Citation
The Children's Museum on the Platte River Greenway

Material Information

Title:
The Children's Museum on the Platte River Greenway
Creator:
Rioth, Lila
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
approximately 125 leaves in various foliations : illustrations (some color), maps (some color), color photographs ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's museums -- Designs and plans ( lcsh )
Children's museums ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's degree in Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
General Note:
Includes museum brochures and a pamphlet, Kids and pets, produced by The Children's Museum of Denver.
Statement of Responsibility:
submitted by Lila Rioth.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
08815353 ( OCLC )
ocm08815353
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1982 .R56 ( lcc )

Full Text
K.IOTH

THE CHILDRENS MUSEUM ON THE
PLATTE RIVER GREENWAY


THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
ON THE
ON THE
ON THE
PLATTE RIVER GREENWAY PLATTE RIVER GREENWAY
PLATTE RIVER GREENWAY
K3
mm*
A Thesis in Preparation for the Master of Architecture Degree at the University of Colorado at Denver College of Environmental Design Submitted by Lila Rioth December 1981 December 1931 December 1981


introduction
introduction
introduction


TABLE OF CONTENTS

introduction
1
*
THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
history
6
philosophy
15
participants
27
program
31


CONT.
rtlhrfyri *
ON THE PLATTE
RIVER GREENWAY
0 location 53
History 60
site analysis natural 62
site analysis urban 71
^ APPENDIX ^ ^PROCESS & DESIGN SOLUTION


THESIS SCHEDULE THESIS SCHEDULE THESIS SCHEDULE THESIS SCHEDULE
1
Continued reading and research on children's museums
-January 18 to January 31, 1982
Generation of alternative design concepts (schematic design)
-February 1 to February 14, 1982
Selection of preferred alternative design
-February 14 to March 1, 1982
Design and design development
-March 1 to April 1, 1982
Preparation of presentation drawings and model
-April 1 to April 30, 1932
Assumed presentation date for the sake of planning
-April 30, 1982


THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
Hi WTFTfnPTrriTwT wwawMWinwwwwi


THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
history history history history


THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
HISTORY HISTORY HISTORY HISTORY HISTORY HISTORY HISTORY
The Children's Museum began in 1973 after receiving a grant from HEW to "test the feasibility of developing a public cultural institution primarily for children". With these funds, a series of "hand-on-exhibits" were constructed and a "traveling-show van" was purchased to tour schools and shopping centers. The HEW grant was renewed for a second year and the Museum began a search for a home. In early 1975 the 931 Bannock Street building was leased.
The 10,000 square foot $15,000 renovation was designed by the A-B-R Partnership with Russell Seacat as Partner-in-Charge. During the last five years, the Museum has demonstrated its legitimacy as an important cultural institution for the Denver Community: visitors have increased from under 2,000 to over 10,000 a month, the staff has grown from two paid employees to nearly thirty, newspaper circulation has leaped from 10,000 to over two million, and exhibit space has moved from 1,600 square feet to 5,000 square feet.
Present physical facilities are much too small for the changes and growth the Museum has experienced. In 1980 the Denver City Council approved the use of two acres in Gates Crescent Park on the Platte River Greenway as a permanent home for the Children's Museum.
6


BarkerRinkerSeacat and Partners were chosen as architects: Russell Seacat again as PartnerinCharge, Roz Schneider as Administrative Partner, and Duane Erickson as Project Architect. Their services have included consultation for site selection, preliminary design and programming, and development of budgets for submission with funding requests. Currently the museum board of directors are soliciting funds for construction of the new museum and it is hoped the new museum will open in the Spring of 1984. I have included floor plan of both the existing Children's Museum and of the future Children's Museum.
Square Foot Requirements
Exhibit Area Current Use 5,000 SF
C1 assroo m/Labs/V/o rks ho p 0
Theater 1,600
Office Space 600
Audio/Visual Lab 0
Gift Shop 200
Meeting Room 0
Shop (Exhibit Construct.) 400
Cafeteria (Public) 0
Library/Resource Center 0
Lobby/Entry-Reception 100
Volunteer & Staff Lounge 0
Sub Total 7,900
Net To Gross 600
(Circulation, Assembly, Toilet Rooms, etc.)
Storage (for various 1,400
functio ns)
TOTAL AREA 9,900 SF
7


6cuji; l/fc" *:<- 931 Bannock
Street
the
existing
museum
*.^0'


- 6






THIRD FLOOR
SI
1. THE CHILDRENS MUSEUM 7WA
\i ON THE PLATTE RIVER


I




I
Legend
1 Entry Kiosk
2 Amphitheater
3 Service Tube
4 Silo Exit
5 Storage Dome
6 Clerestory
7 Sign-Light Grid 3 Skylight
9 Bridge
10 Exterior Exhibit
11 Whale Wall
12 Seating
Brooklyn Childrens MuseumAt one
corrteca 1 gOTTJevTToK^^ kiosk serves as an entry pavilion for the building, while nearby, a grain silo is used for a rooftop fire exit. A highway pedestrian bridge spans the sunken courtyard joining the rooftop play area to the rest of the park, and highway signs are used to announce the museum's presence. For seating, traditional park benches, a grandstand, and steel I-beams are used.
Inside, where three main levels are framed with laminated wood beams and timber decking, four separated sections of corrugated steel culverts diagonally bisect the main exhibition floor to enclose a circulation ramp that extends 180 ft from the entry kiosk through the open-plan terraced exhibition area. Near one corner, a small theater is hidden inside an oil storage tank that rises through the building.
SITE PLAN
BROOKLYN AVE.
- 21 -
- r


THE CHILDRENS MUSEUM
philosophy philosophy
philosophy


THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
PHILOSOPHY PHILOSOPHY
PHILOSOPHY PHILOSOPHY
PHILOSOPHY PHILOSOP
1
On my last Children's Museum visit I watched a group of
six-year old children: they entered the Museum shy, whispering,
with eyes wide and uncertain. Later as I was leaving, I saw them again:
their faces were brightly painted and bright with joy /
voices became loud calling to other children / laughter and silliness
dressed in hats and colored felt names pinned proudly / arms were tugged
by other young friends eager to share their discovery -
eager to explore.
Perhaps that was the key to their delight: the discovery of a place created just for them and a place they in turn create.
The Museum and its exhibits are easily available to the curious by "hands-on" interaction a kinesthetic involvement. Child involvement is achieved by offering diverse exhibits that can be chosen and pursued independently, and by allowing each child to determine the length of time spent investigating any particular activity. This is the philosophy of the Children's Museum:
"learning through doing". There are ten constantly changing exhibits that give children a chance to learn first-hand about
5


the world and about themselves. Children often view the world as mysterious due to concepts they don't understand or facts they haven't learned, but physically exploring the environment helps them demystify their surroundings. Therefore two principal thematic areas are "childhood fears" and "demystification of the environment." For example, the handicap exhibit, "Like Me, Like You" helps children to understand disabilities and be less fearful of them. During the past several years there have been a dentist office, a mock television studio, Arab tents and a room in a Hong Kong home. "Sensorium" introduced the arts and communication, "Figure it Out" uses puzzles to teach math, and "Scientoyfic" uses toys to explain scientific principles. One display explored the life cycle with an emphasis on death and dying. Soon to open is an exhibit called "Insides" a walk-in, full-size kitchen in which everything is exposed from the joints in the floor and ceiling to the wiring in the walls. Even the plumbing is clear so that kids can see where the water goes when they turn on the tap. In this way, children begin to look more questioningly and wonderingly at everything around them. And the cultivation of that attitude the curious mind is what education is all about. I have included information on the exhibits and other services of the Museum; I have also included a bibliography of information on similar museums for children that promote participatory learning.
- 16 -


PHILOSOPHY: Exhibits
0 Principally what we try to be is a place for families. Not just for kids. A place where they can come and have and feel good about themselves. Where they can have alot of "successful" experiences. Everything is structured around how kids can feel good about themselves. So when they experiment with things the experiments work.
At the Children's Museum everything is designed for families. An adult must accompany all childrer This is deliberate on two accounts. The Museum is not, nor does it ever want to be, a babysitting service. And the Museum wants to encourage parents to work with their kids.
All exhibits have words many of which are not for children.
0 The words are there for adults so they will feel comfortable going through the exhibit with their kids. They will be one step ahead. They will have whatever background information they need to make them feel comfortable answering the kid's questions. Just helps them be a facilitator.
Interview with Robin Simons, October 12, 1981.


THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
BIBLIOGRAPHY BIBLIOGRAPHY BIBLIOGRAPHY BIBLIOGRAPHY BIBLIOGRAPHY
Books and publications include:
Brooklyn Children's Museum, Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, 1975.
Career Educational Facilities, A Report from Educational Facilities Laboratories, 1975 .
Hands-on Museums: Partners in Learning, A Report from Educational Facilities Laboratories, 1975.
Summerhill: A Radical Approach to Child Rearing, A. S. Neil, Hart Publishing, New York., I960.
Magazine Articles include:
"Children are Sensitive to Space", Interior Design, John Holt.
"Children's Museum", Forum, September 1971, pp. 32-33.
"Designing a Learning Environment for Children", Architectural Record, October 1974, pp. 113-118.
"Gas Works Park, Seattle, Washington", Progressive Architecture.
"Growing Up Free: a Ground-Breaking New Guide", MS. Magazine, October 1980, pp. 49-56.
"Learning Center in Brooklyn", Domus, July 1975.
"McDonald's: They Did It All For You, Progressive Architecture,
June 1978.
"Museum Architecture: New Children's Museum in Florida", Museum News, Michael Webb, March 1971.
17


"Muse", Forum, September 1968, pp. 86-89.
"Museum Goes Underground Brooklyn Children's Museum", Contract Interiors, June 1978, pp. 114-119.
"A Playground for All Children", Progressive Architecture.
"Please Do Touch These Exhibits", Smithsonian, May 1974.
"Three Successful Programs Do Not A Museum Make", Museum News, April 1974, pp. 14-19.
I also have a large collection of books written for children. My xandergraduate coursework included "Children's Literature" and a desire to illustrate children's books.


UWHIM
Project: Brooklyn Children's Museum, Brooklyn, NY.
Architect: Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates; HHPAteam: Patrick Stanigar, M. Herbert Staruch, Marvin Wiehe, James W. Rhodes. Robert York, Theron Grinage.
Program: a 30.000-sq-ft open-plan facility for a children's museum which is a participatory learning environment.
Site: an urban park in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn.
Structural system: reinforced concrete and steel, with four levels framed in heavy timber and wood decking.
Mechanical system: forced-air heating system with hot water coil heated by gas-fired boiler; supplementary system of fm-tube radiation; thermostat controlled. Remote air-cooled con-densor with direct expansion cooling; conden-sor mounted on I-beams above rooftop play area
Major materials: reinforced concrete, steel, heavy timber, wood decking, and various industrial, agricultural, and transportation structures. Consultants: Hannaham & Johnston, mechanical; Goldreich Page & Thropp, structural;
Robert A. Hansen Associates, acoustical; Edwin Schlossberg, exhibition conceptualization; Saville Design, exhibition installation; Edwin L. Marshall. PE. special mechanical.
General contractor: D. Fortunato, Inc Client: The City of New York, Department of Parks and Recreation. Lloyd Hezekiah, Director, Brooklyn Children's Museum.
Cost: S3 25 million Photography: Norman McGrath
M EZZJUUKf
Stream flowing down circulation culvert (above) is used to illustrate the nature ani uses of water. The terraced exhibition area (below) is organized into six major areas that constitute the most important part of the museum, its open-plan participatory learning environment on the four connected levels.
LEGEND
SELF
1 Self identification
2 Body tracing
3 Sum and substance
4 Random access resources
FIRE/LIGHT
5
6
7
8 9
10
Solar cells Neon helix Ripple tank Portable freezer Steam engine Light theater
WATER
11 Stream
12 Hydraulic lift
13 Counter balance life
AIR
14 Air pressure lift
15 Air slide
16 Windmill
17 Calliope
18 Piper, Harp, Piano
19 Wind generators
20 Aquarium
EARTH
21 Habitat
22 Greenhouse
23 Soils mixture area
24 Curved space
CULTURAL LINKS
25 Collections cupboard
26 Theater
27 Orientation


The current philosophy for children's museums was set forth in 1969 by Michael Spock (son of Dr. Benjamin Spock) of the Boston Children's Museum. "The thing that I think makes us really different is that all of the other museums you hear about art museums, science museums, history museums, are all subject matter museums," says Spock. "They're about some area or areas of knowledge or information... on the other hand, we're a children's museum, which means nor that we're about children -although some of our programs look at childhood, early child development, growing up in other cultures but that we're a client center.
And so we are for somebody instead of about something." (Smithsonian October 1981)


Gvmazosanc
-7 /
Tearwood & Johnson design a tricky playhouse/ within the open plan / Uffelman School in Te
u'c
o ra.i ' II
TTalfmhrk Cauls, i
K ^ii}Si2)2?3S(p) __ J
ildren's mini museum of educational experiences, create
session at Crown Center in Kansas City, Missouri
- a \ a .
now in
1. One time poolhall and auto showroom. and now a one-of-its-kind children's museum, MUSE is at the corner of Bedford Avenue and Lincoln Place in Brooklyn. Entry is by a tunnel that opens from the corner. 2
V E .'/A N: N /


General Information
discovery
learning
fun
creativity
amazement
investigation
laughter
traveling
exhibits
publications
No glass cases here!
Learning through doing is what the Childrens Museum is all about.
10 constantly changing exhibits give children a chance to learn first-hand about the world and about themselves. Whether its operating a TV camera or trying out a wheelchair, children challenge themselves, discover how things work, try on new roles and learn through play.
Recent exhibits have included:
the TV Studio,where children work with actual TV equipment to produce the news;
Computers which children program to play games and draw pictures;
Like Me Like You, where children try out a wheelchair, learn sign language and go on a blind walk to understand what handicaps are all about;
Consumer Ed, where kids practice being critical consumers; and
The Pad, an indoor foam rubber playground.
In addition to our many in-house exhibits, travelling exhibits take the Museum out to the community. Shopping centers, schools and other museums can rent eight participatory exhibits on wheels.
BOING!, the Childrens Museums bi-monthly childrens newspaper, is distributed in schools nationwide. Full of feature stories, contests and kid-works, BOING! is the countrys first participatory newspaper!
A-Maze-Ing Denver is a book of pencil mazes that lets you draw your way through Denver bus routes, pipe lines, floor plans and landmarks.
Babysitters Guide is a book full of information and guidelines for anyone seeking to become a babysitting pro.
Activity Books carry many of our exhibits home to the family. Guide Books offer suggestions on how to make holiday presents, what to do during the summer and how to be a better babysitter. And new publications roll off our production line regularly.
the childrens museum / 931 bannock street / denver, Colorado 80204 / (303) 571-5198


General Information
hours
Closed Mondays
summer hours: June 15 thru August 31 Tuesday-Friday 12-5 p.m.
Saturday 10-5 p.m.
Sunday 12-5 p.m.
winter hours: September 15 thru June 14
Tuesday-Friday 2-5 p.m.
Saturday 10-5 p.m.
Sunday 12-5 p.m.
The museum is closed the first 2 weeks in September for the annual face lift.
group hours
summer hours: June 15 thru August 31 Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m.-12 winter hours: September 15 thru June 14 Tuesday-Friday 9:30, 10:30, 12:00 and 1:00 For group tours, reservations are requested. Call Monday-Friday between 3 and 5 p.m. for groups of 10 to 60.
admission
$1.00 per person
Tuesdays are donation days and no admission is charged.
-Coupon and memberships will not be honored during group hours.
birthday
parties
exhibits
Children are not admitted unless accompanied by an adult. Adults are not admitted unless accompanied by a child.
for members only
Reservations can be made in advance for two hour time blocks on Saturdays or Sundays.
The museum exhibits are designed for children ages 3 to 12 years. Present exhibits include: The TV Station, Jim Shorts Health Club, Monster in My Closet, The Ballroom, The Miniature Room, Movies To Go, Face Painting, and Arts and Crafts.
theatre Performances are held at regular intervals throughout the year. For information about dates and times call the museum at 571-5198.
group policy
during public hours
Groups of 10 to 30 will be admitted during the public hours without reservations or tours if there is one adult for every 5 children and the visit is limited to one hour. If the museum is filled to capacity when a group arrives, there is no guarantee that the whole group will be admitted at the same time. Tuesday afternoon groups are charged 50

the childrens museum / 931 bannock street / denver, Colorado 80204 / (303) 571-5198



Fact Sheet
The Childrens Museum is Pioneering a Profitability Approach to Fundraising (its own survival).
1
The Childrens Museum has an annual budget of over $700,000.
2Ninety-five percent of the Museums operating funds are internally generated, from such sources as travelling exhibits, memberships, promotions, gift shop sales, admission fees and publications.
3 The Childrens Museum has developed a
unique marketing approach to fundraising that has become a model for other non-profit organizations across the country who want to be self-sufficient.
___fclncome-producing projects are developed as
I part of the program to achieve financial self-sufficiency. Three examples are: a travelling museum that is rented to shopping centers, banks, schools, and other museums; Boing!, a childrens newspaper circulated to one million readers across the nation; The Celebrity Art Auction, an auction of artworks created by V.I.P.s and a national marketing program
which custom produces childrens products for major corporations and organizations.
5The Childrens Museum is managed according to sound business principles. The operating budget is carefully planned and monitored, with special consideration given to the cost-effectiveness of each item.
6The Childrens Museum seeks seed money to develop and test new income-producing ventures. This use of funds enables the Museum to plan and implement marketable projects without using its operating funds. This allows the Museum to test the profitability of a project before committing its own funds to it.
7The Childrens Museum received the prestigious national award given by the Business Council for the Arts to the arts organization that has contributed the most towards involving business in the support of the arts.
The Childrens Museum fills unmet creative, educational, and cultural needs in Denver and the southwest.
The Childrens Museum serves almost 10,000 visitors per month.
Each month, over 3,000 children from schools,
day care centers, community and youth organizations visit the Museum during reserved group hours. These reserved times are fully booked many months in advance.
The Childrens Museum serves as a model and
provides consultantsfor other non-profit organizations across the countryin the areas of financial management, fundraising, marketing and exhibit development.
Exhibits and programs are designed to appeal to adults as well as to children. Parents make the decisions about visiting the Museum and the length of their stay. They also comprise the majority of the volunteer staff. Thus the Museum must be and is as enticing and pleasurable to adults as it is to children.
The Childrens Museum encourages family participation. Parents and children experiment with and enjoy the exhibits together. They may create a family mural, explore their feelings about death, or take apart and reassemble a machine together. Many volunteers bring their children with them to share their activities at the Museum.


J The Childrens Museum encourages community involvement and cooperaton among cultural, educational and social institutions. Whenever possible, exhibits are developed with other organizations in order to maximize the utilization of community resources.
B*|The Childrens Museum provides an inviting B environment for handicapped people. The
Museum is fully accessible to all disabled people and is visited over and over by schools for mentally, physically and emotionally handicapped children. Currently, it has a major travelling exhibit on handicapped conditions that tours schools, community centers and other museums.
Children and adults may confront their fears and their curiosity. Two principal thematic areas are childhood fears and demystification of their environment. The handicap exhibit, Like Me, Like Your helps children understand disabilities and to be less fearful of them. Through exhibits on telecommunications and computers, children (and adults) learn about common, but often mysterious, technological factors in our lives.
nMAII exhibits and programs change periodically
that visitors may return over and over and always find something new. Within major thematic areas, there is a rotation of exhibits exploring different aspects of that theme.
gg The^ Childrens Museum is a training center for I# people in education and for individuals progressing from a sheltered workshop to regular employment.
MR The Childrens Museum is an important
Colorado cultural institution and it has been designated one of Colorados major cultural institutions by the Colorado Council on the Arts and Humanities. The travelling exhibits take the fun of the Childrens Museum to other parts of the state and country.
the childrens museum / 931 bannock street / denver, Colorado 80204 / (303) 571-5198


F
participants
I
THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM participants participants


F
THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM PARTICIPANTS PARTICIPANTS PARTICIPANTS PARTICIPANTS PARTICIPANTS
"Children are not admitted unless accompanied by an adult. Adults are not admitted unless accompanied by a child." There are over 10,000 visitors each month to the Children's Museum: 3,000 are children from schools, day care centers, community and youth organizations that visit the Museum during reserved group hours. These reserved times are fully booked many months in advance: the popularity of the Museum is that exhibits and programs are designed to appeal to adults parents, families, and people in education as well as to children. The children are primarily between the ages of 3 to 12. There is a broad base from which to draw because 767o of the children in Colorado live within a 75 mile radius of Denver.
Distinctly "humanist" in its attitude, the Museum encourages the natural integration and cultural understanding of children from all ethnic groups, races, sexes, and economic classes.
An important objective is to have a child come away feeling good about oneself. The Museum is visited over and over by schools for mentally, physically and emotionally handicapped children; it also encourages community involvement and cultural diversity. These are the participants in the Children's Museum: children, parents, educators and volunteers, the Museum Staff, the Board
27


of Directors.
Instrumental in creating a model for other none-profit organizations across the country, the Museum staff and Board of Directors excel in areas of financial management, fundraising, marketing, and exhibit development. Dr. Gail Schoetter, president of the Museum Board, and Richard Steckel, executive director of Museum staff and administration, are responsible for selecting Board members who oversee fundraising and policy making. Children's Museum Board of Directors include the usual listing of prominent Denver attorneys, business people, school superintendents, physicians and bankers.
Richard Steckel has been revolutionary in transforming the Museum from near bankruptcy in 1976 to self-sufficiency in 1981. Steckel took the directorship job after other applicants had turned it down because it seemed a short-term job: at that point, the three grants that supported the museum had run out and the budget remaining could carry the museum and pay the directors salary for five weeks only. "The wolf and disaster were already at the door." He now has a reputation as a mogul of museums and plans to move into the new $3.2 million museum without a mortgage. The Denver Children's Museum is a financial rarity and much admired by non-profit organizations across the country.
In 1980 the Children's Museum received the prestigious national award given by the Business Council for the Arts for involving businesses in the support of the arts. This involvement is


achieved through the Museum's unusual marketing approach to fundraising: instead of asking businesses, banks or corporations
for charitable donations and contributions, the Museum presents a business proposition in terms of a marketable product designed to meet the needs of both "seed money" to develop and test new income-producing ventures. The Museum is self-sufficient, generating close to 1007o of its $686,000 operating budget.
Goods and services of the Museum include Boing!, a children's participatory newspaper circulated to more than two million school children across the nation; other education publications and games; traveling exhibits that can be rented to schools, shopping centers, and other museums; and the Celebrity Art Auction and other promotions.
Boing! is a bimonthly tabloid-size paper sponsored by at least 23 museums from California to Rhode Island. The paper is a blend of core material written by Suzanne Thumhart of the Denver Children's Museum and local material from the area museum sponsor. Judy Blume, a noted children's author, writes a question and answer column; and newspaper articles are both lighthearted and serious: from "responsible pet care" to child abuse. 'One of the aims of the paper is to let kids feel they can have an impact on the world around them." It is mainly the children who write the book reviews, conduct interviews with celebrities, and create the art work, poems, and plays. To encourage readers to participate, much of the paper is in the form of puzzles,
29


quizzes and contests.
Other publications include "Denver City Game", a child's guide to Denver using games to learn about the city and its history;
"Summer Fun Guide", listing summer activities and ways to find a job; "A-Maze-Ing Denver", a book of 36 mazes of Denver sites; and a child's activity program for Frontier Airlines. I have included "Kids and Pets" written in association with the American Humane Association as an example of the Children's Museums publications.
- 30 -


ANTHROPOMETRIC DATA -MALE AND FEMALE CHILDREN
top figure in boi it data for boys, lower figure it for girlt, and one figure opplies to both.


A Marketing Prospectus: the goods and services of the Childrens Museum
................................r ri______ ......I, -)|-
The Childrens Museum of Denver has an unusual marketing approach to generating income. Rather than asking corporations, banks, or businesses for charitable contributions, the Museum presents a business proposition designed to meet the needs of both institutions, one that will produce income for all involved. This approach has proven to be extremely successful for the Museum and its business partners, and the Museum generates 95% of its own income from marketing its goods and services. The following is the growing list of educational goods and services The Childrens Museum can provide. Further information about each program and product is available.
publications
The Childrens Museum produces a variety of educational family publications which are either sold or distributed free of charge. Whenever possible seed grants are obtained to cover design and production costs. Finished products are then sold wholesale to businesses for promotional and advertising use or to merchants for retail sale. Publications are often produced exclusively for a client and are custom packaged to meet their particular needs. This kind of custom publication can be produced on a fee for service basis.
Many publications include advertising. The business community has found the Museums ads to be a cost effective means of soliciting new customers and promoting products. For instance, one retailer received 8,000 responses from an ad in Boing!
The following publications are available at costs ranging from $.50 to $1.25 per unit. Ad space is available in the starred (*) publications.
A-maze-ing Denver: a book of 36 natural mazes of Denver sites.
The Babysitters Guide: a book for parents, babysitters, and children that makes child care more effective for all three groups.
Boing!*: a family newspaper distributed bimonthly free of charge to 250,000 families in Denver and 2 million nation-wide.
Boing Blast*: a special edition spin-off publication of Boing! which includes the best of Boing! and new material.
Denver City Games: a childs guide to Denver, a book of games to discover the city and its history.
Exhibit-Related Activity Books: the following books bring the Museum experience to families at home:
Scientoyfic: how you can use toys at home to explore principles of science Figure It Out: math games, puzzles, and activities to help kids practice computation and math skills
Consumer Ed: a kids consumer guide: how to make wise consumer choices Like Me Like You: games and activities that teach about handicaps
Family Guide to the Holidays*: a priority listing of the best holiday events for the family and holiday activities.
Harmless Cookbook: cooking without heat for the parent and child.
In-Flight Activity Book: a game book to engage active children on airplanes.
Pets and Kids: an activity-oriented handbook on pet care.
Summer Fun Guide*: an exclusive listing of summer activities and hints for finding a job.
Trip Kiks: a book of entertaining travel games and car activities for kids on trips.
Colorado Kid Trips: a family guidebook to Colorado attractions, written in part by kids.
m
the children's museum / 931 bannock street / denver, Colorado 80204 / (303) 571-5198


Wild Walls and Spiffy Spaces: How to Paint Them Yourself: A childrens activity book about paint-how to decorate a room using stencils, how to mix colors, and how paint is made.
Clean Up Your Act: a book about grooming for pre-teens.
travelling exhibits
The Childrens Museum has designed portable, participatory exhibits which can be rented or leased. All are hands-on activity centers that bring the excitement, discovery, and learning associated with the Museum to the community. Exhibits are rented to schools which use them to supplement their curriculum; to shopping centers and banks for promotions; and to day care centers for activity areas. Many other potential uses do exist and, custom exhibits can be designed for clients. Other museums throughout the country lease exhibits and, in turn, rent them to their local merchants to generate income and introduce the concept of a childrens museum to their community. The following exhibits are available at costs ranging from $100 to $400 per day to $750 per month, which includes staffing, transport, publicity and rental.
Sensorlum I: activity centers set up in a booth arrangement: sounds, theatre, labyrinth, kaleidoscope and mechanics.
Sensorlum li: 5 activity centers that introduce the arts and communication to children: murals, drama, language, sculpture, printmaking.
Movies To Go: an introduction to animation using zoetropes, phenakistoscopes, kinemati-scopes, flip cards and an actual story board and film.
Like Me Uke You To Go: teaches children what its like to be handicapped. Mental retardation,
physical, visual and auditory handicaps are all explored in a fascinating, hands-on way.
Colors To Go: explores the aesthetic and scientific principles of color in three participatory areas: rainbows, color tricks, and color mixing.
Figure It Out: provides concrete activities, games and puzzles which give children a chance to practice computation and mathematical thinking.
Scientoyfic: capitalizes on a childs natural enjoyment of toys to teach basic scientific principles. Controlled scientific experiments help kids learn the laws of the universe.
Consumer Ed: sharpens consumer know-how by helping children to buy wisely. Comparison shopping, durability and deceptive advertising are some of the subjects included.
promotions
The Childrens Museum has a reputation for creating and implementing successful promotions and events co-sponsored by businesses, the media, and the Museum. These events provide sponsors with: an effective way to bring in new clients and customers, high visibility, an exclusive, creative event, and free publicity and the association with one of Colorados most popular cultural institutions. The Museum usually charges a sponsor for costs plus a management fee. The following is a partial list of promotions ranging in price from $2,000 to $10,000.
Create-A-Card: A guaranteed traffic-builder. Kids pick up a form at a business and write and design a greeting on it for a disadvantaged or ill child in an area hospital. The form is then returned to the business where it is entered in a contest. All the cards are delivered to local hospitals and charities.


JC Penney Pals: Children register for pen pals at local Penneys stores and through Boing! The Museum matches pals and distributes identification cards which entitle children to a variety of discounts and free admission to the Museum.
Columbia Savings Guaranteed Fun Card:
Children receive their own i.d. card from Columbia which provides a variety of benefits including a newsletter that demystifies the world of banking.
Celebrity Art Auction: Local celebrities create original artwork which is auctioned off with proceeds going to the Museum.
Construction Barricade Murals: With the help of children/artists the Museum decorates construction barricades with colorful, original murals.
My Lovable Pet: kids enter their pet in a contest for the most lovable of all pets. Entry forms are distributed at the sponsors stores, and entries are judged in an event.
Shape Up For Fitness: Children do as many push-ups, sit-ups, and laps as they can during a two week period. Pledges are collected for each exercise and proceeds are split between the Museum and Ronald McDonald House.
Toy Trade: Kids unselfishly bring old toys and exchange them for other kids used toys. The first toy they bring goes to a charity.
Treasure Hunt: a city-wide treasure hunt which would combine the excitement of taking chances at opening treasure-laden trunks while helping others. Combination on locks to trunks would be available at sponsors places of business. Prizes will be for a child, adult, a senior center, and a school.
Circus Ice Follies Days: Through a 3-way trade with the circus, a radio station and the Museum, tickets are procured and sold by the Museum, with all proceeds going to the Museum.
United Bank Mural: Downtown Denvers largest childrens mural designed and painted by children and conceived and organized by Museum staff and artists.
other products and programs
Kid Art: A collection of professionally framed and matted childrens art, selected by art teachers and Museum staff. Kid Art decorates doctors offices, homes and businesses. Prices range from $40 to $60.
Create-A-Card Series: a creative kit that instructs children how to make 10 three-dimensional cards.
Educational Pin Ball Machines: pin ball machines with educational objectives: to teach children about energy, math, history, science.
Maze Cards: a series of trading cards with pencil mazes based on natural objects such as local and national historic places and cultural objects. These can be printed with promotional material on one side of the card and the maze on the other.
Halloween Costumes: A basic costume for kids with a variety of ad ons so that children can be a mouse or superman one day and a princess the next.
Posters and Placemats: Black and white posters with a fairy tale theme that have the Museums logo and the logo of the restaurant or business in the center. These are colored in by children and colored pencils can be provided. Placemats can be made with the same design. A series of posters with different themes are also available.
Support Memberships: For a tax deductible contribution of $50, businesses receive an unlimited number of two-for-the-price-of-one admission coupons to the Museum to be used as give-aways for their clients.
Visitor Coupon Book: A special coupon book for Denver visitors with coupons for discounts at Denver attractions and stores, and free admission to the Museum for the length of a visitors stay in Denver.


like me
You have just learned some things about people who are handicapped. Seeing handicapped people can be scary and you are probably very glad that it hasnt happened to you. Thats o.k. We just wanted you to have the chance to understand what being handicapped is all about.


What do people who are handicapped use to help them do things? Circle the correct answer or answers.
1. A person who has a hard time walking would use
wheelchair crutches braces hearing aid
2. A person who has a hard time hearing uses

V 11
hearing aid crutches cane braces
3. A person who has a hard time hearing can talk by using
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walking cane hearing aid wheelchair braces
5. A person who cannot see at all reads by using
braille book braces hearing aid wheelchair


People who are handicapped can do most of the things that you can do. Circle all of the things that they can do.
1. A person who is blind can
A. Eat with his family
B. Drive a car
C. Go for a walk
D. Read a book
2. A person who has a hard time hearing can
A. Go shopping
B. Talk to you
C. Go to school
D. Hear you whisper a secret
3. A person who has a hard time walking can
A. Run a race
B. Sit at a desk
C. Watch T.V.
D. . Listen to music
4. A person who uses a wheelchair to help her get around can
A. Walk up steps
B. Go to school
C. Eat in a restaurant
D. Tell a joke
5. A person who has a hard time thinking can
A. Play a game
B. Go to school
C. Learn the way that you do
D. Go shopping


Circle what you should do if you see a person who is... 1. Physically handicapped
A. Push the persons wheelchair very fast. B. Ask the person if you can help them.
2. Deaf
A. Talk in the persons face. 3. Mentally retarded
3. Learn some signs and try to use them.
4. Blind
A. Leave the person out when you are playing
3. Ask the person to play with you.
You will probably be getting to know a lot of handicapped people in your life. The next time that you meet a person who is handicapped, try to remember all the ways that they are just like you.
Another To Go exhibit from
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931 bannock street denver, Colorado 80204



strategy b-or #*chiewng Self bufriciency
1980/81 Budget
Publications
Denver City Games Babysitters Guide Amazing Denver Boing! Blast
Family Guide to the Holidays Summer Fun Guide Maze Cards
Scientoyfic Activity Book Figure It Out Activity Book Trip Kiks
Kids and Pets Activity Book Boing!
National Museum Passport
Traveling Exhibits: Curricula
Colors
Like Me, Like You Scientoyfic Figure It Out Consumer Education Bones
Traveling Exhibits: Institutional
Sensorium I
Movies
Gift Shop
Memberships
General
Support
In House Revenue
Public Admission School Admission Misc. (Interest, returns, allowance)
Contributions/Grants (operating)
Donation Box Individual Donations Corporate Donations Organizational Donations Foundation Donations Government Schools
Grant Administration
Art Auction
Community Art
Kid Art Murals
the childrens museum
931 bannock street denver, Colorado 80204 303/571-5198
Promotions
Toy Trade JC Penney Pals Amazing America Treasure Hunt Create a Valentine My Lovable Pet Kid Proof Paint Clean up your Act
Income Generating Products and Services
Traveling Exhibits: Institutional Traveling Exhibits: Curricula Gift Shop
Halloween Costumes Art Auction Community Art


I
F
THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
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program program program program


F
THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM PROGRAM PROGRAM PROGRAM PROGRAM PROGRAM
THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
PROGRAM PROGRAM
PROGR^J
The program of the new Children's Museum has been defined by the Board of Directors; by Richard Steckel, the Executive Director: and by Robin Simmons, Programs Director. Specific concerns are as follows: (1) The new Museum should reflect the unique nature of a participatory children's museum. It should have a strong visual identity, should engender excitement, and should "reflect bur gutsy approach to child education."
(2) The new Museum should clearly respond to the importance of the Gates-Crescent Park Site and to the Platte River Greenway System.
(3) The new Museum is a "mixed use" facility; not only housing exhibits, but also providing appropriate spaces for staff offices, outreach program support and retail functions.
Both exhibit spaces and staff offices must remain flexible and adaptable to changed definition.
(4) The new Museum must have the ability to be constructed in phases because of the nature of non-profit organization fund raising and because of the Museum's policy not to make financial commitments for which funds do not exist.
(5) The new Museum must be efficient in terms of operational economy and life-cycle economy. The enclosure of
_ _


the building should recognize the need for minimum maintenance. Interior systems should provide flexibility, conserve the use of energy, be efficient to operate and minimize the need for staff control of public spaces. Construction systems and materials shall be evaluated on a "life-cycle" basis and should reflect "durability and utility as opposed to richness."
- 32 -


Organizational Chart
the childrens museum / 931 bannock street / denver, Colorado 80204 / (303) 571-5198


THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM
BUILDING PROGRAM BUILDING PROGRAM BUILDING PROGRAM BUILDING PROG
Floor area Distribution with Minimum Program Gross Floor Area 22100 SF
4
*
Allocation by Use in gross square feet:
Exhibits / Entry / Public Service / Circulation 9500 Changing Events (theatre for mime, plays, etc.) 2100 Exhibit Laboratory 0 Retail / Restaurant (also serves park) 0 Staff Offices 5500 Exhibit Support (carpentry, storage, etc.) 5000
Total Area 22100 SF
Floor Area Distribution with Total Program Gross Floor Area
31300 SF
Allocation by Use in gross square feet:
Exhibits / Entry / Public Service / Circulation 12200
Changing Events (theatre for mime, plays, etc.) 2100
Exhibit Laboratory 1600
Retail / Restaurant (also serves park) 4600
Staff Offices 5500
Exhibit Support (carpentry, storage, etc.) 5300
Total Area 31300 SF
53 -


F
ENTRY GALLERY ENTRY GALLERY ENTRY GALLERY ENTRY GALLERY

OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: This is an enclosed circulation area which allows arrival and orientation for the individual visitor or for groups of up to 60 children. Beyond the waiting area should be a control counter where admission is charged; public phones, drinking fountains, and coat storage should be included near the control counter. The entry gallery should introduce visitors to the excitement of the Museum: it should begin the experience.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Vestibule (including 2 public phones and 2 drinking fountains)
2. Movement space
3. Waiting (seating for 10 people at 10 SF)
4. Control station (where admission is charged)
5. Information and Museum Membership
6. Group Control Area (two groups of 30 children)
7. Coat and personal belongings storage for 120 people (including 5 to 7 strollers)
100 SF
300 SF
100 SF
60 SF
60 SF
1000 SF
150 SF
8. Entry to Exhibits Area and to Changing Events
Space (including signage and sense of orientation)
Total 1700 SF
ADJACENCY: Exhibit Area / Changing Events Space / Classrooms /
Retail /Vertical Circulation / Public Restrooms /
- 54 -


PUBLIC RESTROOMS PUBLIC RESTROOMS PUBLIC RESTROOMS
PUBLIC RESTROON
OCCUPANCY ANALYSIS based on Denver Building Code:
1. Entry and Exhibits 8000 GSF Occupancy Load 160
2. Changing Events Space 2500 GSF Occupancy Load 100
3. Classroom Space 1500 GSF Occupancy Load 60
4. Retail Space: Restaurant 2500 GSF Occupancy Load 100
Shops / Store 200 GSF Occupancy Load 20
Total Occupancy 440
TOILETS REQUIRED BY PUBLIC
1. Men: Water Closets 4 / Urinals 7 / Lavoratories 6
2. Women: Water Closets 7 / Lavoratories 4
NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA:
1. Handicapped Requirements of the Denver Building Code allow one Water Closet and one Lavoratory must be accessible.
2. Two drinking fountains are also required.
3. Restrooms must be visible from the Reception / Control Counter.
4. Doors should be open at all times so include good ventilation and block sight lines.
5. Restrooms near entrance should accomodate large number of children with place for others to wait.
6. Include a high counter or "changing table" in restrooms, covered trash cans, sitting place for nursing mothers, place for sick children to lie down, and children-size lavoratories and water closets.
7. Consider exposed plumbing so bathrooms function as an exhibit and full length mirror for mirror exhibit.


EXHIBIT SPACE EXHIBIT SPACE EXHIBIT SPACE EXHIBIT SPACE EXHIBIT SPACE
Three categories of exhibit space have been defined: General Exhibit Space, Changing Exhibit Space and Exhibits Laboratories (Phase 2).
GENERAL EXHIBIT SPACE GENERAL EXHIBIT SPACE GENERAL EXHIBIT SPACE
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: The General Exhibit area houses the Museum's ever-changing collection. It will not be permanently subdivided, although temporary partitions and the exhibits themselves will define areas assigned to an exhibit concept. Individual exhibit separation must be clear.
ADJACENCY: Lobby / Coat Room / Box Office / Toilets / Shop
EXHIBT SPACE FLOOR AREA HEIGHT CLOSED OPEN TO OUTSIDE BUDGET
Dentist Office 400 1 story 5,000
Community (Chicano) 700 1 25,000
Energy 700 1 to 1 % 40,000
Wellness 1000 1 150,000
Careers (Airline) 500 + 700 lk to 2 15,000
The Pad Room -Gross Motor Skills 300 1 k to 2 10,000
F ears (There s a Monster) 700 Ik 25,000
Technology 500 1 5,000
Advertising 700 1 25,000
6,200 square feet
$300,000


NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA:
1. Circulation pattern could be clearly linear or could be with surprise, but it must have reasonable visual access for staff.
2. The exhibit can extend to several floors but must be controlled from a single point of entry.
3. Allow flexibility in terms of ceiling heights.
4. Connect one exhibit on each level to outside if possible.
5. Some exhibits will extend to two stories. Natural light can be used in most spaces but not necessary.
6. A children's art gallery area should be provided.
7. Storage is needed nearby for supplies and repair.
8. The area will not always be staffed so consider a PA system.
9. Include sound absorption materials.
10. All walls in the building should be washable surfaces and electrical outlets should be inaccessible to children.
11. May require special plumbing and drains for water capability (two exhibits).
12. Non-exhibit exhibits may be corridor exhibits or exposed building systems.
13. Small seating areas should be included throughout the museum.
14. Corridors and other available wall areas throughout the museum will be used for kids collections such as 8-year-old shoes exhibit.
- ?7. -


CHANGING EVENTS SPACE CHANGING EVENTS SPACE CHANGING EVENTS SPACE
I
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: This is multi-purpose space that can be used for theatre performances, special events, and group assembly for up to 100 visitors. It may be used for traveling exhibits offered by other museums and for all types of theatre functions (plays, clowns, storytelling, movies and audio-visuals, dance workshops, and even adult use at night). Plays often include children as part of the cast and allow "hands-on" experience with set design, stage craft, and make-up for the theatre. The space should be divisible into classrooms if Phase 2 is not funded: it should then include plumbing and sinks perhaps
the kitchenette for classroom use.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Lobby
Coat Room Box Office Toilets Entry Shop
(Possible common area with the Museum)
2. Public Seating for 100 Visitors 1000 SF
3. Stage / Performance Area 500 SF
4. Flats Rooms and Prop Storage / Backstage / Dressing / (Plumbing and sinks for classroom use) 600 SF
5. Projection Room
TOTAL 2100 SF
ADJACENCY: Exhibits Area / Lobby / Coat Room / Box Office /
Toilets / Shop


NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA:

1. Allow adjacency to all common areas if not provided directly for the theatre thereby utilizing public and staff spaces to meet many functional needs.
2. There must be night-time access from the theatre to the bathrooms, drinking fountains, phones, and coat storage.
3. There should be public access to the theatre as well as access from exhibit space.
4. The Changing Events Space should be an uncluttered open space with removable non-traditional seating such as carpeted risers, scaffolding, or collapsible bleacher-type seating on wheels.
5. This area can be experimental in nature, but requires sound, lighting, projection, separate temperature and humidity control.
6. Include sound control from all high-noise areas.
7. Include tackable walls on all sides so it can also function as a children's art gallery.
8. Consider lighting needs (overall house light, stage lights and spotlights).
9. Consider ceiling grid for hanging lights and props.
10. Doors should be double-width for easy access.
- 39 -


EXHIBIT LABORATORIES EXHIBIT LABORATORIES EXHIBIT LABORATORIES
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: The exhibit laboratories will be defined spaces that serve as y'classrooms" for programs offered by the Museum and as testing areas for exhibits under development. Workshop leaders would provide an intesive exposure to a particular exhibit or craft (video / computer / ceramics / weaving / painting / science / drama / dance / cooking). Workshop classrooms could also be used for group meetings, birthday party rooms, and as day-care centers. The exhibit laboratories will be constructed in Phase 2.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Space for 60 people divisible into
two spaces for 30 (at 25/sf) 1500 SF
2. Kitchenette with slop sink and storage 100 SF
TOTAL 1600 SF (Phase 2)
ADJACENCY: Lobby / Exhibits / Coat Room / Toilets / Storage
NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA:
1. Acoustical control from other spaces.
2. Washable floor / tackable walls / blackboard / low counters / storage cabinets.
3. Allow that kitchen can be closed off when not in use. When open, kids sit on classroom side and staff person works on kitchen side.
Total, is 1600 square feet projected for Phase 2 of construction
and will only be included for schematic design.
- kO -


CHILDREN'S MUSEUM STAFF SPACE PLANNING
*

Executive and Finance Unit Floor Area
Executive Director A 470 SF
Finance Director A
Finance Assistant Director A
Programs
Programs Director A 1440 SF
Exhibit Coordinator A
6 Floorstaff C
3 Exhibit Developers C
Publications
Publications Director A 570 SF
Graphic Designer D
2 Illustrators D
Marketing and Creative
Marketing Director B 650 SF
Membership B
Community Arts Coordinator B
Creative Director B
Creative Assistant C
Public- Relations B
Central Reception and Secretarial
Pool Receptionist 580 SF
Secretary (Executive/Finance)
Secretary (Publications)
Secretary (Programs/Marketing/Creative)
Also
3 Workrooms (100 SF each) 300 SF
Central Service (300 SF) 300 SF
Men/Women Restroom (120 SF each) 240 SF
Board Room (500 SF) 500 SF
Action Center (240 SF) 240 SF
Net to Gross 210 SF
5500 SF
- k2 -


RETAIL / RESTAURANT RETAIL / RESTAURANT RETAIL / RESTAURANT
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: Retail activities anticipated include a retaurant and four small shops, one of which would be the Museum's Gift Shop. The Gift Shop will be stocked with unique children's toys, games, inexpensive gifts, books and Museum publications. The design of the retaurant and other retail must proceed as "open leasable" until individual tenants are arranged. Retail / Restaurant will be constructed in Phase 2.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE: FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Restaurant 2000/2500 SF
2. Retail Shops (3 to 4 at 400/500 SF) 1200/2000 SF
TOTAL 3200/4500 SF
NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA:
1. The retail should have its own exterior entries to operate independent of Museum public hours. It should also be accessible from the Museum Lobby.
2. Retail should be clearly recognizable as "stores" with
no confusion with the Museum proper. The Museum Shop should look clearly like "Museum Shop" and not like other stores.
3. The corridor from Museum to Retail should be comfortable, wide, and inviting.
4. Consider access for restaurant delivery and garbage removal.
Total is 4600 square feet project for Phase 2 of construction and will only be included for schematic design.


^{Executive Director ^{Financial Director
Financial Assistant Director r .Programs Director tjExhibit Coordinator
'Publications Coordinator
i ~*Desks (2)
Storage Cabinet File Cabinet Open Shelving Tackable Wallspace Typewriter Visitor Chair (1)



H
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4
42-CtJ
QQMarketing Director Membership
Community Arts Coordinator Q_l Creative Director
Public Relations
Shesk (1) and Return i File Cabinet f^Tackable Wall Space
Aslo: Visitor Chairs (2) Creative Directi Computer Terminal (1) membership
0 Graphic Designer Illustrators (2)
Cj Drawing Board
1 Dp.sk nY
Side Table Open Shelving ^Storage Cabinet 'Tackable Wall Space Also: Visitor Chair (1) Graphic Designer
1

h ID


Assistant Creative Director Floor Staff (6)
Exhibits Developers (3)
Desk (1)
Storage Cabinet Tackable Wall Space
/f v.

CHILDREN'S MUSEUM STAFF SPACE PLANNING


___________________________________________________i
STAFF AND STAFF SUPPORT STAFF AND STAFF SUPPORT STAFF AND STAFF SUPPORT
CENTRAL RECEPTION AND SECRETARIAL POOL:
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: This area will function as control / support for all the administrative offices.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Entry / Waiting Area (with seating for 4 people.) 60 SF
2. Receptionist 100 SF
3. Secretarial / Clerical Pool / Files (2) 240 SF
4. Workroom / Xerox / Mail 80 SF
5. Storage (stationary, office supplies) 100 SF
TOTAL 580 SF
ADJACENCIES: Executive Director / Bulk Central Storage and
other supplies / In general is central of all offices.
NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA:
1. Secretarial / Clerical should include four desks (Receptionist / Secretary for Executive and Finance / Secretary for Publications / Secretary for Programs, Marketing, Creative).
2. Equipment includes: desks with typing returns and two files / work table or counter / postage meter / duplicator / mail / message / xerox / collating machine.
3. There should be storage to accomodate in orderly fashion all public relation information kits.
4. Open-office planning concepts will be used throughout the staff offices to allow the maximum flexibility for change.


I
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR:

OBJECTIVES AND CONCEE.NS: Provide a reasonable degree of privacy for the Director while keeping him/her accessible to other staff. Presently Richard Steckel is responsible for fund raising, staff supervision, and administration. This area would not be large enough for conferences this would be achieved in the Board room.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE: FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Director's Office (UNIT A) (semi-enclosed) 150 SF
2. Assistant Director's Office (UNIT A) 100 SF
TOTAL 250 SF
FINANCE:
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: Provide office space for the accounting and general office management functions of the Museum. This should be a quiet / private space.
I
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Finance Director (UNIT A) (semi-enclosed) 120 SF
2. Assistant Finance Director 100 SF
(UNIT A)
3. Desktop Computer Terminal
4. Filing cabinets (5) for dead storage (Locking file cabinets for record security / wall safe.)
TOTAL 220 SF
Note: This space should consider expansion to include computer
hardware which supports the finance department (bookkeeping, membership control and other marketing lists, potential use with typesetting for publications and with exhibits.)
^ 45 -


PROGRAM:

OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: The Programs Department of the Museum is responsible for developing and staffing floor exhibits. Robin Simmons Program Director oversees exhibit design and program development.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Director (UNIT A) 120
2. Exhibits program floor manager (UNIT A) 100
3. Floor staff 6 at 60 SF (UNIT C) 360
4. Volunteers 2 at 60 SF (one large table) 120
5. Exhibit developers 3 at 80 (UNIT C)
6. Action Center (Shelving and storage) 200
100
TOTAL SF
ADJACENCIES: Marketing Outreach / Creative Services / Central Receiving / Shop and Rehab / Exhibit Floor.
NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA:
1. Director's office includes: two desks / 2 lockable cabinets / typewriter (travels through Programs Department) / phones / bulletin board / 4 drawer file cabinet / privacy. The office should be close to the conference area because has a lot of visitors.
2. Exhibits Program Floor Manager's office includes: desk / bulletin board / phone / locking tool box / 2 storage cabinets. Need to be close to floor staff, traveling exhibits, and Robin.
3. Floor Staff (6) includes: separate desks or workspaces / storage / bulletin board / 3 phones to share.
4. Volunteers (12 but only 2 in at one time): 1 large desk to share / one phone to share / file drawer.
5. Exhibit Developers (3): Small desks for each / bulletin board / phones / storage.
6. Action Center: Tackable wall surface / large work table and chairs / library space / shelving and storage. This areawould be the hub of the Program Department, could include volunteers work area, and could be used for short staff meetings.
- 46 -


1
PUBLICATIONS DEPARTMENT:
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: This department takes care of all publications and graphic design.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Publications Director (UNIT A) 120 SF
2. Graphic Designer (UNIT D) 100 SF
3. Illustrators (2) (UNIT D) 150 SF
4. Common Art Storage 200 SF
TOTAL 570 SF
ADJACENCY: Marketing Outreach / Creative Services / Executive
Director / Central Receiving / Common Storage
NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA:
1. Publications Director: large desk top 6' x 3' / 8 drawer file / side tale / back table / typewriter / 2 chairs for visitors / storage for large volume of printed material / privacy close to conference area.
2. Graphic Designer: Desk and drawing board / good light / work-in-progress shelving 12" x 18" / sees a lot of people / needs to be close to Marketing Outreach and Creative Services.
3. Illustrators: drawing board / side and back tables / storage for supplies / close to common art storage.
4. Common Art Storage: Raw material storage (6'h x 12'd x 3'w) / Work in progress storage (flat files 5'h x 42"w) / light table / waxer / other heavy electrical equipment / mat board cutter.
- 47 -


MARKETING OUTREACH PROGRAM:
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: Responsible for development and sales of Museum's goods and services, membership development, and public relations.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Director (UNIT B) 120 SF
2. Membership (UNIT B) 100 SF
3. Community Arts Coordinator (UNIT B) 150 SF
4. Public Relations Person (UNIT B) 100 SF
TOTAL 470 SF
ADJACENCY: Most important to Creative Services / Secretarial Pool / Programs Department / Workroom.
NOTE: Include storage files. Include computer terminal for
membership.
CREATIVE SERVICE:
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: Responsible for national P.R. of the Museum.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Director's Office (UNIT B)
2. Assistant Directors Office (UNIT C)
TOTAL 180 SF
ADJACENCY: Most inportant to Marketing Outreach / Secretarial
Pool / Publications.
NOTE:
Include storage and two guest chairs.


BOARDROOM: 30 people at 15/SF Floor Area 300 SF('NET')
CONCERNS AND OBJECTIVES: The Boardroom would be used for Board of Directors meetings, staff meetings, and private conferences.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE: It should include a large conference table and chairs and a credenza. It should be acoustically controlled.
ADJACENCIES: It should be apart from the main flow of museum
activities. It should be located near the reception desk and be easily accessible for staff and visitors.
STAFF LOUNGE: 30 people at 15/SF Floor Area 300 SF(NET)__________
CONCERNS AND OBJECTIVES: This should be a relaxing, quiet space for lunch and coffee breaks and social assembly. It is a well-deserved space and would be much appreciated.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE: There should be both casual lounge seating and table seating. There should be a coffee/service counter (refrigerator, sink, microwave, coffee bar, disposal). Provide for vending machines.
ADJACENCIES: It should be easily accessible for the staff but
apart from the main flow of activity. Include outside area if possible and make accessible to staff toilets and showers.
WORKROOM: 3 at 100 SF each Floor Area BOO SFfNETi
CONCERNS AND OBJECTIVES: The staff needs to be provided with 3 small work areas. These would often be used to mat and frame children's art.
ADJACENCY: General staff / Community Arts Coordinator (in marketing) / Creative Services Department / Central Reception / Classrooms / Shop.
NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA: Desk / Work table for cutting, matting
and framing / Storage for artwork and murals / Large double door access / High Ceiling / Window area not required.
NOTE: This space is still to be dfined by the staff.
- 49 -


STAFF TOILETS:
OCCUPANCY ANALYSIS based on Denver Building Code:
1. Staff offices 5,000 GSF Occupancy Load 50
2. Receiving / Work Shop Exhibit Prep / 3,000 GSF Occupancy Load 10
3. Exhibit and General Storage 800 GSF Occupancy Load 3
Total Occupancy 63
TOILETS REQUIRED BY STAFF:
1. Men: Water Closets 2 / Urinals 1 / Lavoratories 2
2. Women: Water Closets 3 / Lavoratories 2
NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA:
1. Handicap requirements of the Denver Building Code allow
one Water Closet and one Lavoratory each must be accessible.
2. 1 drinking fountain is also required.
3. Design requirements of the Museum include one shower for each sex and lockers for volunteers (6) .
JANITORS CLOSET:
FLOOR AREA
65 SF (NET)
This would store cleaning equipment and would include a sink and slop sink. It should have easy access to vertical circulation and should be on the first or second building floor.
- 50 -


STAFF SUPPORT: Both in-house and traveling exhibits for the Museum are designed and constructed by the Museum staff. The three spaces for Staff Support are (1) Exhibit Preparation and Rehab with 2,000 SF (2) Traveling Exhibits Storage with 600 SF (3) Workshop with 500 SF. These areas could be observed by the public (glazed partitions) and on occasion will be used with public Museum programs.
EXHIBIT PREPARATION AND REHAB:
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: This is an area for both the development and rehabilitation of Museum exhibits and traveling exhibits. It is a large open area for the repair, shipping and receiving of exhibits and materials. Storage needs to be provided for construction supplies (paint, lumber, tools, etc.). A dock should be directly adjacent as the service access since most large deliveries are exhibits or materials for exhibit construction.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. General open area for exhibit assemby and repair
2. Work tables (fixed)
3. Storage cabinets
4. Shelving
5. Desk area
6. Slop sinks
7. Storage area for large construction supplies (lumber, sheetrock, etc.)
TOTAL 2000 SF
ADJACENCY: Loading dock area / workshop / Exhibit storage / staff toilet.
NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA:
1. Allow good ventilation and plentiful lighting and power.
2. High ceilings 10' to 20'.
3. Pegboard / phone / natural light.
4. The elevator should be accessible from this area. All storage areas should be adjacent or accessible.
5. Outside loading docks should be multiple height (27" for small vans / 48" for semi-trucks with ramp down.)
- 51


TRAVELING EXHIBITS STORAGE:
<
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: This area will store traveling exhibits. The concept expressed by the staff is a mini-warehouse with separate stalls for each exhibit.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Warehouse based on 12 modules 8' x 6' x 10' high
2. Adjustable shelving
TOTAL 600 SF
ADJACENCY: Loading area with oversized door / Exhibit preparation-/ workshop / staff toilet.
WORKSHOP:
OBJECTIVES AND CONCERNS: This would provide an area to store tools and painting equipment securely.
ELEMENTS OF SPACE:
FLOOR AREA (NET)
1. Table saw area (to allow use with 20' board)
2. Spray paint booth
3. Storage for tools / storage for lumber and plastic
4. Shop bench and desk ____________
TOTAL 500 SF
ADJACENCY: Exhibit prep and rehab / staff toilets / traveling exhibit storage.
NOTES ON DESIGN CRITERIA:
1. Allow good ventilation (especially spray paint booth) and plentiful lighting and power. Include acoustical control.
2. Include access to outside trash collection.
3. Concrete floor / tackable walls / telephone.
52 -


ON THE
PLATTE RIVER GREENWAY


ON THE
PLATTE RIVER GREENWAY
location location location location



"A
river
is more than an amenity, it is a
treasure."
Justice Wm. 0. Douglas
CHAIRMAN Joe Shoemaker
TREASURER Ted Bendelow
Bill Avery Dana Crawford Hiawatha Davis Bill DeGroot Marjorie Hornbem Pat McClearn Philip Milstein Dan Trujillo John Zapien
MAYOR OF DENVER William McNichols. Jr.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Jan Johnson
DEVELOPMENT & GRANTS COORDINATOR URBAN EDGES. INC. Rick Lamoreaux
Rosen Sear ns Joan Mason
THE
GREENWAY
NEWS for Immediate Release
CONTACT: Joe Shoemaker, 53^-6386
Rick Lamoreaux, 831-0920
Joe Shoemaker, Chairman of the Platte River Greenway Foundation, announced today the receipt of over $1 million in private contributions to continue development of the river within Denver. Three local foundations have contributed the money to the project since December 11, 198 I.
The first grant was awarded by the Gates Foundation in the amount of $500,000. Of this amount, $338,000 will be used to complete Gates-Crescent Park, situated across the Valley Highway from Mile High Stadium. Gates funded the initial construction through a 1976 grant of $250,000. Final arrangements have been completed for the relocation of Denver Public Works from the site, and construction of the remaining park area is expected to commence in February.
When completed, the park will feature some 10 acres of sodded area suitable for informal field sports and concert performances accomodating 10,000 people. A formal volleyball court and children's play structure were completed in the park last fall. The Children's Museum of Denver is planning to begin construction of their new facility within a portion of Gates-Crescent Park sometime this summer.
PLATTE RIVER GREENWAY FOUNDATION
1421 COURT PLACE
DENVER, COLORADO 80202 (303)623-2252


SITE LOCATION MAP
JST'X


URARIA CAMP


/ Cherry Creek icke
The Regional Greenway System
Once rhe heart of a beautiful valley, Denver's Platte River has been sadly neglected and abused. Now, rhe Greenway effort is restoring rhe river, bringing new vitality to our core city.
Numerous riverfront parlss, picnic areas, playgrounds and nature exhibits have been built. All are linked by a hike/'bike trail and boating course running rhe river's ren miles through Denver. And, rhe Greenway is a regional system offering unique health fitness, recreation, and transportation opportunities for our citizens.
Denver's Greenway contains over 400 ceres of river-oriented open space. Fifteen neighborhood and city-wide parks are situated along rhe river, and a major riverfront development program is underway in the Central Platte Valley near downrown. It's a great beginning, bur much work remains.
Denver Greenway
1. Frontier Paris
2. Pasquineis Landing
3. Ruby Hill Paris
4. Overland Pond
5. Vanderbilt Paris
6. Habitat Paris
7 Valverde Paris 8. Frog Hollow
9 Weir Guich Marina
10. Zuni Whirewarer Chute
11. Laisewood Gulch/' Ruoe Paris
12. Gares-Crescenr Parts
13. Centennial Paris
14. Fishbacis Landing
15. Confluence Paris
16. Cherry Creeis Paris
17. Riverfront Paris
18. Gloveville Lending






PreHminEry Djsion
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ON THE
PLATTE RIVER GREENWAY site analysis site analysis natural


i
Local Climatological Data ^/D ?il
Annual Summary With Comparative Data
1978
DENVER, COLORADO
Narrative Climatological Summary
Denver enjoys the mild, sonny, semi-arid climate that prevails over much of the central Rocky Mountain region, without the extremely cold mornings of the high elevations and restricted mountain valleys during the cold part of the year, or the hot afternoons of susmter at lower altitudes. Extremely warm or cold weather Is usually of short duration.
All masses from at Iqast four different sources Influence Denver's weather: arctic air from Canada and Alusku; warm moist air from the Culf of Mexico; warm dry air from Mexico and the southwest; and Pacific air modified by its passage over coastal ranges and other mountains to the west.
The good climate results largely from Denver's location at the foot of the east slope of the Rocky Mountains In the belt of the prevailing westerlies. During most summer afternoons cumuliform clouds so shade the City that temperatures of 90 or over are reached on an average of only thlrry-two days of the year, and in only one year in five doe6 the mercury very briefly reach the 100* mark.
In the cold season the high altitude and the location of the mountains to the west combine to moderate temperatures. Invasions of cold alt from the north, intensified by the high altitude, can be abrupt and severe. On the other hand, many of the cold air masses that spread southward out of Canada over the plains never reach Denver's altitude and move off over the lower plains to the east. Surges of cold air from the west are usually moderated in their descent down the east face of the mountains, and Chinooks resulting from some of these westerly flows often raise the temperature far above that normally to be expected at this latitude in the cold season. These conditions result in a tempering of winter cold to an average temperature above that of other cities situated at the same latitude.
In spring when outbreaks of polar air are waning, they are often met by moist currents from the Gulf of Mexico. The Juxtaposition of these two currents produces the rainy season in Denver, which reaches its peak In May.
Situated a long distance from any moisture source, and separated from the Pacific source by several high mountain barriers, Denver enjoys a low relative humidity, low average precipitation, and considerable sunshine.
Spring i6 the wettest, cloudiest, and windiest season. Much of the 37 percent of the annual total precipitation that occurs in spring falls as snow during the colder, earlier period of that season. Stormy periods are often interspersed by stretches of mLld sunny weather that remove previous snow cover.
Summer precipitation (about 32 percent of the annual total), particularly In July and August, usually falls mainly from scattered local thundershowers during the afternoon and evening. Mornings are usually clear and sunny. Clouds often form during early afternoon and cut off the sunshine at what would otherwise be the hottest part of the day. Many afternoons have a cooling shower.
Autumn is the most pleasant season. bocal summer thunderstorms are mostly over and invasions of cold air and severe weather are infrequent, so that there is less cloudiness and a greater percent of possible sunshine than at any other time of the year. Periods of unpleasant weather are generally brief. Precipitation amounts to about 20 percent of the annual total.
Ulnter has least precipitation accumulation, only about 11 percent of the annual total, and almost all of it snow. Precipitation frequency, however' is higher than In autumn. There is also more cloudiness and the relative humidity averages higher than In the autumn. Weather can be quite severe, but as a general rule the severity doesn't last long.
NATIONAL OCEANIC AND
lUCICl ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION
/
ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE
A
NATIONAL CLIMATIC CENTfR ASHEVILLE. N C


DENVER


DENVER
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE (Degrees Fahrenheit)
AVERAGE PRECIPITATION (inches of Precipitation)
AVERAGE SNOWFALL (inches of Snowfall)
PERCENT POSSIBLE SUNSHINE ($)
Total 70$


BTU/S.F. / DAY
HOT and COLD DAYS

to***

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J F M A M J J A S o N D

one day
less than one day
SOLAR RADIATION
J FM AM J J A SO N D
DENVER


MILES PER HOUR
HHAMaa*

t
AVERAGE WIND SPEED


1
i
HEATING AND COOLING CHART, DENVER, COLORADO
70*
NORMAL HEATING DEGREE DAYS NORMAL COOLING DEGREE DAYS SUN ANGLE 0-
DATA SOURCE: U.S. WEATHER BUREAU 1941-1970, DENVER
K
SUN ANGLE


HaAKaa
05' *\0' 15 I a> i obe


I
I
I
1
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1
Average Yearly Precipitation 1^.53"
Average Yearly Temperature 50.2 F
Average Relative Humidity (Noon)
Degree Days
Heating 6016
Cooling 623
Denver enjoys a mild, sunny, semi-arid climate as a result of its location on the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains. Extremes in temperature are usually short in duration, and are typically more moderate than other cities at the same latitudeprimarily due to the proximity of the mountains.
Prevailing winds are westerly (northwesterly in the winter). Average temperatures in the summer are in the 80's; in the winter, the high 30's. Temperatures do have great diurnal swing, which offers many opportunities for natural heating and cooling processes in buildings. Denver has 6,016 heating degree days and 625 cooling degree days (heating is more of a problem in small to moderate scale buildings than cooling). Denver has over 300 partially or totally sunny days per year, making it an excellent location for utilizing solar energy to help meet energy needs for buildings. Denver has low relative humidity and low annual precipitation. Denver receives most of its rain in the spring. Winter is the dryest season with only 11% of the total annual precipitation, mostly in the form of snow. The average annual precipitation is only 16 to 18 inches.
There seems to be no special microclimate on the site, except that the site slopes approximately 2% down toward the west, and is unprotected (by vegetation or architecture) from prevailing winds in that direction.
At 12:00 noon, the sun angles on the site are as follows: winter, 26; spring and fall, 50; and summer, 73. Solar tables and charts for 40 latitude are accurate enough for the design and development of passive and active solar architecture in this area.
f
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p
SOLAR CHART-DENVER
LAT. 3950'N LONG10450'W
ELEVATION 5280 FT.
350


i
ON THE
PLATTE RIVER GREENWAY
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