Citation
Ellicott small animal care complex

Material Information

Title:
Ellicott small animal care complex a mixed use project, Buffalo, New York
Creator:
McClelland, Mark E
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
106 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, charts, maps, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Veterinary hospitals -- Designs and plans -- New York (State) -- Buffalo ( lcsh )
Joint occupancy of buildings -- New York (State) -- Buffalo ( lcsh )
Joint occupancy of buildings ( fast )
Veterinary hospitals ( fast )
New York (State) -- Buffalo ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Architecture and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Mark E. McClelland.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
16686494 ( OCLC )
ocm16686494
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1987 .M244 ( lcc )

Full Text
Ellicott Small Animal Care Complex A Mixed Use Project Buf f a 1 o, New Yor k
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of- Design and Planning., University of Colorado at Denver, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Archi torture Degree.
Mar k May,
E. McClelland 1987
AL


T a b I e o f C d n t e n t s
Part I..
Ac k nowIed gements ~ Thesis Statement
Part II.
History
Em i st i ng Fac i .1 i t y
- Organization and Personnel
Part III.
~ Context Urban and Neighborhood
Part IV.
Site
- Climate
Part V.
- Program Project Goals and Objectives -- Organization and Personnel
- Mixed Use
Animal Care Complex -- Housing
Part VI.
- Zoning
- Building Codes
Part VII.
- i b 1 i o g r a p I") y
Part VIII.
- Project Drawings


Ac kn ow1ed qements
I would like t.o thank the following people:
...my family for their overall patience and perseverence.
...Ms. Melinda Moses for her patience and advice.
...my father. Dr. F.E. McClelland, and my uncle. Dr.
R.B. McClelland, for their valuable assistance in
x
gathering information for the program and history, r espect i vely.
...Mr. Fv'obert O'Hara, Building Dept. Director, for his encouragement and help in getting me around Buffalo City Hall.


T h esis St a temen t
host cities assume character as they grow. Some began as an embodiment of an .ideal" but the original form and ideology usually did not last. The urban fabric, like todays economy, is in a state of transtion. We are moving into an information age, away from mass consumption of energy and capital resources. The? resulting change in social and environmental values has led not only to a change in the urban fabric but also to the concept of "the urban sustainable community"2 which includes a general move towards improvement of the citys physical and environmental conditions. Trie major steps proposed to implement the concept are: (1> restimulate concern about human dimension and the natural and built environments, (2) rehabilitate and/or redefine the block, street and public spaces, and (3> reintroduce mixed-use buildings and public transport systems to "encourage social interactions that foster community"3. Architects need to explore further what a citys residents want but do not have: relationships between neighbors and between people and their workplaces, what to do with leisure time, needs for transportation, and the qualities of sun, space, and greenery for physical and emotional needs are but a few of the factors.
How can we characterise these concepts and goals within an integrated system which can account for the shifting, transitional state of the urban fabric? Rather than look to such examples as Corbusiers modern city arid its imposition of rigid solutions on society we should look to provide for growth and change within the flexiblity of society and its cities. By considering relative architectural responses through the existing fabric we can discover- the possibilities for transformation of existing spaces and structures.
"The physical and material modification of a building happens through projects of extension and completion, of addition and of superimpostion, of collage and of internal modification, of simplification and of repetitions all address the problem of reinforcing the value of what is existing. 1,4
Much energy has been focused on converting individual buildings by the most practical means in the shortest time as commercial needs arise. However, for generic adaptive reuse or any program, attention must also be paid to concept and design and their impact on the city fabric in addition to the economic and technical aspects.
Another function of architecture is the exploitation and trarisformation of its setting. In the urban environment and its neighborhoods, that function can result, in new architectural perceptions and interpretatidds. The idea of architecture as modification is architecture as "a process which preserves*the status of the initial conditions; it is


an act of integration governed by an aesthetic: of the purposeful context."5 Architecture as modification is not a new concept. Historically, geographic conditions or the perception of a specific context have illicited a conscious strategy of modification. But. the beauty of modification as a strategy today is its ability to foster new techniques as processes for understanding and responding to the complex and transitional character of our urban neighborhoods.
These techniques, such as reordering urban spaces into interior~type spaces, or connecting, articulating, and densifying existing structures, or even reproducing existing densities via studies of form and typology, help the modern city transform itself through consolodating and mixing with t h e ex i st i n g c i t y.
Architecture is also communication. It can be commercially influenced and motivated without being equivalent to the advertiser*s message, and it can be responsive to the client's needs on one level while being culturally relevant to the urban context and its use on another. Changes in the existing urban fabric or neighborhood chat.act.er :i st i c often dictate the interpretation of a new order "to build some of the city the way it was, to allow other parts to be different, and to ensure the old and the new tie together well."
In dealing with the built environment, modification, as a specific: program, can revitalize and strengthen the urban neighborhoods by encouraging a cross-relation of diverse functions between districts as well as within individual buildings. What is needed is a building block, perhaps an idea or concept capable of maintaining the heterogeneous, vital urban fabric. But architecture functions to translate and transform ideas into physical and emotional realities. These ultimately become designs not necessarily extrapolated from their environments but modified by their relationships within the urban framework and their neighborhoods. I feel that an architecural response which acts to reinforce the value of the existing can better accommodate the changing urbab fabric than a response which values only the new or i ts onw f unct i on.
Modification embodies three elements: (i> concept, (2) process, and (3) effect. You cannot have one without the other and experience success. Effect must echo concept; process must be consistent with both concept and effect.
The city is under constant modification, both correct, and misguided. We must be concerned with the effects of modification locally and regionally. Urban renewal (the err ad i. cat i on of urban blight through mass deomli tion) was primarily concerned with result without proper consideration of concept or process. 'the effects were disastrous to the city fabric. But neighborhoods, even if only shreds remain, are amazingly resilient if people use them. Neighborhoods remain or change by use.. If coaxed by relevant modi f i. cat i on, neighborhoods (especially inner city areas where the variables .increase dramatical 1 y) can retain their1 character and also change for the benefit of residents, workers, visitors, and the surrounding areas. This process can also be contagious.
The Waterfront development in Buffalo demonstrates that modification can .occur and often does occur on a large


scale. But. large scale means many modifying factors, many variables. There must be underlying economics to support such a project. What the project reiterates, however, is the need for more moderately priced housing to stem the outmigration of middle income people from the inner city.
To date, the high-priced units have been commercially unsuccessful. The project further emphasises the importance of smaller infill projects to respond to other economic needs of the city. The encouragement and coordination of both small and larger projects by city planning is imperative. Buffalo was once a thriving, growing metropolis. Surburban flight and the decline of commercial and retail businesses cannot be ignored. We may not relive history but we can revitalise its spirit.
Although diminished recently in douwntown Buffalo, this spirit has been thriving in some businesses and is being revitalized through various projects, such as the new Gal dome Bank Building, the Waterfront Development, and the Main Street Transit Corridor. The veterinary hospital involved in this thesis project has occupied its present building and site (near to Main St.) non-stop since the'*' building's birth, and will continue to do so in a new, expanded form. The history and business strength of the hospital make possible a unique opportunity for positive response to the citys changing fabric and to the hospitals neighborhood revitalization, both economically and architectural1y. Through modification, this project can be a connecting link between downtown Buffalos colorful past and its promising future.




History -- Buffalo and the Buffalo Veterinary Hospital
The Treaty of Fort Stanwix in 1784 firmly established property ownership of land west of Seneca Lake to the Great Lakes by the Indians. The right to buy the land from the Indians was assigned to the State of Massachusetts in the Convention of Hartford in 1786, and by 1791 Robert Morris had purchased the pre-empted rights to the area from the Benessee River to the Pensyl vania Boarder. The largest, parcel was sold to the Holland Land Co. which obtained title from the Indians in the Treaty of Big Tree in 1797.
That same year Joseph El1icott (brother of Pierre LEnfants assistant for the plan of Washington, D.C.) iayed out a city plan for "New Amsterdam (later Buffalo Creek, then Buffalo by 1809). His solution to meshing two existing grids was to create a large plaza from which radiated, at equal angles, eight streets. That plaza, now known as Niagara Square and the "civic heart of the Buffalo metropolis"1 is slightly more than 1/2 mile from the site for my thesis project. Joseph El 1icott? s plan, however, was not ultimately resolved until the end of the I860s when Frederick Law Olmstead devised a chain of parks and parkways finally giving "shape and coherence to a city that was about to launch on a phase of spectacular growth. 1,2 This system helped to create and solidify boundaries and character from the "disjointed subdivisions and opportunistic industrial installations"3 of the city's growth. Buffalo, which benefitted economically from its association with Lake Erie and the Erie Canal as transportation routes, was spared major changes in its components, geographically, from the influence of railroads (post 1845) by the strength of 01mstead s pi an.
Eventually, with the influx of large populations of immigrants from New York City for the building of the Erie Canal (1825), the opening of the Belt Line Railroad (1883), and the development of cheap hydro-electric power from Niagara Falls <1890*3), factories and other industrial facilities sprang up "anywhere along a wide suburban ring without reference to the water that had been the traditional source of power, or the carrier of fuel."4 A "remarkable crop of high-quality industrial buildings" came from this "traditional phase of Buffalo industry"6 (1890-1920) establishing the golden age of Buffalo's industrial architecture. Nearby the central downtown district, in the East Side area known as the Fruit Belt (for its street names) "all sorts and conditions of men"7 especially Berman carpenters in the 1860s and 70's, built houses. Between this area and Niagara Square many commercial structures were built most likely by these same i/mnagrants who brought with them the building styles and craftsmanship which had proven so successful over the centuries in their European cities.
And it. was within this area, around 1880, that the Buffalo Veterinay Hospital was built by Dr. Nelson Minkley to house an equine practice in direct response to the Washington Farmers' Market across the street as well as to the growing equ-ino needs of downtown Buffalo. The farmers


came on Friday afternoon, boarding their horses and themselves at the hotels flanking the Hospital. A few doors to the north was a large blacksmith shop where they had their horses shod. So the farmers were able to peddle their goods, eat, sleep, and get care for their horses all within one city block. My uncle recalls Saturday afternoons and evenings on Ellicott Street as busy and loud. By .1915, the Hospital had had three owners and was finally purchased by my grandfather (Dr. Frank E. McClelland, Sr.) from Dr. Wallace Baker, whose bookkeeper became my grandmother.
This mixed-use building consisted of an office, pharmacy, equine surgery area, col lie stall, and general stalls on the first floor, a hayloft and an apartment fronting the street on the second floor, and apartment on the third floor where both my uncle (Dr. Robert Baker McClelland) and my father (Dr. Frank E. McClelland, Jr.) were born. By 1920 the Hospital was remodeled to include an isolation ward and a second set of stairs on the first floor, an operating room from a corner of the apartment, kennels from 1/2 of the hayloft, and an exercise roofdeck all on the second floor. The equine practice had now been expanded to include small animals. Between 1930 and 1970 the Hospital underwent two more remodelings and, finally, in .1.974 the facility was consolodated to the first floor.
The second floor remains today as it was in 19130.
The Washington Market was torn down in various stages until the early 50s when the stalls were enclosed in concrete block and roofed because of numerous fires. By 1970 the whole market was replaced by a parking lot. Both hotels on either side of the Hospital and the blacksmith shop were torn down by the early 50s to make room for-parking as well.


Downtown
s
24 76-92 Pearl Street, circa 1870-1890
This group of buildings, which once housed cabinetry and furniture manufacturers, is typical of the nineteenth-century cast-iron and brick commercial structures that once stood in the city.


Built l8P0 by Mels on Hxnkl 1390 Dr,Edward Wieland i960 Dr.Wallace Baker 1915 Dr.Frank McClelland
A, Office
B, Pharmacy
C, Equine surgery
D, Colic stall E0 Stalls
Second Floor
F. Hayloft
G. Apartment


The original Hospital facade
Facade decorated for the Exposition
W fJU


The original Context:-
The Washington St. Farmers*' Market directly-acxoss the street from the Hospital
View north along Ellicott St. from the Hospital
1
I
View south along Ellicott St. ffom the Hospital


About 1920
McClelland Veterinary Hosp,
A. Office
B. Fliarmscy oc exam
C. Equine surgery
D. Colic stall
E. Stalls
F. Isolation ward
Second Floor
G. Hayloft II* Ward I* Surgery
J, Apartment'.
K. Exercise roof




Upstairs kennels, c. 1928 (door to operating room in background)
ihe operating room, c. 1928


1930
1950
A Alia in 1935
McClelland Veterinary Hasp.


The Hospital and its neighbors, a. 1915
"New" facade after removal of second and third floor bay-windows. Photo c. 1935


j tJ t O W
McClelland Vet
. Koap. 1970 Out.-pntiont reconstruction
4
G.
H.
I.
K.
I.
J.
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y
V
- 4
r.
VJ
Waiting
Reception
Farmscy & Tab.
Library
Xray Therapy
Garays
Lav.
Storage
Second Floor
Office T.av.
Recovery
Xray
Surgery
Trepo
Wa rda
Emereiae
Kitchen


30 x 150
30 x 150
i
McClelland Veterinary IIosp.
Buffalo NY
fi&o
A Waiting Room
B Receptionist
C Exam Rooms '
I) Pharmacy
E Library
F 1-aboratory
G Staff Lounge
H lavatories
J Xray
J Surgical prep
K Ward
L Recovery
M Scrub
N Surgery
0 Kitchen
P Storage
( V Autopsy
It Runs
S Rubbish
T Garage
U Parking lot
l/16th = 1*
I I
Entrance


Main corridor to examination, operating and x-ray rooms
f
Recovery and surgical preparation area


Surgical preparation station
Bathing and surgical preparation station
Surgery room


Existing Facility
The Hospital has been consolodated to the -first -floor since 1970, with the -final remodeling in 1975. Organization of the facility, dispite the constraints of such a long and narrow layout, maintains the basic tripartate method typical to many animal hospital designs, namely front, middle, and back rooms corresponding to public, general work, and animal housing areas. What is missing, however, and what is nerarly impossible in the present arrangement of rooms, is the f1ow-through traffic pattern for clients which prevents confusion and avoids the mixing of incoming and outgoing clients. Also, the linear arrangement of the examining rooms does not allow the receptionist to see which rooms may be available, while the long main corridor back to the wards and runs can create further traffic: problems between clients traveling to and from examining rooms and staff retrieving* ani ma 1 s to be di. scharged.
The present business volume is approximately 28 outpatients and 13 .inpatients per day based on the annual average for the 1985-1986 fiscal year.1


Qrganizatianal Background & Personnel Chart The Hospital
LOT & BUILDING Owner; the Bruzgal Corp.
Director: Joseph Bruzgal, D.V.M.
(leased to)
THE PRACTICE Owner; the Ellicott Small Animal
Hospital. P.C.
Director: Franklin Yartz, D.V.M.
(employs)
THE PRACTITIONERS Dr. Franklin Yartz
Dr. Renee' Bugenhagen
Dr. Frank McClelland (part time)
Dr. Robert McClelland (part time)
(and)
THE STAFF
Two licensed Animal Health Technician One Groomer (part time)
One Records/Bookkeeper (part time)
One Maintenance Person (part time)
(treat)
No special general 1y,
THE PATIENTS
client structure -individuals and their pets



Part III.

I




Economic Overview
There has been a major economic recession in the Buffalo area especially for the blue collar wsorkers and the young from the late 1970's to the early 1980's. This followed the energy-related recession in 1974 to 1975 which also affected the major employers of the area, namely auto and steel manufacturing. The present situation is critical as well. There are now appro;-: i mate! y 30,000 displaced or structural1y unemployed persons in the area. As the economy recovers, however, the unemployment problem will remain critical as the areas supply of labor greatly exceeds the number of jobs available, and does not match the skill requirements of the jobs; in demand..1
Mixed with the outmigration of the population and the general trend towards nonfactory employment, the economic: scene in Buffalo is changing. This will demand that there* be manpower retraining and education programs for displaced youth and workers, and efforts to facilitate creation of new nonmanufacturing jobs through commercial activities that do not currently exist in the community, especially along the Main St. Transit Corridor into the Central Business District (CBD). The employment opportunit.es that now exist in the area are mainly in service, sales, and professional and technical jobs. As a result of this shift in employment, the area hospitals and research facilities, many of which are located near the CBD, as well as local medical offices in this area, will prosper and capture the industrial growth in the region, although much of any new industrial development will tend to locate out of the central areas and into suburban locations.2 Dispite this shift away from the traditional heavy manufacturing industries to light manufacturing, high tech, and service related industries, it is projected that recycling of the existing space will be sufficient to accommodate the limited demand for industrial space that is likely to take place along the transit corridor and within the CBD.
Presently, Buffalo has an office vacancy rate of approximately 9.5"/., Other than the recently completed Goldome Bank Building, no new major office structures are-planned for the near future although it is projected that the new service sector employment will represent 100,000 new service jobs and about 40,000 new office jobs within the city -3
There has been an overall decline in retail establishments in the CBD since 1967, and this trend will continue unless some corrective measures are taken to revitlaise the downtown economy. This is likely to be centered at the waterfront development with an emphasis on the regional and tourism markets. Although the waterfront development, approximately 3/4 mile west of the project site, has had limited success as a luxury priced townhouse condominium development, there is also a need for moderately priced housing now, and this will be a growing need in the inner city as the economics of the CBD improve.
Up until five years ago public transit to and from the


downtown district was exclusively by city bus. When the new undergraduate campus for the State University was built in the mi d 1970 s there was a proposal to build a mass transit system which would connect the new and existing campuses and the downtown area, all along Main Street.
Completed in May, 3.985, the new light rail system carries approximately 20,000 passengers to and from downtown, although it presently extends only to the older campus, approximately 1.6 miles of its desired five mile route. it serves seven underground stations, then rises up to act as a trolley along a revitalised stretch of lower Main Street replacing both bus and auto on what was the heaviest traffic corridor into downtown. In this way, and with the proposed future expansions, this system will lessen vehicular loads, impact positively the pedestrian traffic, and add to the character and economic revitalization of the downtown district. There is an important connection between urban development and the transportation network. Public tansit systems are responsible for city growth ~ urban developments need traffic routes and traffic routes generate development. While land prices usually decrease away from the city core, along main transit routes high land values can be found. This has been true in Toronto, SanFrancisco, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, New York, Washington, and throughout. Europe.
Because of its economic development potential, up to 207. of the new housing units required between 1980 and 2010 could be located north of the CBD along the transit corridor (total of 9176 units), with an annual requirement of 300 units.4 The southern most station, which boarders the CBD one block north of the project site, is recommended as a high priority development area.
Previously, between 1974 and 1980, the city captured only 47. of the new housing starts while accounting for over 807. of the permit-authorized demolitions. 457. of the in-city housing starts during the same period were single family units.5 It is projected the future central city residents will probably have no school-age children and will have at least one household member working in the CBD.
In conclusion, to promote revitalization of downtown Buffalo and the area in general there is a need to counter (1) the outmigration of middle and upper middle class families from the .inner city, (2) the loss of persons from the Buffalo area altogether, and <3> the negative retail market image of all downtown elements including traffic, parking, security, and the general apperarance of a declining city core.


MAIN 5T. TR.AN5IT CORJUPOR.
Urban
Context
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Demographi cs
Presently, there are no permanent residents in the neighborhood except the maintenance man, his wife and small child living in the third -floor apartment above the Hospital. The population mostly consisits of commuters from the suburbs who park in the city lot across the street from the Hospital, or those attending St- Michaels Church or frequenting the destination businesses along Ellicott St. between Genesee and Tupper Streets such as the Post Office, Frontier Water and Steam Supply Co., Whoesale Produce Co., Whele Electric Co., the Ellicott Small Animal Hospital, or Tom's Produce Market.
The historic: buildings facing Washington Street on the west side are presently vacant, as are a number of older buildings along Ellicott St. on the east side. Also, the number of street, people has dropped drastically in the last five to ten years due to the city parking lot and the decreased and changing businesses along the neighborhood streets.
Accordingly, crime in the area has dropped due to changing demographics (especially the population numbers) as well as economics. The entire city's economy has been devistated within the last 15 years due to loss of its major industries (e.g. General Motors, Ford Motor Co., and Bethlehem Steel Carp.> creating vast unemployment and great losses to the city tax base.
The proposed changes in the existing neighborhood will have a major impact on local demographics. The vacant buildings or\ Washington St. facing the site will be rehabilitated primarily retail and the vacant lots will be infilled with various new uses including a theater and hotel complex on the corner of Chippewa and Washington Streets.
With the backbone of the revitalization effort on Main St. only two blocks to the west, undoubtedly Ellicott,
Washington, Chippewa, and Genesee Streets in the vicinity will see increases in land value as well as business volume. The bank parking lot (across the street) will also be functionally valuable as this district becomes more popular, increasing the pedestrian traffic along Ellicott St. and pedestrian interest in what resides there.
Traff i c
The immediate neighborhood is bounded by Genesee St. on the south, Tupper St. on the north, Washington St. on the west, and Ellicott St. on the east, with St. Michael Street connecting Washington and Ellicott half-way through the block. Both Washington and Ellicott are presently one-way (the former southbound, the latter northbound) while Genesee and Tupper and St.'Michael are all two-way streets. Generally, the loads on the one-way streets are heaviest during the morning and evening rush hours. Genesee .is one


of the eight streets which radiate from Niagara Square and therefore has moderately heavy traffic loads throughout the day.. Both Tupper and St. Michael are cross streets and have r el at :i. ve 1 y 1 i t. tie t r af f i c:..
Major bus routes in and out of the downtown area still exist along the following streets:
North-south: Elmwood, Delaware, Franklin,
Pear 1 W a sh i n g t on, and M :i. c h i g an
East-west: Seneca, Swan, Eagle, and Clinton
Radially to and from Niagara Square:
Niagara, Genesee, and Broadway
The New York State Thruway passes within 1/2 mile of Niagara Square, and exits to and enters from the lower downtown and waterfront areas.
Pedestrian traffic is very slight along the existing streets except from the city parking lot to places of employment outside the neighborhood and to destinations within the neigborhood. In the future, when the area revitalization has been extended to the neighborhood, there will be increased pedestrian traffic, from the light rail system presently operating on Main Street, which is two blocks west of the neighborhood, to and along Ellicott, Washington, and Genesee Streets.
In the proposed Masterplan, both Washington and Ellicott Streets would change. Washington would become one-way northbound while Ellicott would change to two-way.. This would increase the traffic loads on Ellicott throughout the day but would alter the character of this traffic by decreasing its speed. Both changes would be highly compatable with the proposed zoning changes and this projects goals and objectives.




Neighborhood
Context
EllicottSt. from the West. Hospital is 2n three story-building from the left
St. Michael's Church northwest across Ellicott St.
warn
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I'lllflufflliffl
mnk i m pwnm; JUgg

Buildings under rennovation on Washington St., facing the Hospital
m
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K
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P-? a




S i t. e
Location and Boundaries
The address at the Hospital building is 455 El 1icott Street, Butt-ala, New York. The lot is in Tax District #3, Outer Lot 1139, and is located slightly .more than 1/2 mile radially northeast from Niagara Square1
Existing Structures
The two exterior bearing walls of the existing Hospital building are brick.. The rear wall is presen11 y conc:rete block while the El.licott St. facade consists of cast iron supports to the second floor with brick and wood infill for the first floor and wood frame for the second and third floors. The windows are ail wood frame and have stone exterior sills on the first and second floors. The roofs are all flat with parapet walls on the front and two sides.
The interior .is almost exclusively wood frame consturction with lath and plaster, vertical wood siding, particle board, or sheet rock walls. The present first -floor x-ray and operating rooms, and the "runs have concrete or concrete and tile floors and tile walls. All other floors are wood frame and subfloor with linoleum tile finish. All the wal1s (except the tiled areas) are painted. The ceilings are either wood siding or lath and plaster in the older areas, or dropped acoustical tiles in the remodeled areas.
The structure consists of two brick bearing walls 28.5 feet apart, spanned by 8x8 wood beams or, where upgraded as of 1930 The building measures 151' by 28'-6" outside to outside with floor to floor heights as follows: first floor 14'0"; second floor 12'-0"; and the third floor had a iO'-O" floor to ceiling height. Gross floor areas are, approximately, 3950 sq. ft. on the first floor, 2250 sq. ft. on the second floor, and 1365 sq. ft. on the third floor, totaling 7556 sq. ft., not including 1750 and 643 sq. ft. of open roof deck on the second and third floors respectively.
The neighboring building on the site (previously occupied by the Hi-Grade Meat Packing Co.), also of brick bearing wall construction but of a later construction date than the Hospital, has been vacant for a number of years and will be renovated for this project. It has been subjected to a number of fires as well as vandalism, and is in major cosmetic disrepair. The City presently considers the building a fire and safety h ar. a r d.
Parking and Service


Parking .is accommodated by the adjacent lot to the south of the Hospital which allows for a maximum of 14 angled spaces and a single width drive, and by parallel street parking along the east side of Ellicott St- Together they do not provide sufficient parking for clients much less client and staff parking- Supplemental parking is available at the lot across the street to the west at rates set by the owner (Go1dame Ban k)-
Service, which is generally light deliveries and waste removal, occurs thr ough the garage entered off Ellicott S3t-
Vi ew Analysi s
Into the site, the facades of the Hospital building and those of the historic buildings south of Hi-Grade are the only visual aspects worth noting. Out of the site, there is a view of the new Buffalo Savings Bank building and views of the street scape of the building facades to be restored on Washington St. These facades, which face the site across'* the city parking lot are visually pleasing and have historical significance relating to the Hospital project, although they are virtually all subject to obliteration from my site depending on the type and scale of any development to occur on the city parking lot inbetween. There has been a proposal to construct a two-story parking structure on the south end of the lot adjacent to Genesee St.
Access
Pedestrian access to the site :i s presently facilitated along Ellicott St.., although very few arrive with their pets via this method. Access to the Hospital is now almost exclusively by automobile, as it is for- the remaining destination businesses along the block, via Washington and Oak Streets southbound to Chippewa St-, then to Ellicott St-northbound .
Noi se
The present and proposed situations would result in vertual 1 y the same p.m. peak noise via automobile traffic: but would double the a.m. peak traffic loads for the proposed Buffalo Regional Center Traffic: Plan- However, this traffic would probably be slower and therefore less noisy as Ellicott would become two-way versus its present one-way condition.
There is also reduced background traffic noise due to the recent conversion of Main Street (two blocks to the west) to pedestrian and rapid transit status from its previous two-way heavy automobiles traffic condition.


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Cl i mate1
Buffalo's weather can be extreme. The most dramatic effects result from the piercing winter winds from the northwest, the high humidity in both winter and summer due to the proximity to Lake Erie, the amount of snowfall, and the low number of clear days, especially in the winter months.
One of the more pleasurable climatic effects results from the pleasant summer breezes from the southwest, especially in the evenings, which is a welcomed relief from the heat and humidity of the summer days.


1
I
CLIMATE:1
The following two pages include all the climatic data in chart form, and a schematic diagram of the solar orientation of the site, along with the prevailing winter and summer winds
sun angle chart:
lat it udo:
Imigil tide: elevat ion:
12 deg. r>fi' N 7H deg. <11' W 7(15 feet
clog solar cluirr


* 2
amt.
7062 deg days
94 high temp
-20 low temp
3.88 max ram in 24 hr
'O hi ghest wind
sw dir
24.3 snow max in 24hr
Ln OO days: clear
108 P c
661 c 1


climatic data2




Pro j ec t Goa.1 s an d Obj ect i. ves
* respond to the changing economics and rvitalization efforts of the neighborhood and the CBD in general
t responses to the changing demographics of the
neighborhood by this project will be, but not
limited to, the followings
% committment of one of the five building uses to the encouragement of the Masterplan by providing needed permanent moderately priced housing in the district
% maintaining the street scape and contextual sensitivity through design of a new building and rehabilitation and restoration of the existing hospital >.nd Hi-Grade buildings the facades will be restored to their original conditions (c. 1890 to 1912) thereby helping to
maintain the original pedestrian/commercial atmosphere of the street
% provide retail businesses and a complex which would be especially convenient to local residents
1 to produce an exemplary functional and aesthetic design for the expansion of the facilities at the Ellicott Small Animal Hospital and an expansion of the economic base for the corporation through the proposed uses of the existing arid new buildings
# to produce a mixed-use project which will fit economically as well as contextural1y within its existing neighborhood while fulfilling the clients needs
maintain an image for the project of a professional small animal care complex having housing as separate, di screel, pri vate enti t y
% for each programed use:
* Ellicott Small Animal Hospital, F'.C. ("the Hospital")
% expansion of the present business (in patients, out patients, and staff) in accordance with the needs of the .client (the Brusgal Carp, and the Ellicott Small Animal Hospital, F'.C.) *
* facility design that surpasses the AAHA
Hospital design standards, that actually may set exemplary standards for this unique project and its unique physical setting


& Veterinary Testing Laboratory
t to design a facility to service the Hospital on the first floor as well as other area hospitals and clinics. This will add credibility to the "sms11 an i ma1 care aomp1 ex" i d ea.
# Pet Supply and Equipment Store
t to design a retail facility geared to the
general public but also as a support facility for the Hospital through Hospital referrals for specific animal care products and equipment not carried by the Hospital or, in general, by other area animal hospitals
'! Pet Grooming Parlor
t a general retail facility and Hospital support, f ac i 1 i t y
-it Living Units
* main concern to add to revitaiization process of downtown district by building affordable, saf e, and a11ractive 1i ving units
t secondary concerns physical compatibility wi th other uses within the bu i 1 d i. ng, mi x i ng of people having different concerns (depending upot the building uses), and providing unique, functional and aesthetically pleasing apartments for new urban "pioneers"


New Organizational Background and Personnel Chart
LOT & BUILDING Owner:the BrU2ga1 Cor p. D i r e c t o r s J o se p h Br u z g a 1 D.. V.. Ivl.
THE PRACTICE Owner: the Ellicott. Small Animal Hospital, P.C.. Director: Franklin Yartz, D.V.M.
T h e or g a n i z a t i o i i a n d f- u n c: t i o ri s o f t h e H o spit a 1 w i 11 remain as they are currently except -for the addition of 30 50% more personnel to handle a proposed 50'% increase in business due to the facility expansion. The personnel recommended are as follows;
THE PRACTITIONERS F our t o five f u11-1 i me Veter .i nar i ans
THE STAFF Four licensed Animal Health Technicians 0n e Sec r e t ar y / R ec ep t i on i s t One Records/Bookkeeper One Maintenance Person {part-time)
THE VETERINARY TESTING
LABORATORY Owner: the Bruzgal Corp.
THE STAFF Directors the Ellicott Small An i ma 1 Hosp i (; a 1 P. C. One full-time Pathologist, D.V.M., F'h.D. Five full-time Technicians Two part-ti me T£-:chnici ans One full-time Technical Director One full-time Ad mi n i s t r at i ve Di rector Three full-time Sectretary/ Rec ep t i on i. st s E i g h t full t. i m e Dr i ver s
The lab will possibly operate on a 24 hour basis
prov.i d i ng same-day service for most test results.
THE PET SUPPLY AND EQUIPMENT STORE Owner: the Bruzgal Corp. Directors the Ellicott. Small Animal Hosp i t a1, P.C.
THE STAFF One ful1time Manager/Salesperson One p ar t-1i me Techni c. i an /Sal esper son


THE PET GROOMING PARLOR
Owner: the Bruzgal Carp.
Director: the Elicott Small Animal Hospital, P.C.
THE! STAFF One full-time Recepti oni st/Groomer
Thr ee fu11 ti me Groomer s One part-time Groomer
The store and the grooming/boarding businesses would operate as one business, leasing space -from the Bruzgal Corporation. Admissions and discharge for the grooming/boarding business and sales for the store would occur in the same storefront area.


Mi xed-Use Program
Program Elements Gross Sq.Et
She Hospi Lai Grooming/Eoarding Ps?t Supp 1 y St are General Petal1 7100 600 3.000 3200
Subtotal: 11,900
Offi ces P r 1 v a t e 0 f f i. c e Restrooms Lab Inhouse Offi ces Boiler Roam 5000 700 340 2900 1150 240
Subtotal: 10,330
Mew Ap ar tmen t s Laundry Faci 1 i. ty (Ex i st .i ng Ap a r tment) 6700 320 1450)
Subtotal: 7020
i otal: 29,250 (30,700)
0n Site Parking Spaces Gross Sq.Ft
Complex 13. Apartments 9 4785 3915
Total: Off Site Parking (Goldome Bank lot) Hospital 17 Lab 12 Store/Groom. 7 8700


Ui 0)
Mixed-Use Desiqn Considerations
* Separation and segregation of entry, vertical circulation, and parking for residents.
* Continuity of the historic streetscape and the nature of the neighborhood.
* The project should function as a complex, maintain the status as a cornerstone neighborhood business, and project and image of revitalisation to the downtown.
* Provide different transition edperiences from the treet and parking to Housing, the Hospital, the Lab, and the tore. *
* Do not facilitate public access to the Lab.


MIXED-USE ADJACENCIES
HOU^IKJC,
r "
>T. 4 PARJCJNQ
TRAW^ITIOKJ
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V.
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sr


Hospital
5917
71.00
Parking: :l 1 spaces S) 435 sq.ft. 4785 (on site)
17 spaces across the street in the bank lot Other: Special route in the transition space to and from parking and the street for clients to w a 1 k t h e i r p e t s.
De si g n C or t s i d er a t i on s --
General Requirements
f provide care for approximate!y 42 outpatients and 20 inpatients daily
if will occupy the ground floor of the complex
* entrance and exit shall facilitate a flow t hrough tr af f .i c p at i: er n f or c: 1 i en t e 1 e
* provide for tripartate division of the
functions within the Hospital : (1) front
end, (2) middle group, (3) back end
f maintain sanitary conditions and avoid s o u r c e s o f t r a n s m :i s s i o n o f i n f e c t i o n s
* safety controls will be adequate for, e.g., proper storage of flammable materials, proper storage and handling of anesthetic: agents and oxygen, and proper routine disposal of waste materials
Sp e c i f i c. R e qu ire me n t s
f pr ovide f or t.he f o 11 owi ng :1
* Records and Admissions/Discharge £ Waiting Area f Pharmacy
£ Laboratory short term testing if Radiology
if Nursing, Surgical Preparation, and General Work Areas f Surgery and Anesthesia % Surgery and Pack/Scrub Rooms if Autopsy
% Housekeeping and Maintenance f Storage
if Library, Offices, Conference, Employee Faci 1 i i:.i es if Emergency Care


HOSPITAL ADJACENCIES
/
/fS
!
i


SPACE: The Front Gffiae
(1000 sq.ft.)'
ACTIVITIES
entry/reception discharge/exit reception seating records/bookkeeping access to exam rooms by clients and staff
access to middle group and back end of the hospital by staff public restrooms front end maintenance
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
business office reception desk file cabinets
reception area seating built in and loose
built in computor, cash register general office equipment maintenance closet
CHECKLIST
ZONE X PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY EXPANDABILITY
X VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES X NORMAL
SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT X DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATIOr BRIGHT
X MODERATE
SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
X NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL X REQUIRED
NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
X NORMAL
SPECIAL
NOTES
reception area should maintain separation of incoming and outgoing clients


SPACE:
Examination Room
(132 sq.ft, ea.)
ACTIVITIES
complete physical examinations
hi story-taking-
vaccination'
minor therapy-
prophylaxis
opthalmic. examination
client education
admissions, dismissals
outpatient treatment
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
examination table built-in work cabinet and sink built-in' storage cabinets wall-mounted client seating radiographic view box
CHECKLIST
ZONE PU B L1C
X SEMI-PUBLIC
RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY EXPANDABILITY
VERSATILITY
X NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
X SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
X NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
MODERATE
X SPECIAL
X FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
X NORMAL
SPECIAL
NOTES
a comfortable client is less likely to become annoyed
generally, there are more exam rooms than veterinarians on duty they should be both -professional and attractive in appearance


SPACE: Pharmacy,"
('l80 sq.ft.)
ACTIVITIES
storage, security, preparation,
dispensing of drugs, ahenicals, and biologies
accountability7 and documentation of drugs
work and storage (general)*
can be centrally located or located in multiple areas
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
24"' x 24"' counter-top work spaces with wall-mounted lockable cabinets above (minimum of eight spaces) lockable floor-mounted' storage cabinets (min. 12" deep) special sinks
under-cabinet task lighting refrigerator built-in desk vent hoods
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY X EXPANDABILITY
VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
X SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
X NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
X NONE
ILLUMINATIOIS BRIGHT
MODERATE
X SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
NORMAL
X SPECIAL
NOTES
may need to provide storage for sterile equipment locked and secure
storage for controllec substances is mandatory


SPACE: Laboratory?
(180 sq.ft.)
ACTIVITIES
Note:' Most lab functions will be performed by the Laboratory on the second floor of the Complex.
Those to be done routinely in the Hospital lab are as follows: urine analysis parasitological examination necropsies/autopsies continuous record keeping on daily access of specimens, quality control equipment maintenance, anatomic diagnosis in all necropsy procedures, and all pathology services and examinations
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
counter-top work spaces (24" x 24"), minimum of eight
wall mounted cabinets above the work spaces with task lighting beneath double sink vent hoods
12" x 72"' floor-mounted utility cabinets refrigerator
special counter-top testing equipment
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY EXPANDABILITY
X VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
X SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
X NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
X NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
MODERATE
X SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
NORMAL
X SPECIAL
NOTES
tests run should be those from which results are rapidly obtained snecial circuits or voltage regulators may be necessary for stability of certain equipment


SPACE: X-ray Suite
(300 sq.ft.)
ACTIVITIES
radiography -
radiographic, diagnosis or evaluation of medical or surgical problems radiation therapy dark room -
processing of exposed radiographs viewing room -
multiple film viewing
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
radiography- -
x-ray table, floor-mounted end adjustable, with transformer below
Gontrol center, wall-mounted, and behind.1 a lead-lined barrier storage cabinet dark room
automatic processor with hot and cold water developing tank
wall-mounted* cabinet/work counter wall-mounted. view box film hangers and storage bins viewing room -
wall-mounted multiple film viewer
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY EXPANDABILITY
VERSATILITY
X NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
X SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
X NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
X NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
MODERATE
X SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
natural
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
NORMAL
X SPECIAL
NOTES
dark room must be lighttight, obviously, and also have special ventilation


SPACE: Surgery Suite
(482 sq.ft.)
ACTIVITIES
operating room -
a closed single-purpose' room for the performance of all aseptic surgical procedures pack and scrub room -
sterilization of all articles to be used in surgery'
surgical preparation (washing) of all surgeons and. operating room personnel/assistants
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
operating room -
adjustable operating table ceiling-mounted surgical lamp, nonexplosive type fixture, completely enclosed to avoid dust two instrument tables suction equipment and neonatal incubator
gas anesthetic apparatus mobile kick bucket
radiographic, viewer, wall or ceiling mounted wall clock
emergency drug- box or tray pack and scrub room -
knee, elbow, or foot-operated hot and cold water taps on a deep sink foot-operated soap dispenser counter/cabinet
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY EXPANDABILITY
VERSATILITY
X NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
X SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT X DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN X DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
MODERATE
X SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
NORMAL
X SPECIAL
NOTES
special venting of all excess escape anestheti gasses positive pressure features on anesthetic apparatus emergency lighting, battery operated wall or ceiling-mounted supply of oxygen


SPACE:
Surgeryr Suite continued
ACTIVITIES
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
cupboard space for sterile equipment storage with, pass-through area receptacle outside for deposit of
articles to be washed, resterilizet, or disposed' of autoclave
tandem washer and dryer movable cart
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY EXPANDABILITY
VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
MODERATE
SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NOTES


SPACE: General Work Center and Recovery Area (535 sq.ft.)
ACTIVITIES
general treatment surgical preparation nursing care
dentistry other than routine examination and oral surgery post surgery observation
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
mobile ICC unit
work center with island console special equipment table counter-top cabinets wall-mounted cupboards floor-mounted utility cabinets post-op kennels in a separate area adjacent to general work area
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY X EXPANDABILITY
X VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
X SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT X DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN X DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
MODERATE
X SPECIAL
X FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
NORMAL
X SPECIAL
NOTES
area may double as a lab, treatment room, or extra examination room
visual communication between Work Center, Surgery, and Pack and. Scrub Room is imperative


(1390 sq.ft.)
SPACE: Employee
Facilities
ACTIVITIES
library (150' sq.ft.)
bat brooms (240 " )
offices (444 " )
conference room (180 " )'
employee lounge (144 " )
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY EXPANDABILITY
X VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES X NORMAL
SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
X MODERATE
SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
X NORMAL
SPECIAL
NOTES


SPACE
Wards, Runs, Receiving, and Vertical Circulation
ACTIVITIES
wards -
recovery' x-ray and surgical
quarentine
general holding
food preparation kitchen area bathing and minor grooming storage
receiving supplies and materials runs patient exercise and observatio vertical circulatation -
to second. floor Grooming Parlor, storage, and kennels service to second floor mechanical room maintenance and housekeeping waste disposal
1
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
built-in kennels
built-in runs with rear flushing drains
double sink and counter-top cabinets in kitchen area; refrigerator HVAC plant for the Hospital, the second floor, and possibly the Housing Units
maintenance closet with hospital maintenance equipment special receptacles for waste until it can be picked up or properly disposed
.of lift/service elevator and emergency
stairs to second, floor
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY X EXPANDABILITY
X VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
X SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
X MODERATE
SPECIAL
X FLEXIBLE
natural
NOISE CONTROL X REQUIRED
NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. X HIGH
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NOTES
odor control!
(total sq.ft.=2590)


A n i m at.!. C a r e C am p I e x
Space #2 Net Sq.Ft. Gross SqFt.
Laboratory 2400 2900
Parking: 15 spaces across the street in bank lot
Others Parking and access to the Lab is for employees, drivers, and professional visitors only
Design Considerations --
Ge n er a1 Requi remen t s
f lab will occupy space on the second floor of thb Comp1ex
f lab shall provide specific test results for the resident hospital as well as potentially up to 500 hospitals regionally t maintain flexibility of design, function, and facility for expansion; adaptability to future changes in business volume as well as lab techniques is mandatory t response to local and national governmental and/or regulatory agency codes and restraints pertaining to fire and safety is mandatory
* sensitvity to human needs for an adequate, attractive, and aesthetic, work environment
4 attention to specimen flow, new admission testing, and minimizing traffic congestion within the lab
# response to physical site conditions, especially the prevailing winds and the overall building form for neighborhood context as well as program facilitation
Speci f i c Requi remants
$ provide for the following:1
* Cl ini call Pathology -- HemotoJ. ci igy, Urine
An a ]. y s i s, Fee a 1 An a 1 y s i s, Bat eriology,
and Cytology
* Anatomical Pathology
* 0f f i ces, Con f er erice, Library, Emp1oyee
F ac i 1 i t ,i es
* St or ag e / E x p an s i or i
may need separate services, life safety,
HVAC, energy conservation, security, and fire protection systems than the rest of the
Complex
$ speci al security considerations for 24 hour operation


LAB ADJACENCIES
/ '
OFFICER
T>UPPUIEE4 WORK. AREA
REAP FT
-onnuNi
o
SUPPORT
FACILITIES
A________
!!
II
LAP AR,LA
LAP AK£A


JTORACA -r
BXrAM^IOKJ
it
n
M


(144 sq.ft.)
SPACE:
C-ommuni cat ions Area
ACTIVITIES
automated data processing- of lab work and incoming/outgoing information bookkeeping/records keeping general secretatial functions including incoming and outgoing calls, and communications with drivers reception
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
computor system
fm radio system for drivers
phone system
desk/command center
file cabinets
seating and end tables
CHECKLIST
ZONE X PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY X EXPANDABILITY
X VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES X NORMAL
SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT X DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN X DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
X MODERATE
SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
X NORMAL
SPECIAL
NOTES


SPACE
Administrative and Employee Areas (Support)1
ACTIVITIES
Offices business manager lab administration Pathologist / (115 sq.ft.) (115 sq.ft.)
Conference room (180 sq.ft.)
Library
Employee facilities -lounge bathrooms (120 sq.ft.,) (98 sq.ft.)
Maintenance room (36> sq.ft.) general facility maintenance but special care to all work surfaces to combat contamination, and for possible toxic/corrosive chemical spills
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
desks, chairs, phones, CRT's, file
cabinets; microscope in Pathologist' office
conference table and chairs, phones
book/utility shelves
lounge table and chairs, phone, micro-wave oven, coffee maker, etc.
special maintenance equipment and supplies for tox^c/corrosive chemical spill clean-ups
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
X SEMI-PUBLIC
RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY X EXPANDABILITY
X VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES X NORMAL
SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
X MODERATE
SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
X NORMAL
SPECIAL
NOTES
areas should be in close proximity to exterior corridor


SPACE
Clinical Pathology General Chemical Analysis
ACTIVITIES
routine procedures for qualitative and quantitative analysis of body fluids such as blood, urine, feces, and spinal fluid
includes chemistry profiles and panels, avian tests, individual chem. tests, cytology, hemotolog coagulation, immunology, serolog endocrinology^, adrenal function tests, microbiology, parasitolog urinalysis, fecal analysis, and reproductive function tests STAT testing for emergencies
may include many routine tests but specimen flow patterns are differed special studies testing for complex tests that may be done in batch one or more times per week
r
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT'
4 centrifuge units
1 electrophoresis unit 1 blood mixer 1 bacterial incinerator 1 ph meter 1 incubator 1 gamma counter 1 fibrometer 1 spectrophotometer
1 chemical analyzer
2 microscopes
1 flourescent microscope 1 hemotology analyzer 1 vortex mixer
5 refrigerators stools and chairs
special surface counter-top cabinet units with sinks (4) and at least on? or two stations with vent hoods
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY X EXPANDABILITY
X VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
X SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
MODERATE
X SPECIAL
X FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
NORMAL
X SPECIAL
NOTES



Clinical Pathology continued
(720 sq.ft.)
ACTIVITIES
drivers" drop-off and pick-up area
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
scales water bath
various racks (counter-top) for tool and material holding 1 copy machine
CHECKLIST
ZONE PU B L1C
SEMI-PUBLIC
RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY EXPANDABILITY
VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
MODERATE
SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
NORMAL
SPECIAL
NOTES


SPACE: Anatomical Pathology
(144 sq.ft.)
ACTIVITIES
histopathology
processing of tissue removed surgica.-ly or at autopsy for microscopic examination and diagnosis storage of gross specimens includes selection of tissue section for microscopic examination, automatic processing, embedding, microtome sectioning, slide drying and staining, slide cover-slipping and labeling, examination, and recording and. reporting results cytology
processing and study of exfoliated cells to determine morphologic abnormalities
close proximity to histology specimens received consist of smears already prepared
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
1 tissue processor 1 microtone 1 embedding center water bath stool
special surface counter-top cabinet units with sink and hooded work station
CHECKLIST
ZONE PU B L1C
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY X EXPANDABILITY
VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
X SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
MODERATE
X SPECIAL
X FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
NORMAL
X SPECIAL
NOTES
close proximity to resident Pathologistrs office
toxic and carcinogenic chemicals may be used in this area


SPACE
General Work and Special Supply Storage ('288 sq.ft.)
ACTIVITIES
minor equipment maintenance and/or repair
non-chemical preparations storage of restricted or readily needed ohemicals, supplies, or lab materials including specimens
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
refrigerators locking cabinets counter-top cabinets with sink utility shelving
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY X EXPANDABILITY
X VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES X NORMAL
SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
X NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
OPTIONAL
X NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
MODERATE
X SPECIAL
X FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
X normal
SPECIAL
NOTES


Animal Care Complex
#3 Net Sq.Ft. Gross Sq.Ft
Store 830 1000
Parking; 3 spaces across the street in the bank lot Design Considerations
General Fie qu i resents
% will occupy space in the storefront (-first floor) of the infill building t will service the Complex as well as the city and regional areas within the state £ service access may be shared with other buidling uses
t location and exposure to the public is i mpartant
Specific Requirements
% shop wi1 be sanitary and provide for proper storage of sterile equipment and supplies, general pet supplies, and special dietary
foods
% adequate precaution far storage and handling of pet medicines
* professional and attractive display of products, goods, and services t circulation must be adequate for handling of clients comfortably and supplies practically % p r o v i d e f or t h e follow! n g:
U one small office
if main area for counter sales, displays, and pickups
if small waiting area near counters storage/expansion area


STORE ADJACENCIES
;5T 0 RAqE/ EXPANSION
*
MAINTENANCE
V
OFFICER

*^
COUNTER PI>PUAT>,
PI ORU PE &WTR.AMGR


SPACE: Main Area
ACTIVITIES
retail counter sales produel displays arranged pickups retail (referrals)'
wholesale (willcall) at the first floor loading dock limited: customer seating
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
sales counter displays
loose seating and small end tables CRT, cash register, etc. lockable cabinets for non-prescription pet medicines
CHECKLIST
ZONE X PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY X EXPANDABILITY
VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES X NORMAL
SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
X MODERATE
SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
X NORMAL
SPECIAL
NOTES


Storage/Expansion Area
ACTIVITIES
storage of all foods, supplies, and equipment, both prescription and non*-pre script ion
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
lockable utility cabinets preparation area including counter-top cabinet', sink, cupboard, and refrigerator
CHECKLIST
ZONE PU B L1C
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY X EXPANDABILITY
X VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES X NORMAL
SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
X MODERATE
SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
X NORMAL
SPECIAL
NOTES


A ni i m a 1 C a r- e C o n i p 3. e
Space #4 Net Sq.Ft. Gross Sq.Ft.
Pet Grooming Parlor 500 600
Parking: 6 spaces across the street in bank lot Desi g n Con si d er a t. i on s
6 e n e r a 1 R e q u :i r e m e n c s
$ will occupy a space within the Hospital on the first f1oor
t will service the Complex, other local
hospitals and clinics, and regional areas within the state
* professional appearance of the spaces and staff
* circulation and access must be adequate for special service and deliveries; will be
d irec 11 y t. i e?d t o the Hosp i t.a 1
% a d in i s s i o n s / d i s c: h a r g e f r o m /1 a t h e p 11 b 1 i c w i 1 3. occur at the sales desk for the Store
Specific Requirements
t pr ov.i de f or t.he f c:> 1 1 ow 1 rig:
The Store,, Grooming, and Boarding wi 13. operate as one business, and will lease space from the Complex t various distinct grooming stations
including ventilation systems, grooming equi pment, suf f i ci ent number of outlets, and special grooming tables, chairs, wash areas, storage cabinets, and holding kennels with specific dry.i ng equi pment t storage/exparisi on area
* exercise runs for the animals will be shared with boarding and the Hospital
* private office will be adjacent to tire sales area for the Store


PARLOR ADJACENCIES

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SPACE: Front Office
(332 sq.ft.)
ACTIVITIES
admissions/discharge of patients from the grooming areas receiving of supplies/materials bookkeeping/records keeping employee lounge area and bathroom
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
counter/desk with a CRT
typical lounge furniture and equipment
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
X SEMI-PUBLIC
RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY X EXPANDABILITY
VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES X NORMAL
SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
X MODERATE
SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL X REQUIRED
NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
NORMAL
X SPECIAL
NOTES


SPACE: Grooming Area
(227 sq.ft.)
ACTIVITIES
bathing and grooming of patients, including kennel drying interim holding of partients between admission and grooming, and grooming and discharge
supplies storage and handling
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
cages
bath tub, drain board, double sink, and. counter-top unit 2rxl''x7,! high storage cabinets 2V x 4'' grooming table (adjustable) groomers chair
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
X SEMI-PUBLIC
RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY EXPANDABILITY
VERSATILITY
X NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES NORMAL
X SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
MODERATE
X SPECIAL
FLEXIBLE
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL X REQUIRED
NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. X HIGH
NORMAL
X SPECIAL
NOTES
special care must' be takf to control both odors and noise due to the proximity of the Housing Units above


SPACE:
Office,
Storage/Expansion, and Maintenance
ACTIVITIES
Office - (100 sq.ft.)
for resident manager
Storage/Expansion - (100 sq.ft.)
general supplies storage and handling
Maintenance - (36 sq.ft.)'
sizeable and well equipped to maintain a clean, safe, and professional environment
FURNITURE/
EQUIPMENT
typical office
lockable cabinets as well as utility shelves
utility shelves for maintenance
supplies, and a tile-lines janitor's closet with 2 x 3" service sink, braced faucet, and mop holder
CHECKLIST
ZONE PUBLIC
SEMI-PUBLIC
X RESTRICTED
FLEXIBILITY EXPANDABILITY
X VERSATILITY
NONE
FACILITIES/ SERVICES X NORMAL
SPECIAL
OPTIONAL
VIEW OUT DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
VIEW IN DESIRABLE
X OPTIONAL
NONE
ILLUMINATION BRIGHT
X MODERATE
SPECIAL
flexible
NATURAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
X NONE
VENTILATION H.V.A.C. HIGH
X NORMAL
SPECIAL
NOTES


pace
Net. Sq. Ft..
Gross Sq.Ft.
8 Apartments 5580 6700
Parking: 8 spaces 3 435 sq.ft. ~ 3915 (on site)
Design considerations --General Requirements
$ discrete and separate from the rest of the comp 1 ex
# private entry into the Complex may be walk-ups from the second level or have a" pr i vat e ver t i ca 1 c i r cu 1 at; i on syst em
# as much natural ventilation and light as possible
% efficiency and security, aesthetics and eomfort
t design to respond to "typical" CBD dwellers no school age children, and at. least one household member working in the CBD -possible set-up with facilities for cottage :i. ridustr i es
# connection to parking should be well-lighted and secure during night hours
Sped, f i c; Requi rements
$ each unit will have access to an outdoor
space, natural lighting and ventilation, and be provided with an adequate security system
% p r o v .i. d e f or t h e f o 11 ow i n g s £ entry area % kitchen
t 1i ving/di ning area
% master bedroom and master bathroom s e c o n d b e d r a a m / o f f i c e w i t h p o s s 1 b 1 e s p e c i a 1 c o 11 a g ei n d u s t r y s e r v i c e s $ second full bath
% balcony or access to a private section of a common court yard (may be part of the vertical and horizontal circulation and entry sequence)


Apartment Unit Sq.Ft. Guidelines
.Room Sq. Ft
Kitchen 80
i._ i v i n q / D i n i n q 300
Bedroom 180
Bath 40
Pat.i o 100


HOUSING ADJACENCIES
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APARTMENT ADJACENCIES
MAJ-TtK PATH ROOM
4*
MAETER pep room

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Part. VI




1
Zoning Check
Proposed Lises Section Page
* Veterinary Hospital
Â¥. Medical Testing Laboratory
* Pet Supply Store
* Pet Grooming Parlor
* Housi ng
Present zoning classification
* CM General Commercial District R2 3
Applicable allowable uses
* hospitals, clinics, non-toxic R2 3 laboratories, multi-family R4 6-7 dwellings, single family R5 8 dwellings, apartments CM 13-14
Mini mun lot size
* 5000 sq.ft, total
Max i mum hei ght
* must be equal to or less than the 12 14 horizontal distance from the building to the opposite side of the street to a maximum of 40'or 4 4 three stories
Offstreet parking
there will be one space for each 17 43 250 sq.ft, of gross floor area for the first two floors, and one space per dwelling unit above two floors plus one guest space per unit
* parking is not. permitted in the setbacks
Sign restrictions
* accessory signs shall be limited 17 48 to 200 sq.ft, or the sum of 3 sq.ft. for each lineal foot of f rant 1 ot 1 i. ne, whi chever i s greater
Other special requirements
* distance between the front/rear
16
80


doors of one building to the front/rear door of the second building must be greater than 40'
* distance between the front/rea^r door of one dwelling and the end o-f another must be greater than
30 '
* screening is required of the 17 4
parking area -for off street
parking for more than five cars
There is a proposal, within the Regional Center Masterplan '85, to change many of the existing land use regulations in the urban core. Part of this proposal is a change within this projects's neighborhood district from a "CM" zoning general commercial to an "LC" zoning low rise commercial. Commensurate with the revitalization of the downtown area, this will encourage more projects of a pedestrian scale. Additionally, there is a proposal before the City Council to extend the historic district boundaries, which now encompass only the blocks boardering Main St., to include this project's site. I will assume, for the purposes of this thesis, that the proposal will be adopted.
The following regulations shall apply in the "LC" Low-Rise Commercial Di strict:2
Permitted uses
*
*
*
*
*
resi denti al low-rise office
limited retail use no larger than 2000 sq.ft, per lot except, on Main St.
eating and drinking establishments grocery stores
Building area and form regulations
* height regulations: the minimium height from curb level for buildings shall be 24'; the maximum height from curb level for buildings shall be 40'
* front yards: no front yards are permitted; buildings shall be built to the front lot line for at least the first 24' of height; for the purposes of this subdivision, a building will be deemed to comply with these restrictions if a maximum of 257. of the area of the building wall is recessed to a maximum of 3' to allow architectural design treatment
* side yards: no side yards shall be permitted in the "LC" District
* setbacks: the first building setback shall be allowed at the minimum height, of 24' *
* entrances: all building entrances in the "LC"


District shall meet the -following requirements and 1i mi ti ati ons:
* entrances to offices must be at streetwal1 or recessed no more than 3'; the width of office entrances can be no greater than 20' or 257. of the front lot line, whichever is less *
* entrances to retail may not exceed 20' in width except upon design review, may be recessed to an unlimited depth below the third story streetwal1 frontage, and shall not permit access to another use or include a secondary entrance except by-design review




o
IO-B6


Bu tiding Codes1
Section Page
Fire zone
* low hazard
707.
3< >
Occupancy classification
* business (Hospital and Lab) Cl
* multiple dwelling (Housing) B1
Construction type
701.1
* type 4 ordinary 704.Id
Occupancy separations required (Table 1-739) 739.4
* Cl to B1 (Lab to Dwelling)
* 2 hours
* Cl to Cl (Hospital to Lab)
* 1 hour
* Cl to Cl (Lab to Grooming)
* 1 hour
Max i mum allowable floor area 705.4
* Bl: 1 story: 7500 sq.ft.
* Cl: 2 stories: 9000 sq.ft.
* if sprinklered: Cl: 18,000 sq. ft.
Max i mum allowable height
* for Bl of 1 story: 15' Table 11-705
* for Cl of 2 stories: 40'
Fire resistance of exterior load
beari ng wal 1 s
* north: 2 hours
* south: 2 hours
* east: 2 hours
* west: 2 hours
Setbacks
* location within city: site i s i n
the new fire district and al 1
buildings can be connected to the
36
112-11
37-39
46-50
automatic fire alarm system
Use of public property 707
* doors are prohibited from swinging into city property
* all marquees, canopies, etc. projecting past the street line must be removable, greater than 10' above the street, non-combustible, and securely supported
Windows 733.1
* Bis tops of windows must be less than 18" below the ceiling unless
80


134
the top of at least one window is greater than or equal to 7' above the -floor 763.2
* in area, must be equal to at least 87. of the floor area
* size of enclosed or semi-endosed courts must be equal to or greater than 3" of width per ft. of height of enclosing walls 731.3 76
Venti1 a tion requirements 733. 3 80
* natural: openable parts must, be equal to or greater than 47. of the total floor area in each space 763.3 13!
Maxi mum ceiling heights in rooms 7 -y '-n f~\ 77
7' -6"
Mini mum floor area of rooms
* assuming habitable spaces .
* kitchens: 60 sq.ft. * others: 80 sq.ft, with a
minimum of 7' ceiling height
* in dwellings: 150 sq.ft, with
a minimum horizontal dimension equal to or greater than 10'
Fire resistive requirements
* exterior bearing walls
* interior bearing walls
* exterior non-bearing walls
* permanent partitions
* between Lab and Housing
* between Lab and Grooming
* exit corridor walls
* vertical openings
* -floors
* between Lab and Housing
* between Hospital and Lab
* roofs
* exterior doors
* exit doors and -frames
* inner court walls
* mezzanine -floors
* roof coverings
* boiler room enclosure
Ex its
* occupancy! B1 and Cl
* cannot use a -fire escape as a means of exit.
* must be lighted at all t i mes
* directions must be posted to a safe, designated termi nation
* cannot be through kitchens or bathrooms
* number of exits required
Tables 1-704 42-44
to 111-704 2 hours 3/4
0
jU
1 n
l
3/4
X-
1
3/4
3/4
3/4
1
1
3/4
n
735 82
765 136
735.9 96


* E-: 1 : 1 exit, to a mess a nine
per dwelling unit from the
third f 1 oar
X Cl: 2 exits to a mess an i ne
f rom the second floor
* Cl: 2 exits on grade
minimum width of exits
* Bl: 36"
* Cl: 44"
exit separation arrangement
* measured from the most remote point on the floor of the fire area to exit exclosure along a natural and unobstructed path, exits must, be less than 150' apart through an unsprinklered
735.
765.
765.
B3
13
15
apart through a sprinklered corridor Table VI-765
maximum allowable travel distance to the closest exit
* Cl: first floor: 175 '
second floor: 150
* Bl: 100 '
Tabl Tab 1
e VI e II
-765
1-735
156
156
90
maximum allowable travel distance to the closest exit
with sprinklers
* Cl: first floor: 250 '
second floor: nnc A.Z J
* B1: 150'
ex i t sequence (through adjoi ni ng
or accessory areas)
* through rooms of the same
tenancy except through bath rooms, bedrooms, and kitchens
735,If
83
Ex i t
doors x
*
*
minimum width and height: 6 '-8"
minimum leaf width: 22" width required for occupants
* first floor:
(two exits)
* second floor:
* third floor:
3'0" x
munber of
42 x 22" = 924"
1027
1232"
73v
735 9 765.8
(2.4 exits) (2.9 exits)
*
*
swing: all exit doors must swing out change in floor level at door; must be greater than or equal to 4", less
93
96
156
Ex i t
than or equal to 7- 3/4"
corridors 735 83
* required width
* Bl: mi ni mum of 36"
* Cl: mini mum of 44" 765 137
* required height
* Bl: mi ni mum of 7 '-6"
* Cl: mini mum of 7 '-6"
length of dead end corridors Bl: maximum of 40'
N ill


*
Cl: maxi mum of 50'
Stairs 735.3 86
* minimum width 765.4 147
* Bl: 36" with an occupancy load of up to 56 Table 1-735 88
* Cl: 44" with an occupancy load of 42 to 47 Table N--765 148
* maximum riser allowed; 7-3/4" Table 1-735 88
* minimum tread allowed: 9-1/2" Table I0-765 149
* no winding, circular, or spiral stairs allowed for Bl or Cl occupancy 735.3a-14 91
* 1andi ngs 765.4a-15 Table 10-765 150 149
* * minimum width required; 44" (at least as wide as the stairway) * maximum width required: same as the stairway * vertical distance between landings: 12'-0" at least, one stair to the roof 735.3a-1 86
is required 765.4a-1 147
* * roof parapet or railing must be at least 3' in height a. stair enclosure is required, and
must have the same fire rating a the corridor s 765. 4a.-4 147
* stair headroom must be at least 7 -0 " Table 10-765 149
Handrai1 s Table 1-735 88
* * * required at each side if the stair width is equal to or greater than 44" maximum width between interior-rails: 6" minimum required height: 33" maximum openings in rails: 6" minimum height above nosing: 30" maximum projection from walls 3- 1/2"
Horizontal exit requirements 735.2 85-86
* equal to or greater than 3 sq.ft 765.2 140
* Ramps * per occupant all exit openings must have opening protectives an 8' fire terrace is required if used as a fire exit, they must be enclosed minimum width Bis 36" 735.2 84-85
* Cls 44" 765. 2 138-1
* maximum slope allowed is 1 ft, rise to 10 ft. run no handrails required is at least 1 to 12
*
it slope


*
exit signs are required
Toilet room requirements
* must be separated by sex
* -fixture requirements
* Bis one kitchen sink,
w. c:.
tub or shower, and lav per dwelling
womens one w.c. one lav per -floor minimum for the first and second f1oors
mens one w.c., one lav per floor minimum for the first and second f1oors
drinking fountains; one per floor minimum for the first and second f1oors
showers; one minimum for the first f 1 oar
900.2c
26
900.2d
!27
Handicapped requirements
* si te
* walks; maximum slope must be
less than or equal to 1' in 20' (57. grade)
* ramps; maximum slope must be
less than or equal to 1' in 12' (8.3% grade)
* Bl; at least one handicapped parking space
* Cls at least two handicapped parking spaces
* building
* required exits on the exterior of the main level must be usable by the handicapped
* there must be at least one accessable drinking fountain, public toilet, and public phone per floor
* accessable routes
* from public street or sidewalk, driveways, parking area, passenger loading zone, transportation stops, and other-buildings and facilities on the same premesis
* accessable bathrooms
* based on the ANSI All7.1 1980 Code:
* Bl, Cls removal of base cabinet, installation of grab bars at the w.c. and shower, installation of shower spray with hose, addition of a seat for the bathtub and shower, insulation of exposed knee space at the hot water piping under the .lav
1 100 1100.1b
1100.5a
1100.2a
1101.4c
371-380
371
377
372
377


110i.3b
* a c c e s s a b 1 e h o u s i n g
* Bl: all units mus
with an elevator
* Bl: all units mus
with a change minimum of
* wit h i n the unit,
: be accessable
be con vert able structural
there must be accessabli1ty to storage, controls, windows, doors, kitchens, baths, appliances, and alarms
* kitchenss removed of base cabinets; adjustment or replacement of counter work surfaces; adjustment or replacement of sink; installation of usable range, cooktop, oven, refrigerator, dishwasher; insulation of exposed knee space at hot water piping under sink; insulation of exposed knee space/contact surfaces under oven or cooktop




Bi h11ography
Thesis Statement
1Cr i t #17, The Archi tectual Student Journal Interview with John B. Jackson
The American Institute of Atchitectural Students, Inc,
M. W. Washi ngton, D.C., 1986.
P- 4
2. S u s t a i n a b 1 e C u m m u n i t :i e s A New Design Synthesis for
Cit i es, Subur bs, and Towns Si fit. Van der Ryn Sierra Club Books San f-rancisco, Ca. , 1906.
p. 25
3. Ibid., p. 25
4. Cassabel1 a
Rivisita Internasionale di Architettura Milan, Italy, Jan./Feb., 1984.
p. 26
5. Ibid., p. 96
6. Ci it #17 The Architectural Student Journal Interview with Denise Scott Brown
The American Institute of Architectural Students, Inc.
N. W. Washington, D.C., 1986.
p Hi story
1. Buf f a 1 o Ar c:hii.er.tur e: A Gui de
Buffalo Architectural Guidebook Corp. M.I.T. Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1982.
p. 3
f~\ -rr n -* I bid., p. 5
4. ,5. .1 h id. p.. 3 0
6 - I b i d. p. 11
7. Ibid., p- 7
8. .Ibid., P73
The historic hospital layouts and photos are courtesy of-the "History of Veterinary Medicine in Western New York", the private notes and .'memoirs of Dr. Robert Baker Me Cl el 11 and.


Buffalo, New York, 1905, and the old family photo album of the late Dr. Frank E. McClelland, Sr.
Ex i st i ng Fac .1 i i ty
1. Research by Dr.. Frank E. McClelland, Jr. Buffalo, New York, Nov.., 1906.
Economic Overview
1
Land.Use.and Market Analysis Report
City of Buffalo Main Street Transit Corridor Master Div. of Planning, Dept, of Ci ommuni ty Development City of Buffalo, New York, May, 1984.
P 53
Pic
O M 1 b id.., p. 6-9
4. 1 b i d. , p. 2-12 .....
5. I b i d. , p 4 J. 6
Urb an Contex t Map
This map was taken from the Zoning Map, Div. of Planning, Dept, of Community Devieopment, City of Buffalo, New York, Nov., 1984.
Neighborhood Context Map
This map was taken from the Sanborn Maps of the City of Buffalo, courtesy of Robert. O'Hara, Director, Bui dl i ng Dept. City of Buffalo, New York.
S.i te
1. From the Survey Map >s of the City of Buffalo
Courtesy of Ray L. S o n n e n b e r g e r, City Surveyor
BuffaIo, New Yor k, March, 1980.
Climatic: Data Sheets
1. ,2. Buffalo Wat erf r ont. V.i 1 lage-- An Are hi tectural Thesis submitted by Kevin Schwarckopf College of Design and Planning University of Colorado at Denver Denver, Colorado, 1985.
PP- 75,76
Animal Care Complex Space #1 ~ Hospital
1 Standards for AAMA Hospitals
American Animal Hospital Association, 1983.


Space #2 Laboratory
p 5
Anime..1 Care Complex ~
1.. 2, Based on interviews at the Colorado Veterinary Laboratory with Daniel J. Mac.k, Executive Director Broom-field, Colorado, Dec. 1986, and Jan., 1987.
3. Medical Laboratory Planning and Design
Laboratory Function arid Design Committee
College of American Pathologists Skokie, 111., 1985.
p. 74
Zoni ng
1. Zoning Ordinance
Ordinances of the City of Buffalo Buffalo, New York, July, 1985. pp. 12, 13
2. "Addendum to the Zoning Ordinance" pp. 7, 8
3. From the Zoning Map
Ddv. of Planning, Dept, of Community Development City of Buffalo, New fork, Nov., 1984.
4. Proposed Regional Center Zoning Map
Div. of Planning, Dept, of Community Development.
City of Buffalo,'New York, Nov., 1984.
B u i 1 d i n g C o d e s
1. Mew York State Uni form Fire Prevention and Building Code State F.i re Prevent.i on and Building Code Counci I New York State Div. of Housing and Community Renewal New York City, New York, Jan.., 1984.




ELLICOTT ANIMAL HOSPITAL & MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT

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ELLICOTT STREET ELEVATION
SCALE* 1-0




LEGEND
1 ADMISSIONS 19-20
2 DISCHARGE 21
3 OVERFLOW WAITING 22
4-6 PRIVATE WAITING 23
7-10 EXAMINING ROOMS 24
11 AUTOPSY 25
12 FREEZER 26
13 LAB/PHARMACY 27
14 PACK & SCRUB 28
15 OPERATING 29
16 X-RAY 30-31
17 DEVELOPING 32-33
18 VIEWING 34
GENERAL WORK & PREP POST-OP WARD STORAGE KITCHEN/WARD EXERCISE RUNS
ADMISSIONS GROOMING & BOARDING
OFFICE
STORAGE
SERVICE ELEVATOR DUMPSTER ANIMAL HOUSING GROOMING RETAIL SALES
^;
FIRST FLOOR PLANS
SCALE1 \