Citation
The Resplendent

Material Information

Title:
The Resplendent an abandoned mining town converted to a ski-mountaineering lodge
Creator:
Scrimgeour, Thomas J
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
86 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, maps, color photographs, plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Lodging-houses -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Alberta ( lcsh )
Lodging-houses ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 80-83).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Thomas J. Scrimgeour.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
12198613 ( OCLC )
ocm12198613
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1985 .S42 ( lcc )

Full Text
The Thesis of Thomas J. Scrimgeour is approved.
Advisor
University of Colorado at Denver May, 1985


THE RESPLENDENT
\
An abandoned mining town converted to a ski/moiintaineering lodge.
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture.
Thomas J. ^crimgeour May, 1985 %
University of Colorado at Denver


INTRODUCTION
I .
Project Statement Thesis Statement
II. SITE ANALYSIS
Context
Vegetation
Geology
Water
III. CLIMATE
Summary
IV. SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS
V. CODES
Building
Zoning
VI. CONCLUSION
Conclusion
Drawings
VII. APPENDIX




INTRODUCTION


PROJECT STATEMENT
This thesis project involves the design of a base facility for backcountry skiers and mountaineers. The facility will be incorporated into the partial renovation and reuse of an abandoned mining town. The site, Alta, will include fourty nine acres and is located about four miles south of Telluride, Colorado, high in the San Juan Mountains (11,050' elevation). The project will explore the idea of "contemplative recreation" and its architecture.


THE THESIS
"From the forest and wilderness come the tonics and barks which brace mankind"
Henry David Thoreau
Thoreau's notion of wilderness as a tonic will be a central theme in this thesis project. In my lifetime, I have taken the remedial and aesthetic values of nature for granted, actually these ideas, in Western thought, are not much more than a century old .
Prejudice against wilderness had the strength of centuries behind it and continued to influence American opinion long after pioneering conditions disappeared.
From the Dictionary of the English Language, dated 1755, wilderness is defined as, "a desert; a tract of solitude and savageness." In classical literature, celebration of nature was limited to the cultivated, pastoral variety. Beautiful in nature was closely related to the fruitful or otherwise useful. The Roman poet of the first century, Titus Lucretius Carus spoke for his age in De Rerum Natura
"It is a serious defect that so much of the earth is greedily possessed by mountains and the forests of wild beasts. Apart from the areas man has civilized it is filled full of restless dread throughout her woods, her mighty mountains, and deep forests. Yet there is hope because these regions it is generally in our power to shun."


described the
American frontiersman often wilderness as 'howling', 'dismal', 'terrible'. In
the 1 650 ' s , Jo hn Eliot wrote of going "into a
wi lde r ne ss whe re nothin g appeareth but hard la bour
and w ant s". I n va r iably pioneers refered to wi lder
as an en emy wh ich had t o be '"conquered' 's ubd ued '
and ' van qui she d' by a ' 3 pioneer army'".
Fr om And r ew Ja ckson' s inaugural address of 1830
"what good man would prefer a country covered with forests and ranged by a few thousand savages to our extensive Republic cities, towns, and prosperous farms, embellished improvements which art can devise or industry
Gilpin, an early governor of Colorado that "progress is God" and that
"the occupation of wild territory proceeds with all the solemnity of providential ordinance". It was in fact the "hand of God that pushed the nation westward and caused the wilderness to surrender to ax and plow."
In an article in The Saturday Evening Post of 1965, on advocating a giant dam on the Colorado River,
"wilderness is precisely what man has been fighting against since he began his painful awkward climb to civilization.
It is the dark, the formless, the terrible, the old chaos which our fathers pushed back... It is held at bay by constant vigilance and when the gigilance slackens it swoops down for a melodramatic revenge."
In the last century in opposition to this tide of fear and loathing there have been some notable
studded with with all £he execute."
William
proclaimed


proponents. Some typical rhetoric of those lending credance to the idea of nature as beneficient follows
"The enjoyment of scenery employs the mind without fatigue and yet exercises it; tranquilizes it and yet enlivens it; and thus through the influence of the mind over the body gives the effect of refreshing rest and reinvigoration to the whole system. If areas were not provided where people could find the glories of nature serious mental disorders might well result."
Fredrick Law Olmstead
"Living in the wilderness promotes that vigorous manliness for the lack of which, in a nation, as in an individual the possession of no other qualities can possibly atone."
Teddy Roosevelt
"If we cherish life liberty and the pursuit of happiness, we must workgto maintain the opportunity of experiencing wilderness."
Chief Justice William 0. Douglas
"How great are the advantages of solitude. How sublime is the silence of nature's ever active energies. There is something in the very name of wilderness which charms the ear and^goothes the spirit of man. There is religion
in it.
Estwick Evans
Though presently American wilderness is not without its antagonists a recent poster, announcing a lecture, suggests what I believe to be the real state of the demand for wilderness experience; "Americas Wilderness, Are We Loving It To Death?" The poster goes on to explain the issue as being
ovpriiqp


And so it is the getting of these tonics of the wilderness in which we are here concerned.
In this project then I intend to isolate the basic amenities which this group of wilderness and forest users need into one base facility at the juncture of what Thoreau would call "wildness" and "tameness".
My patrons for this hypothetical project are a group of people, whom I believe to exist in large numbers and which I will call "comtemplative recreationalists".
"Contemplative implies a slow directed consideration with conscious intent of better understanding or of spiritual or aesthetic enrichment: a contemplative attitude toward nature."
American Heritage
My thesis project is bouyed by my belief that there is a significant portion of our population which is not adequately served by present "urban type" mountain resort facilities. Existing resorts are often situated on or adjacent to public lands of exceptional beauty, character, etc.. With the natural setting as the lure and profit as the motive the focus of the resort becomes the facilities themselves, ie. swimming pools, tennis courts, night clubs, four star restaraunts, ski lifts,


pool slides, retail boutiques, ad infinitum. For the comtemplative recreationalist entertainment facilities are not only not needed but often distracting.
This group of contemplative recreationalists will include, though not exclusively, cross country skiers, rock climbers, hikers, fishermen, bird watchers and mountaineers in general.
This facility will be situated at the edge of an alpine zone. The alpine zone is characterized by sparce and tenuous vegetation, much exposed rock, often very little soil, wind, alot of snow and rain, avalanches, rugged terrain, coldness, dryness, lightning, in short a very 'pushy' environment. By pushy, I mean to imply tactile, here, taking a walk is climbing, merely existing is challenging and hence physically stimulating and invigorating. In this elevated tactile awareness is the spirit of alpinism.
This then is the setting for this facility which is primarily a shelter. A shelter or Lodge which exudes the spirit and mood of alpinism.
The chosen site, a small abandoned mining town at one time impacted the area significantly. Though some aspects of the past mining operation remain


as 'open wounds' on the site, many of the physical structures have rapidly degenerated. Many buildings appear to be virtually melting into the ground.
The site is appropriate at several levels. The first, a requisite, is access to a public forest or wilderness area; the small town of Alta is surrounded by the San Miguel National Forest. Secondly, the site, as an abandoned small town, offers us the opportunity to "recycle" an appropriately scaled infrastructure. Existing roads, electric service and building sites can be used sparing the need for some new intervention of an intact ecosystem. Third, the site has a very distinct and pleasing temporal quality about it.
The severe wheather at this site leaves us with a clear expose of the forces of nature; a chronicle of natures reclamation as seen in the "melting buildings". This chroncile of erosion and regrowth enhances our apprehension of the eternity of this system of which we are a part.
The tone of a "contemplative attitude" will guide my architectural solution for this facility.
In this vein, the architecture does not want to appear as an exaggerated technological conquest of the alpine environment but should stand in a


durable though weathered coexistence with nature, reflecting nature's vast energies but not dominion over them.
A building which accurately reflects its natural
environment is through this response posing as a
diagram of forces. All of the forms of nature are
1 2
clearly examples of this. A tree is a form
shaped by gravity, wind, light, water, snow load, etc. They're all there and discernable even if only at a subliminal level. The same can be true for a building. So the building as a diagram which is congrous with the existing pattern of diagrams should here to be clearly discernable.
Through a congruous fit, we enhance our belief and understanding of belonging to, or being a part of, the natural world. So for the contemplative recreationalist wanting to immerse himself in the natural order, these buildings need to be clearly perceived as an organic response to the envir onment .
I have already begun to describe more specifically the architectural response by describing it as durable and weathered. By durable, I am speaking of strength and resiliency. This alpine environment is a severe one and the building needs to have the


strength, and as importantly appear to have the strength to resist the ravages of this environment. Exposed structural elements like heavy timbers or thick masonry bearing walls could convey this strength and resiliency. By weathering, I am suggesting that the building materials should be allowed to show their exposure to the elements. Wood for example is stained by rain water and bleached by the sun, steel rusts (Core Ten perhaps), and masonry is worn smooth.
An organic architectural response could also be anthropomorphic in nature. For instance, the building as an organism wants to snuggle up in the trees and hide from the wind or stretch out in the sun and pan the horizon for distant views.
There is a duality in the experience sought at
a mountaineering lodge. This facility must recognize
both the personel comtemplative experience as well
13
as the esprit de corps of mountaineering. The
facility must set the tone for communion with nature as well as fellow mountaineers.
As the mountaineering comes seeking new and fresh encounters in nature so too should the lodge stimulate the same. Ironically to accomplish this,


I imagine a sort of subtle coercion in the organization of spaces which will generate some spontaneous encounters. For example: dining will be cafeteria style, and a few large tables will be used instead of many small ones, and sleeping accomodations will be dormitory style, sharing the bathrooms. I am speaking here primarily of encounters among fellow mountaineers but I would also include the encounters that the intricacies of the facility might generate in its response to this dramatic environment. For example, in what little places, seemingly coincidental, might a distant view of three fourteen thousand foot peaks appear, or how does one walk out into three hundred and fifty inches of snow? The site, in this way, is rich in potential of which I hope to exploit.
Through this thesis project then, I intend to explore the integration of: the values of wilderness preservation, the nature of contemplative recreation, an organic architectural response to an alpine environment and the spirit of alpinism.


FOOTNOTES
1 .
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8. 9. 10 11
12
13
Nash, Roderick. Wilderness and the American Mind New Haven: Yale University Press, 1967.
Ibid .
Ibid.
Ibid.
Ibid.
Ibid .
Ibid.
Ibid .
Ibid .
Ibid.
Sax, Joseph L.. Mountains Without Handrails..
Ann Arbor, Mich.: The University of Michigan Press, 1980.
Thompson, Darcy. On Growth and Form.
Mitchell, Jr., Richard G.. Mountain Experience.
Chicago: The University of Chicago Press,1983


SITE ANALYSIS


LOCATION
COLORADO
The site for this project is located approximately four miles south of Telluride in the San Juan Mountain Range of South Western Colorado.
The site is also within the Uncompahgre National Forest and San Miguel County.
The latitude is 3753' North, longitude 10751' West. The elevation is 11,050'.
Solar altitudes for 38N range form 28.5 at noon on December 21 to 75.5 at noon on June 21.
Access to the site is by a very stable unpaved road five miles from Colorado State Highway 145.
Highway 145 is maintained year round.
Specifically, the site is 49 acres surrounded by National Forest land.


Looking southwest at Alta and the south fork of the San Miguel river valley beyond.


Entering Alta,looking east at the three buildings to be renovated with Palmyra Peak in the background.


CONTEXT
The project site is the abandoned mining "town" of Alta. Actually Alta was something be-
tween a town and a camp. There were no stores though there was a school and a boarding house.
Alta was first settled in 1877 and abandoned in 1946. There remains a handfull of surviving structures on the site all of typical turn of the century wood frame construction.
At a regional scale Alta is in an area of very rugged mountains that was settled primarily for its mining opportunities. The predominent architectural styles of the region are a mixture of late nineteenth century Victorian, mining shed, and plain wood clapboard cabins.
The site,coincidently,had the first A.C. elec-
ELECTRIC SERVICE
trie transmission line in the world! The service is still there.


VEGETATION
At 11050' Alta is in a subalpine ecosystem. Here the vegetation is composed of a dense Spruce/ Fir forest with interspersed groves of Aspen. A few small meadows contain grasses and small shrubs.
The majority of the landscape is covered with landslide deposits from a recent geologic time zone. The site is at the top of this deposit and it is therefore quite shallow showing much exposed bedrock of the San Jaun Formation. The San Jaun Formation is comprised of predominently Massive,Bedded, Rhyodatic,Tuff,Breccia, (volcanic stuff).
Most of the buildings presently on the site .which appear to be quite stable, were built with no foundation, resting essentially on free floating piers.


WATER
The site does not have water or sewer services. There is ample ground water which will be assumed to need treatment to be potable. A small water treatment facility will be included in the project.
The sewage will be handled using a mound soil absorption / septic tank system. The soil absorption mound will utilize one of the tailings ponds from the past gold mining operation.
Typical mound system.




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CLIMATE


APPROACH
Site specific data for Alta does not exist.
In fact very little high altitude data exists at all. Though the closest wheather station, Telluride is only four miles away, the 2300' difference in elevation renders the data usefull as no more than a seasonal gauge.
My approach in developing a climate profile for Alta has been to talk to the folks that oughta know;
l.Noel Doeskin Assistant State Climatologist for Colorado. 2.Michael Johnson a solar systems and photo-votaic designer in Telluride. 3.George Greenbank an architect who lived at Alta while designing and building a house nearby. 4.A Telluride ski area manager. The combined information from all of the interviews has given me a reasonably confident outline for the climate of Alta.
PRECIPITATION Annual
30"to 40" will be the average range,. Of that 350" of snow can be expected. Using 15" snow = 1" water 350/15 = 23.3" water,then 35"-23.3=11.7" rain.


WIND
"Yes,there will be wind". The wind will consistently be WEST, SOUTH WEST .
TEMPERATURE Extremes The extreme lows should not be as low as Telluride. Where Telluride has -36F as a record low, Alta could expect -30F as an all time low. A record high for Alta would likely be in the high 70' (96 for Telluride) Summer,A1ta Highs in the mid 60's. Lows in the mid 30's. Rule of thumb; Day temps will be 10 less than Telluride, night temps 6 to 8 lower.
Winter Highs in the 20's Lows, 5-10 (Nov-Mar) Rule of thumb; The winter lows will be only slightly lower than in Telluride.


SOME NOTEWORTHY HYPOTHESES
1. "In the San Miguel basin the heating degree days will increase linearly with elevation"eg.Tell-uride elevation-8800' HDD = 9100 Alta eleation-11050' HDD = 11000. M. Johnson
2. "The reduced radiation from the lingering clouds associated with high mountain peaks will be compensated for by the increased radiation due to the thinner atomosphereN. Doeskin
3. "There should be good solar potential up there."
N. Doeskin, M. Johnson


SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS


INTRODUCTION
The Resplendent Lodge is a complex of new and renovated buildings. In the following discussion of spaces, I have separated this complex into four pieces: the cabins, the dormitory, the bathhouse, and the lodge. So I am referring to the entirety as the Resplendent Lodge and the main or central building as the lodge.
The organization and functioning of the lodge will resemble a European alpine hut or a traditional roadside inn. In both, their is normally a live-in caretaker family. The overall effect is that of being a guest in someones home, for instance, meals are prepared by the caretaker and often taken together or in huts of the Alps, it is common to leave your boots at the door and wear only "hut shoes" within. This type of atmosphere is envisioned at the Resplendent.


THE GREAT ROOM
This room is the heart of the lodge and will accomodate all fifty guests. The room will be used as a lounge, a meeting space, a place for slide shows, dancing and music on special occassions, basically the 'living' room of the lodge. A great proto type for this space, though at a larger scale, exists in the Old Faithful Inn at Yellowstone Park. The room has a four story high cathedral ceiling with three tiers of galleries surrounding it.
Roughly in the middle is a fireplace large enough for a dozen people to stand inside. Somehow the room and the building are still modest in their surroundings. It is this scale, which can house the hale and hearty spirit of mountaineering and be powerful enough to respectfully sit within these imposing mountain peaks but yet readily yield to the presence of this sublime setting, which the great room and the Resplendent Lodge must embody.


'GREAT ROOM'
USE DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
lounge large enough for fifty people to
meeting room gather
slide shows a fireplace
projection facilities
USERS
guests
visitors
staff
ADJACENCIES
ACTIVITY SCHEDULE
lights out at midnight
NOTES


DINING ROOM/BAR
RENTAL/RETAIL
Meals will be served cafeteria style in one room large enough to accomodate all fifty people. The bar will be a distinct space within the dining room serving only beer and wine.
Within the lodge will be a small mountaineering shop. The shop would sell all of the items which would likely be forgotten or consumed and rent some of the major pieces of equipment likely to be used at the Resplendent, e.g. skis. The shop will also include an area for guests to "tune" their own equipment, e.g. sharpening and waxing skis.


DINING ROOM / BAR
USE
cafeteria style dining
ACTIVITY SCHEDULE
early am to midnight


RENTAL /RETAIL
USE DESIGN REQUIREMENTS USERS
ski and mountaineering equipment retail display guests of the lodge
sales .rental and repair storage space
a workspace to repair small equipment
and tune skis
ACTIVITY SCHEDULE
open on a part time basis seven days a week this shop would be staff ed for only about four hours a day, typically in the am for rental and sales then again in the pm for returns and sales
NOTES


BEDROOMS
There will be five bedrooms in the lodge for guests, each of which will sleep two people. As in the domitory, the rooms should provide a means for hanging and drying wet clothes and boots. Bathrooms will be shared by guests, but the staff will have separate bathrooms, four in all.


MP.B.QQMS
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS USERS
space heating element needs to be guests 10
placed or configured to augment drying
boots and clothes
gear storage e.g. racks shelves etc. 14
ACTIVITY SCHEDULE
NOTES
five guest bedrooms four staff bedrooms


KITCHEN
USE
food prep for fifty people
ADJACENCIES
ACTIVITY SCHEDULE
NOTES
food storage space to be included


DESK / LOBBY
USE
check in
information
phone
waiting
messages
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
USERS
ACTIVITY SCHEDULE 6 am to 8 pm
NOTES


DORMITORY
Of the seven surviving buildings at Alta, three will be demolished, three will be renovated and one will be left to stand as long as it may.
A survivor in this case is a building which still has a roof on it, which in itself demonstrates substantial structural integrity in resisting a very significant snow load. Most of the remaining vestiges of building will be allowed to hold their place in Alta if only as "puddles of lumber" seen for a few months of the year in the late summer.
The buildings chosen for renovation not only fit programmatically into this project, but are representative of the needs, values, and technologies of a nineteenth century mining operation. In this sense the renovation and reuse of these building will serve as a historical link to the past, nearly one hundred years, of activity at Alta.
The most prominent building still standing at Alta is the boarding house. Quite conveniently the boarding house will serve in nearly its original capacity, here being renovated for use as a dormitory.
The boarding house is a two story building of wood frame construction with wood clapboard siding and a metal sheathed gable roof. The building


dimensions are 30' x 60' with a porch, entry vestibule, and stairwell protruding from that basic box. The boarding house rests on bedrock with no foundation.
An overall strategy of the Resplendent will be to provide a range of accomodations for groups of varying size and temperment. While the dormitory as a whole will function uniquely in the complex, within the dormitory there will be a variety of accomodations.
The dormitory will sleep approximately twenty four people, in seven different rooms. Two rooms will accomodate groups of six, two rooms groups of four, and three rooms groups of two. There will be bathrooms on each floor of the dormitory but none in the individual rooms.
The dormitory will be tied together through one keyspace, the parlor. The parlor will have a hearth for a wood fire which will be the pivotal element for this space if not for the entire building. The parlor will be a place for reading, conversation or just warming up upon coming in out of the cold.


DORMITORY
USE
overnight lodging
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
the furnishings and building details must accomodate the transition from heavy weather and the gear associated with mountaineering eg. copious quantities of mud and snow, heavy wet clothes,ski boots,skis,ice axes,packs, etc.
USERS
able bodied skiers & mountaineers of any age (typically over ten) and either gender.
NOTES


DORMITORY BEDROOMS
USE DESIGN REQUIREMENTS USERS
sleeping accomodations for six the means to combine space heating drying boots and clothes up to six either gender
preparation and organization of mountaineering gear a large sturdy table with benchs or chairs
drying boots and clothes
ADJACENCIES
ACTIVITY SCHEDULE NOTES
see dormitory this space summary describes one of the typical bedrooms in the dormitory, the others will differ only in size.
SIZE
room for 6, 360 ft2
room for 4, 288 ft2
room for 2, 144 ft2


DORMITORY-PARLOR
USE DESIGN REQUIREMENTS USERS
reading hearth with efficient wood stove guests staying in the
conversation or fireplace dormitory,up to 24
warming room finishes to accomodate mud,snow, boots, etc.
seating for fifteen
NOTES


DORMITORY-BATHROOMS
USERS
guests of the dormitory segregated by gender
NOTES
each floor will have two bathrooms ,a mens and a womens
SIZE
each bathroom 180 ft5
total (four) 720 ft2


CABINS
Two wood frame clapboard cabins remain in usable condition at Alta. Both cabins will be renovated for reuse. As all of the existing buildings, the cabins are resting essentially on bedrock and not connected to it. The cabins as well as the dormitory will be given new concrete pier foundations and then renovated from the inside out which will include structural amendments, insulation and new interior surfaces and fixtures.
The cabins will be more rustic and less convenient than the other accomodations at the Lodge.
Each cabin will be just one room with a sleeping loft. Both will have limited cooking facilities allowing these people to bring and prepare their own meals. The kitchen will include a stove, a counter, with a sink and a drain, but no running water. Toilet, bathing facilities and drinking water for the cabins will be provided in the bathouse.
Each cabin will sleep four people and by virtue of their location will provide more seclusion and with the cooking facilities, more autonomy than the other accomodations at the Resplendent.


CABINS
USE
sleeping
cooking
dining
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS USERS
sleeping loft kitchen counter sink (drain only) gas stove (cooking) wood stove (heating) groups of two to four
wood storage
NOTES
toilets and showers in the bathouse this space is a renovation
SIZE
each cabin 430 ft2
two cabins = 860 ft2


BATHOUSE
At 11,000 feet, coldness is ubiquitous. It is the bathouse which will brace the spirit of these chilled mountaineers.
The bathouse will include: at least three separate soak tubs with a total capacity of approximately twenty two people, a sauna with a capacity of about ten people, a cool down area consisting of a variety of small decks to lie on in an unheated area, and a mens and womens dressing/wash room.
The bathouse as a quiet place for soothing relaxation wants to be separated from the other spaces and activities of the lodge. In addition to this the bathouse needs to be obviously accessable to the quests in the dormitory and cabins. In this regard the space wants to be a distinct and recognizable, semi-public, bathouse.
A few utilitarian functions of the lodge could be integrated in to the bathouse, these would include the water treatment facilities for all of the domestic water at the lodge, and the laundry facility.


BATHOUSE
USE DESIGN REQUIREMENTS USERS
thermal relaxation quiet up to 35 people assuming
daylit every aspect was util
solar heated ized to the maximum
views 22 in the tubs
10 in the sauna
3 dressing showering or doing laundry
ACTIVITY SCHEDULE
6 am to midnight for soaking
the toilet facilities must remain available for the cabin guests 24 hours a day
NOTES
each space will be itemized in the following pages
SIZE
with laundry and water treatment 2500 ft3


SOAK TUBS
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
two tubs for six one tub for ten
include soom views in this room
NOTES
active solar hot water systems need to be considered here.


SAUNA
USE
thermal relaxation


COOL DOWN ROOM
USE DESIGN REQUIREMENTS USERS
thermal relaxation this space is layed out like a typical sauna up to ten
daylighting is desirable but not ne'cessary
an ideal temperature would be around 49F
ADJACENCIES
see soak tubs
ACTIVITY SCHEDULE 6 am to midnight


LAMM1
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
three washers three driers
t
USERS
staff only


WATER TREATMENT
DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
a 10,000 gallon holding tank or a volume of 1336 ft3
USERS
using 32 gal/day person
and 50 people
32 x 50 = 1600gal/day
ACTIVITY SCHEDULE
NOTES
(32 gal/dayperson is my average annual household useincluding bathing,cooking,laundry, and a small garden.


CODES


BUILDING CODES
Building codes are designed to provide regulations on construction which will ensure occupant safety.
The policy in San Miguel County is to abide by the Uniform Building Code. The following pages contain a list of pertinent information form the 1982 edition, It has been divided into eight categories:
* Allowable floor area
* Fire resistive requirements
* Wall and opening protection
* Allowable building height
* Allowable occupant loads
* Exit requirements
* Allowable live loads
* Miscellaneous requirements
The project contains building types which fall
into three different occupancy categories, each one
requiring a seperate code search:
B-2: Offices, workshops, storage small meeting
rooms
A-3: Dining, large meeting room
R-3: Dwellings, recreational areas


Group B-2
1 Floor Area
Construction type
Occupancy type
Basic allowance area(505a)
Added stories increase Side(s) separation increase Total allowable area
2. Fire Resistive Requirements
Construction type Exterior bearing walls Interior bearing walls Exterior non-bearing walls Structural frame Permanent partitions Shaft enclosures Floors Roofs
Exterior doors and windows Inner court walls(504c)
Parapets required(1709a)
Attic draftstops required(3205b)
Attic ventilation required(3205c)
3. Wall and Opening Protection
Fire resistance of exterior walls Openings in exterior walls
III
B-2
18000 SF 18000 SF 4500 SF 40500 SF
III
4
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
2003b
1
same as wall below enclosed attic space: 3000 SF
enclosed rafters 1/150 or 1/300 for top and bottom vents
1
3/4 hour


4,
Building Height
Allowable stories Fire sprinkler increase(507) Total allowable stories Maximum height
5. Occupant Loads
Story
Occupancy group Area
4 1
5
65 ft.
5
B-2
40500 SF
Sq. ft. per occupant Total persons per floor Total persons in building
6. Exit Requirements
Number of exits required each floor(3303a) Number of exits required total building(302a) Required exit width(3303b)
Ramps required
Corridor widths(3304b)
Dead end corridor 1imit(3304f)
Corridor construction(3304g)
Stairway widths(3305b)
Stairway landing depths(3305f)
Stairway to roof( 3305o)
Smoke tower tower required(3309)
Exit signs required(3312b)
Exit sign separate circuit(3312c)
100
405
2025
1
5 for 5 floors 50 divided by occupancy yes for ground level with toilet 44 in.
20 ft.
see above, no special case 36 in.
36 in,
4 or more stories, 1 stair to the roof if floor is 75 ft. above ground
only to clearly identify no


7. Occupancy Unit Live Loads
Uniform load Concentrated load
8. Other Requirements
Separations between occupancies-fire ratings and construction
Enclosure of vertical openings(1706)
Light( 05 sections, ch. 6-14)
Ventilation
Sanitation
Fire extinguishing system required(3802) Dry standpipes required(3803)
50 psf
2000 lbs/2.5 SF
B-2 and M= 1 B-2 and R= N more than 2 floors,
1 hr. rated
all habitable rooms get natural or artific. light natural=l/20 floor area or mech.=5 ft-fy min. outside air of 15 ft3/min. total
min. 1 W.C./ sex(nearby) with window or duct if floor area 1500 SF w/o sufficient openings only if 4 stories or 20000 SF/ floor


Group A-3
1c Floor Area
Construction type
Occupancy type
Basic allowance area (505a)
Added stories increase(505b) Side(s) separation increase(506a) Total Allowable area
2. Fire Resistive Requirements
Construction type Exteior bearing walls Interior bearing walls Exterior non-bearing walls Structural frame Permanent partitions Shaft enclosures Floors Roofs
Exterior doors and windows Inner court walls( 504c)
Attic draftstops required(3205b)
Attic ventilation required(3205c)
3 Wall and Opening Protection
Fire resistance of exterior walls Openings in exteripir walls
40 Building Height
Allowable stories
Fire sprinkler increase(507)
Total allowable stories Maximum height
III
A-3
13500 SF 13500 SF 3375 SF 30375 SF
III
4
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
2003b
1
enclosed attic space: 30000 SF
enclosed rafter 1/150 or 1/300 for 2 vents
1
3/4 hr.
2
1
3
65 ft.


5.
Occupant Loads
Story 3
Occupancy group A-3
Area/story 16875 SF
Sq. ft. per occupant 15
Total persons per floor 1125
Total persons in building 3375
6. Exit Requirements
Number exits required each floor(3302a) Number exits required total building(302a) Required exit width(3302b)
Ramps required Corridor widths(3304b)
Dead end corridor 1imit(3304f)
Corridor construction(3304g)
Stairway widths (3305b)
Staiway landing depths( 3305f)
Stairway to roof(3305o)
Exit signs required(3312b)
Exit signs separate circuit(3312c)
7. Occupancy Unit Live Load
Uniform load
Concentrated load
2
50 divided by occupancy yes 44 in.
20 ft. see above 44 in.
36 in,
only if more than 4.stories yes
not required
100 psf
0


8. Other Requirements
Separations between occupancies-Fire ratings and construction
Enclosure of vertical openings(1706)
Light( 05 sect., ch 6-14)
Ventilation
Sanitation
Fire extinguidhing system required(3802b)
Dry standpipes required(3803)
Wet standpipes required(3805)
Combination standpipes required(3802)
A-3 and B-2= N A-3 and E-2= N more than 2 floors,
1 hr. rated Natural light from min. opening of 1/10 floor area
min. 1/10 floor area min. 3 SF window or 100 sq. in. duct for ea. W.C.
when floor area exceeds 1500 SF no no no


Group R-3
1. Floor area
Construction type
Occupancy type
Basic allowance area (505a)
Added stories increase Side(s) separation increase Total allowable area
2. Fire Resistive Requirements
Construction type Exterior bearing walls Interior bearing walls Exterior non-bearing walls Structural frame Permanent partitions Shaft enclosures Floors Roofs
Exterior doors and windows Inner court walls(504c)
Parapets required( 3205b)
Attic draftstops required(3205b)
Attic ventilation required(3205c)
3. Wall and Opening Protection
Fire resistance of exterior walls Openings in exteior walls
4. Building Height
Allowable stories Fire sprinkler increase Total allowable stories Max. height
III
R-3
uniimited
uniimited
III
4
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
enclosed attic space: 3000 SF
enclosed rafters 1/150 or 1/300 for 2 vents
1 hr. 1
3 1
4
65 ft.


5. Occupant loads
Story
Occupancy group Area
Sq. ft. per occupant
6. Exit Requirements
Number exits required each floor(3302a) Number exits required total building(302a) Required exit width(3302b)
Ramps required Corridor widths(3304b)
Dead end corridor limit(3304f)
Corridor construction(3304g)
Stairway width(3305b)
Stairway landing depth(3305f)
Stairway to roof(3305o)
Smoke tower required(3309)
Exit signs required(3312b)
Exit sign separate circuit(3312c)
7 Occupancy Unit Live Loads
Uniform load
Concentrated load
4
R-3
uniimited 300 SF
2
2
50 divided by occupancy no
36 in. min.
20 ft.
1 hr.
36 in. min.
36 in- min. over 3 stories, stair to roof 4/12 75 feet above ground where needed to clearly identify no
40 psf 0


8. Other requirements
Separations between occupancies-fire ratings and construction Enclosure of vertical openings(1706)
Light( 05 sections,ch. 6-14)
Ventilation
Sanitation
Fire extinguishing system required(3802)
Dry standpipes required(3803)
Wet standpipes required(3805)
Combination standpipes required(3802) Special hazards and requirements (see group occupancies)
Exceptions and deviations (see group occupancies)
R-3 and M= 1 hr.
1 hr., not on vents and pipes
guest, dorms, habitable with window of 1/10 floor area
g,d, &h openable exterior openings 1/20 of floor area' 1 W.C.+kit.+W.C., lavatory, tub or shower none required(alarms recommended) no no no
chimney clearance as 37-B
no boiler room on single units dwelling


ZONING
The site is currently classified under the Forestry, Agriculture and Open District zone (F) in the San Miguel County Comprehensive Plan. This zone allows low density residential development, recreation, and forestry/agricultural activities.
Though Lodges are allowed by special permit, obtained from the planning commission, the required densities are about half of that for seen for this facility. A lodge in the F zone needs fourty acres per twenty people.
To permit development of this project a Planned Unit Development application would have to be approved. This classification would allow higher densities and commercial uses to be permitted given that the development occured in a mannor sensitive to the site character and context. These requirements are compatible with the goals of this project such that development would likely be feasable. Additionally in an interview with a county planning official, after being asked twice if there would be condos involved and convincing her that there wouldn't, I was assured that the project was compatible with the attitudes and goals of the county.


CONCLUSION


CONCLUSION
In the end it would simplify an assessment to have an ideal precedent with which to compare this project. If it exists I did not find it. In central Europe, I found many fine examples of buildings in the Alpine zone. Rural Scandinavian buildings were inspirational in their elegantly simple detailing of heavy timber buildings. Here the buildings of the National Park Service seem to reflect an interesting combination of fear and audacity, which I think is clearly the historical spirit of the American in the wilderness. I think on the whole our present attitudes are essentially a reversal of the past, and now, one of understanding and reverence. And so at this point in time, I believe there is a still a growing understanding of how we as Americans put buildings in the wilderness or "at the juncture of wildness and tameness".
I believe there is an architecture of contemplative recreation and I think the Japanese have probably known about it for a long time. I regret not having spent more time exploring oriental architecture and attitudes, for instance the Imperial Villa at Katsura.
On the reuse and partial renovation of an abandoned mining town, I think this aspect of the project was a major source of frustration and


unduly obscured the focus of the thesis, that of new buildings at the edge of wilderness.
Oddly enough, if my buildings do not generate a lot of excitment, I believe they are that much more successfull in balancing the attraction and distractions of nature and buildings.
The End
Tom Scrimgeour 5/21/85


cnd Junction
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COLORADO
CROSS COUNTRY SKI / MOUNTAINEERING LODGE








ROPOSED ELEVATIONS.
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APPENDIX


BIBLIOGRAPHY
ALA Research Corporation. Regional Guidelines for Building Passive Energy Conserving Homes. Washington, D.c.: U.S. Gov't. Printing Office, 1980.
Balcomb, Douglas J. Passive Solar Design Handbook Volumes I, II, and III. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept, of Energy, 1982. "Quantitative passive solar design techniques."
Bloomer, Kent C., and Moore, Charles W. Body, Memory, and Architecture. London: Yale University Press, 1977.
"How buildings are experienced as opposed to how they are built."
Bode, Carl ed. The Portable Thoreau. New York: Viking Press, 1947.
"Essays, stories and abstracts from journals of Henry David Thoreau."
Brockman, Frank D. Trees of North America.
Racine, Wisconsin: Western Publishing Company, Inc, 1968.
"A guide field identification."
Chronic, Halka. Roadside Geology of Colorado. Missoula, Montana: Mountain Press Publishing Co., 1980.
"Colorado geology as seen from the highway."


Elberhart, Perry and Schmuch, Philip. The
Fourteeners. Chicago: Swallow Press Inc., 1970.
"A description of the fifty three mountain peaks in Colorado over fourteen thousand feet in elevation."
Ellis, William S. The Majestic Rocky Mountains. Washington, D.C.: The National Geographic Society, 1976.
"A survey of the Rocky Mountain region with a closer look at small mountain towns."
Heschong, Lisa. Thermal Delight in Architecture Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press 1979.
"Explores the potential for using thermal qualities as an expressive element in building design."
Kees, Bill. Telluride Rock; An Interim Guide.
Modesto, Ca.: Robbins Mountain Letters, Circa 1979.
"Rock climbing around the Telluride area including the Ophir Needles. Includes geology, access and degrees of difficulty.
Kennish, Katherine. The Mountain House. Mid-
land, Michigan: Northwood Institute Press
*?8i- intention of this book is to explain why a mountain house is different from one in the flatlands."
Leckie, Jim; Masters, Gil; Whitehouse, Harry;
and Young, Lily. More Other Homes and Garbage. Sail- Francisco: Sierra Club


Mitchell, Jr., Richard G,. Mountain Experience.
Chicago: University of Chicago Press,1983.
"Psychology and Sociology of mountaineering"
Nash, Roderick. Wilderness and the American
Mind New Haven:. Yale University Press, 1967.
"A history of the idea of wilderness."
Old and New Architecture. Washington, D.C.:
The Preservation Press, 1980.
"Architectural theorey; relating old and new architecture."
Reifsynder, William F.. Weathering the Wilderness. San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1980 "A guide to practical meteorology."
X
Rockwell, Wilson. Uncompahgre County. Denver,
Co.: Sage Biiks, 1965.
"History of the area drained by the Uncompahgre River including the east half of San Miguel County."
Rudner, Ruth. Huts and Hikes in the Dolomites.
San Francisco, Ca.: Soerra Clun, 1974.
"A description of alpine huts in the Alps of northern Italy including access, cost, meals, types of accomodations, and rules of the system."


Sax, Joseph 1., Mountains Without Handrails.
Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, 1980.
"Preservationist philosophy and recreational uses of our national parks."
Tuan, Yi-Fu. Topophilia, A Study of Environmental Perception, Attitudes, and Values. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1974.
Wilson,Ken. The Games Climbers Play. San
Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1978.
"A collection of mountaineering writing."




UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO OUTDOOR PROGRAM
SAN JUAN POWDER!
Jan. 15-20
Start the new year off right with a unique and exciting backcountry ski adventure! From the summit of Red Mountain Pass, between the historic mining towns of Silverton and Ouray, and nestled deep in the heart of the magnificent San Juan Mountains, we'll ski in to the cozy woodstove-warmed haven of the St. Paul Lodge. Located right at timberline, the St. Paul Lodge is a renovated 19th century mining claim that affords access to some of the finest high-mountain powder cross-country skiing in North America. With terrain suitable for beginners to the most hardcore backcountry telemarker, we'll spend our days skiing alpine bowls of untracked snow, exploring an old mining ghost town, and gliding silently through protected, deep-powder glades. Evenings will be spent relaxing and reliving the day's adventures in the rustic (dormitory accomodations, kerosene lamps) but gracious (hot showers, sauna, home-cooked meals) lodge. (In between moonlight skis, of course!) The fee includes 5 days lodging, with three family-style meals per day, roundtrip transportation from Boulder, cross-country ski and backcountry equipment, ski instruction, and guiding. All levels of skiing ability are welcome, but get your deposit in soon because spaces are limited!
* Fees: $250 students/members; $300 all others.
* Registration will be at the cashiers window in the Student Recreation Center, University of Colorado Boulder.
* A $100 deposit is due no later than 12:00 noon, Friday, December 14, at the time of registration, to reserve a place on the trip.
* Refunds will not be issued after 12:00 noon, Friday, December 14.
* The balance of payment is due at the pre-trip meeting, January 8.
* A mandatory pre-trip meeting will be held at 6:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 8, in room 154 of the Student Recreation Center to discuss itinerary, procedures, and equipment.
* We will meet at and depart from the loading dock of the Student Recreation Center (next to tennis courts) at 4:00 a.m., Tuesday, January 15, and return to Boulder Sunday evening, January 20.
* A recommended equipment list will be available at the pre-trip meeting.
* For further information call the Outdoor Program at 492-6080.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO OUTDOOR PROGRAM a service of UCSU


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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO OUTDOOR PROGRAM
Hut Skiing is just catching on in the West. As the Tenth Mountain Trail and Hut System becomes reality, the touring enthusiast has an opportunity to savor his Winter environment. This seminar will focus on nearby recreational resources, medical concerns, avalanche awareness, and appropriate ski mountaineering gear.
The program is designed for the Novice through Intermediate ski tourer, emphasizing safety and preparedness for back-country travel.
This classroom session will meet from 7:00-9:00 pm, Wednesday, November 7, in Room 154 of the Student Recreation Center.
Registration will be at the door on a Walk-in basis.
Enrollment is limited, due to space. Please come early.
The program is offered as an Introduction only and is not intended as a substitute for comprehensive First Aid or Avalanche training.
SKIING THE HIGH COUNTRY HUTS
November 7
For further information, call the Outdoor Program Office at 492-6080