Citation
The Pinecreek Country Club, Colorado Springs, Colorado

Material Information

Title:
The Pinecreek Country Club, Colorado Springs, Colorado
Creator:
Sullivan, Daniel W
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
168 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, charts, maps, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Country clubs -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Colorado Springs ( lcsh )
Country clubs ( fast )
Colorado -- Colorado Springs ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 158-160).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Architecture and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Daniel W. Sullivan.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
16721744 ( OCLC )
ocm16721744
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1987 .S796 ( lcc )

Full Text
sullivwa/
PINECREEK COUNTRY CLUB COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS PROJECT UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER DANIEL W. SULLIVAN MAY 3, 1987


THE PINE CREEK COUNTRY CLUB COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO
DANIEL W. SULLIVAN JANUARY 19, 1937
THIS THESIS PROJECT IS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF DESIGN AND PLANNING IN PARTIAL COMPLETION OF THE DEGREE MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE.


TABLE OF CONTENTS
{
\
1. THESIS STATEMENT
2. PROJECT BACKGROUND
Y Project Introduction
Y Membership Pro-file
Y Project Location
3. PROGRAM
Y Program Summary
% Spatial Analysis
4. SITE ANALYSIS
Y Site Description
* Area Plan
Y Site Plan
Y Site Photos
* Site Considerations
5. SOILS ANALYSIS
6. CLIMATE INFORMATION
7. BUILDING CODE CHECK
Y Zoning Check
8. APPENDIX
Y Time Save St andards-Cr i ter .i a 0 n C1 u b h o u s e D e s i g n
Y Area Statistics for Clubhouse Design
* Checklist for Clubhouse Planning (N.G.F.)
Y "House Rules"
Y Definitions
Y Eubliography
S'
:


THESIS STATEMENT


L
INTRODUCTIONS
The modern golf clubhouse represents centuries of evolution in the game and its traditions- This evoloution involves all aspects of the game including the design and construction of the course, the rules of play, the standards of play (etiquette), and the social interaction of the participants. The successful clubhouse today will respond to the tradition of the game as well as the contemporary needs of the club membership. The following summary of the history of the game and its clubhouses provides the background necessary to formulate an appropriate
ar chi tectu.bal response.
1. A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE GAME OF GOLF AN ITS CLUBHOUSES
Golf i s a g a me r :i c h i n t r a cl :L t i on Wh i 1 e
documentation is not available to precisely date i ts inc ep tion, we do kn ow t h a t t h o game h as b een played since the early 1400?s in Scotland. There wor e o t h er c oun t r i es t h at h a d g ames wh i c h wer e played by hitting a ball with some type of stick, however, these other games had widely different f i e 1 d s of p 1 ay and sc or i n g ob j ec: t i ves, an d sh ou 1 d not be confused with the game as developed by the Scots, The Scots were the only ones to pursue the objective of hitting the ball across the country to a ho1e in the g r oun d, without i nt er f or enc e f rom an opponent...in its conception and essence, the who 1 e proc:ess i s i n keep j. ng wi. th thie reserve, thic* caution, and the painstaking of the Scottish character. Then, there is the traditional pi ayground of galf: 1inksland, those sandy
deposits left by centuries of receding oceanic tides. For the most part, these windswept rain-whipped courses were not so much constructed as they were evolved. St. Andrews, for example, is so old that so far as anyone can tell it has always been there. Its grassas were fertilized into being by the droppings of birds indigenous to the region and were kept cut by rabbits. Bunkers were formed by sheep and other animals that burrowed their way into the turf as protection against the elements. No other game seems to have been played under such adverse geographic
f circumstances, through such trying climatic condi-
tions, often with exasperating results y which, it might be added, so conveniently offoredxhat excuse
1


which the Scots needed in order to take a drink.
(1) "
The game was popular among men -from all walks of life (contrary to popular belief, it was not only played by the aristocrats). In fact, the game was so popular in 1457, that the Scottish King James 11 , in a war with the English, declared golf
playing illegal as it was interfering with the archery practice of the citizen army!
While the game has been played for many centuries, it was not until 1744 that any standard set of rules was derived. In that year the Honourable Company of Ed inbur gh 6o1f er s was e s t ab1i shed by order of the town council to decide on a set of rules and a method of settling disputes. The city pr ovi. decJ a si 1 ver c: 1 ub to these *'Gen11 emen of
h o n o u r w h a w e r e s k :i 1 1 f u 1 1 :L n the a n c i e n t a n d
healthful I game of golf, (2) to be presented annually to the winner of a tournament over the 1i nks of Lieth This man was to be t i 11ed the "captain of golf (3)" and solve all future
disputes over the rules of the game.
Ten years later in 1754, just 33 miles away at St.
A n d r e w s, t h e c 1 u b t o o k t h e i d e a o n e s t e p f u r t h o r
by drawing up a written set of rules. This was done to allow outsiders to enter the club
t o u r n e m e n t w i t h o u t i o o m u c h c o n f u s i o n T h e Society of St. Andrews Golfers laid out thirteen r u 1 e s t h a t y e a r w h i c h s t i 11 f o rm the b a s .i s o f t. h e
game as its played today (in 1834 the Society
received a royal charter and became the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews). In the
following years, golf clubs rapidly gained in popularity, and were being establi shed al1 over England and Scotland.
In the 16th and 17th centuries the nobility became quite active in the game. The equipment and dress became more elaborate and the game became a real production at the more famous links. Foursome matches were played in the mornings after which the players would retire to a nearby tavern for food and drink and stories of the morning round (presumably the same type of outrageous stories told in the mens grilles today). After lunch the singles matches were played.
Golf did not come to America until 1873 with the formation of the Royal Montreal Golf Club. The


earliest permanent club in the U.S. was the St. Andrews Club in Yonkers, New York (the club was moved several years later to lit. Hope, N.Y. were it remains today). The game grew in.popularity at a furious pace. In 1890 St. Andrews was the only golf club in the U.S. and by 1900 there were over 1000 !
One of the unique elements the Americans brought to the game of golf was their concept of the golf-clubhouse. The golf clubhouse in Europe was originally as ancient and simple as the game
itself. Its fundamental purpose was to house the golfing paraphenalia of the members, and provide a small shop for the production and repair of golf clubs. The American clubhouse were typically old f a r m h o u s e s w h i c h cam e w i t. h t h e pro p e r t y a q u i r e d f or deve1 opino t he cour se. As membershi ps gr ew and more funds became available, these buildings were en 3. ar ged by var i ous add i. t i ons wh i ch wer e typical 1y unsight1y and often not proper1y f u n c t i o n a 1 S o o n m a n y o f t h e s e e a r 3. y c 1 u b s b e g a n
to consider building entirely new clubhouses desi gned speci f i cal 1y f or the new needs of the American golfer. The country was becoming more and more affluent and the club members were typically wealthy people with time for such 1eisure acti vit i es. As their homes became 1arger
and grander, they began to desire similar ammeni ti es i n their clubhouses. As a result clubhouses began to. i ncorporate more conveniences than were customary. These ammenities included larger and lighter locker rooms with more d1n i ng areas and 1i vi ng areas (to g a i h e r i n g s p r e v i o u s 3. y h e 1 d i n t h e t he a 1 1 i mpor t. an t men s grille (wh i c h same function as the tavern in the older days of the game in Europe). The clubhouse began to become more widely used for dinner parties and other social events which continued
the demand for larger and more elaborate
facilities. Thes new demands created a need for more careful! planning by architects, members and their building committees, so that the newer and more expensive clubhouses were able to fill the needs of the rapidly growing golf clubs around the country (to this end, Clifford Charles Wendehack, AIA, wrote a book on golf club design in 1929 which was the standard for many years).
venti1 at i on, hoid social home), and served the
The rate at which golf clubs have developed in this country over the last century is phenominal.


As mentioned earlier, the -first club began i n ,1889. with 1000 i n ex i stance by 1900. By 1930 tTfere were roughly 5600 clubs which continued to grow to approximately 12,300 clubs by 1985! it is interesting to note that most o-f the growth since the? 1930's has been primarily -from daily -fee (privately owned courses open to public play) and municipal gol-f courses (owned and operated by local governments -for public play). In 1931 there were 4448 private gol-f clubs which increased to 4861 clubs in 1985. Meanwhile, courses open to public play have increased in number from 1243 clubs to 7485 clubs in the same period of time. This is important to the designer as the increasing diversity among golf clubs creates different sets of problems and requirements than were present in the earlier days of the game.
While this thesis project deals with a private go 1 f c:ourse and c: 1 u.hhouse, they too have conti nued to ex per i nee cont i nued chang i ng progr ammat. i c needs. The major change has come in the additional ammenities which have become increasingly common at golf clubs. These include pools, bath houses, exercise rooms, and tennis facilities (sometimes to include other racquet sports as well). In addition, the golf club is no 1 onger str i c11 y the domai n of the wea 11.hy as more clubs are being built for a3 1 economic sectors of our society. Finally it is important to note that now more than ever, golf clubs are including more ammeni t i es for enc ourag i ng use b y women and ch i 1 dr en (same c: I ubs even have women s gr ill es -is nothing sa.cred anymore?) It is true however, that most private clubs remain traditional1y male dominated (even if only in subtle ways). All of these changing tides must be considered in the programming and design of today's clubhouses if they are to be successful! and enjoyable to the management and the users (the members)
2. TODAY'S GOLF CLUBHOUSE
The golf clubhouse provides its members with a home away from home, a place for relaxation, recreation, and entertainment. It is a. place for refreshing oneself in strength and spirit from the doldrums of the real" world. It is a refuge, a place of escape a place of leisure. It is a place were people of similar interests and backgrounds come together for sport and friendly encounters.


While the private club exists -Tor a -fairly stratified socio-economic group, this it is not in itself a negative situation- In fact, this is one of the major reasons for its success as a comfortable retreat.
The golf clubhouse should embody several different qualities. The ritual/tradition of the game itself should be a primary concern. The richness of the games past and the respect that the golfing community shows for this history and tradition should be evident in the character of the clubhouse itself. For example, golf etiquette deals not only with the rules of play but also transcends the game itself through the attitude and conduct of the players both on the course and in the clubhouse- This is a "gentlemen's" game and this aspect of its history should be transmitted into the clubhouse design.
As mentioned earlier, the midday stop at the local pub was very much a part of the game. This is one of the rituals of the game which has thrived throughout the history of the game. The men's grille (sometimes referred to as the men's card room) has assumed this role in todays clubhouses. As more play involves couples and families, the informal dining area usually performs this function. However, the men's grille remains a dominant place of importance in the ritual and tradition of the game. This is were the men can go as their ultimate refuge from their work and family responsi1ities, and just be "one of the boys" again.
The clubhouse is the hub of activity for this leisuretime oasis in the suburbs. While golf is the primary activity of the country club, socializing is an important extension of the sport- In addition to the traditional men's grille, the clubhouse must have "living rooms" and "dining rooms" for the formal as well as informal entertaining of the members and their guests. The dining ares also provide a "home away from home" role as members can take their families to out dinner to a comfortable setting without having to deal with the confusion or trials of a public restaurant. The clubhouse should therefore convey a character which is compatible with the lifestyles of the membership (as this is a second home for them in a figurative sense). Within the clubhouse itself there will be distinctions


(
between formal and informal space, however, the overall tone or atmosphere should reflect the attitudes of the membership. The range of simplicity to pretentiousness becomes a relative issue depending on the membership, which must be carefully balanced for the proper effect. The correct sensitivity in this area should produce a sense of subtle elegance allowing the membership to feel a sense of pride in their club as an extension of themselves, while maintaining a feeling of homelike comfort.
In addition to the mens grille, and the dining and living areas, the clubhouse must also have the necessary support facilities for the game of golf. As previously mentioned, the original clubhouses of Europe were strictly meant to house golf equipment and provide spece for the manufacture a n d r e p a i r o f t hi a t e q u i p m e n t. M o d e r n c 1 u b h o u s e s
require the same services in concept, but
like the rest of the clubhouse, the level of conveniences has increased in thse areas. New equ i pment 1i ke the e1ectri c go3 f cart reui re special storage and servicing areas. The golf shop shou 1 d be 1 ocated i n suchi a way as t:o be ab 1 e to effectively control the play on the course. Locker rooms and the mens grille should be conveniently located for ease of access in the middle or at the end of the round. The spatial quality and arrangement of these areas (including b a g s t o r a g e a n d c: 1 u b r e p a i r ) can h a v e a m a j o r effect on the success of the clubhouse. Other ammen i t i e?s such as tenn i. s or swi mmi ng f ac ill t i es and ex ere .i se rooms have trad i t. i onal 1 y been physically separate facilities. Probably the ma j or r eason f or t h .i s is t h e f act t h a t t h ey wer e
additions to older clubhouses. In one sense they should be somewhat differentiated as they are not really traditional elements of the American golf clubhouse. However, with the increasingly health concious nature of our society, and the widening use of these facilities by all family members, the role of these elements in todays clubhouse is worth some re-evaluation.
3. THE PINE CREEK COUNTRY CLUB
The Pine Creek Country Club reflects many of these modern attributes. Its membership is young and middle to upper middle class. They are generally family oriented so the clubhouse facilities must repond to active use by men, women, and children.
6


The golf course is the primary athletic activity for the club, but a pool and limited tennis facilities are also required (refer to the membership profile in the project background secti on)
The developer (Briargate Development Group) desires a comfortable clubhouse of quality construction devoid of pretentious overtones. Its design and appointments should be consistent with its prodominant1y upper middle class membership, yet it should not be uncomfortable to the members or guests who may have a more moderate economic standing.
4. THE ARCHITECTURAL RESPONSE
The Country Club as it has developed in this country has not only carried on the traditions of t h e game, b ut h as aIso d eve1 oped a r ep ut ati on of elegance and perhaps even opulance. Opulent or ostentatious clubhouses are only good for a club whos members espouse pretentious lifestyles and are therefore comfortable in such an environment. Fortunately, most clubs are formed for the purpose of en j oy i ng t he game of go 1 f and t.he soc i a 1 activities which the clubhouse can provide, and opulence (for the sole purpose of status or self gratification) is typically seen as an unnecessary and undesireable spatial quali ty El seance, however, is an attribute that adds to the enjoyment of the members and gives them a sense of pride in their club (Websters Dictionary defines elegance as "A ref ined grace or dignif i ed property? a tasteful richness of design or ornamentation; a dignified gracefulness or restrained beauty of style"). To a certain extent elegance is in the eye of the? beholder. This becomes a gray area of discussion and begins to require some judgements as to what is "elegant" to a given sector of society. It has been noted that the one of the country clubs primary roles is as a second home to its members, and since this membership is a* fairly homogeneous group, it becomes important to view the design of their clubhouse the way they might perceive it. The clubhouse is their refuge, their second home, and the focal point for their liesure time in social and athletic pursuits. Therefore the architecture should reflect the essence of the quality and elegance that would bring pride to its members. It should be honest and devoid of pretentious
*7


overtones. To this end, the design, craftsmanship, and materials should be carefully balanced to represent the finest availavle space which is consistent with the members own lifestyles.
The primary goal of the architectural expression is to produce a clubhouse with a sense of subtle elegance. It should not be seen as a "middle
class country club" as this would infer that the space is of lesser quality than that of a wealthier club (which may appear more attractive simply by virtue of more expensive materials, etc-). The Pine Creek Country Club should represent a subtle elegance, a relatively modest clubhouse full of the character and essence of the country club lifestyle. The country club does not require antique furnishings, oriental rugs, crystal chandaliers, and hardwood paneling to instill a sense of pride and comfort. In fact, while these appointments are beautiful in their own way, they are not necessary features for a successful country club, and may even create an uncomfortable and "stuffy" atmosphere not desired by the membership- Subtle elegance throught design has more of a relationship to the issues of simplicity and complexity in architecture than it does to ex pens i ve f u.r n i sh i ngs
Architecture should serve two basic purposes. A bui1di no desi on should be f uncti anal as def i ned by the users needs, and it should in some respect enh anee t he qua1ity of 1if e of t hose who experience it- It is my contention that clarity of concept is the simplicity required to give a building its basic character and lays the foundation for the quality of "subtle elegance." The complexity enters the design by adding various layers, twists, and turns into the process to accomodate functional refinements as well as appealing aesthetic character. This character can be considered the "soul" of the project. It is that intangible element of architecture that enhances the quality of ones experience as a user of the space?- Physical elements can help capture and preserve this spirit of place by designing around attributes such as the framing of views and the introduction of daylighting. The volumes of spaces, their scale, their adjacencies, and the appropriate level of ornamentation also help create t hi i s special atmosphere by enhancing the activities contained within them. The aesthetic ambiance, or character of a space is also affected
8


in a more subliminal way by a unified and well ref i ned archi tectural soluti on. Unresolved, awkward spaces can quickly detract from the architectures appeal even when only minor elements are problemati c.
The architectural challenge which presents itself here is to create a relatively modest compost!on which fulfills a rather complicated little program (in the sense of circulation and adjacencies in light of ever present informal/formal spatial conflicts among other issues). The design must serve its functional requirements and create an ambiance conducive to its role as a refuge and second home to its predomina.nt 1 y upper middle class membership. The successful clubhouse will express a. clarity of concept combined with a certain level of complexity adding to the buildings character and appeal. It is important, to emphasjze that qua1i ty archi tecture does not occur by accident. It is a result of many concious decisions made by the designer. The user may never understand the level of complexity involved in a space which may on first inspection appear "simple." All he knows is that he enjoys the space, however closer and closer inspection might begin to reveal the hidden layers of complexi ty which the ski 11ed designer manipulated to achieve a harmoniously "simple" design. In my view, the very essence of a successful space (its tangible quality) is achieved through the delicate and complex manipulations of space (scale, volume, color, texture, etc.) which combine to support and enhance a clear and apparently simple concept. This is what I mean by subtle elegance in architecture ( a space possessing the quality of a quietly refined grace and dignity), and this is the promary goal of this thesis project. A major portion of the tradition of the game of golf lies in its intangible qualities of intefrity, dignity, and elegance. A clubhouse which exhibits this quality of subtle elegance will not only provide a wonderful atmosphere for the members to enjoy, but it will also complement the very essence of this time honored game with which it is so closely tied.
9


FOOTNOTES
1. Charles Price,Xhe World of Ggl£ (Random House,
New York 1962) pp. 16-17
2. IBID pp.19
3. IBID pp.19
Webster Is New Collegiate Dictionary (G. ?; C.
lierriam Company, Springfield, Massachusetts)
pp. 367
10


PROJECT BACKGROUND


BRIARGATE AN INTRODUCTION
Briargate Development Corportation is developing a master planned community of roughtly 9,600 acres in north east Colorado Springs. The project has been in progress now for eight years and approximately 2,500 acres have been developed. When completed the project will accomodate over 26,000 dwel 1 i ng uni ts and wi 11 have over 1000 acres developed as industrial research parks. The primary goal of the Briargate Development Group is to provide a complete and well rounded lifestyle where its residents can live, work, and recreate.
Several studies and reports have been commissioned by the Briargate Development Group regarding athletic and golf clubs for the area. One proposal (by Kindred Watts Inc.) suggested a full scale athletic facility combined with a golf course. This first plan was rejected by the group as they consider a plan from a second study for a golf clubhouse with the potential for an athletic facility in a nearby location (proposed by Pannel1 Kerr Forster). The golf course is under construction even though the specific type of f aci 1 :i. t y has not been conf .i rmed. A third st udy (by Faber, Williams, and Brown) looked at a phased clubhouse operation, al1owing the f ac i1ity to expand as membership and demand for facilities
increase. For the purpose of this thesis project, the assumption is made that the actual facility wi 11 be a pr i vate c 1 ubhouse wi th 1 i mi ted at.h 1 et. i c: facilities and its primary function will be that
of a golf at one i ntrodneed
clubhouse. The project will be built time eliminating the inefficiencies in a phased building plan.


PINE CREEK COUNTRY CLUB
MEMBERSHIP PROFILE
MEMBERSHIP SIZE
MEMBER AGE
FAMILY SIZE ECONOMIC BACKGROUND
SOCIAL ORIENTATION
CLUBHOUSE USAGE
* 450 Full Golfing Membersh ips
* 150 Social Memberships
* Majority in the 30 to 50 year old range Average 38 years old
* 3.7 per household
* Middle to Upper Middle Cl ass
t Income range $30,000 to $60,000
t Homes values from $ 100,000 to $250,000
t Frequent Private Parties
* Luncheons and Dinner Parties
* Family Dining
* Re quir e Mu11i p1e Pr i vate Dining Rooms
* Active Golfing Membership
% Mens Card Room with Bar
* Locker demand roughly SOX (because close to homes)
* Locker Room quality i mportant
% Golf Shop important retail source
* Bag Storage for 70X
% Womens Card Room
desi reable (Bar opti onal)
% Usage by gender;
C


PROXIMITY
FORMALITY
TO COURSE
7 O / mal 0 o U / f 0 rn a 1 0
* Tennis and swimming desired
* Seasonal slowing -for dining and golf during Winter months
* Most members live on or near the course, private golf carts will be common (reducing the need for club carts, bag storage, and 1ocker facilities)
# Please Clubs i n the
refer to the "House Rules" append!x


r
-18-
PUEBLO

FOUNTAIN


(
f


THE PROGRAM FOR PINE CREEK COUNTRY CLUB


PINE CREEK COUNTRY CLUB PROGRAM SUMMARY
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS
6970 sq.
A
'\
Entry Lounge/Lobby1 400
Cocktai1 Lounge 700
I n *F or ma 1 D i n i n g
(Mixed Grille)-seat 52 910
Formal Dini ng
(and Banquets)seat SO 1400
Private Dining Rooms 3 at 400 each 1200
# Flexible -for Banquet use
Club Card Room 400
'Kitchen Facilities 1600
* Food Preparation 1160
# Chefs Office 80
t Employee Area 210
% Storage
Services (Toilet, Janitorial Storage,
Mechanics) .
MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS
Lobb y (c offib i n e w i t hi social entry)

360
B o a r d P a o m / L i b r a r y 400
C1 la b M a n a g e r 150
Ass i stan t Man ager 125
S)ecr ct ar y / Rec c p t i on /
Wait ing 150
Account ing 350
Rec or d St or ag e 160
Coffee Bar 25
To 1 op h on e E qu. i p men t 40
GOLF AND ATHLETIC AREAS
Pro Shop Area 211!
Pros Office 150
Pro Counter/Starter 100
Sales ?/. Display 900
Dressing Rooms 50
Storage 250
Pro & Assistant
1oc her/shower 60
Club Repair 80
Bag Storage 525
# 65?/ of 550 Members
350 Bags at 1.5 sq.ft .
Cart Storage 300<
1.40er-iq".
9275

ft.
Ti-
ft.
l



T.CjQcr
Urn W i W

Men s L.oc ker Area fp Full lockers 150 Ha If 3. oc k er s Built in shoe storage Card Room (Men's Grille)
Service and Bar Area
Spa
Steam
Sauna
Showers
Vanity and Dry Dress Area
Toilets (2 WC/2 L/2 U) Mechani cs
Janitorial Storage Gen er a 3. St or ag e 'Attendants Station
250
120
125
60
60
100
120
150
120 40 180 SO
Women ? s Loc: ker Ar ea
full ft£0 half lockers Card Area Service Bar Spa Steam
Sauna
TC."
Showers
50
Vanlty 120
Toilet (2 WC/2 L) 100
Mechanics SO
Janitorial Storage 40
General Storage 250
P o oI><$ol s e 5^ Merrs^Locker ^f) 200 200 100 200 200
1565
900
PROGRAM TOTAL
18,545 sq. ft.
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(
SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.)
ENTRY L0UNGE/L0BBY 400 Sq. Ft.
USER
* Members
* Guests
ACTIVITIES
* Temporary inciting, primarily on arrival for Dinner and social events
* Crossroads of the club
* Meeting place for waiting for others
* Guests and Outsiders first view and impression of the club
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Critically important first impression to visitors
* Point opposite entry deserves some special consideration as focal point
* Carefull attention to decoration,
should be understated so members don't tire of it
* Plantings, paintings, display, statuary
* Should be of generous proportions
* Some attractive lounge furniture desireable
* Typically center for offices, restrooms, coat check, social areas (cocktail lounge and dining rooms)
* Screens, partial walls and plants helpful to help control the area
* High ceiling desireable Min. 10 ft.
* Special features Skylights, bookcases, wood
* NOTE: Try to capitalize on views
on entry
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC '
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN.
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES

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SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.)
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 700 Sq. Ft.
USER
* Members and Guest before and after Dinner
ACTIVITIES
* Primarily evening use (vs. 19th hole day use)
* Some Luncheon use
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Highly decorative area with carpeted floor, paneled/papered/masonry walls, draperies, paintings
* Rich decorative Bar and Back Bar
* Fireplace lends warm comfortable feel to this room
* Primary purpose is for drinking so keep tables small
* Chairs in small groups
* Indirect florescents for accents some spot accent lights in cans
* Ceiling 8 feet minimum
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC '
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
f SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
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SPACE
INFORMAL DINING (MIXED GRILLE) SEATING FOR 52
SIZE(SQ.FT.)
910 Sq. Ft.
USER
* Families
* Mixed Couples
ACTIVITIES
* Family Dining
* Mixed Dining Before/After Sport
* Lunch and Dinner Sevice
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Should be a reasonable scale to avoid cold atmosphere
* Bring in views of golf course
* Budget for tasteful furnishing and decor, nice surroundings help sell the food
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC *
formality FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
* Most clubs lose money in their dining rooms and make it up in their bars
* Comfortable and durable furniture, chairs on casters to slide easily over carpet
* Spaces for small groups to feel cozy are important for casual dining
* 2-6 tops and 10-4 tops
(£>> 'O'
* Possible fireplace divider between mixed grille and lounge
* Ceiling 8 foot minimum and modulated possible exposed structure
ADJACENCIES


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SPACE FORMAL DINING AND BALLROOM (Seating 80) SIZE(SQ.FT.) 1400 Sq. Ft.

USER
*' Members and Families Guests
ACTIVITIES
* Banquets, Large parties ( Weddings, Christmas, etc.)
* Dancing
* Business Lunches
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Dance floor and bandstand ability to cover when not in use
* Variation in floor level can help scale down the size of the space
* Nice furnishings, linen tablecloths, formal lighting, etc.
* Dramatic views utilized over terraces to short course views and long mountain views
* High ceilings 10 foot minimum, variable to roof structure
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES


SPACE PRIVATE DINING ROOMS SIZE(SQ.FT.) 1200 Sq. Ft.

USER
* Members and Guests
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Nice furniture, wall treatment, curtains, carpeting
* Privacy visually and acoustically is very important
* Close views of lanscaped areas
* Minimum of 2 rooms seating 25-30
and 60-70; 3 rooms totalling 100
seats is O.K. also
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
* Speakers lecturn with integral microphone and speaker
* Flexibility a key to room sizes for different uses perhaps use folding partitions
* i
l~ti n___________txJ
* Or partitions that fold into the
walls l
d
* Ceiling 10 foot minimum, variable to roof


SPACE CLUB CARD ROOM SIZE(SQ.FT-) A00 Sq. Ft.

USER
* Mixed Couples primarily members
ACTIVITIES
*
*
Card games, Bridge Clubs, etc.
Also function as a library/den
for reading the Wall Street Journal,
etc.
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Casual but nice, primarily for members
Built in shelves/bookcases A "den" type atmosphere Views to landscape/forecourt of building
Possible fireplace "Quiet" member room
Furniture A Bridge tables A Wing chairs Coffee tables End tables/sideboards Lighting Recessed incandescent on dimmers
Ceinling 10 foot minimum variable to roof
*
*
*
*
*
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
formality FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN .
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
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SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.)
SOCIAL AREA SERVICES 360 Sq. Ft.
USER
* Members and Guests
ACTIVITIES
* Janitorial Storage
* Mech. room
* Mens and Womens restrooms
* Coat check room
* Telephone
* Entry vestibule
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Restrooms should be decorated and not completely institutional i.e. nice wall treatment, lighting
* Mech. and Janitorial areas out
of view
2 sets of double doors on entry
vestibule
Size restrooms
Generally acceptable (T.S. Stds.)
# people #WCs
75 100 5
101 125 6
126 150 7
150+ 8
* 1 lavatory for each WC or Urinal
DESIGN PAR) \METERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE administrative
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL '
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOORESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES


42-182 100 SHEETS
U U. S. A.


SPACE BOARD ROOM/LIBRARY SIZE(SQ.FT.) 400 Sq.Ft.

USER
* Board of Directors
ACTIVITIES
* Board meetings (monthly)
* Committe meetings (daily/weekly)
* Perhaps meetings with outside advisors Bankers, Lawyers, etc.
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Important room, seats of power-wall treatment (paneling, paper) curtains, etc.
* Display cases, paintings
* Quality furniture
* Finishings-
Conference table for 8-12 Lounge/club type seating in small group wing chairs & sofa
0 \
j l \
0
* Recessed incandescents, daylight table lamps
* Ceiling 10 foot minimum, special features indirect light, wood, etc.
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES


SPACE CLUB MANAGER SIZE(SQ.FT.) 150 Sq. Ft.

USER
* Club Manager
ACTIVITIES
* Management functions
* Business meetings with prospective members, current members, Bankers, Lawyers, Accountants, etc.
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Tasteful but understated, it is a place for work, not public display
Furniture required -
Desk, chair, credenza, 2 drawer lateral file, small work table, 2-4 armchairs
Ceiling at 8 foot minimum, variable
to roof
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
_ SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
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SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.)
ASSISTANT MANAGER 125 Sq. Ft.
USER
* Assistant Manager
ACTIVITIES
* Daily club administration, taking job lists from Club Manager, and having standard list of respons-iblities.
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Businesslike, clean, flourscent, and daylighting, blinds vs. curtains, painted walls, carpeting, etc.
Furniture -
Desk, chair, credenza, 2 drawer lateral file, 2 armchairs
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
Ceiling 8 foot minimum, variable to roof
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SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.) SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST 150 Sq. Ft.

USER * Secretary * Possible waiting for 1-2 people ' DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
ACTIVITIES Secretarial and Receptionist duties, greet guests to offices, answer phones, typing, etc. FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT * Office like Flourscent light, painted walls, etc. * Views Interior toward entry Furniture (Etc.) Word processor, Desk with return, 2-2 drawer lateral files, small armchair and sofa if seperate waiting area for offices (from lobby/lounge) Ceiling 8 foot minimum, variable to roof SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.

ADJACENCIES ^sm2>r/ \
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SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.)
ACCOUNTING OFFICE 350 Sq.Ft.
USER
'* Bookkeepers, staff
ACTIVITIES
* Billing, receipts, club newsletters, mailings, etc.
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Office like
Ceiling 8 foot minimum, variable to roof structure
Furniture -
A desks with chairs, A armchairs A A drawer lateral files, 2 computer terminals, copy machine
Power and environmental control for computers
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
CA'SSr. WkC
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SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.) ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 225 Sq.Ft.

USER Office Workers DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
ACTIVITIES * Record storage (160 Sq.Ft.) * Coffee Bar (25 Sq. Ft.) * Telephone Equipment (AO Sq.Ft.) FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT Functional SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
f


SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.)
PRO SHOP AREA PRO'S OFFICE 150 Sq. Ft.
USER
* Golf Profesional and his staff
ACTIVITIES
* Administer retailing operations
* Club golf tournaments
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Functional and businesslike
* View into Pro Shop (visual control) view out to practice areas and golf
Ceiling 8 foot minimum, variable to roof
Furniture -
3x6 desk with chair, 2 side chairs, credenza, credenza, shelves
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE administrative
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
Peo's
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PARKING LOT
BASIC GOLF SHOP LAYOUT
This hypothetical layout incorporates the features of seveial plans, and could be considered the near perfect golf shop m rangement The traffic pattern for each unit coordinates with all other units The professional is situated where he can con trol virtually all golf operations
BAG
DROF- OFF
18th
9th GREEN
/ DRIVING 1st TEE /
/ RANGE I
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14


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SPACE
PRO SHOP AREA -
STARTER AND RETAILING AREA
SIZE(SQ.FT.)
1300 Sq.Ft.
USER
* Pro, Assistant Pro, Staff Members and Guests
ACTIVITIES
* Retailing of golf clothing, clubs, and accessories Starting times regulated Practice tee regulated Book lessons
*
*
#
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Pro Starter Area (100 sq.ft.) to control golf play must view #1 and 10 tees if possible
* Display (900 sq.ft.) special spot lighting, flexible display layout, should contain 2 chaning rooms
( at 25 sq.ft, each)
* Visual Control of course #1 and 10 tees, #9 and 18 greens, practice area, cart staging area
* Ceiling 9 foot minimum, variable to roof
* Furnishing Glass/wood display cases, card table and 4 chairs, bag and club display, show display with bench
* See NGF article on shop design
* Circulation should be arranged to get maximum traffic thru the shop
DESIGN PAR) \METERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC '
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
* r SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.


SPACE
PRO SHOP AREA -CLUB REPAIR & BAG STORAGE
SIZE(SQ.FT.)
REPAIR 80 Sq.Ft. STORAGE 525 Sq.Ft.
USER
'* Golf Shop Sta
ACTIVITIES
*
*
Storage of golf bags Repair of clubs
-x
*
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
Functional
Easy Maintenance washable concrete floor, floor drain
Bags storage 1.5 sq.ft, per bag assuming 65% storage on 550 Members = 525 sq.ft, (storage can be vertical or horizontal)
Repair shop equipment Metal shelving, stand up workbench, sink with soils interceptor, grinder, balancer, vice, plug strip
DESIGN PAR/ \METERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL .
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.


SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.)
GOLF CART STORAGE 3000 Sq.Ft.
USER
* Staff
ACTIVITIES
* Storage, cleaning & repair of electric golf carts
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Easy maintenance washable concrete floors, floor drains
* Ceiling 7 foot minimum
* See NGF article
S.5
V4'
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC 1
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
* OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.


SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.)
MENS LOCKER FACILITIES 2195 Sq.Ft.
OVERVIEW SPECIFICS ON FOLLOWING PAGES
USER
* Male golfing members & guests (No children under 16)
ACTIVITIES
lockers mech.
shoe storage janitorial storage
showers general storage
toilets attendant station
dressing areas
spa card
steam bar
sauna
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Locker rooms should be bright, well ventilated
* Ceiling 10 foot minimum, variable to roof structure
SEE FOLLOWING PAGES
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES


SPACE MENS LOCKER FACILITY: MENS LOCKER ROOM SIZE(SQ.FT.) 1190 Sq.Ft.

USER
* Male Members & Guests ( No boys under 16)
ACTIVITIES
* Dressing & grooming changing clothes for athletic events
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Good lighting & ventilation important
Ceiling 10 foot minimum, variable
Floor spike resistent carpeting Furniture -
Metal/formical lockers cost efficient, wood expensive but great looking
See Diagram next page for layout Supply 50 fulllockers
150 half lockers
*
*
*
*
*
NOTE: More lockers?
' MeM&eiZS fOLL.
' fACOi&C
Fce- V2, *
* 'TYpic^h
\jauceyts in fspt
orv
o rn n
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC r
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
* f SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
fZorSTg-ou-) (^gp
I
i
AMMt-K ("p fcS


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SPACE MEN,S L0CKER FACILITY: SIZE(SQ.FT.) 250 Sq.Ft. &
CARD AREA & BAR 120 Sq.Ft.
USER
* Male members (over 16) & guests
ACTIVITIES
* Poker, gin, bridge
* Lunch, drinks & good old boy talk, anything goes here
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Mens private club atmosphere, casual dress and speach are the rule here
* Should be directly accessible from 9 & 18 greens & practice area
* Fireplace & "pub" amenities,
* Bar & Lunch service typically closes in evening hours except for private parties
* Views of course desireable
* Ceiling 10 foot minimum, variable
* Floor spike proof carpet
* Walls wood paneling works well in this area
* Furniture -
2- 3 poker tables, 10 15 chairs
3- 5 lounge chairs & coffee tables
* T.V.
* Telephones
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
C


SPACE
MENS LOCKER FACILITY SPA
SIZE(SQ.FT.)
125 Sq.Ft.
USER
ACTIVITIES
* Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
*
*
*
*
*
Ceramic tile walls & floor Recessed lighting Fiberglass Spa Sound system & paging Ceiling 8 foot minimum
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC '
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS - DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES



SPACE L0CKER facility SIZE(SQ.FT.) 60 Sq.Ft.
STEAM ROOM

USER
ACTIVITIES
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
*
*
*
*
*
*
Built in tile benches Tile walls, ceiling, floor Recessed lighting Steam system Glass door
Ceiling 8 foot maximum, sloped special construction
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC 1
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
(


SPACE MEN'S LOCKER FACILITY: SAUNA SIZE(SQ.FT.) 60 Sq.Ft.

USER \ DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC '
ACTIVITIES FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT * Wood finish * Built in wood benches * Wood door with glass light * Ceiling 7 foot minimum SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
(


i SPACE MENS LOCKER FACILITY: SHOWER SIZE(SQ.FT.) 100 Sq.Ft.
(
USER s DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC *
ACTIVITIES FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING natural'
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT * A individual showers * Robe/towel hooks * Built-in Bench * Ceiling, walls, floor-tiled SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
(


SPACE
MEN'S LOCKER FACILITY: VANITY & DRY DRESSING AREA
SIZE(SQ.FT-)
120 Sq.Ft,
USER
ACTIVITIES
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Tile- walls, floor
* Tile or formica counter with toiletries, hair dryers, etc.
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC '
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
(


SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.) MENS LOCKER FACILITY: Ar c TOILETS 65 Sq*Ft*

USER DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC r
ACTIVITIES FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT * 1 wc * 1 Lavatory * 2 Urinals SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.

ADJACENCIES


SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.)
MEN'S LOCKER FACILITY: 340 Sq.Ft.
SERVICES
USER DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC '
ACTIVITIES FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT * Mechanical/Electrical room (120) Pumps, filters, steam generator * Janitor storage Mop sink, shelves * Laundry storage (180 Sq.Ft.) SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES


SPACE womens LOCKER FACILITY SIZE(SQ.FT.) 1565 Sq# Ft<
USER
* Women Members & Guests
ACTIVITIES
* See Men's Facilities
* Descriptions identical, only sizes change
* Exception: No full Bar/Food service in womens card room
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
15 full/46 Half Lockers 360 sqft
card area 250
service bar (coffee, etc.) 120
spa 125
Steam 35
sauna 35
showers 50
vanity 120
toilet 100
janitorial storage 40
general storage 250
mech 80
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
# ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
1 f SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES


SPACE POOL HOUSE: MEN/WOMEN LOCKERS SIZE(SQ.FT.) 200 Sq.Ft.

USER
ACTIVITIES
* Day Lockers
* Showers
* Toilets
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
* Easy maintenance tile, concrete, floor drains, etc.
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES


SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.)
POOL HOUSE: 100 Sq.Ft.
ATTENDANT AREA
USER
* Staff
ACTIVITIES
* Towel dispensing
* Lost & found
* Telephone to clubhouse control
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
rEA


I
SPACE SIZE(SQ.FT.)
POOL HOUSE: 200 Sq.Ft.
SNACK BAR
USER
* Pool Patrons
ACTIVITIES
*
*
*
Prepare & serve food Primarily lunch sandwich Type items
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT
Grill, deep fryer, sinks, refridgera-tion, storage, food preperation area
service control
DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL SOCIAL
ZONE ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
LIGHTING NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES


I

(


SPACE TENNIS SHOP SIZE(SQ.FT.) 2Q0 Sq Ft>

USER Men, Women & Children DESIGN PARAMETERS
FUNCTIONAL ZONE SOCIAL
ADMINISTRATIVE
ATHLETIC
ACTIVITIES * Retail sales of tennis clothing & supplies * Court reservations * Tennis lessons FORMALITY FORMAL
INFORMAL
SPECIAL
VIEWS DESIREABLE
OPTIONAL
NONE
lighting NATURAL
FLOURESCENT
INCANDESCENT
SPATIAL REQUIREMENT SPECIAL
NOISE CONTROL REQUIRED
CEILING HEIGHT 10 MIN.
9 MIN.
8 MIN
7 MIN.
ADJACENCIES
(T£*-ah J
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SITE ANALYSIS



SITE ANALYSIS
The Pine Creek Golf Course is located on the northwest portion of the development. The course was designed by Richard M. Phelps, Golf Course Architect of Evergreen, Colorado. The clubhouse site is centrally located on the course. It is bounded by number 1 and 10 tee boxes, the driving range, and the ninth and eighteenth greens. The site slopes from north to south at a moderate grade of roughly five to ten percent. The front nine plays uphill to the east/northeast of the clubhouse site, while the back nine plays west/southwest from the clubhouse along Pine
Creek.
There is a large stand of decidous trees (mostly cottonwoods) on the southern edge of the ninth green and fairway which effectively blocks the mai ntenance b uiIcing (a1r ead y c on s t r ucted) from view from the clubhouse site. The rest of the area is only sparsely populated with trees. Other vegetation around the site is primarily prairie grasses. However, the golf course itself has recently been seeded and eventually the site will require landscaping treatment such as sodding or seeding, shrubbery, flowers, and other plant materials conducive to the country club atom-sphere.
Currently access to the site is by a dirt road from Research Parkway to the south. While it would be possible to keep* the southern access when Br i ar g ate Par k way i s b u i 11, it seems i 11 ad v i sed from an aesthetic point of view to have the entry sequence include a trip past the maintenance facility. Therefore, it is recommended that clubhouse access occur from Chapel Hills Drive north of the site. A road easement will be available through the proposed medium and medium-high housing areas on the north edge of the site.
The land use plans for the northern site boundry was suggested prior to a decision on size and scope of the clubhouse facility. As a result, the Briargate Development Group is aware of the potential need to use a portion of the medium and medium-high housing zones for club purposes (such as parking, swimming, and tennis facilities). This accounts for the seemingly random way the buildable site overlaps housing zones on the map included in this report.
Views into the clubhouse site will come from the hillsides adjacent the Pine Creek Va1 ley. Tbe
1


development in these areas will be primarily residential with both single family and multi-family units planned. The clubhouse will also be highly visible from eastbound traffic on Briargate Parkway. Views of the maintenance facility are screened by the natural rolling terrain.
There are good views from the clubhouse in all directions. While there is a nice view of the front nine, the views to the south and southwest over the back nine are particularly spectactular. The distant views in this direction are of the mountains including an excellent view of Pikes Peak. Northern portions of Colorado Springs are visible at the base of the mountains. Middle range views are of the golf course to the west. Briargate Parkway will also be visible from the clubhouse but its impact will be minimised, as it follows the hillside, by the views of the golf course in its foreground and the mountains in the background. Short range views from the clubhouse include both the first and tenth tec boxes, the ninth and eighteenth greens, the practice green, the practice range and a small lake. This visual access to these important areas of the course is very important for the golf professional in the effective management and control of play.
Drainage on the site occurs from north to south down the hillside to Pine Creek (this also i n c 1 u d e s d r a i n a g e f r o m a b a v e t h e c 1 ubhou.se si te to the north > .
A preliminary soils report by Geotechnical Consultants Inc. for the clubhouse area of the site indicates the existence of several different soil conditions. Ground water rises close to the surface on the southern portion of the site and in some cases seepage may occur in this area. The soils engineers recommendations for the clubhouse area includes (1) Build on one soil type if possible; (2) Expect expansive soils on the southern portion of the site; (3) Expect the use of crawl space areas and/or overexcavation, structural fill, waterproofing and subsurface drainage over most of the southern protion of the clubhouse site; (4) Locate surface parking, tennis courts, and pool facilities as far north on the clubhouse site as possible to move c*bove the high ground water areas; and (5) Provide fill instead of excavating for areas/faci1ities requireing flat surfaces, as cutting in the surfaces may create active springs.
Utilities for the site will all be provided


underground -
In summary, the site possesses a nic of attr i bates Its south si opi
invites desireahle solar exposure, t.he east a.r e 1 ook i. ng uph ill over th holes, the southern view is or the d and lake, and the views to the west/ the most dramatic o-f all as they inc nine holes, northern Colorado Spring Peak as it towers over the -front rang of minor importance as they are only few weeks in early spring or late fal the prevailing westerly breeze is mod
e c omb i n at i on ng character The views to e front nine riving range southwest are lude the back s, and Pikes e. Winds are a factor a 1, otherwise erate.
I<3?' M


SITE ANAYSIS
sci



COLORADO
SPRINGS
VOOOWCN
VAltfV
-18-
PUEBIO



t
MASTER PLAN
BRIARGATE DEVELOPMENT GROUP N.E.S. INC.
GRUEN ASSOC
l l 1111 n00000@00Q[H0E]00000Q0
LEGEND
RESIDENTIAL VERY LOW (12 DCi cr. RESIDENTIAL LOW 12-S DU/*cr.)
RESIDENTIAL LOW-MEDIUM <5-0 DU m,.) RESIDENTIAL MEDIUM (0-12 DU/r,.
RESIDENTIAL MEDIUM-HIGH <12 20 du/m> RESIDENTIAL HIGH (20-2* DU/cr.
RESIDENTIAL HOLDING ZONE COMMERCIAL VILLAGE CENTER OFFICE PARK ihm-rim (XiktMi M. 110 (mi I CAMPUS RESEARCH A DEVELOPMENT INDUSTRIAL
GOVERNMENTAL FACILITY CHURCH
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MIDDLE SCHOOL HKX school COMMUNITY PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PARK PRIVATE PARK FLOODPLAIN mw FREEWAY EXPRESSWAY MAJOR ARTERIAL MINOR ARTERIAL COLLECTOR
COMMUNITY TRAIL ___________
PRIVATE TRAIL SRSEnHWMSTSr"
ON STREET BIKEPATH O POTENTIAL LOCATION OF PEDESTRIAN CROSSING




ITATI


-
MEDIUM
> MEDIUM-HIGH


MEDIUM
MEDIUM
\ MEDIUM


Co)o83
Vicinity Map
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LEGAL DESCRIPTION:

' .1.
A tract of land located in Sections 26,
27, 28, 32, 33, 34 and 35, all in Township
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il2 South, Range 66 West of the 6th P.M.,
I El Paso County, Colorado, and containing ,1374.7 acres, more or less

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water available at nominal cost? If the source is from underground water, arc costs for necessary well or wells and distribution piping normal? Arc there any special conditions regarding soil stability or areas of potential flooding which must be considered? In northern regions, what arc requirements for snow removal and protection from freezing?
It is very obvious, from the number and complexity of factors which must be considered in selecting the proper location for a new' clubhouse, that the answers can best be furnished by the professional planners, architects, and engineers working together as a team.
On buildings or projects of smaller scope, the professional first retained by the client or owner should make sure that the owner is willing to pay for additional consultation services in order to provide any specific detailed information and advice required. For every clubhouse and site, the same full range or questions regarding use, accessibility, appearance, and utilities must be considered and answxrcd. As previously stated, even the smallest clubhouse deserves the services of a qualified architect.
l ocating the Clubhouse
A rather standard country club style clubhouse entails certain considerations w'hich arc nearly always present. After soil and water tests, assume that our team of professional consultants has finally agreed upon one location on the property where the new- golf course clubhouse will be constructed. Each consultant has been given the green light to this particular area as the clubhouse location. It is now up to the clubhouse architect.
What factors must now' be considered? These w'ill include most, if not all, of the follow ing design elements:
1. Views available from clubhouse
2. Clubhouse building
3. Clubhouse parking space and turn-around
4. Swimming pool and bathhouse
5. Tennis courts
6. Maintenance building for golf course and clubhouse Let us examine each of these elements.
Many golf courses arc located in regions of spectacular views of mountains, lakes, or ocean. Even when this type of view' is not present, a golf course clubhouse does have available the very pleasant views of the golf course itself, and these view's should be used when establishing the final orientation of the clubhouse on the site.
Modern golf courses arc usually designed so that the first and 10th tecs, and the ninth and 18th greens, arc located near the clubhouse. There will also be a putting green somewhere near the first tee. There may be one or more golf course ponds or lakes visible from the clubhouse site.
It is a sad mistake when views of this kind arc ignored so that they are not visible from vantage points within the clubhouse building. A view thus ignored is an opportunity lost. Conversely, the architect who provides large expanses of glass to take full advantage of these views is indeed creating permanent joy for the club members or guests.
94


It is certainly desirable to provide a view of the 18th green, cither from the lounge or bar. All of the good views from the clubhouse site should be considered in the design of the rooms of the building, so, in the final analysis, members are happy with the magnificent views provided and do not feel that the architect muffed his golden opportunity.
A purely functional aspect of clubhouse architecture is to locate the golf professionals shop in a spot where the pro can have a good view or good visibility of the first and 10th tecs, of the practice putting green, and of the ninth and 18th greens. These items have been listed in order of importance and relate to how few people can effectively operate the golf course.
If located away from the clubhouse, the best place for the pro shop would be about halfway between the first and 10th tees. On very busy days, the pro will want to start golfers from both tecs, and it may cost him an extra man if he cannot actually see both tecs to control the play. Provision must also be made at the pro shop for driving the power golf cars close to the bag storage room. Sometimes there will also be a need for facilities for young boys to serve as caddies. These must be located close enough to the pro shop to control these boys before they are assigned to start working.
Site Considerations
Aside from the architectural style of the clubhouse, the building must function on its site as follows:
1. Provide for people arriving to play golf with golf bags.
2. Provide for people arriving for other club functions, such as dining.
3. Provide for people coming out of building to play golf, tennis, swim, or leave.
4. Provide service entrance for delivery trucks, garbage removal, and service vehicles.
Often a separate entrance is provided for golfers directly into the pro shop or locker rooms, and this arrangement can reduce traffic through the main lobby.
Obviously, some covered area for people to get out of or into their automobiles is desirable, if the driveway cannot be made continuous from the entrance through the unloading point to the parking space, then a turnaround may be needed.
Undoubtedly, it would be economical if the same locker rooms and showers were used for swimmers as for golfers. Because swimming pools are heavily used by children with consequent high noise level, many clubs want to have a separate bathhouse. In that case, the bathhouse would have its own zone for unloading and loading adults and children. Because of the children, bicycle racks may then be needed at the bathhouse.
Trying to provide an unobtrusive service entrance to the clubhouse will quickly separate the skilled architect from the unskilled. When you have to hunt to find a service entrance, it is a successful design. It is possible, of course, to help hide or screen the service area by proper landscaping. Often, however, relying upon screen plantings can be disappointing when the budget for landscaping does not allow the proper size of plant material to do the job.
95


One basic consideration for placing the clubhouse on the site relates to the topography or amount of change of elevation of the site. If the site is somewhat hilly, perhaps a single story building on more than one level would be good. On sites which arc flat, however, often a two (or more) story building will add interest to the structure. Without moving too much earth fill, it is possible to raise the entrance turnaround to the building to arrive at the second floor level. The lobby, dining room or rooms, lounges, and bars arc then at the second floor level, affording a better view over the golf course grounds, while the locker rooms, utility rooms, and golf pro shop arc on the first floor and come right out onto the golf course at that side of the building.
Parking Areas
Parking areas arc a necessary evil. It is not easy to build a parking area that will be attractive visually, although landscape plantings interspersed with the cars are very worthwhile. Unbroken expanses of asphalt or concrete should be avoided.
Considerations for parking areas involve location, size, arrangement, safety, storm water control, lighting, and landscaping.
Most clubs want the parking space close to the clubhouse front door. Some nonparking space should be designed for landscape beautification around the building itself and the approach to the building. A traffic pattern with one entrance, one exit, clearly marked, is desirable. Ideally, the entrance drive is arranged to bring people all of the way to the building, with only views of the golf course and beautiful landscaped grounds and the parked cars screened by landscaped plantings. The parking area can be divided into two or more areas, and the smaller size of each makes them less obtrusive. Asphalt bumps help keep speeds in safe ranges.
Fairly heavy golf play for almost any course would be 300 players for one day. If half played in the morning and went home, the parking area would be comfortable with spaces for approximately 150 cars since some golfers would arrive with more than one person per car. A private club needs parking spaces equal to at least half the membership. If additional overflow parking space is reserved for peak occasions, such as a golf tournament or a large club function such as a dinner dance, then the parking needs have been properly met. Most parking areas require about 200 square feet of gross space per car. Spaces should be marked and not crowded, especially for larger cars at private clubs.
Provision must be made for adequate storm water removal from the parking areas, especially if curb and gutter edges arc constructed. It may be that storm water from the parking area, as well as from the building gutters, must be run off across the golf course or into a golf course pond or lagoon. This will then become a matter of concern and study for the golf course architect.
Lighting should cover the total parking areas and be compatible with the general style of architecture, and, of course, all electric service lines should be underground.
Proper landscaping of the parking area will contribute to its appearance. By building a six-inch curb totally around a single parking space, and using this space for large shade trees and some ground cover, the expanse of automobiles will be broken up and softened. A good landscape architect will know how to handle this problem, and how many spaces should be reserved for trees.
96


Swimming Pool and Bathhouse
At membership clubs and resorts, there are many successful swimming pools adjoining their clubhouses, often with the lockers and showers doing double duty for golfers and swimmers. Usually, separate showers and lockers are provided for children under this arrangement.
Many clubs feel that large numbers of children using the pool are extremely noisy, so the pool and bathhouse arc built at some little distance away. This distance must not be so great, however, that the swimmers cannot easily use the same parking space.
Because swimmers and golfers will be using the parking space at the same time during the day, however, some increase in the number of parking spaces should be made. This number will be related to the designed capacity of the swimming pool and sunning deck, and can easily be calculated from available swimming pool data.
Tennis
s>
Interest in tennis makes it desirable for a private club to plan for at least four outdoor courts initially and to provide space to expand in the future. Just how many courts could be useful in the future will depend to a large extent upon whether or not the club hires a full-time tennis pro. If this happens, as many as 10 or 12 courts could be used at some future time.
Special consideration for tennis courts include adequate subsurface drainage under and around all courts, plus some landscape planting to soften the expanses of wire fencing.
Maintenance Building
The maintenance building is often located far away from the clubhouse site, and the clubhouse architect may not be involved with it. Sometimes it seems best to locate it closer to the clubhouse, and it then becomes a very great concern to the architect. Usually some compatibility of architecture will be desirable, and of course, coordination of utilities.
For most 18-hole courses, a maintenance building should be 50v.100\ or 60xl20\ or some similar size. A heated and air conditioned office space for the golf course superintendent and a heated workshop area are needed while the larger part of this building can remain unheated, or with minimal heat. There should be a concrete floor for the entire building, and a work storage yard outside the building should be at least 1/2-acre in size. This space will also park the workers automobiles. It should be thoroughly screened from view from the clubhouse and golf course by means of thick plantings of trees and shrubs.
r
97


00
Planners were blessed with a hill overlooking virtually the entire Earl F. Elliott Park Golf Course at Rockford, III. and golf architect Packard, Inc. of LaGrange, III. put it to good use. To reduce the number of staff members necessary to operate the facility, the clubhouse was situated on the hill so the pro shop was located close to the 1st and 10th tees and the lighted driving range. Golf car storage was placed In the basement of the structure. Swimming and tennis facilities for the park were located separately in order to prevent Interference with the golfing operation.


SOILS REPORT


Geotechnical Consultants, Inc.
January 24 1986
Briargate Development Group c/o Mallon Development 7730 North Union Blvd. Colorado Springs, CO 80918
Attn: Mr. Mike Brennan
Received
JAN 3 o ]98G
**>->, W7r ., i A Pr0f***,0"*l Corp,,.,^
Re: Pine Creek Country Club
Maintenance Building and Clubhouse Preliminary Subsurface Soil Investigation
Dear Mr. Brennan:
This report contains the results of a Preliminary Subsurface Soil Investigation for the Maintenance Building and Clubhouse at the Pine Creek Country Club located in the Briargate area in northeastern Colorado Springs, Colorado.
This opportunity to be of service is sincerely appreciated. If, after reading this report, there are points which you do not fully understand or if you have any additional questions, please feel free to contact us at any.time.
Respectfully submitted, GEOTECHNICAL CONSULTANTS, INC
V' \
'RRqinmann. P-
By: Martin F.'Essigmann, P. E
MFE/heh
GCI Job No. 1149-8
........
7730 N. Union Blvd., Suite 105
Colorado Springs. Coloiado 80018
(303) 528-1331


PROJECT SUMMARY
GCI has investigated the subsoil conditions present beneath the location of the maintenance, building and clubhouse for the Pine Creek Country Club. Test borings were drilled, to determine the relevant engineering characteristics of the soil and bedrock present. On the basis of these test borings, as supplemented by our previous experience across the project site, preliminary design and construction recommendations have been issued.
At the proposed maintenance building site, soft, compressible soils were noted. In addition, a very shallow groundwater table was observed. Because of these conditions, it would be our recommendation that the structure rest on a drilled pier foundation system to minimize the potential for foundation settlement. The required piers would penetrate the soft, saturated soil and transfer the structural load to the bedrock surface below.
At present, the precise design of the clubhouse has not been finalized. The test borings drilled in that area have been included with this report, but a general discussion of the foundation conditions and design recommendations are not listed. We anticipate that the clubhouse will be the subject of a second report to be issued at a later date.
Within the text of this report can be found additional details regarding the soil conditions present. Additional design and construction recommendations are also included.


INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL CONDITIONS
The proposed maintenance building and clubhouse under evaluation are associated with the Pine Creek Cduntry Club Master Plan. The subject of this particular report is the design and construction of the foundations for the maintenance buildi ng. Although test borings were drilled during the completion of this study beneath the proposed clubhouse, a detailed discussion of that structure will not be included. The clubhouse will be the subject of a later report which will be issued after the architectural design schematics have been completed.
The proposed maintenance building will be located to the east and southeast of the proposed clubhouse area. It will be situated just south of the Number 9 fairway. We anticipate that it will be of basic single story, slab on grade design. In addition to containing space for actual maintenance of the golf course equipment, the structure will house an equipment storage area, as well as offices, restrooms and other high finished areas. Fuel storage tanks are also proposed.
As shown on the attached Topographic Map, the maintenance building area occupies a west to southwest sloping hillside. Eight to ten feet of elevation difference presently exists across the proposed building area. Because of existing site topography, we would anticipate that some amount of earthwork will be necessary, prior to commencing foundation construction.
The general geology of the study area was previously investigated by GCI. Reports and maps previously prepared are available for this portion of the Pine Creek Country Club. The results of these earlier studies indicate that both the clubhouse and the


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maintenance building are located within regions of relatively shallow groundwater. Areas of active seepaqe were identified within this study region and water on the ground surface can be found from point to point. Within the area of the maintenance building, the active seepage conditions are not considered localized. They will continue approximately 500 feet to the west of the building, 300 feet to the north, 200 feet to the east and 150 feet to the south. It appears, therefore, that relocation of the maintenance building within a reasonable distance of the location presently selected will not provide relief from the existing shallow groundwater conditions.
As is oftentimes the case, where shallow groundwater conditions are found, lush vegetation is present. This vegetation results in a considerable organic layer being present which has an adverse affect on foundation stability and general site development. During general development, earthmoving equipment which travels on tires may encounter impassable conditions. Such an organic layer was identified by our investigation and will be discussed in greater detail throughout the text of this report. The native soil iri the vicinity of the maintenance building is of an alluvial origin. These alluvial soils are associated with the action of Pine Creek during the geologic past. The present channel of Sand Creek is found a short distance to the south of the area under investigation. The alluvium was deposited on the Denver Formation Bedrock which uniformly underlies the site. The bedrock was found at a depth of 15 to 20 feet below the existing ground surface during our field investigation.
-3-


FIELD INVESTIGATION AND LABORATORY TESTING RESULTS
Test Borings 1 and 2 were drilled at the'proposed location of the maintenance building. Several additional test borings are available in the area of the proposed clubhouse. Several of these available test borings were drilled in conjunction with this study while others were drilled during the completion of previous studies. All of the available test borings, both for the clubhouse and for the maintenance building, are attached to this report for your reference.
At regular intervals throughout all of the drill holes, samples were taken by our engineering geologist. These samples were taken using either a split-spoon sampler (SSS) or by bulk methods. The soils were visually examined and classified in the field and brought back to our laboratory for further detailed analysis. Representative samples were then selected for laboratory testing to further define the relevant engineering characteristics of the soils.
During the drilling of our test borings, shallow groundwater was identified in the region of the proposed maintenance building. The groundwater table was identified as existing at distances varying from 0 to 2 feet below the existing ground surface. The presence of this shallow groundwater will certainly be felt during the anticipated foundation construction and construction of other appurtenant structures.
In the vicinity of the maintenance building, three different soil layers will be found. Beginning at the ground surface, and extending to a depth ranging from 6 to 7 feet, was found a deposit of colluvial sand and clay. This deposit is guite stratified and.
-4-


at the ground surface r will contain a conspicuous amount of organic material. The amount of organics will decrease with depth. This layer is almost uniformly in a soft or low density condition and is saturated.
Beneath this first layer was found a deposit of sandier material believed to be of alluvial origin. At the bottom of this layer was found the bedrock which underlies the site and serves as the third soil layer encountered. The bedrock surface, at least at the two locations tested, appears to be relatively level and can be found at approximate site elevation 6727 to 6728 (Test Borings 2 and 1, respectively). At the maintenance building location, it appears that the bedrock consists of sandstone of hard to very hard consistency. At the contact with the overlying alluvial sand, some amount of weathered material can be expected. However, we would anticipate that the degree of weathering would quickly change with increasing penetration into the bedrock layer. At a short distance into the weathered zone, relatively unweathered, hard, bedrock should be encountered.
Each of the various soil types encountered during our investigation has been assigned a soil type number. The soil type number for each material can be found on the Drilling Logs in the third vertical column from the left. Several samples of these soil types were selected for laboratory testing and the results of these various tests are summarized on the logs themselves and on the soil summary sheets which are also attached.
(
-5-


GENERAL SITE DEVELOPMENT AND FOUNDATION DESIGN GUIDELINES
The presence of a shallow groundwater table and soft, compressible organic soils will have an impact on the proposed maintenance building construction. These near-surface soils are felt to be guite compressible and have a very low design bearing capacity. Because of the potential for settlement, we would strongly discourage the use of a conventional spread footing type foundation system for this building.
Overexcavation of the "problem" soil could also be employed under normal circumstances. However, because of the position of the free water surface, such an overexcavation would reguire the construction to penetrate below the free water table. This would result in severe construction difficulties and may reguire dewatering of the area. Since the bedrock surface lies at a relatively shallow depth beneath the existing grade, it is felt that a deep foundation system can be used and will represent an economic alternative to the spread footing design. This is particularly true when examining the possible conseguences of the use of spread footings in terms of foundation settlement, loss of building utility and so on.
Prior to commencing building construction, some amount of earthmoving will undoubtedly occur. During the preparation of site grading plans, as little cut as possible should be designed. Importing soil to the general site area from adjacent borrow sources would be encouraged. The normal cut/fill type operation is discouraged in the area of the proposed maintenance building because of the obvious problems associated with the shallow groundwater table.
-6-


To provide as much relief as possible at the building site during development, it might be advisable to construct an interceptor drain around the uphill side of the building, prior to actually commencing the reguired site work. The actual location and depth of this cutoff drain has not been determined at present, since it does require a precise location of the proposed building. However, since it appears that adequate fall exists across the property area, it does not seem that the design and construction of this drain system will encounter severe difficulties. As the development plans continue for this project, we can easily complete the design of the drain at a later date.
All fill used to create a level building pad .must be compacted to at least 90% of the soil's maximum modified Proctor dry density, ASTM D-1557 Prior to the introduction of the anticipated fill wedge, we would suggest that as much of the organic material as practically feasible be removed from beneath the fill. We anticipate the use of a concrete slab on grade for the interior floor system and the removal of the vegetation from beneath the fill which will ultimately support the floor slab and will help minimize floor slab related problems.
We would recommend that a drilled pier foundation system be used to support the structural loads created by the maintenance building. The drilled piers would extend through the new structural fill and the soft, wet, native soils, transferring the structural load to the bedrock surface below. Because of the wet conditions found, we would anticipate that all of the drill holes would require temporary casing to facilitate the installation of the concrete. Evacuation of the water from inside of the cased


hole is recommended, unless the concrete is tremied below the free water surface. The maximum amount of water allowed in the drill hole will be 6 inches unless a tremie is used.
All of the drilled piers should extend at least 3 feet into the underlying bedrock layer. At this penetration, the tip bearing capacity would be on the order of 35,000 psf. For that portion of the concrete shaft in contact with the bedrock layer, an allowable side friction value of 3500 psf can be used for design purposes.
Continuous observation of the caisson installation process by a soils engineer would be recommended. The observation is necessary to accurately identify the proper bearing stratum and to identify any anomolies which might be present. Changes in the design recommendations might be necessary if site conditions vary from those assumed during the preparation of this report.
Reinforcement over the entire length of the drilled piers is recommended. This.reinforcing should be at least equal to 1/2% of the gross cross-sectional concrete area. Additional steel should be used if structural conditions so warrant.
Around the perimeter of the building, a reinforced concrete stem wall would be constructed on top of the caissons. We would not anticipate the use of voids beneath the stem wall in this case, since the caissons are to be used because of compressible soils, rather than expansive soils.
After the grade beam has been constructed, then backfill on the inside and outside of the building can be placed. The interior and exterior backfill should be compacted to a minimum of 90% of its maximum modified Proctor dry density, ASTM D-1557. If the
-8-


uphill interceptor drain is not constructed, then some form of foundation drain would be advisable. This drain would help prevent saturation of the soil beneath the floor slab and might help alleviate floor slab settlement problems. If the building pad can be built up to elevate it at all points above the existing grade, and if surface drainage features can be constructed, then the standard foundation drain may not be required. Foundation drainage will be discussed at a later date as site grading and site development plans are formalized.
The interior floor slab can be constructed directly upon the newly placed structural fill. However, because of the presence of organic soils, we would suggest that at least 2 feet of new structural fill be placed beneath the concrete floor slabs. On the "downhill" side of the building, this recommendation will be achieved because of the existing site topography. However, on the "uphill" side of the building, this recommendation may require some limited overexcavation of the existing organic soils.
After completion of backfilling, the ground surface should slope away from the structure at an anqle sufficient to remove surface water. The uphill side of the building should be ringed with well defined drainage swales which intercept and remove surface water which is directed towards the structure. Water should not pond around the perimeter of the maintenance building.
Several below-ground storage tanks are anticipated. These storage tanks should be designed with the shallow groundwater conditions in mind. Special design steps should be taken to prevent the "floating" of these tanks as the stored fluid is


evacuated. The manufacturer's recommendations for anchoring should be closely followed.
All of the concrete in contact with the soil on this property should be made with a Type II Cement. Under no circumstances should calcium chloride ever be used.
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