Citation
Trapper's Loop

Material Information

Title:
Trapper's Loop thesis project for University of Colorado, Denver
Creator:
Takahashi, Julia
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
11 leaves : color illustrations, maps, folded plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
New towns -- Utah ( lcsh )
City planning -- Utah ( lcsh )
City planning -- Utah -- Trapper's Loop ( lcsh )
City planning ( fast )
New towns ( fast )
Utah ( fast )
Genre:
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Julia Takahashi.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
09453323 ( OCLC )
ocm09453323
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1979 .T33 ( lcc )

Full Text


RCH student papei^


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275 4647
Trapper's Loop Thesis Project for University of Colorado, Denver Julia Takahashi Spring 1979
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
AURARIA LIBRARY


Acknowledgements:
I would like to thank the following members of my thesis conmittee and others for their help and support; Dwayne Nifeiam, Brian Goodey, Noel Copeland, Devon Carlson, Joni Jones and the office of Gage Davis and Associates






BACKGROUND
SITE PARAMETERS
Site is located on the north facing slope of the valley near the major drainage/stream.
Views: tremendous views of the Wassatch Range to the west, southwest and northwest; views to the east are minimal.
Water amenities: major drainage to the north with large cottonwoods and willows; future development plans indicate park lands and a golf course for this area. Minor drainage/creek along the west edge of the site pleasantly vegetated with scrub oak.
Site vegetation: primarily meadowlands with some scrub oak and sagebrush.
Topography: site generally slopes 6 12%, dropping off more quickly along the eastern and north-eastern edge.
Climate: Winters are generally 8 months long and average 4 feet of snow build-up. However, the climate is similar to Colorado's front range so that lots of winter sun can be expected. Sumners are more temperate than in the Great Salt Lake basin. Winds cone primarily from the northwest with possible Chinooks in the spring.
Sun/Shade: Gage Davis and Assoicates' studies indicated that the site would be in the mountain shadow by 4:00 p.m. ,Decanber 22nd.


2

Wild Life: Although the Trapper's Loop area contains grazing areas for elk and mule deer the community center site is located along the edge of various bird habitats.(grouse, groshawk, etc.) Careful development of the site would minimize the inpacts on these habitats.
. v *
Soils: rather impermeable shale and silty clays and clay loam overlaying volcanic tufts.
LOCATION
Major urban development in the State of Utah, USA, has clustered along the foothills and valleys of the Wasatch Mountain range, leaving the beautiful but arid desert areas almost totally undeveloped.
Trapper's Loop is a full service residential comnunity of 15,000 population, that has been proposed in response to the growing demand for housing in the region. The site is a short 15 minute comnute to Ogden and a 40 minute drive to Salt Lake City.
The high elevations (5200' 8500'), mountain topography, cooler climate, excellent winter snow conditions, and proximity to major transportation linkages indicate that the site also has potential as a "destination" conference center and ski resort. Development of both potential uses would have a symbiotic effect by creating in the comnunity the interest, vitality, amenities, employment base and industry necessary for new town success. The Trapper's Loop concept is based on the AIA recommendation to use "growth units" as an alternative to urban sprawl. "Growth units" are "well designed clusters of 500-3000 dwelling units with a full range of physical facilities and human services that ensure an urban life of quality".
In the context of this site the conceptual plan shows two linked villages following a hierarchy of interpersonal relationships:
Corrmunity with a full range of facilities, services, and amenities.
Villages: community wide services and facilities
"Upper Village" relating to the ski area and mountain "Lower Village" relating to the permanent residential
population and the Dry Creek Valley
Neighborhoods: primary social units for residents and group activities.
Housing clusters.
Note that: circulation, open space, et cetera follow a similar hierarchy.


3
CIRCULATION
Major arterial bypasses the site to loop around the retail core area. . *
Conmunity center has two intersections on east and west sides which link a limited access or emergency vehicle road to the "retail loop".
Site circulation is best kept along the east, south or north sides in order to maintain reasonable (8% max.) grades.
Other circulation requirements:
local circulator bus stop
*' catch' basin for pedestrian movement through the retail area
locate and provide for a regional terminal for comnuter traffic to Ogden and Salt Lake City
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CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN A
LAND USE
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4
PROBLEM
In a new town it would seen that the success orfailure of its municipal and governmental functions is directly related to the development of a sense of community by its residents. This problem is compounded by the fact that many of the spaces and institutions that usually foster these feelings are non-existant in the early stages.
Analysis of new town problems has suggested that the social failure of new towns is due in great part to the lack of history and a sense of the past a sense of permanence. I do not deny that a senof permanence is important but I would suggest that the problem can be attributed to the two following needs:
A. The need for formal, informal and incidental social contacts between the residents during the course of every day.
B. The psychological ne-d to feel that one controls one's own destiny translated into a new town community this would mean the need to feel that the individual is invited to actively participate in the important decision making processes of government and planning of the new town. To
add to this need: people must feel that there are no secrets and no smoke filled rooms if a healthy government constituant relationship is to develop. Also, given the invitation to participate the individual will decide the level that is most comfortable for him or her.
Trapper's Loop is a proposed new town that will have two different population groups that will be partially separated into two different villages. In addition to the problems discussed above, Trapper's Loop has the problem of integration of the permanent and transient population. The permanent residents must still be able to feel that they live in a "real comnunity"; while the visitor must be made to feel like a guest rather than an intruder or patsy.
The municipal and community center is scheduled to be among the first structures to be built in the lower village. In a social planning sense it must begin to immediately provide for the needs of community development, participation and integration. Architecturally, the major problem to be solved (in this project) is not the creation of a monument to civic pride but rather the creation of spaces that encourage, support, and serve the processes of democracy in a new town.


GORE
The specific response of this project involves the-concept of a "community core".
"The core is not one space or one activity, but an idea expressed now here, now there, now by one activity, now by another, though reading its highest expression within a definite but not rigidly bounded space." ClAM, '52
the core is singular and man-made
it must express contemporary social habits yet respond to change
the core is not a rigid plan but a clear and definite space conception
the core is an expression of person to person and individual to canmunity relationships
People need a sense of belonging and participating in a group. This need is manifested in all levels of society: family, extended family, interest groups, neighborhoods, and community. In the transient society of the contemporary USA, outlets for this need are insufficient. It is vitally important that urban development begins to provide structures in which interpersonal and group interactions spontaneously grow and are nutured.
There is a similarity between the growth of a new canmunity today and the historic development of villages:
people group together for services
place of gathering is along a transportation link or as a satellite of a larger urban area.
village development is clustered around a centrally located exterior community space


6
Medieval Town
Thus for a newly developing cormiunity the core takes on a special significance as a:
symbolic center
gathering place
meeting place
for residents engaged in a new and uncertain experiment.
Given the above considerations the new community response to a municipal center would have to include these parameters:
provide meeting places that are used frequently
act as a symbolic center for the community
provide a place for community celebration
allow for the provision of certain community services at the onset of development with other services phased to population growth


To supplement the activity of the corrmercial area and to fill the parameters, the Trapper's Loop Municipal Center will be multi-functional and serve as a focus for larger corrmunity activities. "*> *
FUNCTIONS: Corrmunity meeting space
Municipal government offices
Municipal courts
Police station
Post Office
Library
Exterior space for large gatherings and corrmunity events
Relationships within the core area:
Initial development plans include the construction of the first phases of the municipal center. The corrmercial areas and other core functions will be phased to meet the requirements of a growing corrmunity.


THESIS PROPOSAL
The major emphasis of this proposal is the integration of the municipal complex into the daily activities of the"-residents, this has been achieved by the following points:
Grouping major public functions together: council chambers, municipal departments, ccrrmunity meeting spaces, library, police station and post office and regional transportation center.
Integrating non-governmental functions into the complex that support those functions and provide a continuity of use patterns with the commercial core:
cafe
retail space commuter bus terminal
Creating cross circulation patterns and use adjacencies that encourage casual social interaction.
Creating a flow of space that begins to make government functions more accessable.
Organization of the complex around a series of exterior spaces to:
1. Create the historically precedented town square that acts as the symbolic center for the town and provides for an exterior room informal and formal -community celebrations
2. Begin a pattern of a close relationship of building occupants with nature that will continue throughout the village.
3. Augment circulation and necessary separation of functions.
Use of a scale and roof form pattern that begins to be contiguous with the village pattern thus emphasizing the town square as the village center rather than the municipal buildings (note: site highly visible from above by other sections of the village).


Provision of spaces for social interaction that will otherwise be lacking during the early growth periods of the town
*"Town living roans" ,
*cafe
meeting rocxns and flexible large hall retail space
rentable office space for comnunity oriented organizations and services


PROGRAM SUMMARY
(from original program for target population of
7,500 10,000)
Municipal Government Center
Administration
public reception office space ancillary space
Finance
public reception office space
Ccmnunity Development reception office conference
Other
350
2200
150
100
700
350
2000
180
1100
sub total 7130 square feet
Library
entries 250 circulation desk 400 reference 200 periodicals 250 stacks 2200 kid's area 1000 office 225 processing 350 other 1000
sub total 5875 square feet
Courts and Conference
clerk and court administration 300 attorney workspace 150 conference space 600 lobby 300 council chambers/courtrocrn 1600 other 600
sub total 3550


Post Office
offices
lobbies
workroom
other
Police
reception
office and records
lab
evidence storage
lounge
briefing
dispatch
interview rooms
booking
holding
locker rooms
other
Commercial
120
970
4500
1000
sub total 6590
350
750
150
400
150
150
250
320
200
200
500
500
sub total 3920
6000 = 33,065
Circulation
Police vehicles
Docks
Parking
Total
5 spaces 5600 sq. ft. 100 150 spaces


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