seating
I'NmiMI
i
ntH'll i I iiiim.i n I
------------*
( *!' l*
ft
f-......
^ Iliair.n
! htiM u n
t
Seat groupings around roctangular and circular tablet.
I
I
Banquette seating arrangements and limiting mentions including space for access and service.
Fred Lawton, Ptttauront Planning and Dtt'gn, Tbe Arch,%cturol Press. ltd.. London. 1973.


H|U<\ jjBip pua
1 i II o ca T 3 e 3 > S- 5 o ft 3* O *o c cr
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WALL OR OTHER FIXED OBSTRUCTION
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WALL OR OTHER FIXED OBSTRUCTION
LIMITS OF PUBLIC AISLE
LIMITS OF PUBLIC AISLE

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RESTAURANTS AND EATING PLACE
Rattouront Stalin


Commercial
RESTAURANTS AND EATING PLACES
Restaurant Seating
2 PERSONS SIDE BY SIDE
Abs. Min. Dos. Min. Comfort- able
Service
A and pub. circ'n 2-6 3-0 3-6
Length 3-6 3-9 4-0
Width 3-0 3-3 3-6
Note: ThU type not ordinarily recommended.
2 PERSONS FACE TO FACE
Ab. Det. Comfort-
Min. Min. eble
Service 2-6 3-0 3-6
A end pub. to to to
circ'n 3-0 4-0 S-0
2-2
Length 2-0 to 2-6
2-6
4-10 S-2 S-8
Width to to to
S6 5-6 s-to
dimensions in foot and inches
BOOTH FURNITURE HEIGHTS
4 PERSONS
Abi. Dei. Comfort-
Min. Min. able
Service 2-6 3-0 3-6
A end pub. to to to
circn 3-0 4-0 S-0
3-9 4-0
Length 3-6 to to
4-0 4-2
4-10 S-2 S-8
Width to to to
5-6 5-6 S-10
Abs. Min. Dos. Min. Comfort- able
H 30 to 36 3-6 4r-0
S 1-5 to 1-6 l-S to 1-6 ' 1-6
T 2-S 2-S to 2-6 2-6
W 1-8 to 2-0 2-0 to 2-2 24 to 26
S.et 1-4 to l-S 1-5 to 1-6 1-6 to 1-8
Splay 0 to 0-3 0-2 to 0-3 0-3'/j to 0-4


iiiiiiiiTirnnTHi'm
Commerc
RESTAURANTS AND EATING PLAC
Food B<
mm...i n i M1111 m i n11'.! i n 1111 n 1111! m 11111
BACK Io75 Cm X
BAR > ,
~~ i
COUNTERMANS AISLE >-
lit
COUNTER
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B
ccj
N
Ul
Cl
<
STANDARD (straight) TYPE
Ab*. DtsirobU
Min. Min.
X No cooking nquipmont . I- 6 2-0
X With cookinq .quipt. 2- 0 2-6
r 1 pmon 2- 0 2-3
r 7 or moro p.rtonl 2- 6 2-9
z 1-10 2-0
i 9 1-2
Ap 3- 6 4-6
1 1- 0 1-2
cc 1-10 2-0
Variations in Shape
Uu*l Minimum
A 2-6 to 3*6
2-6 to 4-6
C 2-9 to 5-6 dimontiom in font ond inch**
HEIGHTS
dropped floor
Rnq of Dimniion Rnq* of Dimmion*
> 2-6 to 3- 6 X ~~ I 1-2 to I- 3 k 2-4 to 2-10
ii 3 0 to 3- 6 Work 2-4 to 2- 7 S 1-6 to 2- 1
H 7 to 10 S 1-6 to 2- 6 * 1-2 to 1- 3
K 2-4 to 2- 1 Work 2-4 to 2- 1
** rm i,n.


Commercial
| RESTAURANTS AND EATING PLACES
Serving Unite
I
i
I
I
t
I
I
1 f f 1 f £ 1 1 1 1
1 ' Jc , L r cL
cx 1/5' < 1 1 1 ' 1 i i i _j
SERVINC TABLE (& sideboard)
Abs. Min. Das. Min. Comfort bit
As Service only J.0 3-6
Ap Public cire n 7-0 2-6 3-0
C jocent uniti 2-0 2-3 2-6
30 70" 4?" it dvCfflOe.
Display tables (hors d'oeuvics. etc.) usually S'0" x 2 0": (wines), 3* 0" round
IA
<
AREA OCCUPIED J \ BY CART WHEN wl STORED: 38x21^35" \
0
\
\
1
I
SERVINC CART
Abi. D*>.
Min. Min.
Aft Service only 2-0 2-6
R Turn radius 3-0 3-6
O Door, opening width 2-0 2-6
Approx. area when ttorcdi 51" x 21%" x 35"
I
I
(

l
WALL OR COLUMN
TRAY STAND
Ab. Min. Dal. Min. Comfort- able
As Service only 2-6 3-0 3 6
Ap Public circn 2-0 2-6 3-0
C Clearance to ad* jacent unitt 2-0 2-2 2-6
Length (tray) \
Width (tray] J ^epen^s on *VPe of restaurant.
Approx, area of stand, stored: 5*' x 20" x 34*
WATER COOLER
Abi. Min. Dei. Min. Comfort* able
At Service only 7-6 3-0 3-6
Ap Public circ'n 2-0 2-6 3-0,
q Clearance to adjacent unitt Can arrange on top or front
Length ) Depends on capacity and if glass storage Width f included.___________________________________
Scoring wott*.


CAB
Commrc
RESTAURANTS AND EATING PLAC
liquor B
WALL
gg* BACKBAR
A _ -- ~
> . * -*v > .5 ^ V a_ \ *
^V; BAR v'*- 7 '
^__
bartenders aisle
ooooe
UJ
B,
CC
o.
<

STRAICHT TYPEwith or without stools
Abs. Min. Dot. Min. Comfort- able
Ap Public aisle 3-6 to 4-6 4-0 to 5-0 4-6 to 6-0
Stool to well 1-0 to 1-6 1-2 t0 1-6 1-4 to 1-6
CC Stool, cent, to cent. 1-9 to 2-0 2-0 2-2 to 2-6
I Stool to ber 9 to 1-0 1-0 l-l to 1-2
X Back bar 1-6 to 1*8 1-8 to 2-0 2-0 to 2-3
T 2-0 to 2-2 2-6 3-0
z Bar 2-3 to 2-6 2-5 to 2-6 2-8 to 2-9
CURVED TYPES l Radius R should b# t least
2 ft.; other dimensions as for straight types.
Bar langth: Allow from I ft. 8 in. to I ft. 10 in. per person for stendup bars; 2 ft. for each *tool.
Bor depth: No increase in depth is needed for more than I bartender, as each man should be provided with his own "set-up" space in the work counter end back-bar.
Service bon: These are usually from 6 to 8 ft. long, for (-man service: from 10 to 12 ft. long if 2 bartender* are needed for peak service periods. No footreil. counter overhenq. or stools are required. Location is often adjacent to kitchen and concealed from patrons: however, advertising values sometimes cause it to be set in Dublic view. In the latter case, a rope rail or similar device, to discoureqe patrons from. standing at the bar. is often advisable.
here.
dimensions in feet and Inches
RAIL OR STEP
P = 7 tp 10 H = 7 to 10
Usual Min. Usual Ma*.
B 3 6 3-9
81 3-6 3-9
Cob 3-0 to 3-10 5 0 to S-7
S 2-4 to 2-6 2-7
Work 2-4 2-6
X 10 to 1-2 1-2 to 1-3




END NOTES.
1
Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintanance (New York: Morrow, 197*+), p. 227.
^Uniform Building Code. 1982.
^Revisio sel Pla General D'Ordenacio Urbana. (Mallorca' Spain. 1981).
^U.S. dept, of Commerce. World Weather Records. (U.S. Enviromental Data and Information Services, 19*+0), p. 303*
9Willy Rudloff. World Climates. (Sttugart, 1981), p.1*+3, p. 632.
8E.A. Pearce. The Times Books World Weather Guide. (New York, N.Y.: Times Books, 198*+), p.*+15
n
'Walter A. Rutes. Hotel planning and Design. (New York: Whitney Library of Design, 1985.), p. 173*
8Ibid., p. 179.
9Ibid., p. 1i+5-1*+9.
4
10Ibid., p. 200.
11 Ibid., p. 206-209.
^Daniel Scott Grant. North Slope Village Hotel. (UCD Thesis, 1 98*+).


BIBLIOGRAPHY
Grant, Daniel Scott. North Slone Village Hotel. UCD Thesis:
1984.
Pirsig, Robert. Zgq and the Ayt Qf Motorcycle Maintenance.
New York: Morrow, 1974*
Pearce, E.A. The Times Books World Weather Guide. New York, N.Y. : Times Books, 1984*
Rudloff, Willy. World Climates. Sttugart; l'98i.m L\
'v? iS.
Rutes, Walter A. Hotel Planning and Design. New York: Whitney Library of Design, 1985*
Revisio del Pla General D'Ordenacio Urbana. Mallorca, Spain,
1981.
U.S. dept, of Commerce. World Weather records. U.S. Enviromen-tal Data and Information Services, 1940.
Uniform Building Code. 1982








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