Citation
Battlement Mesa town center

Material Information

Title:
Battlement Mesa town center
Creator:
Schler, Jon
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
66 leaves : illustrations (some color), maps (some color), plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
City planning -- Colorado -- Battlement Mesa ( lcsh )
City planning -- Colorado ( lcsh )
City planning ( fast )
Colorado ( fast )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 65-66).
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Typescript.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Jon Schler.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09250246 ( OCLC )
ocm09250246
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1980 .S384 ( lcc )

Full Text
environmental design
auraria library
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
auraria library
Jon Schler the? is spring 80


^'ite Dt
TABLE Or CONTI
THE PROBLEM ................................................... 1 to 3
Problem
Issues
Goals
Scope
Approach
Personal Goals
Product
Thesis Advisory Board THE ANLYSIS
Project Location and Introduction............................. k
Loation Maps................................................ 5 & 6
Climate Description Summary.................................. 7 & 8
Producing Oil from Shale......................................10
Services and Natural Hazards..................................11 to 13
THE SITE
Site Overview.................................................14
Location Maps.................................................15 to 16
Site Location to Climate......................................1? to 2k
THE PROGRAM
Programming...................................................25
Preliminary Layout by ARCO....................................26
Population Projections........................................27 & 28
Tenants of Neighborhood and Community Centers.................29 4 30
THE DESIGN
Appendix.................................................... 31 to63
Conversations.................................................6k
Books, Studies and surveys.................................. 65 to 66



PROBLEM


Subject: Thesis Preparation
Battlement Mesa Commercial/Business Development Prepared By: Jon Schier
1. Project Statement:
Battlement Mesa, located between Rifle and Grand Junction, Colo rado, is the site for a new town. This town is being developed by Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) as a service town for a new oil shale development in the piceance Creek Basin.
It is my intention to design a commercial/business district for the town which will have a population range of 2,500 to 6,000 people, plus the possibility of growing to 12,000 people.
2. Issues
There are many issues which will be addressed in this thesis, the major ones are:
- ON THE LARGE SCALE environmental concerns, site density effect on an environment, circulation, commercial/business development for boom towns, and energy conservation.
- ON THE MORE SPECIFIC SCALE look into the design of a commercial/business center with it's, transition of stages, ability to expand and contract, relationships, energy conservation and the ability to work with the given town concepts.
3. Goals and Objectives
- Design a commercial/business center for a boom town with a changing population.
- Develop density relationships for semi-arid location.
- Develop an energy efficient design.
- Research industrial new towns, boom towns, find out what has worked and what has failed.
- Have a commercial/business/service which can expand, contract, and can be economically stable.
- Hope to develop a system or outline for boom town center development semi-arid regions.


b. Scope/Limits
- Will assume project will go through and will be built on proposed site.
- Will take proposed land use, circulation and development plan -review it and make ammendments or use given information for developing the town center.
- Town center design will include overall layouts, square footages, relationships, design resraints, growth and expansion possibilities, energy efficient design and design of facilities required.
5. Approach
* Will follow the problem solving method.
- Will review existing information, research shopping of industrial area, look at semi-arid developments, environmental constraints and energy conservation.
- Will then set up final goals and objectives on the specific development.
- Work on the schematic design ideas.
- Come up with alternatives.
- Select best of all alternatives and take to a finished state.
- Through whole process, will test ideas and research.
6. Personal Goals
- To get a better understanding of boom town development.
- Come up with guidelines and design considerations to help me in
working with Western Slope communities.
- Get a better understanding of what the land can support in ways
of densities and conditions.
- Work with and get to know the rural people, large corporations, and design people working on the Western Slope.
7. Products of Project
- Verbal Presentation final slide show or pin-ups.
- Written report and brochure containing process, research, review of Battlement Mesa Plan and design of town center.


8. Thesis Advisory Board
- Greg Trainor Project Coordinator (Western Slope) for(Arco)- Battlement Mesa
- Bob Huff Director of Community Development (ARCO)
- Steve Schimitt (sp) Energy Impact Coordinator for the State of Colo.
- Max Ruppeck Architect/Urban Designer for Carl Worthington Partnership.
- Gene Herbert Architect/Planner for Harmen, O'Donnell and Henninger Assoc, (working on master plan for Battlement Mesa)
- John Prosser Tnstructer at the University of Colorado at Denver Center, Urban 'Designer.


ANLYSIS


Project Location
Battlement Mesa is located on the Colorado River. Juet east of Grand Valley, Colorado in Garfield County, on Interstate Highway 70. Approxiaaately 280 miles west of Denver, Colorado, and about 38 miles east of Grand Junction, Colorado.
This location is only about 18 miles from the Piceance Creek Basin, part of the Ancient Green River Formation, which holds the richest single supply of recoverable oil shale in the nation, (see following maps)
Introduction
Battlement Mesa is a new town being developed by Colony Oil and ARCO. (Atlantic Richfield Company) as a service town
for oil shale development in the Piceance Creek Basin.
The company plans to build along *ith the Residential units a community shopping and business center.
It is my intention to design this shopping and business center as my thesis design.
This design problem offers many exiting as well as challenging design and personal experiences'?.
Much of the information for this project is still on the drawing board, but I do have a preliminary layout and a general program for the shopping/business center. However, as you will see it leaves me a great deal of flexibility to work with.
In discussion with ARCO staff, I have agreed to develop several different alternatives to each phase of the design process and present this information to them, with the feedbacks as well as my advisors I will develop these different ideas into a final project design, which I hope will have some use in boom town commercial/business development.
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Battlement Mesa, Colorado Climate Description Summary-
Located in a large mountain valley, on the Colorado River, on the west slope of the rockies, Battlement Mesa has a climate marked "by the wide seasonal range usual to interior localities at this latitude of 39 07*. All climate information from the following pages is for Grand Junction, 20 miles from Battlement Mesa, but the climates are very similar. The mountain valley location has valley breezes which provide protection from spring and fall frosts, and results in a longer growing season averaging 191 days. The end result of this is quite a temperate climate, with many pleasant days outside and little need for mechanical aide on the inside.
Precipitation in all seasons is quite low, with an average of a little over eight inches per year. This is due ti> the continental location ringed by mountains on all sides. This indicates the area is quite arrid tending to have dry soils and materials also tend to dry out. This would indicate that building materials selection is quite important.
Temperatures at Battlement Mesa have ranged from 105' to -23, but readings of 100 or higher are infrequent, and about one third of the winters have no readings below 0. Summer days with maximum temperatures in the middle and low 90's and minimum in the low 60s are common. The monthly average is in the range of the 50's. Relative humidity is ver low during the summer. At times though cold spells of cold winter weather are sometimes prolonged due to cold air becomaing trapped in the valley. Winds are usually very light during the coldest weather. Cold waves are quite rare, with annaverage of 69% possible sunny days during the year. This criteria also aides the designer, for the temperate extremes can provide adaption of time lags in materials. Heat gain is definitely dominate with little aide from cooling winds. The prevailing wind is from the east-southeast due to the valley breeze effects, however the strongest winds are usually from the west and north.
Looking over the solar radiation tables one can see that the main design criteria deals with solar absorbtion in materials. There is a high degree of gain in all seasons, requiring the designer to provide interior protection from overtemp.
Again mate-ials selected with a time lag will provide the necessary heat at night.
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Soils temperatures deviate at foirr feet below taken at 5*00 pm from 30.2 in January to 80.5 in July. At the same time only at eight feet below the surface temperatures of the soil range from 32.6 in January to 81.1 in July. This data will determine insulation from heat gain again during summer months while very little loss during the winter.
Solar collection in this area will be quite easy, however the designer must provide protection from overtemp. The necessary design criteria becomes that of cooling the structures down during the day and provide adequate heating during the night cycle.


Producing Oil From Shale
Colonys commercialization plans reflect continuous research and engineering activities, as well as experience gained from operating a 1,000-ton-a-day semi-works plant and pilot mine at Parachute Creek from 1969-72. During that three-year period, Colony successfully tested the workability and effectiveness of a retorting process known as TOSCO II.
The Colony approach uses conventional underground mining techniques to recover oil shale. The mined shale is then coarsely crushed and conveyed to the plant site, where it is crushed again into particles less than a half-inch thick. These enter the retort where the solid kerogen is converted into hydrocarbon vapors.
During retorting, the crushed shale is first preheated by hot flue gases, then conveyed to a rotary kiln filled with thousands of hot, marble-size ceramic balls. At temperatures of about 900 degrees Fahrenheit, the kerogen turns into hydrocarbon vapors that are collected and condensed to a liquid.The liquid productshale oilis then sent to on-site upgrading facilities, while non-condensed vapors are used as fuel in the plant complex.
Meanwhile, the ceramic balls and processed shale are separated. The processed shale is then cooled and moistened for eventual disposal as a compacted land fill that will be revegetated.The ceramic balls are recycled and reheated for reuse.
The well-developed TOSCO II process is an energy-efficient system, able to recover essentially all of the precious hydrocarbons in the oil shale.
Using six TOSCO II units, Colonys billion-dollar commercial plant will be able to process 20 million tons of mined oil shale and produce 15 million barrels of premium quality low-sulfur oil annually for a 30-year period.
The oil produced by Colony will be upgraded on site and then transported to markets primarily by pipeline, linking up with the regions existing pipeline networks. Salable byproducts, mainly ammonia and sulfur, will be trucked to market.
Shale oil has broad utility, and the extent of upgrading enables it to meet a number of market requirements. Raw shale oil, for example, can be used as a boiler fuel under certain conditions; upgrading can produce a petroleum feedstock for jet, diesel and home heating fuels; additional processing at a refinery can yield gasoline for automobiles, as well as petrochemicals with a myriad of consumer and industrial applications.


Services
Since this is a new town, no existing services are present near the site except for a main telephone cable which is on the North end of the site.
Water and Sewer
Water and sewer system? are to be started in the summer of 1990, and final plans are presently being drawn up. When information is available it will be added to the report.
Provision of Electricity
At the present time Public Service of Colorado and Holy Cross Electric Assosiation hold franchise rights for the provision of elecrical power to the site, (they are in process of finalizing the line location.)
Provision of Gas
Public Service Company of Colorado supplies gas service to the town of Grand Valley and provides for a small number of farm taps in the immediste area around the site. If gas is available, and this is questionable, it will be provided by the Public Service Company of Colorado.
Natural Hazards
Consideration has been given to the following possible natural hazards: Soils and Geology;
Avalanche;
Fl ood Plain;
Wildfire;.
Soils and Geaology: Two soils and geology analysis' have been completed on the site, each having a slightly different scope of study. The first report, titled, Subsurface, Foundation and Geological Study was prepared by Zeff, Cogomo and Sealy Inc.. This study was somewhat general in nature, intended to generally locate any potential hazards of the site.
The second study, titled, Subsoil and Geological Study for Site Stability," was prepared by Chen and Assosiates, Inc., This study dealt with the potential problem of mud flows, and soil stability. The testing and analysis program for this study was for more detailed than that accomplished during the first study.


Natural Hazards Cost.
The following summerizes the final conclusions of the studies.
A) The site is suitable for the proposed commercial development.
B) Existing slopes are presently stable and have had a stable geologic history, with the exception of a few small active slides North of the site along the encarpment adjacent to the Colorado River.
C) Analysis of slopes under probable conditions of future development indicate th**y will be stable.
D) The probability of mud flows on this site is extremely remote.
E) The probability of small mud flows along the tributary drainage ways id more frequent, and protective measures should be initiated to prevent damage from any such flows.
F) An erosion control scheme should be incorporated into the site development plan of this property.
G) Stability of the site with resrect to the possibility of collapsing soils is minimal.
Avalanche; Neither the normal snow depth nor the characteristics of the slopes above the site, are conducive to developing avalanche hazards.
Flood Plains; Site is well above the flood plain hazard of the Colorado River. Localized channels have limited area and pose no danger of flooding the site. Wildfire: A large part of the Battlement Mesa project has been used as agricultural land for many years. Both the agricultural and sage-brush in this area are both quick burners. By the use of cleared open spaces or natural fire breaks, such as deep ravines, these fires can be controlled. Also, 25' wide road, drainage ditches, will help to limit the spread of wildfire.
Storm Drainage: A detailed storm drainage analysis of the development area has been completed by Frasier and Gingery, Inc.
The following statement summerizes the conclusions of the storm drainage analysis:
A) There are no major storm drainage hazards which would preclude development of the site.
E) Ttie commercial development should be planned to reserve space for drainage courses across the site.
II.


C) Run-off from all development should be held reasonably close to historic limits.
D) Erosion control measures should be taken in all open channels.
E) The general location of detention ponds, culverts, open channels, an other major drainage facilities are in the report.
Access
Present access for ingress and egress from public roads to the site is provided for by Garfield County Road 300 and 301. Im in the process of getting final street locations around the site. There locations will be very close to those shown on the site maps in this report.


LOCAL ARCHITECTURE


LOCAL ARCHITECTURE




The Site Overview
The town center commercial, is a site of 19 acres located on the main arterial street which loops the center of Battlement Mesa. Located around the center will he a motel, high and medium density housing, office, and warehouse area. The site has good access from all parts of town and Interstate 70. There is a river that runs through the site which can be developed into a nice feature. It has irrigation water running through it most of the year, and some apple and pinion pine trees.
The following maps show location in the proposed town and site itself. Better maps are being made available in the near future.
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WINDS & SUN ANGLES
SLOPES


1. Site Location to Climate
Site should be on upper or middle slope areas, which tend to recieve larger amounts of radiation during underheated periods, and less at overheated times, than horizontal sites or those located at the foot or crest of slopes.
In the western temperste zone heat should be conserved but extreme conditions of heating o cooling should be avoided. On valley slopes intermediate temperature conditions are created by a mixture of smaller circulations with neighboring warm air. as a result, the higher sides of the slopes tend to remain warm while ridge crest and valley floor conditions are cold. In the temperate zone this "thermal belt" is most advantageous for site selection. However, if this location is exposed to unwanted crest winds that may offset higher temperatures, a more desireable place would be approxiamately hslfway up the slope.
On long slopes, locations over the crest or behind intermediate ridges would offer wind protection.
Site should have slopes oriented sonth to southeast.
The total maximum isolation would come from an orientation facing directly south. But in the cold months maximum radiant gain is from the east of south. Generally speaking, exposures up to about 17 degrees East of South are permiss-able, but this would have to be varified for specific sites in the western temperate zone.
Site should be selected in areas where north and east winter winds-are of a minimum.
Specific locations should be able to provide protection from night breezes and strong air movements in general.
In most parts of the westam temperate zone, orientation to wind is not a primary concern, but wind protection will be a factor. Evening breezes induce rapid cooling, often to extremes. Constant strong air movements, including constant on-shore movements, can bring with them a wind chill factor through cooling effects.
2. REQUIREMENT. MAJOR BUILDINGS AND OUTDOOR LIVING AREAS SHOULD BE SITED TO TAKE MAXIMUM ADVANTAGE OF THE INTRINSIC ORIENTATION AND LANDFORM OPPORTUNITIES AFFORDED BY SUITABLE SITES.
On sites affording the opportunity, orient buildingE in a south to southeast direction.


SOLAS CHARACTER
OPTIMUM SOLAR ORIENTATION
TEMPERATE REGION
optimum solar orientation
. DEwOUOUS SJ.MMER SHADE 2AV0Q PUWTIS: tog CJ2SE TC STRUCTURES TO RQXT DAMPNESS
1 ADMIT WINTER SUN
vegetational control
COOL REGION


The total maximum isolation in this zone would come from an orientation facing directly south. But in the cold months, maximum radiant gain is from the east or south.
Major entrances to buildings and exposed outdoor living areas should not be oriented in a south to southeast direction, if possibles if not possible, these entrances and areas should be protected from winter winds.
3. Integration of Building and Site
A REQUIREMENT. BUILDINGS SHOULD BE SITED WITH PROPER CONSIDERATION OF THE ROLE THAT EXISTING NATURAL FEATURES OF THE SITE CAN PLAY IN MODERATING THE EXTREME EFFECTS OF SOLAR RADIATION, k. Site Planning and Design
Outdoor living areas should be located on the site where there are good opportunities for recieving solar heat.
The general mild temperatures in the western temperate region, in all seasons, encourages more outdoor living can be appreciably extended on a daily basis by taking admantage of solar radiation opportunities in those areas of the site where said opportunities exist.
In general, provide shade for dwellings and outdoor living areas through the use of high deciduous trees.
Shading devices for summertime use must not preclude summertime breezes or solar radiation in the wintertime. High deciduous trees are most desireable, because they permit maximumwinter sun and cooling summer breezes to penetrate the site. It is especially important to avoid tall evergreens to the south and southwest.
5. Locate elements on the site for beneficial utilization and control of air flows across the site.
Roads on the site should be oriented to avoid winter winds and to channel summer breezes.
As linear open spaces, streets and roadways can exist in channelling air movements. Since roads often have sidewalks for pedestrians, it is important that the roads are so orriented as to afford comfortable walking conditions.
Locate buildings, fences, walls, hedges and other planting as shelters to control breezes? where necessary employ portable wall shelters.
It is important to maximize outdoor living opportunities and wind protection, in addition to solar orientation, plays an important role in this respect.


Shrubbery can augment fences and walls in this in this respect in many parts of the western temperate region, since winds are not normally violent enough to cause damage to vegetation. Specific local wind conditions should be carefully analyzed, however.
Windbreaks should be used against winter winds and placed close to the structure or area being protected.
The chilling effects of the winter winds should be mitigated. Variation in direction of summer and winter winds permits windbreaks close to a house without serious interference with summer breezes. Some protection may be needed from North and East winter winds by evergreen deflectors in localities where such winds exist.
6. Selection and use of Materials to Climate
Hard-surfaced materials should be used 6or terraces and other outdoor sitting areas.
Solar heat on hard-surf aced terraces, patios and courtyards will increase the iengtfi of evening use and contribute to a fuller anjoyment of the site inthe western temperate zone.
Limited lawns and grassy materials should be used in the immediate area of structure.
Grass is a material capable of keeping a relatively even temperature throughout the day.
Where possible, employ medium colors on sun exposed surfaces, and use dark colors only in recessed places protected from summer sun.
Light colors will generally be too reflective in the western temperate zone to achieve balanced radiation, and dark colors, except in special places, absorb more radiation than desired.
7. Solar Energy Architecture
In the temperate region it is absolutely imperative to assure maximum exposure of the solar collection panel. The primary outdoor living areas should be located on the southwest side of structures and protected from north or northwest winds. Only deciduous vegetation should be used on the south side of the dwelling,- this provides summer shade and allows for the penetration of the winter sun. The impact of winter winds should be lessened. The structure itself should have steeply pitched roofs on the windward side, thus deflecting the


the wind and reducing the roof area affected by the winds. Blank walls, garages or storage areas should be protected with earth mounds, evergreen vegetation, walls or fences. Outdoor areas used during warm weather should be designed and oriented to take advantage of the prevailing southwest summer breezes.
8. The site planning principles for solar energy utilization and energy conservation for the cool and temperate regions indicate:
...the use of windbrake planning;
...the orintation of road alignment with planting on either side to channel summer breezes;
...the location of units in a conformation suggested by the topography;
...of storage areas on other/to buffer buildings from northwest winter winds;
...the use of berms to shelter outdoor terraces; and
...the use and location of deciduous trees to block or filter afternoon summer sun.
9. Site Accomodation of the Solar Collection Device
Solar energy collection often requires the utilization of extensive mechanical and engineering equipment. This structural equipment ma$ be placed either on the building to utilize the energy, on a related or nearby structure or at some point on or near the site itself. The incorporation of solar collection devices into the architecture, the use of common collectors or the use of individual solar collection devices on the site all have site implications.
If the collector is placed on the structure itself, there are minimal site implications. Most of these have to do with proper siting and orientation of the building itself, selective trimming of existing vegetation, protection of remaining planting,screening or masking of any visually disharmonious areas or elements created by the collection structure or device on the building. The following illustrations show methods for determining the location and types of sites development which may be able to be utilized without disrupting or interfering with the roof mounted solar collector on an individual dwelling unit.


SOME FACTORS INFLUENCING SITE SELECT^ WESTERN TEMPERA7F REGION*
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A. ALTITUDE AND SLOPE
seek upper or middle slope areas
Utjuru
C. VEGETATION AND MOISTURE
relate to wind protection possibilities
relate to sun pockets
&
D. COMPOSITE SHOWING PREFERRED SITES


-q
Temperate Hot-Arid Hot-Humid Cold
Objectives Maximize warming effects of sun in winter. Maximize shade in summer. Reduce impact of winter wind but allow air circulation in summer. Maximize shade late morn-and all afternoon. Maximize humidity. Maximize air movement in summer. Maximize shade. Minimize wind. Maximize warming effects of solar radiation. Reduce impact of winter wind. Avoid microclimatic cold pockets.
Adaptations
Position on slope Middle-upper for radiation Low for cool air flow High for wind Low for wind shelter
Orientation on slope South to Southeast East-southeast for P.M. shade. South South to Southeast
Relation to water Close to water, but avoid coastal fog On lee side of water Near any water Near large body of water.
Preferred winds Avoid continental cold winds Exposed to prevailing winds Sheltered from north Sheltered from North and West
Qustering Around a common, sunny terrace Along E-W axis, for shade Open to wind Around sun pockets
Building orientation South to Southeast South South 5 toward prevailing wind Southeast
Tree forms Deciduous trees nearby on west. No evergreens near on south Trees overhanging roof if possible High canopy trees. Use deciduous trees near building Deciduous trees near building. Evergreens for windbreaks
Road orientation Crosswise to winter wind Narrow; E-W axis Broad channel, E-W axis Crosswise to winter wind
Materials coloration Medium Light on exposed surfaces, dark to avoid reflection Light, especially for roof Medium to dark
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LOOKING SOUTH DOWN THE COLORADO RIVER AT THE EDGE OF BLUFF


PROGRAM


Programming
In view of the lack of an economic analysis of the trade area, since it is not yet developed. My building program will revolve around projected populations for the town and company gimen shopping and business needs.
On the following page there is a preliminary layout developed by ARCO. It shows their first phase space needs. As you can see this is very rough and can be revised and reworked to almost any degree.
This much latitude has its advantages but has already given me a lot of problems in narrowing the design down to a workable scale.
ARCO staff and I have decided to meet every two weeks and I will present alternatives and information, in turn I will be givtn more gaideiibes to develop a more realistic design.
The pages following the preliminary layout of the center, is some general information which has been collected, that will be used in the design of this facility.


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11/5/79
Population Projections Battlement Mesa Assumptions
1. 5Q£ capture rate
2. Construction population - 6CfK married 2.8 family size
kQfi. single 1.0 family size
3. Permanent population - 85^ married 3.0 family size
\% single 1.0 family size
4. Service population - Ratio of energy workers to sup
population lj .5
6($ married 2.8 family size
kCf% single 1.0 family size


11/5/79 Totals 509t Capture I98I 1982 1983 1984 1985 Total
const. 1550 1302 (988) (536) 0 1328
cum 1550 2852 1864 1328 1328
perma- nent 156 289 305 626 622 1998
cum 156 445 750 1376 1998
service 1076 854 (386) 44 232 1820
cum 1076 1930 155^ 1588 1820
total 2782 2445 (1069) 134 854 5146
cum 2782 5227 4158 4292 5146


Conversations
Max Rupeck Urban Designer Carl Worhtington Assoc.
Dates October 15, nov. 12 and 26. (discossion of shopping center design)
Greg Trainor Project Coordinator Western Slope For ARCO Battlement Mesa Dates Oct. 10,26 Nov. 5* 15* 23 Dec. 11. Organization with company, program development, site tour, staff meetings.
Steve Schmitt Energy Impact Coordinator for the State of Colorado.
Date nov. 14. State on new growth arid information from COG region 11.
Roger _______ Commercial specialist for ARCO y General program.
Dates Dec. 11 Preliminary program development, sq. ft. of project etc..
Jeff Bloom Town planner for Carbondale, Colorado. Phone conversation -
Date Nov. 5 about zoning in county, feeling of oil shale and shopping needs.
The People of Grand Valley -
Dates Sept. 20-21 General talk with some of the people in area. Their feelings on new development.


DESIGN


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SUPERMARKET (PASSIVE SOLAR ) LOOKING EAST


SITE LAYOUT WITH DESIGN COMPONENTS
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SITE OVERVIEW (SOUTH TO THE RIGHT )


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CLOSE UP OF STAIRS AND WALKWAYS


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LOOKING NORTH ACROSS THE SITE


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PLAZA VIEW


APPENIX


Neighborhood Ceftters The following lists are offered as a guide for tenant composition;3 3-6 TWENTY MOST FREQUENTLY FOUND TENANTS IN NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS TENANT CLASSIFICATION RANK
FOOD AND FOOD SERVICE Supermarket*^ 2
Restaurant without liquor -* 8
Ice cream parlor 20
GENERAL MERCHANDISE Variety store 14
CLOTHING AND SHOES Ladies specialty 15
Ladies ready-to-wear 7
DRY GOODS Yard goods 18
FURNITURE Radio, TV, hi-fi 19
OTHER RETAIL Hardware 16
Drugs 4
Cards and gifts 10
Liquor and wine 12
FINANCIAL Banks ' 13
OFFICES Medical and dental 3
Real estate 9
SERVICES Beauty shop 1
Barber shop 6
Cleaners and dyers ' 5
Coin laundries y 11
Service station 17
3-7 NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER COMPOSITION BY TENANT CLASSIFICATION
TENANT GROUP PERCENT GLA PERCENT SALES PERCENT TOTAL CHARGES (INCOME FROM TENANTS)
Food 26.5 43.8 21.4
Food service 5.r 3.2 6.7
General merchandise 16.3 8.9 12.2
Clothing and shoes 5.5 4.2 7.7
Dry goods 3.8 1.6 4.3
Furniture 4.8 1.7 5.2
Other retail 16.9 13.4 17.6
Financial 3.0 0 3.7
Offices 4.7 0 5.0
Services 5.6 2.5 7.8
Other 4.7 20.7 8.4
Vacant 3.1 0 0
Total 100.0 100.0 100.0
The neighborhood center has its major tenants in the food group; those tenants represent 26 percent of GLA, 44 percent of sales, and 21 percent of total revenue. The other retail category (drugs, liquor, hardware, etc.) comprises the second major tenant group and represents about 18 percent of total charges. (Total charges includes minimum rent, overage rent, and common area charges.)
Community Centers
Community centers, the in-between centers, provide a greater array of tenant classifications than do neighborhood centers.
3-8 TWENTY MOST FREQUENTLY FOUND TENANTS IN COMMUNITY CENTERS
TENANT CLASSIFICATION RANK
FOOD AND FOOD SERVICE Supermarket 2
Restaurant without liquor 17
Restaurant with liquor 20 .
GENERAL MERCHANDISE Junior department store 6
Variety store 13
3 These lists of tenants in neighborhood centers, as well as the lists which follow for community, regional, and super-regional centers, are taken from Dollars and Cents of Shopping Centers: 1975, cited in footnote 1 above. The ranking shown in the lists, as well as the percentages shown for GLA, sales, and landlord income, were current in 1975 but obviously will change.
X1.


CLOTHING AND SHOES
Ladies specialty 14
Ladies ready-to-wear 1
Mens wear 7
Family shoe 5
DRY GOODS
Yard goods 11
FURNITURE
Radio, TV, hi-fi 19
OTHER RETAIL
Drugs 8
Jewelry 12
Cards and gifts 10
FINANCIAL
Bank 16
Insurance 18
OTHER OFFICES
Medical and dental 3
SERVICES
Beauty shop 4
Barber shop 9
Cleaners and dyers 15
3-9 COMMUNITY CENTER COMPOSITION BY
TENANT CLASSIFICATION
PERCENT
TENANT PERCENT PERCENT TOTAL
GROUP GLA SALES CHARGES
Food 15.7 33.2 13.1
Food service 3.7 3.8 6.0
General
merchandise 35.8 30.1 27.0
Clothing and shoes 7.8 7.6 10.6
Dry goods 3.0 2.0 3.6
Furniture 3.7 3.6 3.6
Other retail 14.5 15.5 18.2
Financial 2.5 0 3.6
Offices 2.2 0 3.0
Services 3.6 1.8 5.0
Other 4.3 2.4 6.3
Vacant 3.3 0 0


SHOPPING CENTER BUILDING CONFIGURATIONS
CLUSTER
The stripa line of stores tied together by a canopy over the sidewalk, which runs along the fronts of the stores. Economical for small centers, but must be kept within a reasonable length to avoid excessive walking distances and difficult merchandising.
The Lbasically a strip, but with one end turned. Good for corner locations.
The Ubasically a strip with both ends turned in the same direction.
The mallessentially a pedestrian way between two facing strips. The mall may also take other shapes an L, for example.
The clustera group of retail buildings separated by small pedestrian malls or courts.


generally the least expensive structure to build and is easily adapted to most site conditions. With strong sign control and good architectural treatment, the strip center can become an attractive and successful merchandising unit.
Care must be taken to avoid lengthening the strip beyond a comfortable walking distance. About 400 feet is normal, although there are successful strip centers of 750 feet and more. People are apparently willing to walk farther in a shopping center than they are downtown. Also, with adequate parking provided, people will drive back and forth within a center to various sections of the strip.
TheL
The L is basically a strip with one end turned; the U is a strip with both ends turned in the same direction. In most?cases, the intent of the L or U is to reduce the length of an otherwise overlong strip. The L can be turned in either direction according to the necessary site orientation. Another use of the L or U is to make the fullest use of a site which is nearly square; a strip development on such a site would waste site capacity and provide redundant parking. In general, the L is suitable for large neighborhood and smaller community centers, the U for larger community centers.
The Mall
Essentially a pedestrian way between two facing strips, the mall becomes a pedestrian street for back-and-forth shopping movement. It has become the standard pattern for the regional center and is being applied to community-size centers. The mall has come into its own, particularly for the regional center, because more and more regional centers are being designed for more than one department store.
The mall may be either open to the sky or roofed over, using glass or plastic skylights to allow natural lighting. The weather-protected area is usually heated and cooled according to the season. The enclosed mall, with its heating and air conditioning, has become the dominant pattern for regional centers, regardless of climate. Under current practices of mall construction, the enclosed mall is consistent with goals of energy conservation. The mall is designed with an efficient, centralized plant or rooftop units, low wattage lighting, and complete insulation.
Early shopping centers provided for pedestrian weather protection by constructing canopies or colonnaded roof projections along the storefronts.
For a neighborhood strip center, the front sidewalk was later glass-enclosed and air-conditioned to add the appeal of shopping comfort.
Straight malls are giving way to an offset design with meandering mall streets. But in most cases, department stores are not placed directly across a mall from one another.
Open mall centers are often remodeled and enclosed to improve customer appeal. Construction cost is offset by the increased sales volume, which results from the improved appeal and from the fact that, during poor weather, shopping in this type of center becomes a pleasurable activity rather than a simple necessity.
The Cluster
The cluster is an extension of the mall concept. In a regional center, the cluster takes on such variations on the customary letter shapes as the X, the Y, and the dumbbell. The cluster is a design that has been applied to the one-department-store regional center. The department store is placed in the center of the complex, surrounded by smaller stores, rather than placing it at one end of a mall and leaving the other end with no anchor or a weak anchor. The X and Y forms are the kinds of design solutions that have been developed for centers with three or four department stores.
The Specialty Center
The specialty center takes building forms having no prescribed patterns. The specialty center requires the building pattern best suited to the location and market area.
With any building pattern, there are basic design principles that the experienced developer and architect understand but the inexperienced overlook. For example, an enclosed mall, if it is too wide, is expensive to operate and discourages back-and-forth movement for impulse buying. If a mall is too narrow, it becomes crowded, hard to keep clean, and difficult to use for promotional activities. Forty feet is the most common width for malls. A mall can be widened into a court at one or two spots, both for design purposes and as a place for promotional activities.
SummaryBuilding Patterns
Common design errors, found in all building patterns, include unvarying widths or depths for all types of stores, difficulty in servicing smaller stores without interfering with pedestrian or auto traffic,
32,


Traffic
Foot traffic. Foot traffic is the lifeblood of retail facilities. The facility should therefore be planned to attract and intercept a maximum amount of pedestrian traffic.
Such traffic should be well separated from vehicular traffic.
Vehicular traffic. A shopping center is not planned to serve traffic: traffic is planned to serve the shopping center. The aims of such traffic planning are as follows:
1. Easy traffic flow on surrounding road system: adjacent facilities with constant come and go of cars, such as the post office, present problems.
Cars should enter and leave the site without slow downs.
2. Effective transfer of road traffic onto the site is required.
3. Even and effective distribution of on-site traffic: customer should be free to go to any parking area on the site so he can get as close as possible to his destination. Secondary traffic movements should be facilitated.
4. Convenient and efficient layout of stalls: the aim is to ensure the greatest possible turnover in a given period, not to park the maximum amount of Gars.
Pedestrian walkways and proper illumination should
be provided. Traffic lanes should be perpendicular to the building facade to allow shoppers to approach without threading through cars. Wide 45 stalls permit fastest, most comfortable parking, although 90 stalls are most common on grade. Allow 400 square feet per stall, including drives, walks and landscaping. The number of stalls required is generally assumed to be 2.5 or 3 per 1000 feet of gross leasable area in CBDs, and 5 or 6 per 1000 in suburban areas. Since this project is a rural CBD, the figure will be somewhere between these two standards.
5. Separation of service vehicles from customer car traffic: service vehicles should never cross customer access roads.
Parking lot landscaping. Some general rules for the landscaping of parking lots are listed here.


1. Obtain mass effects through the close spacing of several trees or bushes in clumps or rows. It is generally more effective to group five trees a few feet apart than to spot them singly, where they will be lost.
2. Concentrate the planting near the building, where it will have the most effect, and not on the periphery.
3. Use long lines of hedges at least three feet high wherever the parking pattern will permit. If they are high enough and properly located, they will break up the "sea of asphalt."
4. Install the maximum size plant material the budget will permit. The first one to three years is the most important period in establishing a new shopping complex.
Service
Service functions include the delivery of goods and the removal of trash. The more successful a center is, the more important its service functions become due to increased volume.
The service functions, furthermore, should be separated from customer traffic functionally, visually, and acoustically.
Various alternatives for servicing the building include the following.
1. Alley behind a strip of shops.
2. Underground service tunnel: a very expensive solution.
3. Service courts on the periphery of the building complex: use prime parking space, must be carefully screened.
4. Direct access from street: cheapest, requires least land. Requires strict control for cleanliness, and delivery hours are most favorable when no customers are around.
In general, the greatest service demand is produced by markets, restaurants, department stores, and drug and variety stores.


Pedestrian and Buffer Areas
Pedestrian areas can be broken down into plazas, walks and parks. Landscaping is an integral part of both pedestrian areas and buffer areas. Some considerations of both, then, will be outlined in this section.
Definitions. A plaza is an outdoor space, usually with vehicular traffic excluded, used in contrast to the surrounding buildings. A plaza is usually paved. A mall is a pedestrian street used within a shopping or office context. A park is an : outdoor space which is generally soft-textured, using predominantly plants and little hard paving.
Objectives. Following is a list of objectives for plazas, malls and parks. It should be noted that daily objectives should be weighed against annual or infrequent functions in the event of a conflict. Furthermore, the pedestrian spaces of this project may very likely become a hybrid of the three classifications given. Objectives will then intermingle as dictated by the design concept.
Plaza
1. Visual setback for major building(s).
2. Transition space for pedestrians approaching a building.
3. Space for lunchtime relaxation for office workers, shoppers, etc.
4. Circulation: promenade.
5. Bus-waiting area.
6. Locale for sidewalk cafes.
7. Setting for occasional performances or public meetings.
8. Setting for temporary or permanent display cases or exhibits,
9. Forecourts to entertainment centers.
10. Mid-block pedestrian thoroughfares which might also act as a strolling or sitting space.
11. A haven from the street.


Mai 1
1. Put people on streets r3ther than cars.
2. Meet the competition of shopping centers.
3. Help rejuvenate the downtown.
4. Create a better atmosphere for retail facilities.
5. Eliminate pedestrian/vehicular conflict.
6. Lead shoppers into stores and other buildings.
7. Connect similar type buildings.
8. Glamorize downtown.
9. Publicize downtown.
10. Improve ambient environmental conditions.
11. Strengthen the CBD as a destination.
12. Strongly identify and symbolize downtown fmmmmv. WtfSfc
Parks
1. Contrast the hard edges of downtown.
2. Provide a nice spot for relaxation from shopping.
3. Improve over-all aesthetics of downtown.
Users and activities. For plazas, users can be classified as passers through and lingerers. Behavioral studies indicate that 30 60% of the people walking down a street enter a plaza when they come upon it. The higher percentage is for plazas with no resistance to the walk (stairs, fences, gates, etc.) or that offer a short-cut path across the block. The lower percentage is for oasis-type plazas and those with physical barriers between the sidewalk and the plaza. People that enter oasis-type plazas tend to stay longer than those who enter thoroughfare plazas. Regarding the question of what people do in plazas, the only study available indicates that two-thirds of the people are on the move, walking; the other third is equally divided between standing still and sitting groups, r


Landscaping. Planting can be adapted to suit a variety of architectural and engineering purposes. Some of these are:
control of privacy and screening of objectional views,
articulation of space as a part of "serial view", glare reduction, acoustic control,
linkage of buildings: completion of a space.
Plants can be used to modulate spaces by placement such that large spaces which are difficult to comprehend at a glance can be broken down into easily discernible units. Movement and views through a space can be controlled to draw the viewer's attention to points of interest (entrances, sculptures, etc.) or to direct flow from hazardous or undesirable views. The designer should
try to enhance the feeling of mobility in the viewer's mind, encouraging him to move through a space rather than observe the view from a static point. The progression of textures, forms and colors of plant materials and landforms will direct the viewer's vision and compel them to proceed through the space. The rate of movement through a space or walk can be emphasized in the selection and placement of appropriate plant materials. Spaces should reflect the type of activities that will be taking place in them.
Plants can also be used effectively in many environmental engineering applications. Erosion can be controlled by densely covering the afflicted area with plants having a fibrous root system. Noise control can be effectively carried out through the use of dense plantings and berms. Furthermore, plants affect the atmosphere in many ways, including the reduction of air movement.
Plants can be used to extend the building into the site, providing a pleasant transition from a natural, human scale experience to the man-made environment within the structure. Plants may be used as sculptural elements themselves or in conjunction with man-made sculpture and architecture. Waterfalls and pools integrated into the surroundings can provide a quieting focal point. Cascading water is a natural attraction for people.
Plants can introduce a dynamic element through changing colors, forms, shadows, sounds and smells.
Mechanical and electrical service is handled in various ways. Electrical service can either be supplied by the developer or each tenant may be responsible for his own. HVAC is generally handled in one of three ways: 1) individual units, 2) central plant, or 3) combination. Air movement is sometimes handled in the ceiling plenum; this, however, creates fire problems. Smoke hatches are a necessity in a shopping facility; they can be handled by compartmentalizing the plenum to contain smoke in small areas, or they can be built into high windows in exterior walls.
37.


Uses Permitted: Retail commercial establishments,
including grocery, dry goods, hardware, bakery, liquor, drug, florist, books, sporting goods, appliances, variety stores, department stores, automotive accessory parts, furniture, garden supply, animal feed, plant nursery outlets and similar uses.
Personal service establishments,
including barber, beauty, self^-..- ~
service laundry, dry cleaning, photo and art studios, travel agency, shoe repair, health spa, private clubs, indoor eating and drinking establishments (which may include liquor), banks and similar uses.
Offices for business and professional uses; research facilities, testing laboratories, and facilities for manufacturing, fabrication, processing or assembly of products provided that such facilities are completely enclosed and provided that noise, smoke, glare, vibration, fumes or other environmental problems which exceed normal residential conditions are confined to the user's lot.
Churches, day-care centers and indoor theatres.
Recreation facilities, provided that noise, smoke, glare, vibration, fumes


or other environmental problems which exceed normal residential conditions are confined to the user's lot.
Gasoline service stations, car wash and automotive services, which must be sited with limited vehicular access and with service areas reasonably screened from public view.
Motels, hotels, including eating and drinking -establishments (which may include liquor).
Multiple family dwellings when located above retail commercial, personal service or office uses.
Public and semi-public uses as specified in this PUD.
Maximum Site Coverage: Not more than 80% of the platted
area at time of subdivision shall be covered by buildings, parking areas and private streets.
Minimum Building Setbacks: Front yard: 50 feet if measured from
arterial street right-of-way; otherwise as per plat at time of subdivision.
Rear yard: As per plat at time of subdivision.
Side yard: As per plat at time of subdivision.
Maximum Building Height: 40 feet measured at right angles
to the grade at the center of the building.
Minimum Off-Street Parking: Retail commercial and personal
service: One parking space per
200 square feet of floor area (except storage area).
Office, research facility, testing laboratory, manufacturing, fabrication, processing or assembly facility: One parking space per
400 square feet of floor area.


Building Code
The applicable building code is the Uniform Building Code,
1976 edition.
Fire Zone Designation: Fire Zone 3.
Occupancy Classification: B-2; restaurant is A-3.
'Construction Type: B-2 may be Type 1, Fire-Resistive,
or Type-II, Fire-Resistive.
A-3 may be any type of construction, but for this code search will be assumed to be of the same type as the rest of the building.
Occupancy Separation Requirements: 'None.
Exterior Wall Fire Ratings: ~^4-hr. Nonbearing walls fronting on streets or yards of at least 40' in width may be of unprotected noncombustible construction. Exterior bearing walls in Group B may be of 2-hour fire-resistive noncombustible construction where openings are permitted. Exterior nonbearing walls may be of 1-hour fire-resistive noncombustible construction where unprotected openings are permitted, and 2-hour fire-resistive noncombustible construction where fire protection of openings is required.
Exterior Wall Openings Limitations: Where exterior walls are required to be protected due to distance from property line, the sum of the area of such openings shall not exceed 50% of the total wall area in each story. Openings shall be protected if less than 20' from the center line of a street or public space. No openings permitted if less than 5 from the property line.
Floors Fire Rating: 2-nour.
Roofs Fire Rating: Type I, 2-hour. Type II, F.R., 1-hour.
Roof covering to be fire-retardant.


Partitions Fire Rating: 1-hour. Fire-retardant treated
wood may be used provided fire-resistive requirements are maintained.
Structural Frame Fire Rating: Type I, 3-hour. Type II, F.R.,
2-hour. In exterior walls, 4-hour.
Maximum Floor Area: . Type I, unlimited. Type II, F.R.,
30,000 x 1.33 x 2 x (60 x .025) = 120,000 square feet.
If sprinklered, may be 120,000 x 2 = 240,000 sq.ft.
Maximum Height: Aoby zoning ordinance.
Number of Exits Required: For B-2, 4 exits are required on
the ground floor and 3 on the upper floor. Individual shops require a minimum of 2 exits when the number of occupants is over 50 on the ground floor (at 30 square feet per occupant) or 10 on the upper floor (at 50 square feet per occupant).
A minimum of 2 exits are' required for the restaurant.
Handicapped egress is required for all shops, the restaurant and the building.
^ ior. t
Number of Stairs Required: 3." um
Doors Width Requirements: Total width shall be not less than 33'.
Each exit door shall be at least 3' in width.
Stairs Width Requirements: Minimum of 44". Stairs serving an
occupant load of less than 50 may be 36" wide.
Corridors Width Requirements: Minimum of 44".
Stairway Landing Requirements: In direction of travel, length should be equal to the width of the stairway. There shall be not more than 12' vertically between landings.
Travel Distance/Dead-End Corridor Limits: Maximum distance of travel from any point to an exterior exit door, horizontal exit, exit passageway or an enclosed stairway in a building not equipped with an automatic fire-extinguishing system throughout, shall not exceed 150'. Maximum is 200' if an automatic fire-extinguishing system is provided throughout the building. These distances may be increased 100' when the last 150' is within an acceptable corridor. Dead-end corridors shall not exceed 20' without an exit.

sJ*-enX


Door Swing Requirements: Exit doors must swing in the direction
of travel. Double acting doors shall not be used as exits serving a tributary occupant load of more than 100.
Stair and Balcony Rail Requirements: Handrails shall be placed from 30" 34" above the nosing of treads. Maximum width of stairways between handrails is 83". At least one handrail shall extend 6" beyond the top and bottom risers. Guardrails shall be not less than 42" high. A 9" sphere shall not be able to pass through the guardrail.
Vt" Y3-U
Ramp Requirements: Width requirements same as for stair-
ways. Slope of ramps for handicapped shall not exceed 1:10. Landings shall be provided for each 5' of rise if the slope, exceeds 1:15. Minimum landing dimension in the direction of ramp run is 5' for intermediate landings and 5' for landings at the bottom of ramps. Slopes exceeding 1:15 require handrails as for stairs.
Riser/Tread Limits: Maximum riser is 7V' minimum tread
is 10 . cloiAo JLu.
Vertical Opening Limits and Fire Ratings: In existing buildings, elevators, shafts, ducts and other vertical openings shall be enclosed with walls of not less than 1-hour fire-resistive construction or by wired glass set in metal frames. Doors shall be noncombustible. Shaft enclosures for new construction shall be of 2-hour fire-resistive construction, except when serving only one adjacent floor and not concealed in the building construction.
Exit Lighting Requirements: Exits shall be illuminated at all times the building is occupied with light having an intensity of not less than 1 F.C. at floor level. Illuminated exit signs shall be provided.
Emergency Lighting Requirements: Exit illumination shall be provided with separate circuits or separate sources of power when these are required for exit sign illumination.
Ceiling Height Minimums: 7'-0". "7.C
Mezzanine Restrictions: May be of wood or unprotected steel.
No more than 2 mezzanine floors shall be in any room of a building. No mezzanine floor or floors shall cover more than one-third of the floor area of any room.


Furnace and Boiler Room Restrictions: Boiler or central heating room shall be separated from the rest of the building by at least a 1-hour fire-resistive separation. Tv/o means of egress are required if the room exceeds 500 square feet and the largest piece of equipment exceeds 400,000 BTUH input capacity.
Light and Ventilation Requirements: Natural light to be pro-
vided by exterior glazed openings of at least 1/10 of total floor area, ventilation provided by exterior openings of at least 1/20 of total floor area. Exception is if adequate artificial light is provided and mechanical ventilation system supplying a minimum of 5 cfm of outside air with a total circulation of not less than 15 cfm per occupant in all portions of the building is also provided. Such a system shall operate continuously at all times that the building is occupied.
Penthouse Limitations: Total area of all penthouses and roof structures shall not exceed 1/3 of total roof area. Penthouses shall only be used to shelter mechanical equipment or vertical shaft openings in the roof.
Sprinkler Requirements: Required in any enclosed usable
space above or below a stairway in Group A, Division 3; in basements or cellars larger than 1500 square feet in floor area in Group A; in retail sales rooms where the floor area exceeds 12,000 square feet on any floor or 24,000 square feet on all floors (area increases are permitted with the latter use).
Wet Standpipe Requirements: Required in Group B, Division 2 occupancy having a floor area exceeding 20,000 square feet per floor, unless equipped with an automatic fire-extinguishing system throughout. Shall be located so that all portions of the building are within 30* of a nozzle attached to 100' of hose.
Toilet Room Fixture Requirements: Each toilet shall be located
in a clear space at least 30" in width and extending at least 24" in front of the stool. Handicapped access: 44" minimum clear and unobstructed access to toilet room, clear space 44" minimum on each side of doors providing access to toilet room, clear space not less than 60" in diameter within the room into which doors may not encroach more than 12", clear space 42" wide and 48" long in front of at least one toilet for the use of the handicapped. Grab bars shall be provided for this stall, securely attached 32" 34" above and parallel to the floor.


Grab bars at the side shall be 42" long with the front end 24" in front of the stool. Grab bars at the rear shall be 30" long. A clear unobstructed space 26" in width, 27" in height and 12" in depth shall be provided under at least one lavatory. Where mirrors are provided, at least one shall be installed so that the bottom is within 40" of the floor. When towel and disposal fixtures are provided, at least one shall be.within 40" of the floor.
Skylight Requirements: All skylight frames shall be constructed of noncombustible materials. All skylights shall be designed to carry all tributary roof loads. All skylights, the glazing of which is placed at an angle of less than 45 from the horizontal, shall be mounted on a curb extending at least 4" above the plane of the roof.


person and $-------- per occurrence whether
involving personal injury liability (or death resulting therefrom) or property damage liability or a combination thereof with a minimum aggregate limit of $________Such insur-
ance shall provide for explosion and collapse coverage and contractual liability coverage and shall insure the general contractor and/or subcontractors against any and all claims for personal injury, including death resulting therefrom, and damage to the property of others and arising from his operations under the Contract and whether such operations arc performed by the general contractor, subcontractors or any of their subcontractors, or by anyone directly or indirectly employed by any of them.
c. Comprehensive Automobile Liability Insurance, including the ownership, maintenance and operation of any automotive equipment, owned, hired and non-owned in the following minimum amounts:
(i) Bodily injury,
each person $_______
(ii) Bodily injury,
each occurrence $_______
(iii) Property Damage,
each occurrence S_______
(iv) Property Damage,
Aggregate $-------
d. Tenants Protective Liability Insurance. Tenant shall provide Owner's Protective Liability Insurance as will insure Tenant against any and all liability to third parties for damage because of bodily injury liability (or death resulting therefrom) and property damage liability of others or a combination thereof which may arise from work in the completion of the Premises, and any other liability for damages which the general contractor and/or subcontractors are required to insure under any provisions herein. Said insurance shall be provided in minimum amounts as follows:
(i) Bodily injury,
each person $_______
(ii) Bodily injury,
each occurrence $-------
(iii) Property Damage,
each occurrence $-------
(iv) Property Damage,
Aggregate S_______
e. Tenants Builders Risk Insurance. Tenant shall provide a completed Value Form All Physical Loss" Builders Risk coverage on its work in the Premises as it relates to the building within which the Premises is located, naming the interests of the Landlord, its general contractor and all subcontractors, as their respective interest may appear, within a radius of 100 feet of the Premises.
D. TENANT CONTRACTORS
All contractors engaged by Tenant shall be bondable, licensed contractors, having good labor relations, capable of performing quality workmanship and working in harmony with Landlord's contractors and other contractors on the job. In the event Tenant's contractor willfully violates the requirements of this Lease, Landlord may order Tenants contractor to remove himself, his equipment and his employees from Landlords property.
E. MATERIALS AND WARRANTIES
Tenant shall use only new, first class materials in the completion of Tenants Work. All work and equipment shall be warranted for a minimum of one year from installation.
F. PROOF OF PAYMENT
Tenant shall provide Landlord with proof of payment that all costs of construction of Tenant's Work have been paid. Such proof shall include Waivers of Lien and sworn statements from Tenants contractors or such other proof as may be required by Landlord in special instances.
G. CONFLICTS
Where conflict between building codes, utility regulations, statutes, ordinances or other regulatory authority requirements and Landlord's requirements, as set forth herein exist, the more stringent of the two shall govern.
exhibit c
ARCHITECTURAL STANDARDS
It is the desire of Landlord to give Tenant the greatest practical freedom in design, but such design must offer a pleasant, orderly appearance and must harmonize with the design of the Shopping Center itself and the design of the surrounding stores. All Tenant Work shall conform to the following standards.
I. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN CRITERIA
A. FLOORS
1. Landlord has depressed Tenant slab ; Tenant finish materials must be selected so as to cause Tenants finish floor elevation to correspond exactly with Landlords finish mall floor elevation.
2. Waterproofing. All kitchen and food handling areas on the upper level shall be waterproofed with regular asphalt sprinkle mopping, 3 layers of No. 15 asphalt felt with regular asphalt moppings between layers and on top surface.
3. Carpeting shall be used in all sales areas except in such instances where other equivalent types of floor covering materials are specifically approved by Landlord. Vinyl tile and vinyl asbestos tile are not considered acceptable finish materials.
4. Should an expansion joint occur in Premises, Tenant is responsible for the construction of the floor affected by that joint in a manner consistent with standard project details.
5. If Tenant elects to set the base of Tenants store front back from lease line. Tenant shall furnish and install flooring material identical in quality, color and pattern to the mall flooring within the area extending from lease line to such new store front line.
6. All exposed concrete within Premises must be sealed.
B. STORE FRONTS
1. A minimum of 50% of the Tenants store front shall be open for pedestrian circulation. Those tenants having, in the judgment of Landlord, an inordinate proportion of store front to floor area will be considered exempt from this requirement. However, in no case will excessive blind wall sections be permitted.
2. Integral with the store front design shall be an air relief opening of not less than
0.5 square feet per one hundred (100) square feet of Tenants Premises.
3. No store front or any part thereof shall project beyond the lines describing the Premises with the exception that signs may project beyond the store front lease line as described in Exhibit C.
4. All store front work requiring structural support, including sliding door tracks and housing boxes for grilles shall be supported at their head sections by a welded structural steel framework which, in turn, shall be securely attached and braced to the existing building structure.
5. Aluminum store front construction shall employ extruded anodized sections and/or sliding aluminum and glass doors, with pockets to receive sliding doors, open type rolling aluminum curtains or ornamental metal grilles. All sliding door or rolling grille tracks must be recessed into their respective soffit or floor elements to maintain flush elevations.
6. All wood, if permitted by code, employed in conjunction with store front work shall be kiln-dried, mill quality finish.
7. All glass used in conjunction with store front work shall be tempered plate glass.
8. Integral with the store front design shall be a one-hour rated draft curtain extending twenty-four inches (24") down from the finished ceiling elevation.
C. WALLS
1. All interior partitions shall be metal stud or nonccmbustible wood frame construction with taped and spackled fire code gypsum board finish on all sides. Interior partitions
shall not exceed the ceiling height of Premises.
2. Metal stud demising partition walls by Landlord between adjacent tenant spaces shall be covered by Tenant with one layer of fire code gypsum board from the floor to the underside of Landlords structure.
3. Exposed concrete block walls will not be permissible in sales area of Tenant's Premises. Block walls not concealed by fixtures must be covered with gypsum board by Tenant.
4. If finished ceiling is to be omitted in Tenant's storage area, then the partition wall dividing remainder of Premises from storage area must be one-hour rated construction and extend from the floor slab to the underside of Landlord's overhead structure.
D. CEILINGS
1. Maximum ceiling height will be 12'-0" unless otherwise specifically allowed by Landlord-
2. Exposed wood framing and combustible materials will not be allowed above Tenant's finished ceiling.
3. Should an expansion joint occur in the Premises, Tenant is responsible for the construction of the ceiling affected by that joint in a manner consistent with acceptable construction design practices.
II. MECHANICAL-ELECTRICAL DESIGN CRITERIA
A. HEATING, VENTILATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING DESIGN
1. Landlords HVAC Design Criteria
a. 1 Heating
1. ) Outside dry bulb temperature:
19F.
2. ) Inside dry bulb temperature: Prevailing temperature of 68F dry bulb in merchandising areas and 60 F dry bulb in service areas during occupied hours.
b. ) Cooling
1. ) Outside dry bulb: 80F.
2. ) Outside wet bulb: 75F.
3. ) Inside dry bulb: Prevailing 78F. dry bulb in merchandising areas.
c. ) Total electrical heat producing load: Total heat gains from the electrical wattage of lighting, appliances and miscellaneous electrical items shall be based on a total of G watts of electrical heat producing load per square foot of Premises or the equivalent maximum of 21 BTU per hour per square foot of Premises.
d. ) Internal Sensible and Latent Heat Gains: Internal sensible and latent heat gains shall be b£sed on 60 square feet of Premises per person.
e. ) Air Supply: Total cool air supply to Tenant's Premises shall be based on the total internal sensible heat load calculated from the Design Criteria established by paragraphs b, c and d above and where applicable, based on exposed outside wall "U value of 0.10, a roof assembly "U" value of 0.10 and a supply air diffusion temperature difference of 20F 3F.
2. Landlords Central System
a. j Cooling: Landlord shall provide large packaged-roof top air conditioning units (variable volume type) complete with air cooled refrigeration, condensing units, DX coils, supply fans, filters, all automatic dampers and controls. These units shall furnish 55F 3F supply air to the Premises via common low pressure air distribution duct systems during occupied Shopping Center hours on a year round basis. Landlord shall provide a supply duct outiet for each tenants premises at a point designated by Landlord.
b. ) Heating: Landlords units do not have heating coils. However, Landlord will provide heaters above upper level tenant ceiling plenums which shall operate from night set back thermostats to offset roof heat losses primarily during unoccupied hours. Landlord shall also provide heaters in public mall and service areas to operate during occupied and unoccupied hours to maintain the space temperature. Landlord shall provide hot water
46


valved connections, at a point designated by Landlord, for those premises having an exposed outside wall. The supply hot water temperature shall vary from 290F (rp 20F outside ambient temperature to 90F (ri 70F outside ambient temperature.
c. ) Ventilation: Outside fresh air shall be provided at the central A.C. units with economizer cycle and enthalpy controls and with not more than 5 CFM per person as required by code during occupied cycle.
d. ) .Tenant Toilet Exhaust: Landlord will furnish a central toilet exhaust duct system at both levels including the fan(s) with a connection for each tenant's toilet exhaust.
3. Additional HVAC Demand
If Tenants HVAC design requirements exceed Landlord's Design Criteria of a total heat pruducing-toad of 21 BTU per hour per square foot of Premises or an equivalent of 6 watts per square foot of Premises. Tenant shall submit the proper load calculations and request, in writing, the required additional cooling capacity. If approved by Landlord. Landlord shall make the necessary revisions to accommodate Tenants request. Tenant shall pay for the necessary revisions and the increased cooling capacity in the form of an increased monthly HVAC Operating Charge.
4 Tenants System
a. ) Description: Tenant shall design and install a complete supply air system within Tenant's Premises from the supply air duct(s) furnished and installed in Tenants ceiling space by Landlord. Tenant's system shall be a variable volume type complete with variable volume terminal units, insulated ductwork, supply diffusers, temperature control devices and associated wiring.
b. ) Tenant Cooling-Heating System: Tenant shall design and provide 100% shut-off variable volume terminal units of sizes and quantities needed to satisfy cooling load and temperature control zone requirements based on actual heat gain calculation for the Premises.
Landlords furnished air supply to the space has no heating capability. Reheating of conditioned air or duct heaters will not be permitted. Variable volume units shall be capable of modulating air supply to the space to maintain space temperature. However, space hot water unit heaters, cabinet heaters or baseboard heaters in Tenant service areas or in Tenant areas with an exterior wall exposure will be permitted to offset the winter heat loss load.
c. ) Variable Volume Terminal Units and Temperature Control: Units shall have a capability to adjust in the Field from 0 to 100% of minimum air flow (normally set at 20% minimum). Discharge air volume from the units shall not be affected by the upstream duct pressure variations. Units shall be insulated to minimize noise to the space. Variable volume terminal units may be controlled by solid state electronic, or electric motors and space thermostat.
d. ) Return Air: All lower and upper level tenants shall relieve air to mall through store front or other acceptable means. The store front relief air opening shall be not less than 0.5 square feet per one hundred (100) square feet of Tenant's Premises. Grille type doors are an acceptable alternate to this requirement.
e. ) Tenant Duct System Static Pressure Design: Tenants air distribution system including ductwork, variable volume air control devices, diffusers, grilles and registers shall be designed such that the static pressure loss in Tenant distribution system docs not exceed 0.75" W.G.
f. ) Ductwork: Tenants ductwork shall be designed, furnished and installed in strict accordance with the standards described in the latest edition of the ASHRAE Guide and Data Book and in the latest editions of the Duct Manual and Sheet Metal Construction for Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems, published by SMACNA and, or local codes. Supply, return and exhaust duct work shall be galvanized steel except kitchen range exhaust
duct work which shall be minimum 18 gauge welded steel and shall comply with local code requirements.
g. Diffusers, registers, grilles: Shall be of adjustable type for volume and direction control.
h. ) Thermostat: Shall be located in an accessible location and not obstructed by any merchandising or appliances nor shall it have light fixtures or other similar heat producing elements adjacent to it. Thermostat shall act to control variable volume units as well as any space heating devices used.
i. ) Ceiling Access Panels: Tenant shall provide access panels for service to Landlords and/or Tenants equipment and/or facilities, and all connections to Landlords services and facilities above the ceiling level within the Premises at locations designed by Landlord.
j. ) Tenant Toilet Exhaust: Tenant shall design and provide exhaust from Tenants toilet facilities as per code requirements. Toilet exhaust duct from Tenants Premises shall be connected to Landlords main toilet exhaust duct system at ceiling level as designated by Landlord.
k. ) Miscellaneous Exhaust System:
1. ) All odor and moisture producing areas and high heat producing equipment and appliances must be exhausted by special mechanical exhaust systems to atmosphere. Special exhaust systems shall be designed to prevent odors, heat and/or moisture from entering the mall and to Landlord's air conditioning system. Exhaust air quantities shall be in an adequate amount and shall be no less than required by code.
2. ) It is required that totally enclosed, highly illuminated show windows be ventilated by means of positive air supply or exhaust. Such exhaust system may be discharged into the false ceiling space, if and at such location as approved by Landlord.
3. ) Special exhaust systems including fans, ductwork, registers, grilles, controls and accessories shall be provided by Tenant. Exhaust discharge openings directly to the exterior will not be allowed without permission of Landlord. In all cases, exhaust ductwork shall connect directly to exhaust hoods, if provided, or registers or grilles mounted in ceiling in ventilated area.
4. ) Air quantities in excess of ten percent (10%) of total air supplied to the Premises, which are exhausted to atmosphere through Tenant's special exhaust system(s), require Landlord's approval.
l. ) Make-up Air System: Tenant shall provide a complete make-up air system if Tenant requires exhaust air quantities in excess of ten percent (10%) of total air allowed to the Premises upon approval of Landlord. Energy equipment and distribution for makeup air system shall be provided by Tenant.
m. ) Location of equipment serving special exhaust and make-up air systems and special heating and cooling systems shall be designated and/or approved by Landlord. Engineering and designs showing structural loads added and all supports shall be furnished and installed by Tenant. Routing of ductwork serving special exhaust and make-up air systems shall be designated and/or approved by Landlord. Tenants ducts passing through the roof shall have motorized shut-off damper(s).
n. ) Special cooling and heating equipment. such as required for refrigerated display cases, walk-in coolers, steam presses, etc., shall be provided by Tenant.
o. ) Openings through roof: At Tenant's written request and for Tenants equipment, based upon approved plans, Landlord's roofing contractor will, at Tenant's costs, provide the openings, anchoring devices, curbs, flashings, patching, etc., necessary to maintain the integrity and guarantee of the roof.
p. ) Sheet metal supply duct work shall be insulated with 1" thick, Va lb. density insulation. Hot water piping for space heating shall be insulated with a minimum of 1" thick insulation not exceeding a flame spread rating of 25 and a Smoked Developed rating of 50.
q. ) Hot water piping shall be Schedule
40 black steel; 2,/a" and above shall use standard weight welded fittings; 2" and smaller shall use 125 pound black cast iron screwed fittings. The system shall be designed to a 125 pound working pressure. All valves shall be ball type. Unions or flanges shall be installed for the removal of automatic control valves.
B. PLUMBING DESIGN
1. Tenonts Plumbing Design Requirements
a. ) Tenants sanitary, vent and domestic water piping shall adhere to all local code requirements.
b. ) Water supplies to fixtures shall be valved at fixtures.
c. ) Domestic hot and cold water piping shall be insulated with minimum %" fiberglass insulation having an average thermal conductivity not exceeding_i22_ BTU in. per sq. ft. per F per hour at mean temperature of 75F.
d. ) Piping shall be supported from hangers at an adequate distance with adequate supporting hanger rods fastened to building framing whenever possible.
e. ) Water heaters shall be equipped with UL approved temperature and pressure relief valves.
f. ) Tenant water closets shall be flush tank type.
2. Gas Piping Requirements
a. ) Gas piping V/a" and over shall be Schedule 40 black steel pipe with welded joints and fittings on all sizes.
b. ) Gas piping 1" and under may be Schedule 40 black steel with screwed fittings if permitted by local code.
c. ) Gas cocks and unions shall be installed ahead of each appliance.
C. FIRE PROTECTION
Tenant, at its expense, shall design (on an ordinary hazard basis), furnish and install a complete automatic wet sprinkler system throughout the Premises in accordance with the following requirements:
1. All work related to the sprinkler system shall be in accordance with the requirements of Landlords Fire Insurance Underwriter.
2. Landlord shall provide a suitable connection on Landlord's sprinkler distribution main at Tenants Premises. Tenants Work starts on the downstreapi side of the test blank. The test blank shall not be removed by Tenant or by Tenants contractor until Tenant's system has been pressure tested by Tenants contractor in presence of Landlords representative.
3. Before proceeding with any installation work, Tenant shall forward a set of reproducible engineered sprinkler plans for the Premises to Landlord. Such plans shall bear the written approval of Landlord's Fire Insurance Underwriter.
4. Tenant's sprinkler system shall be tested at water pressure of 200 psig for a period of two (2) hours in the presence of Landlords representative.
5. Tenant's system shall have all facilities for proper drainage and any necessary test valves, orifices or equipment required.
6. Landlord's sprinkler main will become active on a schedule established by Landlord. Any damage caused by Tenant to Landlord's sprinkler system will be repaired by Landlord's contractor at Tenants expense.
7. Upon completion of the system, and on possession of Premises, Tenant shall submit a written certificate to Landlord from the Underwriter stating that the system was inspected and approved.
D. ELECTRIC DESIGN CRITERIA
1. Landlord's Work
a. ) Landlord shall furnish and install a main fusible disconnect switch in Landlord's distribution panel.
b. ) Landlord shall cause electrical conduits (without conductors) to be provided to a boundary line of the Premises from Landlord's distribution panel located at a point designated by Landlord.
c. ) Conduit and switch shall be sized to carry sufficient conductor capacity for an elec-


trical load of ten (10) watts per square foot of the Premises area. If Tenant's design requirements exceed the installed electrical load of ten (10) watts per square foot of Premises area, Tenant shall request the required additional electrical capacity. If it is approved by Landlord, Landlord will make a provision for additional electrical capacity and Tenant shall pay an additional amount in the monthly electrical charges and reimburse Landlord for all Landlords direct costs for furnishing additional capacity.
d. ) Landlords electrical service to Tenant: 208Y/120 volt, 3 phase. 60 HZ. 4 wire.
e. ) Landlord shall cause suitable empty telephone conduit to be provided to a boundary line of Tenant's Premises from main telephone terminal backboard located at a point designated by Landlord.
2. Tenant's Work
Tenant, at its cost, shall provide all work which shall include, but not be limited to. furnishing and installing the following electrical equipment and services in the Premises.
a. ) Fuse(s) and conductors from Landlords switchboard location to Tenants distribution panel. For the purpose of periodic check-metering of electrical energy consumption, Tenant shall provide sufficient slack at Landlords main distribution panel gutters prior to making connection to fuse-switch terminals to permit the use of clamp-on check meters.
b. ) Panelboard(s), with twenty percent (20%) spare capacity, transformers, conduits and branch wiring, outlet boxes, and final connection to electrical devices including equipment.
c. ) Lighting fixtures and lamps, time clocks, clocks and signs.
d. ) Telephone equipment, phone alert system, conduit and outlet boxes.
e. ) Security equipment with conduit and outlets if desired.
f. ) Exit lights and emergency lighting as required by local codes and ordinances.
3. Electrical Material Standards for Ten-ants Premises
a. ) Electrical materials shall be new, shall meet National Electrical Code Standards, shall bear the Underwriters Laboratories label, and shall be compatible with the general architectural design.
b. ) All transformers shall be dry-type with low sound level.
c. ) Wire and cable shall be insulated copper wire with fire resistant outer covering. It shall be properly coded with a neutral, according to N.E. Code. All conductors shall be type THW or THWN and shall not be smaller than No. 12 AWG".
d. ) Panelboards shall be 208Y/120 volt, 3 phase, 4 wire, solid neutral. Cabinets shall be constructed of code gauge sheet steel with hinged steel door and trim.
e. ) Lighting fixtures shall bear Underwriters label. Recessed fixtures installed in furred spaces shall be connected by means of flexible conduit and "AF wire run to a branch circuit outlet box which is independent of the fixture.
f. ) Electric motors shall be designed to latest NEMA standards. Motors rated at Vs horse power and above shall be 3 phase.
III. SIGN CRITERIA
It is intended that the signing of the Premises be developed in an imaginative and varied manner. Although previous and current signing practices of tenants will be considered, all signs shall conform to the criteria set forth hereafter.
A. Exterior Signs
No exterior signs will be permitted unless Tenants Premises as shown on Exhibit A is in excess of --- square feet.
B. Interior Signs
1. Tenant shall be required to identify Premises by an illuminated sign contained wholly within limitations of Premises and subject to requirements as outlined hereafter.
a.) Signs shall not project beyond the
store front line more than two (2) inches if less than eight (8) feet above finish mall floor or more than six (6) inches if greater than (8) feet above finish mall floor.
b. ) Wording of sign shall be limited to store name as indicated on this Lease.
c. ) The use of a corporate crest, logo, or insignia shall be permitted provided such crest, logo or insignia meet all criteria described herein.
d. ) Multiple or repetitive signing on store fronts shall not be permitted.
c.) Sign letter or components shall not have exposed neon or other lamps. All light source shall be concealed by translucent material. Sign letters or components may be back-illuminated with lamps contained wholly within the depth of the letter. Maximum brightness in any event shall not exceed 100 foot 1am-berts. Light leaks in sign letters will not be permitted and must be repaired promptly by Tenant.
f. ) The average height of sign letters or components on stores shall not exceed 18 inches.
g. ) The extreme outer limits of sign letters or components shall fall within a rectangle each of the two short sides of which shall not fall closer than 24 inches to the side lease line of the Premises; the top side of which shall not fall closer than 12 inches to the soffit of the mall facia element. No part of the sign letters shall hang free of the background when such background is provided.
h. ) Signs of box or cabinet type construction will be permitted only if cabinet is recessed flush with store front, the illuminated surface is limited to letters and/or other minimum decorative surfaces and the non-illumi-nated portions of the cabinet are covered by the store front finish material.
2. The following types of signs or sign components shall be PROHIBITED:
a. ) Signs employing moving or flashing
lights.
b. ) Signs employing exposed raceways, ballast boxes or transformers.
c. ) Sign manufacturer's names, stamps or decals.
d. ) Signs employing painted non-illumi-nated letters.
e. ) Signs employing luminous-vacuum formed type plastic letters.
f. ) Signs employing unedged or uncapped plastic letters or letters with no returns and exposed fastenings.
g. ) Paper or cardboard signs, stickers or decals hung around, on or behind store front (including glass doors and/or windows).
h. ) Signs purporting to identify leased department or concessionaires contained within the Premises.
IV. DRAWING SUBMISSIONS, REVIEWS AND APPROVALS
Landlords written approval of Design Drawings, Working Drawings and Sign Shop Drawings is required prior to the commencement of Tenant construction.
A. Tenant Information Package
Within ten (10) days from the execution of this Lease. Landlord will forward the Tenant Information Package for the Premises to Tenant. The Tenant Information Package shall contain Landlord's technical and design information appropriate for the design and construction of Tenants Premises.
B. Design Drawings
1. Within a maximum of thirty (30) days from either the date Tenant receives the Tenant Information Package or from the date Lease is executed, whichever is the latter, Tenant shall submit one (1) sepia and two (2) print sets of Design Drawings to Landlord for review and approval.
2. Tenants Design Drawings shall include, but not be limited to the following:
a. Floor Plan at V"=T-0" scale.
b. Store Front Elevation at VaM=T-0" scale including finish materials and colors as
well as proposed sign location, size and color.
c. Longitudinal Section at */aw=l*-0"
scale.
d. Rendering may be required for unusual store designs.
3. As soon as possible after receipt of Design Drawings. Landlord shall return to Tenant one (1) set cf prints of Design Drawings with suggested modifications and/or approval. If. upon receipt of approved Design Drawings bearing Landlords comments, Tenant wishes to take exception thereto, Tenant may do so in writing by certified or registered mail addressed to Landlord, within ten (10) days from date of receipt of Design Drawings. Unless such action is taken, it will be deemed that all comments made by Landlord on Design Drawings are acceptable to and approved by Tenant.
4. If Design Drawings arc returned to Tenant with comments, but not bearing approval of Landlord, said Design Drawings shall be immediately revised by Tenant and resubmitted to Landlord for approval within ten (10) days of their receipt by Tenant.
C. Working Drawings
1. A maximum of sixty (60) days from the date of receipt by Tenant of Landlord's approval of Tenant's Design Drawings or a minimum of thirty (30) days prior to the commencement date of Tenants Construction and Fixturing Days, whichever is the shorter, Tenant shall submit one (1) sepia and two
(2) print sets of Working Drawings to Landlord for review and approval.
2. Tenant's Working Drawings shall include. but not be limited to. the following:
a. ) Architectural Drawings
(1) Key Plan showing location of Premises within the Shopping Center.
(2) Floor Plan at Va"=l'-0" scale.
(3) Longitudinal Section at *V'=l'-0"
scale.
(4) Interior Elevations at Va"=l'-0"
scale.
(5) Store Front Plan, Section, Elevation at l/"=l'-0" scale.
(6) Reflected Ceiling Plan at Va"=l'-0"
scale.
(7) Partition Wall Sections at Va" = l'-O" scale.
(8) Door, Finish and Color Schedules and samples.
(9) Specifications.
b. ) Electrical Drawings
(1) Circuitry Plan at x/e''=l'-0" scale.
(2) Panelboard schedules.
(3) Riser Diagrams.
(4) Electric Load Tabulation.
(5) Specifications.
c. ) Mechanical Drawings
(1) HVAC Distribution Plan at V" = l'-O" scale.
(2) Mechanical/Electrical Data Tabulation Sheet.
(3) Plumbing Plan at V'=l'-0".
(4) Specifications.
D. SPRINKLER SUBCONTRACTOR SHOP DRAWINGS
1. Tenants sprinkler subcontractor shall submit Shop Drawings directly to Landlords Fire Insurance Underwriter for approval. Submission shall include one (1) sepia transparency and two (2) blueline prints.
2. Drawings shall include:
a. ) Reflected Ceiling Plan with sprinkler head locations dimensioned at a minimum scale of Va"=l'-10".
b. ) Automatic Sprinkler details.
c. ) Specifications
E. SIGN FABRICATORS SHOP DRAWING
1. Tenant's sign fabricator shall submit Shop Drawings directly to Landlord for approval. All submissions to include one (lj sepia transparency and two (2) blueline prints unless otherwise noted.
2. Shop drawing must include full dimensions, letter style and type, face (color, material and thickness), returns (color, material and thickness), type of lighting, brightness, mounting hardware and transformer location and access.


MUM JUNCTION, C4UMUUK) IWICim AIRfOKT LATlTUDf 3f 07* V
LONQITUOC 106* 31* f
NORMALS, MEANS AND EXTREMES
IUVATION (giouod) S5 rt (Table Revised 1969. Base Period for Climatological Normals: 1931-1960)
* Tor period October 1963 through the csrrsat yaar.
IM wtrsass la tha above table are from the existing location. Annual extraaaa Hava bean axeaadad at other location* a* follows l^aat temperature 101 la Ail; 1BSS| loaaat temperature -13 la Jaasart IMS; bssIbh aoathly precipitation 3.78 la lap tee bar IMi Ml** pe-eatpitatlaa la 34 hours 3.10 la Oet NORMALS, MEANS AND EXTREMES
(Table Revised 1975. Base Period for Climatological Normals: 1941-1970)
tas.o JLKCTION, COuStiOO WAIKM MtlO Surxted tnt uwd m0UNT*|N Latitude >%* 07 N Lonptud* ,0, ' y t **'0" (pound!
1 evioeet ( No*ml Decree dsys Base 65 F Precipitation in Retatrve humic*ty pet. Wn *SO*m*l Eett ~.e Water eo--*vatent Snow, Ice pellets Fastest mi* ! i i Temperature* F
5 5 1 1 * 5 h Us* kSm
| I 1 ' ~1 I i 1 f l i i l & Ibl tta*
i i . f 1 e_L l I i \ c 1 If 1! >s T ! T i ! 1 * , i fc f I it t !i J1 * li 1 i\ 1 p 09 U ll |I7 ocal tim< -1 29 1 I If n If i & a e i i! 1 if 1 s; 1* l 5 1 o \ t i! fci ll ll I b i 4094 leet *U
1 11 1 li 29 29 29 * 29 n * 11 11 29 13 ! 2* is! n 21 29 11 29 29 11 11 11 11 2
j H 7 1*. 7*. 0 1971 i 15 1471 J 1*0 0 0.9* 2.46 14)7 T 1491 0.9* 145* 93.7 14)7 4.1 1 7 77 99 9) 79 1.7 (SC ) i 19)0 3 * 9.1 4 . 14 7 9 e 9 0 19 90 9 94.4
* , **.0 nr 4 1672 S 1974 7 9 0 O.fti 1.49 14*1 T 1472 0.3) 14*0 19.4 144* 9.* 1*49 *9 91 4* 9) 9.4 ISC 39 a 1*97 94 9.1 7 19 6 1 e 2 0 2 29 1 993.4
e 92.9 i.i #1 1471 * 1471 7JI 0 0.7) 1.73 1470 0.02 1472 0.7| 14*9 14.9 144* 9. 1 14** 99 1 49 9.) CSC 93 ;)* 94 9.0 4 t i. 7 1 1 l 0 * 14 0 47.*
a 6*. 6 J 1414 ! 1471 *0* > 0.74 1.49 146) 0.06 14)* 1.3) ls) 9.9 14*3 9.9 1499 9* n 29 49 9.9 kte 34 14)9 99 9.4 10 12 9 a 2 0 0 0 44.3
a 73.9 *9.9 1.2 4 leas It 140 111 47 0.*) 1.74 1497 T 1470 0.7* 1471 T 147) T 1477 49 27 *1 >4 9.9 ISI 9) Hm 1*99 71 9.9 10 11 10 6 0 * e 2 0 1 0 4*. 9
i 9*.9 71.1 ioi 1.T1 | I1* 20 204 0.39 1.07 1494 T |l*9l '* 14*4 6.0 0.0 47 ,0 10.0 III 99 1 mi 79 9.4 It 4 9 * 0 9 0 11 0 0 0 491.2
* ' >.i ; *.l T9.T 101 1971 49 119*1 0 419 0 4 1.9) 1ST. e.o) 14 22 1.41 147* 0.0 0.0 47 29 tl i. 9.4 ISC 9* 14)4 77 *.2 14 W 9 ) 0 9 0 29 0 0 0 93.2
a 1.9 T9.* ioi 14a4 4) l*tl 0 ill i.u) ) .49 1437 0.04 14)4 1.21 14)3 0.0 0.0 9 1 ' > * 4.1 nr 99 1)7 7) 4.3 l 4 11 6 7 0 0 20 0 0 0 992.7
S 91.1 91.0 7.J 49 147* JO Util *0 119 0.9* 2.92 146) y 14)1 1.19 n.i 1.1 16** 3.1 1499 92 9 4 >9 *i 4.2 ISC 91 I 1447 74 9.9 17 9 T e 1 0 4 0 0 993.1
0 97.9 *1.9 94.9 9 14*) 14 il4-2 )24 11 0.) J.4) 1472 0.00 14)2 1.24 1497 1.7 1472 9.7 1472 99 41 99 32 9.1 ISC 91 N* 149* 79 4.2 19 8 8 e 2 e 0 0 9 0 99*.*
90.9 29.9 99.9 71 1147) 12 147 J 73* o 0.91 1.94 1494 0.1) 144 4 0.92 147* 12.1 It** 9.* 1*9* 70 * 49 96 9.7 CSC 9* N 194 9) 9.9 11 11 1 a 1 a 20 0 93.4
**1 19.9 24.1 jl*7J 4 119*9 1101 0 0.39 1.34 1491 0.11 1499 1.19 1*91 19.7 14*7 9.0 1497 77 94 91 7) 9.0 CSC 49 He 1491 34 9.1 10 7 14 7 2 1 0 4 2* 1 9*.*
1 9.1 ; IJUI |J9N ace IOC T JUN JiN J9N at'N
*0.2 92.7 101 |l?l p!9 (1471 *0J >* ...i ).4 1497 0.00 14)2 1.37j14*9 93.7 14)7 4.1 1497 74 41 91 31 9.) !|t( 99 S 1*11 70 9.1 140 107 119 71 * 94 29 ll* 7 nr..
p*na and entree** above are fr.tn r.nnn, and comparahle Vxi.-j:.ro. A ;al rtr*-r.% lave been vat tailed at other sites in the locality at fr'lluwa leefri ature -2 J in Janmrv 19m. Jammu- t>nlM. j.recl pi latu >.;*i m Mptn-.bir U0 ii.aain.um precipitation In 2U hours 2. SO In October 19^9. *a.cam snowfall in 2- l.ours 1 in N..v,mbri 191 v.
REFERENCE NOTES APPL YING K) 1 ABI ES APPEAR ON THE PAGE FOLLOWING LAST TABLE.
(Caution: Letters and symbols may have different meanings in 1941 19/0 tallies than in earlier tables. See notes.)


IV>
Mean Maximum Temperature (F.), January....,
A.
Based on period 1931-52
Isolinea are drawn through points ol approximately equal value. Caution should be used in interpolating on these maps, particularly in mountainous areas.


Ov
0
Mean Maximum Temperature (F.)# July
laolines ax* drawn through points of approximately equal value. Caution should be used
in interpolating on these maps, particularly in mountainous areas.
n.SiUW SWUW'H



Mean Minimum Temperature (F.), January
- O
---e--------------------^-------
*~*G *9 A irrMr 0*
tf\
Based on period 1931-52
Isolines are drawn through points of approximately equal value. Caution should be used
in interpolating on these maps, particularly in mountainous areas.


Mean Minimum Temperature (F.), July
Based on period 1931-52
K)
Isolines are drawn through point* of approximately equal value. Caution should be used
in interpolating on these maps, particularly in mountainous areas.
*Hv**l4* Wi.'we. >.*.

* 4>* *v'


.t^ ***
Mean Annual Precipitation, Inches
Vh
UJ
Isolines are drawn through points of approximately equal value. Caution should be used
in interpolating on these maps, particularly in mountainous areas.


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NORMALS, MEANS AND EXTREMES


CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA
METRIC UNITS
MAM. t.
. 1 Pre!!wre lemprrotare Precipitation Wind No of doyt
, Sno Uunrue to
No of No of w Fajte^t mile iunet)
ilnyt u day* Ice pellet* (1 6 kilomter)
ne u"it Sfu'ion xj 3 E 0 E E i E 6 c E | c 6 a t f o c E 3 0 1 1 p 1 u j X TJ c o 1 *. £ J
o> c 0 o o c o > 0 E > rfi 4 c § 4 o> l c* o 1 i X s ! S o u o c i o 4 o> O 0 V o> 0 1 ~b * 3 I C i 5 i E E j > -o i c L 1 1 o o c E 3 i? 0 0 a c o ~3 T C o -o t 9 l 6 j u T> | > O so o g i 2 > O *" 9* L J > 3
Jl < < a x | 1 Q 4 o 3 h 1 i i < < B & -5 N | i 5 i i at a i/) Q a o a. u A - o
C w J 0 1 n. mtj 1 mti f C c c C I 1 c C S mm 1 mm mm 1 mm i mm Bl S | m > i .
r:springs 1*7' 9 04,1 1011.2 9.2 5.2 2.0 0.2 21.1 20 -16.1 79 0 77 -9.4 49 6 13 3 7 1 i 89 11 1.0 1 19.2 35 9 6 10 15 6.6
: f f * UK 1?9,7 1009.7 10.2 4,4 2.9 0.2 21.7.... 20 -l!,o 28 awe JaxtTiaN V^.'5-"' 1010.9 10.9 -0.9 5.0 0.1 18.3 20 .11.7 20 0 17 -4.4 56 44 1J IQ 1 2/4 102 21.U S* 20 6 5 10 7.6 6'
* 0 - -TT7T- rrrrz 'I7TT.T" T21* =TTK v;T~ 077 zrrn 19 -1 J 9 79 U 73 -6,7 55 i ! 26 6 -
C'N'.KTIC JT *c:;*k*jpT ? 1C 17.9 1013.6 6.4 -1.1 2.7 -0.6 13.3 23 -9.4 9 0 20 -7.0 69 77 -11 17 16 0 46 75 3.0 33 14.3 34 8 6 7 | 18 7.?
-A4*F-0 5? 10 C 6.8 IQ13.4 7.3 -3.0 2.2 0.2 15.6 19 -10.0 9 0 24 -6.1 57 0 75 7.5 32 14.3 Me 26 2 12 17 7,4 56
: e u:> P 118 23 51
2 3 1C11.5 101'.5 9.7 -0.? 4.8 0.6 18.3 25* -7.8 9 0 16 3.0 59 9 1 26 T 7.1 31 16.1 32 20 3 10 16 7,6

Djh es 8 * 1CQ3.4 1015.3 1C. 1 -O. 4.6 -0.B 18.9 22 -10.0 5 0 18 -3.1 60 111 23 78 13 1 30 T 2.1 31 14.0 30 30 4 11 16 7 t
SATIJNAL 1012.9 1015.3 11.9 2.7 7.3 0.1 19.4 22* 6.1 9 0 8 -1.7 56 1 31 51 1 4 12 2 8 T 7.0 31 15.6 Nr* J0 i 13 15 7.J 51
f -a:'t t U - 70.1 12.4 16.3 0.3 26.1 30 3.3 3 0 0 73 46 34 8 3 T 0 13.9 s 16 10 6 13 6.1 61
: i.'i' >k ie *C , 3 n1.3 lOp.fl ? 4.4 12.1 10.7 0.9 37.7 JO 3. J 9 1 0 17.1 70 -47 19 7 2 0 0 0,6 70 1 1.2 ?1 19 11 N 12 1 .1
* -*) * 1r l f.9 ?8. 7 11.0 7 1.6 1.6 I7.n 21 6.U 4 J 0 11.0 70 10 1 0 0 1 10.) /) 7- 9 12 10 1.1
4 1016.6 101 7,6 22.4 9.2 15.6 -0.4 30.6 24 -0.6 3 0 2 10.6 7? -71 7 1 10 4 1 0 0,6 75 16.1 5*. 14 t 11 U * 1 61
f A * 1 l^ie.i low. , 27.1 22.7 74.7 1.1 29.4 J04 17.U 9 0 0 19.4 71 11 0 1 0 0 7.7 12 17.5 5 5 13 13 5 4 t V'
M 26.1 14.2 70.2 1.1 JO.6 24 4.4 4 0 0 - 6 7 1 4 5 c 0 12 11 a 4.4 tt 1
7 10)7,6 1017.7 77.1 18.1 73.0 1.2 31.7 21 B .9 3 0 0 16.1 66 1 1 11 4 1 0 0 1.6 1 1 1 A.4 73 19 * 13 9 1.1
-. i*:'/*c ct* Ab ?9 1713.9 1017.7 26.4 12.9 19.7 0.8 37.2 30* 3.9 4 2 0 17.1 69 1 i 3 0 0 22 12.5 77 19 13 7 1 l 5.1
et 3* 1C 17 2 1016.6 21.3 11.6 16.4 0.9 27.8 22 2.8 5 0 0 10.6 72 81 3 0 0 1.0 14 10.7 72 74 7 6 10 7.1
*i.. : i S S E f 11 1C 1 9 1017.3 22.- 8.7 15.6 -0.2 28.3 244 -0.6 94 0 3 10.0 72 15 11 6 T 0 18 12.1 19 24 6 11 14 6.5
8 *717,3 10P.6 25.9 13.6 19.8 0.9 30.6 26 3.3 4 0 0 17.2 61 21 -71 1 1 7 3 0 0 0.1 17 8.9 71 24- 14 7 10 5.? 8-
Ei* IEaC- 1 1C *6.9 1017.5 37.. 16.1 72.1 1.1 32.2 304 7.2 4 2 0 15.6 70 61 1 0 0 1.5 14 11.2 27 19* 6 14 11 5.9
0*-GU 757 112 !
i-e* S ?4* 987.1 1016.2 16.8 4.6 10.7 -0.3 26.7 21 -6.7 3 0 7 3.9 69 104 15 8 7 T 1 1 76 13.4 18 1 3 7 3 21 7.?
A-.A 531 m,o 1016.1 16.3 4.2 10.3 0.3 26.7 23 -6. 7 3 0 9 7.1 66 711 61 49 11 6 T T 0.7 77 16.1 S " 1 7 5 19 7.1 4 9
;/.! 41 1011.2 1016.4 18.6 4.1 ir.7 -0,8 28.3 13 -6.7 94 0 7 3.9 61 1 31 14 37 12 3 T 0 1.1 25 15.6 30 7 1 7 15 6.1 J
- v b S ; : i7 1CC2.7 19.9 6.7 13.3 0.3 28.3 23 -2.8 3 0 6 6,1 61 1 86 31 57 10 6 0 1 0 0.4 29 13.9 13 16 6 0 17 7,0
l- 101 ICC*. 1 1C 17,1 19.7 6.1 13.1 -0,5 28.9 23 -3.9 3 0 6 6.1 67 169 3 ft 19 1 10 6 c 0 0.9 76 13.0 N 75 8 6 17 6.- 3
1 9 4 16.4 3.7 10.1 0,2 27.2 21 -6.1 94 0 10 726 70 19 ! 14 T T !
Sa.AK-.Am I* 1011.6 1017.4 21.1. 9.1 15.3 , 0.8 29.6 2 4 -2.2 94 0 2 8.3 61 101 -11 29 10 0 0 0 0.8 25 13.4 4 7 d 8 15 6.4 . 61
-i *l !! -i.: * 1711.3 101 V 5 25.6 *7.9 21.8 0.1 2B .9 294 15.6 2 0 0 16.7 77 764 84 65 28 0 0 i 0 0.8 16 9.4. St 30* t 7 >2 8.7 I J1
- ~2 7 1011,0 1018.5 26.9 H.6 72.8 0.0 2B.9 7 19.9 29 0 0 16.7 70 51 -29 36 8 0 0 0 4.3 6 12.5 6E 20 J 16 12 i 6.9 , -3
i w 11 1C 15.6 1 o i e. o 26.9 17.1 72.2 -0.1 30,0 24 19.9 274 0 0 4ft -25 36 7 0 0 0 5.1 6 1 13.4 NE 70 8 12 11 6.1 ! 5<
.;-f 31 1C 1 *.. 2 *019.5 25.3 19.1 72.6 0.5 26,7 27. 13.3 30 0 0 17.2 73 81 -33 55 16 0 0 0 5.1 7 10.3 NE 19* J 14 14 .I ; 35
rs* *61 912.0 1013.1 10.2 0.3 5.3 0.2 16.7 1 -7.2 28 0 13 -7.7 62 49 23 10 13 1 , 56 T 0.4 1 16.5 NW 25 . 7 20 7.4 . tie
E J 5 T C * 431 9.9 0.1 5.0 -1.1 16.1 1 -7.2 28 0 17 25 1 9 12 i T T 74.6V 30 2 3 2* 8.1
F-'tc ;7 1351 151.1 1013.4 6.6 -2.7 1.9 0.1 11.6 19 -19.9 7* 0 25 -3.9 68 43 20 17 15 1 ; 2,1 >6 3.0 22 16.5 S4 30* | i 7 2 3 6 . 56
: :*.:s :**- i 91 10.8 3.0 6.9 -1.9 21.7 20 -5.0 ! 3 . 0 10 751 134 9# 16 i 310 lr2 19.7 S4 ? 4 ! 51
i -ae 701 9 90,? 1016.7 5.6 -3.1 1.2 -0.9 21.1 21 -10.6 94 1 0 2 4 -1.9 71 51 -13 70 13 2 114 *1 0.9 30 13.- 2 7 Q 3 20 7 -
'-::*;) i * 1 8 * 992.6 1015.6 5.7 -3.1 1.2 -1.4 23. 3 21 -11.1 9 0 24 -1.0 66 6? 71 14 4 < 114 il 0.6 JO 13.9 Sfc 7 3 6 7 18 6.4 5<*
*- : e , 1 77 99 3.9 1016.1 4.1 -5.6 -0.8 -2.8 20.6 21 -15.0 4 0 27 -5.6 72 84 19 76 14 4 310 76 1 1 29 15.2 S " 74 3 1 1 15 j 6.4
* i 1 9 9 9 1.2 1016.0 J.7 -3,7 1.0 -1.9 23.1 21 -12.8 6 0 23 -3,3 74 44 -77 19 1 97 76 0.9 27 15.2 54 74 5 7 19 7. < 6?
*. n 721 981.2 1016.'. 2.9 -6.1 -1.6 -2.7 16.1 21 -15.6 9 , 0 25 -6.1 71 71 4 7 3 14 3 213 H2 0.6 33 13.4 9 7 3 4 10 11 7,7
1 71 993,2 1016.0 7., -1.9 3.0 -1.1 23.9 21 -9.9 J 0 22 -7.1 6ft 49 -20 75 10 3 1 114 76 1.0 79 17.9 SM 7 % 4 1 6 >1 l- I 5'
I S *** A.A--5.: E 1 11 : roi.7 1016.1 10.6 1 1 5.9 -0,9 24.4 21 -5.6 15. 0 14 0,6 70 187 61 32 1 l7 8 338 P8 o. 32 18.B s 6 1 J 7 21 ! 7,9 - *
*.i- -*v.| 74' 9 8 1 1 1016. B 5.1 -3.9 0.6 -1.9 17.2 21 -16.1 i 15 j 0 26 -3.9 71 57 -77 15 12 3 1 , 162 o,6 30 | 16.5 4 30 ! i 7 22 J-' 5*
to



Chart 1. A Normal Daily Average Temperature (F. 1941 70), March
V


CKort II A Total Pr*opi>Qtion (IrvcKti). Mor ^ 7.


LOCATION GRAND JUNCTION 1' 1 COLO. LATITUDE 39 DEGREES 7 MINUTES
month 1 HO 1078. TOO ?7. TOT 2*4. KT .597 KD .170
ORIENTATION HOUPLY SOLAR RADIATION DAILY TOTAL sag/daytime SAG/ALL DAY
<4 5 6 7 0 9 10 11 12 13 10 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SAT GS SATGO satgs satgp
SOUTH 0. 0. 0. 0. 71 . mo. IBS. 211. 220. 211. 105. 109. 71. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1033. 100. 233. 70. 197.
SOUTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 22. 72. 123. 166. 105. 206. IBB. 1 16. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1096. 110. 185. 59. OB.
WEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 20. 2e. 30. 36. 05. 123. 137. 99. 0. 0. 0. 0. 570. 72. 109. 02. 57.
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 20. 28. 30. 36. 30. 2B 29. 29. 0. 0. 0. 0. 237. 06. 61. 32. 38.
north 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 20. 28. 30. 36. :v*. 20. 29. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0. 217. Ut4. 50. 31. 37.
northeast 0. 0. 0. 0. 39. 20. 20. 39. 36. 30. 2B. 20. 9. 0. 0. 0. 9. 237. 06. 61. 32. 38.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 99. 137. 123. AS. 36. 30. 28. 29. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0. 570. 72. 109. 02. 57.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 116. IBB. 206. 195. 166. 123. 72. 22. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0.. 1096. 110. 185. 59. BB.
HORIZ. 0. 0. 0. 0. 39. 77. 117. 193. 152. 103. 117. 77. 29. 0. 0. 0. 0. BR3 97. 150. 52. 75.
MONTH 2 HO 2039. TOD 35. TOT 32. KT 6^3 KD .166
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR RADIATION daily total SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
0 5 6 7 B 9 10 11 12 13 10 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION satgs satgd satgs SATGO
south 0. 0. 0. 19. 92. 107. 187. 212. 220. 212. 1B7. 107. 92. 19. 0. 0. 0. 1537. 100. 233. 01. 122.
southwest 0. 0. 0. *4 16. 28. 66. 121. 169. 203. 220. 213. 172. 09. 0. 0. 0. 1262. 125. 198. 72. 106.
west 0. 0. 0. 16. 28. 37. 02. 00. 191. 106. 171. 160. 52. 0. 0. 0. 001. 92. 138. 50. 79.
northwest 0. 0. 0. u. 16. 28. 37. 02. 00. 02. 37. 05. 60. 27. 0. 0. 0. 386. 62. 05. 00. 55.
north 0. 0. 0. <4. 16. 28. 37. 02. 00. 02. 37. 20. 16. u. 0. 0. 0. 299. 56. 73. 02. 09.
northeast 0. 0. 0. 27. bU, 05. 37. 02. 00. 02. 37. 20. 16. 0. 0. 0. 0. 386. 62. 05. 00. 55.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 52 160. 171. 106. 101. 00. 02. 37. 20. 16. 0. 0. 0. 0. 801. 92. 138. 50. 79.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 09. 17?. 213. 220. 203. 169. 121. 66. 20. 16. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1262. 125. 190. 72. 106.
HORIZ. 0. 0. o. 10. 65. 119. 162. 109, log, mg. 162. 119. 65. 10. 0. 0. 0. 1290. 127. 201. 73. 107.
MONTH 3 ho ; 2655. TOD 05. TOT 01. KT 6*43 KD .163
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR RADIATION DAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
<4 s 6 7 A 9 10 11 12 13 10 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION satgs SATGO SATGS SATGD
SOUTH 0. 0. 0. 33. 00. 131. 167. 190. 19B 190. 167. 131. 80. 33. 0. 0. 0. 1006. 135. 208. 06. 123.
southwest 0. 0. 0. 12. 25. 36. 51. 107. 155. 191. 211. 210. 103. 117. 0. 0. 0. 1290. 128. 195. 03. 117.
WEST 0. 0. 0. 12. 25. .36. 05. 50. 62. MO. 15B. 1B7. 190. 100. 0. 0. 0. 1000. 109. 161. 73. 100.
NORTHWLST 0. 0. 0. 12. 25. 36. 05. 50. 52. 50. 05. 76. 99. 87. 0. 0. 0. 577. 02. 112. 60. 75.
north 0. 0. 0. 12. 25. 36. 05. 50. 52. 50. 05. 36. 25. 12. 0. 0. 0. 306. 69. 09. 50. 60.
northeast 0. 0. 0. 87. 99. 76. 05. 50. 52. 50. 05. 36. 25. 12. 0. 0. 0. 577. 02. 112. 60. 75.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 100. 190. 187. 150. 110. 52. 50. 05. 36. 25. 12. 0. 0. 0. 1000. 109. 161. 73. ion.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 117. 1B3. 210. 211. 191. 155. 107. 51. 36. 25. 12. 0. 0. 0. 1298. 128. 195. 03. 117.
HORIZ. 0. 0. 0. 02. 103. 158. 201. 229. 23B. 229. 201. 150. 103. 02. 0. 0. 0. 1706. 100. 203. 96. 101 .


LOCATION
GRAND JUNCTION# COLO
LATITUDE
39 nrr,Rrr.s
7 MINUTES
month 9 ORIENTATION 9 HO 3253. 5 6 TOO 7 8 56. 9 TOT 52. KT .832 HOURLY SOLAR RADIATION 10 11 12 13 19 15 KO 16 17 1*6 18 19 20 DAILY TOTAL RADIATION SAG/DAYTIME SATGS SATGO sag/all day SATGS SATGO
south 0. 0. 7. 19. 60. 100. 133. 153. 160. 153. 133. 100. 60. 19. 7. 0. 0. 1105. 120. 172. 87. 116.
southwest 0. 0. 7. 19. 32. 93. 51. 85. 130. 169. 189. 185. 167. 1?9. 96. 0. 0. 1239. 127. 186. 92. 129.
west 0. 0. 7. 19. 32. 93. 51. 57. 58. 113. 157. 187. 199. 168. 79. 0. n. 1160. 123. 178. 89. 119.
northwest 0. 0. 7. 19. .32. 93. 51. 57. 58. 87. 69. 109. 127. 129. 62. 0. 0. 810. 103. 191. 78. 99.
NORTH 0. 0. in. 19. 32. 93. 51. 57, 88. 57. 51. 93. 32. 19. 18. 0. 0. 998. 85. 108. 68. 81.
NORTHEAST 0. 0. 62. 129 127. 104. 69. 57. 58. 57. 51. 93. 32. 19. 7. 0. 0. 810. 103. 191. 78. 99.
EAST 0. 0. 79. ion. 199. in/. 157. 113. 58. 57. 51. 4 A. 32. 19. 7. 0. 0. 1160. 123. 178. 89. 119.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 96. 129. 167. 1 05. 189. 169. 130. 85. 51. 93. 32. 19. 7. 0. 0. 1239. 127. 186. 92. 129.
HORIZ. 0. 0. IB. 75. 135. 187. 228. 259. 263. 259. 228. 187. 135. 75. 18. 0. 0. 2057. 175. 272. 118. 172.
MONTH 5 HO 3626. TOO 66. TOT 62. KT .693 KD .163
ORIENTATION hourly SOLAR RADIATION DAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIME sag/all hay
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 19 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATGO SATGS SATGO
south 0. 1. 12. 29. 92. 79. 109. 128. 135. 128. 109. 79. 92. 29. 12. 1. 0. Q22 119. 160. 09. 118.
SOUTHWEST 0. I. 12. 29. 36. 97. 55. 69. 113. 197. 166. 169. 159. 120. 65. 1. n. 1180. 139. 186. 102. 133.
WEST 0. 1. 12. 29. 36. 97. 55. 60. 61 . 119. 158. 188. 198. 180. 118. 2. 0. 1259. 138. 193. 105. 138.
NORTHWEST 0. 1. 12. 29. 36. 97. 55. 60. 61 . 60. 90. 129. 197, 198. 109. 2. 0. 979. 122. 165. 95. 121.
NORTH 0. 1. 92. 99. 36. 97. 55. 60. 61 . 60. 55. 97. 36. 99. 92. 1. 0. 630. 102. 130. 89. 100.
NORTHEAST 0. 2. 109. 198. 197. 129. 90. 60. 61 . 60. 55. 97. 36. 29. 12. 1 . 0. 979. 122. 165. 9 . 121.
EAST 0. 2. 118. 180. 198. 188. 158. 119. 61. 60. 55. 97. 36. 29. 12. 1. 0. 1259. 138. 193. 105. 138.
SOUTHEAST 0. 1. 65. 120. 159. 169. 166. 197. 113. 69. 55. 97. 36. 29. 12. 1. n. 1180. 139. 186. 102. 133.
HORIZ. 0. 2. 90. 99. 157. 208. 297. 272. 281 . 272. 297. 208. 157. 99. 90. 2. 0. 2331 . 200. 302. 192. 203.
MONTH 6 HO 3759. TOO 76. TOT 71. KT .704 KD .197
ORIENTATION hourly SOLAR RADI AT I ON nAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIVE SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 P 9 10 11 12 13 19 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATon SATGS SATGO
SOUTH 0. 3. 13. 25. 37. 72. 109. 125. 132. 125. 109. 72. 37. 25. 13. 3. 0. 891. 125. 163. 102. 125.
SOUTHWEST 0. 3. 13. 25. ^7. 97. 55. 62. 112. 150. 173. 178. 169. 129. 75. 7. 0. 1230. 191*. 197. 113. 196.
WEST 0. 3. 13. 25. 37. 97. 55. 60. 62. 122. 173. 208. 221. 205. 195. 16. 0. 1390. 153. 212. 119. 1S5.
NORTHWEST 0. 3. 13. 25. 37. 97. 55. 60. 62. 60. 103. 193. 170. 175. 137. 17. 0. 1107. 137. 185. 109. 138.
north 0. 10. 57. 57. 91 . 97. 55. 60. 62. 60. 55. 97. 91. 57. 57. 10. 0. 717. 116. 196. Q6. 115.
northeast 0. 17. 137. 175. 170. 193. 103. 60. 62. 60. 55. 97. 37. 25. 13. 3. n. 1107. 137. 185. 109. 138.
EAST 0. 16. 195. 205. 221. 208. 173. 122. 62. 60. 55. 97, 37. 25. 13. 3. 0. 1390. 153. 212. 119. 155.
SOUTHEAST 0. 7. 75. 129. 169. 170. 173. 1 50 . 112. 62. 85. 97. 37. 25. 13. .3. 0. 1230. 199. 197. 113. 196.
HORIZ. 0. 5. 52. 116. 179. 239. 277. 309. 313. 304. 277. 239. 179. 116. 52. 5. 0. 2696. 223. 336. 162. ?3l .


i
\
^vkiiw GRAND JUNCTION. COLO. MONTH 7 HO 3622. TOO ORIENTATION 9 b 6 7 0 LATITUDE 39 OFGREES 7 mthuTES (12. TOT 78. KT .6q0 1 HOURLY SOLAR RADIATION 9 10 11 12 13 19 15 16 LOUTH 0. 1. 11. 29. 91. 81. 119. 135. 193. 1 35. 119. 81 . 91. 29. 11. 1 . 0. 959. 137. 179. 111. 136.
SOUTHWEST 0. 1. 11. 29. 36. 96. f>4. 70. 119. 156. 179. 183. 167. 130. 70. 1. 0. 1297. 159. 200. 121. 159.
WEST 0. 1. 11. 29. 36. 46. '.4. 59. 61 . 121. 171 . 209. 216. 196. 127. 2. 0. 1330. 159. 217. 129. 159.
NORTHWEST 0. 1. 11. 29. 36. 96. 59. 59. 61 . 59. 94. 133. 159. 162. 117. 2. 0. 1019. 191. 185. 113. 190.
north 0. 1. 95. 96. 36. 96. 59. 59. 61 . 59. 59. 46. 36. 96. 95. 1. 0. 637. 119. 197. 100. 117.
northeast 0. 2. 117. 162. 159. 133. 99. 59. 61 . 59. 59. 96. 36. 29. 11. 1. 0. 1019. 191 . 185. 113. 190.
EAST 0. 2. 127. 196. 216. 209. 171. 121. 61 . 59. 59. 96. 36. 29. 11. 1. 0. 1330. 169. 217. 129. 159.
SOUTHEAST 0. 1. 70. 130. 167. 183. 179. 156. 119. 70. 59. 96. 36. 29. 11. 1. 0. 1297. 159. 208. 121. 159.
HORIZ. 0. 2. 2. 109. 168. 223. 266. . 303, 293. 266. 223. 168. 109. 92. 2. 0. 2500. 225. 335. 169. 220.
month a HO 3229. TOO 80. TOT 76. KT .650 KD .162
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR RADIATION OAILY TOTAL SA6/DAYTJMF SAG/ALL nAY
*4 b 6 7 8 9 10 n 12 13 19 16 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATGD SATGS SATGD
South 0. 0. 6. 19. 60. 102. 135. 157. 169. 157. 135. 1 02. 60. 19. 6. 0. 0. 1129. 149. 202. 119. 193.
southwest 0. 0. 6 19. 32. 92. 51. 86. 133. 169. 189. 190. 170. 125. 93. 0. 0. 1255. 167. 216. 119. 151 .
WEST 0. 0. 6. 19. 32. 92. 51. 56. 58. 115. 162. 192. 199. 169. 69. 0. 0. 1169. 152. 207. 116. 196.
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 6. 19. 32. 92. 51 . 56. 'A. 56. 70. 106. 129. 125. 58. 0. 0. 809. 129. 168. 103. 129.
north 0. 0. 17. 19. 32. 92. 51 . 56. 68. 56. 51 . 4?. 32. 19. 17. 0. 0. 492. 110. 1 33. 92. 105.
northeast 0. 0. SB. 125. 129. 106. 70. 58. 58. 66. 51 . 4?. 32. 19. 6. 0. 0. 809. 129. 168. 103. 128,
EAST 0. 0. 69. 169. 199. 192. 162. 115. c8 66. 51 . 92. 32. 19. 6. 0. 0. 1169. 162. 207. 116. 196.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 93. 125. 170. 190. 189. 169. 133. 86. 51 . 92. 32. 19. 6. 0. 0. 1255. 167. 216. 119. 151.
HORIZ. 0. 0. 18. 75. 137. 191. 239. 261 . 270. 261. 239. 191. 137. 75. 18. 0. 0. 2100. 209. 308. 197. 202.
MONTH 9 HO 2692. TOD 71. TDT b7. KT .705 KD . 197
ORIENTATION HOURLY SOLAR padiation daily total SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ,12 13 19 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATGD SATGS SATGD
SOUTH 0. 0. 0. 33. 90. 193. 189. 211. 220. 211. 189. 193. 90. 33. 0. 0. 0. 1599. 176. 257. 120. 161 .
southwest 0. 0. 0. 11. 29. 35. 61. 119. 170. 213. 236. 235. 203. 126. 0. 0. 0. 1918. 168. 292. 116. 153.
WEST 0. 0. 0. 11. 29. 35. 99. 50. 51. 119. 175. 209. 211. 151. 0. 0. 0. 1080. 195. 201 . 109. 1 '3.
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 11 . 29. 3b. 99, 50. 51. 50. 44. 82. 109. 99. 0. 0. 0. 599. 112. 19 3. 88. 103.
north 0. 0. 0. 11. 29. 35. 99. 50. 61. 60. 44. 35. 29. 11. 0. 0. 0. 379. 97. 117. 80. 90.
northeast 0. 0. 0. 94. 109. 82. 99. 50. 61. 60. 44 35. 29. 11. 0. 0. 0. 599. 112. 193. 88. 103.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 151. 211. 209. 175. 11Q. 61. 60. 44 . 35. 29. 11. 0. 0. 0. 1080. 195. 201. 109. 133.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 126. 203. 235. 236. 213. 170. 119. 51. 35. 29. 11. 0. 0. 0. 1918. 168. 292. 116. 153.
HORIZ. 0. 0. 0. 93. 111. 173. 221. 252. 262. 262. 221. 173. 111. 93. 0. 0. 0. 1862. 198. 295. 131. 180.


LOCATION
GRAND JUNCTION. C^LO
LATlTUOr
39 nFG^rcs
7 N<
MONT H 10 HO 2005. TOO 50. TOT 54. KT 6SU KO .151
orientation HOURLY SOLAR nAD T AT I ON OAIl Y TOTAL SAG/OAYTI SAG/ALL DAY
9 s 6 7 A 9 10 11 12 13 18 16 16 17 10 19 20 paotatton Satgs SATr.n Satgs SATf.O
SOUTH 0. 0. 0. If.. 94. 1S2. 195. 222. 231. 272. 195. 152. 09. 16. 0. 0. 0. 1590. 172. 269. 105. 197.
SOUTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 8. \ A. 27. 68. 126. 176. 213. 230. 221. 179. 91. 0. 0. 0. 1299. 150. ?26. 6. 138.
west 0. 0. 0. 4. 16. 27. .16. 82. 80. 103. 151. 176. 161. 93. 0. 0. 0. 803. 115. 162. 80. 101.
northwest 0. 0. 0. 9 . 16. 27. 36. 2. 08. 92. 35. 44. 69. 23. . 0. 0. 0. 376. 85. 107. 66. 76.
north 0. 0. 0. 4. 16. 27. 36. 82. **. n?. 36. 27. 16. 4 . n. 0. n. 292. 79. 96. 69. 71.
NORTHf AST 0. 0. 0. 23. *11. 44 36. 82. n a. ii2 36. ?7. 16. 9. 0. 0. 0. 376. 85. 107. 66. 76.
LAST 0. 0. 0. 161 . 1 76. 151 . 10.3. nu. n2. 36. 27. 16. <4. 0. 0. 0. 803. 1 15. 162. 80. mi.
SOUTHlAST n. 0. 0. 81 . ITU. 221 . 230. 2 11. 176. 126. 50. ?7 . 16. *4 . 0. 0. 0. 1299. 160. 226. 96. 130.
HORIZ. 0. 0. 0. 9. 68. 121 . 166. 19U . 2n*4 ion. 166. 121. 69. 9. 0. 0. 0. 1311. 152. 228. 96. 131.
MONTH 11 ho 1966. Ton 92. TOT 39. KT . 50 KD .176
orientation HOURLY SOLAR RADIATION oaily total SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL DAY
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 18 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION satgs SATGD SATGS SATGD
south 0. 0. 0. 0. 67. 137. 181. 208. 216. 208. 181 . 137. 67. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1802. 153. 288. 88. 120.
SOUT HWEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 22. 71. 121. 163. 192. 202. 183. 110. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1073. 127. 197. 73. 101.
WEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 19. 28. 34. 35. A4 . 121 . 138. 93. 0. 0. 0. 0. 557. 86. 122. 56. 71.
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 0. o. 9. 19. 28. 39. 35. 38. 28. 19. 27. 0. 0. 0. 0. 233. 61 . 76. 86. 52.
north 0. 0. 0. 0. 9. 19. 28. 39. 35. 38. 28. 19. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0. 215. 59. 73. 85. 51.
northeast 0. 0. 0. 0. 27. 19. 28. 39. 35. 34. 28. 19. 9. 0. 0. 0. 0. 233. 61. 76. 86. 52.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 93. 138. 121. A *4 . 35. 38. 28. 19. 9, 0. 0. 0. n. 557. 86. 122. 56. 71.
southeast 0. 0. 0. 0. 110. 183. 202. 12. 16 3. 121. 71 . 22. 9. n. 0. 0. n. 1073. 17. 197. 73. 101 .
HORIZ. 0. 0. 0. 0. 27. 75. 1)5. 141 . 199. 141. 1 15. 75. 27. 0. 0. 0. 0. R65 111. 167. Af>. 89.
MONTH 12 HO 1263. Ton 31. TOT 28. KT .621 KD .169
ORIENTATION HOUPLY SOLAR PAD IATION DAILY TOTAL SAG/DAYTIME SAG/ALL day
4 5 6 7 p 9 10 11 12 13 18 15 16 17 18 19 20 RADIATION SATGS SATGD satgs SATGD
SOUTH 0. 0. 0. 0. 55. 186. 19. 229. 238. 229. 1 99. 186. 55. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1893. 156. 257. 76. 115.
SOUTHWEST 0. 0. 0. Q. 6. 25. 78. 132. 178. 209. 217. 190. 86. 0. 0. 0. 0. 1121 . 125. 201. 68. 98.
WEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 6. 16. 25. 30. 32. A 4 . 123. 133. 71. 0. 0. 0. 0. 520. 75. 110. 85. 59.
NORTHWEST 0. 0. 0. 0. 6. 16. 25. 30. '2. *0. 25. 16. 17. 0. 0. 0. 0. 197. 88. 61. 35. 80.
NOPTh 0. 0. 0. 0. 6. 16. 25. 30. 32. 25. 16. 6. 0. 0. 0. 0. 186. 87. 59. 38. 39.
northeast 0. 0. 0. 0. 17. 16. 25. 30. ?2 .^0. 25. 16. 6. 0. 0. 0. 0. 197. 88. 61. 35. 80.
EAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 71 . 1 33. 123. A4 . 32. 30. 25. 16. 6. 0. 0. 0. 0. 520. 75. 110. 85. 59.
SOUTHEAST 0. 0. 0. 0. 86. 190. 217. ?n 9. 178. 1 32. 78. 25. 6. 0. 0. 0. n. 1121. 125. 201 . 68. 94.
HORIl. 0. 0. n. 0. t 7 , 65. 107. 1 33. 18 J. 1 33. 107. 66. 17. n. 0. 0. 0. 786. 97. 150. 58. 78.


LOCATION GRAIJD JUNCTION. COLO.
ANNUAL SUMMARY OP
ORIENTATION JAN FEB MARCH
SOUTH 1<*0. 199. 1 35.
SOUTHWEST lit. 125. 120.
wrsT 7?. 92. 109.
NORTHWEST AO. 62. 02.
NORTH 99. 56. 69.
NORTHEAST 96. 62. 02.
EAST 72. 92. 109.
SOUTHEAST 119. 125. 120.
hORlZ. 97. 127. 159.
ANNUAL SUMMAPY OF
ORIENTATION JAN FEB MARCH
SOUTH 233. 233. ?08.
SOUTHWEST 105. 198. S.
WEST 109. 138. 161.
NORTHWEST 61. 05. 1 12.
NORTH SO. 73. 09.
northeast 61. 05. 112.
EAST 109. 130. 161 .
SOUTHEAST 185. 190. 1 9S .
HORIZ. 159. 201. 29 3.
annual summary of
ORIENTATION JAN FEB MARCH
south 70. 81. 06.
SOUTHWEST 59. 72. 03.
WEST 92. 58. 73.
NORTHWEST 32. 99. 60.
NORTH 31. 92. 59.
NORTHEAST 32. 99. 60.
EAST 92. 58. 73.
SOUTHEAST 59. 72. 03.
HORIZ. 52. 73. 96.
ANNUAL SUMMARY Or
ORIENTATION JAN FEB
south 107. 122. 123.
SOUTHWEST 88. 106. 117.
WEST 57. 79. 100.
NORTHWEST 30. 55. 75.
NORTH 37. 99. 64.
northeast 30. SS. 75.
LAST 57 79. 100.
SOUTHEAST on. 106. 117.
1 / . 75. 107. 1* 1
LATITUDC 39 OFGRPES 7 MINUTES SOL-AIR TEMPERATURE FOR GLASS. DAYT
APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST
120. 119. 125. 137. 199.
127. 139. 199. 159. 157.
123. 130. 153. 159. 152.
103. 122. 137. 191. 129.
05. 102. 116. 119. 1 in.
103. 122. 137. 191. 129.
123. 130. 153. 159. 152.
127. 139 . 199. 159. 157.
175. 200. 223. 225. 2R.
SOL-A IP tcmperaturf FOR GLASS. DAYT
APRIL MAY JUNE Jl 'LY AUGUST
172. 160. 163. 179. 202.
186. 106. 197. 200. 216.
170. 193. 212. 217. 207.
191 . 165. 105. 105. 160.
100. 130. 196. 197. 13'.
191 . 165. 105. 105. 160.
170. 193. 212. 217. 207.
186. 106. 197. 200. 216.
272. 30?. 336. 335. 300.
SOL-A IP TFWPEOATURF FOR GLASS. ALL
APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST
87. 99 . 102. 111 . 119.
92. 102. 113. 121. 119.
09. 105. 119. 129. 116.
70. 95. 109. 113. 103.
60. 09. 96. ino. 9?.
70. 95. 109. 113. 103.
09. 105. 119. 129. 116.
92. 102. 113. 121. 119.
110. 192. 162. 169. 197.
f.OL-A TP TEWPERATURr FOR GLASS. ALL
APRIL MAY JUMP JULY AUGUST
116. lift. 125. 136. 193.
129. 133. 146. 154. 151.
119. 13ft. 155. 159. 196.
99. 121. 13P. 1U0. 129 .
01. 100 . 115. 117. 106.
99. 121 . \ 3ft 140. 124 .
119. 1 3ft . 16*,. 160. 1*6.
129 . 1^. 146. 1 6'*. 1M .
172 . 20' . . 2 2** . 242 .
I r r
IME (SINGLE GLAZING) ANNUAL
SFPT OCT NOV DEC AVERAGF
176. 172. 153. 156. 199.
160.- 150. 127. 125. 130.
195. 115. 06. 75. 110.
112. 05. 61 . 90. 99.
97. 79. 59. 97. 02.
112. 05. 61. 90. 99.
195. 115. 06. 75. 1 10.
160. 150. 127. 125. 130.
198. 152. 111. 97. 169.
IME (DOUBLE C-LA7ING) annual
SEPT OCT NOV DEC AVERAGF
257. 269. 299. 257. 219.
292. 226. 197. 201. 203.
201. 162. 122. 110. 160.
193. 107. 76. 61. 129 .
117. 96. 73. 59. 103.
193. 107. 76. 61 . 129.
201 . 162. 122. 110. 160.
292. 226. 197. 201 . 203.
295. ?28. 167. 150. 299.
DAY (SINGLE GLA7ING) ANNUAL
SEPT OCT NOV OEC AVFRAGF
120. 105. 09. 76. 99.
116. 96. 73. 69. 93.
109. 00. 56. 95. 09.
08. 66. 96. 35. 72.
00. 69. 95. 39. 66
80. 66. 96. 35. 72.
109. 80. 56. 95. 09.
116. 96. 73. 69. 93.
131. 96. 56 59. 108.
DAY (DOUBLE ftl.A/INft) annual
SEPT OCT NOV DEC AVERAGE
161. 197. 120. 115. 120.
153. 130. 101. 99. 125.
133. 101. 71. 59. 110.
103. 76. 62. 90. 80.
90. 71 . 51. 39. 77.
103. 76. 62. 90 . 00.
1 33. 101 . 71 . 59. no.
153. . 1 3(1 . im. 9*. . 175.
1 nn . \ 31 . A<> . 133.

t..


*N. LATITUOC
juNt 22
i' 9Tu Sq it Hour
AM
ALT BEAR it S
6am
7
8 9 0
1____
12
6pm 0 00
5
4_
3_
2
_ 1 pm"
11 77 23 20 33 86 4303 49 57 *52 00
90 00^
80 63 22
70 43 " 65
58 38_ [ 10 7 42 16 140 23 52 ij~ 162 0 00~j;~'l69
j s
S£
110
175
196
'9?
164~
120
SW
NE
sw
MOB
134
182
173
131
71
79
83
47
6
65
120
NW N
SE
28
_83_ 137 1 79 207 217
OR
1ECEM8ER 22
ALT BEAR
BTU Sq Et_ Hour S SE E
NE N
SW
HQR
8 a m. 1
)
l
12
4 p.m
3
2
1
669
1544
22 40 26 96 28 55
53 12 42 30 29 75 15 45 000
PM
51
120
166
193
202
S
84
162
185
174
143
Sw
68
109
95
53
12
8
50
99
143
SE
10
45
79
102
110
hQR
42* N. LATITUDE
,.E 22
ALT 3EAP
> Our
SE E
NE
OR
7 pm &
5
4
10
PM
5 15 117 !6_ 15 44_17 87_ 26 28 98 78
37 38 89 19
48 45 7 796_
58 95 62 79
67 64 38 62J
71 45 0 00*
21
61
65
145
161
31
50
X
6
45
98
140
153
37
67
151
138
176
129
98
44
203
242
Ji5
92
109
65
SW
68
12_
65
266
274
SE
OR
-IARCH 21. SEPT 24
ALT BEAR
BTU Sq El Hour S SE E
NE
SW
mQR
12
6pm
5
4
3
2
1
000 11 09 21 81 31 70 40 06
45 58
46 00
CO
84
88
81
79
82
00
PM
23
68
113
150
173
181
S
107
174
200
197
171
128
sw
128
177
169
129
69
w
74
77
40
NW N
15
73
128
SE
25__
76_ 126 i66j 192_ 201 OR"
EMBER 22
ALT BEAR
BTU Sq 6 Hour S SE E
NE N
SW
OR
4pm
3
2
1
l?
4 28 12 46 18 91
23 09
24 55
52 82 > 41 63 29 01 J 14 96 1'
0 00 7
35
105
157
187
197
S
57
141
173
167
139
SW
46
94
87
50
8
50
97
119
SE
1 ^
31
62
62
90 OR
a
DgCLWaTiQN or tmc 1PM
D*tc Dcl*wtion Correip Data Declinator Unf#d
June 21 Mvy 21 7327 TOW jJi 21 *-203r 2327 20 20
1148* Aaj 21 1212 -ir-oc
Mar 71 010- Sap 21 * o4 r C^TS
Ert> 71 -103 7" Oct 21 -1038 -10 38
7*15^57' No. 21 r-i953 t~- !9S5
Dec 21 -7327' 2327


Studies and Surveys
Briscoe, Maphis, Murray and Lamont, Inc., Action Handbook: Managing Growth in the Small Community Part 1, Boulder, Colorado, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1978.
Western Colorado Rural Communities Institute, Growth: Problems and Promises, January 1979.
Books
Baker, Geoffrey, and Bruno Funaro, Shopping Centers: Design and Operation,
New York, Reinhold Publishing Company, 1951.
Davem, Jeanne M. Places For People, McGraw Hill Book Company., New York.
De Chiara, Joseph, and John Hancock Callender, Timesaver Standards for Building Types, New York, McGraw Hill Book Company, 1973.
De Chiara, Joseph, and Lee Koppelman, Urban Planning and Design Criteria,
New York, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1975.
Golang, Gideon, Urban Planning for Arid Zones, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1978.
Harrigan, John E., and Wesley S. Ward, Human Factors Information Taxonomy:
A Guide to User Oriented Architectural Services, School of Architecture and Environmental Design, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Osbisbo, California.
De Chiara, Joseph and Lee Koppelman, Site Planning Standards, New York, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1978.
Ketchum, Morris Jr., Shops and Stores, New York, Reinhold Publishing Corporation,
1977.
Mazria, Edward, The Passive Solar Energy Book, Rodale Press, Emmans, Pa.
McKeever, J. Ross, and Nathaniel M. Griffin, Shopping Center Development Handbook, the Urban Land Institute, 1977.
Minnesta, Underground Space Center, Earth Sheltered Housing Design, Van Nostrand Re inhold Company, New York.
Redstone, Louie G. New Dimensions in Shopping Centers and Stores, New York, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1973.
White, Edward T., Introduction to Architectural Programming, Tucson, Architectural Med ia, 1972.
/ rl


Codes and Booklets
Garfield County Zoning Ordinance, 1979.
Battlement Mesa Zoning Ordinance,1976.
Uniform Building Code, 1976.
Battlement Meas Inc., Planned Unit Development, 1975.