Citation
Mesa Developmental Services office and educational facilities

Material Information

Title:
Mesa Developmental Services office and educational facilities
Creator:
Wahbeh, E. Joanne
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
105 pages : illustrations, charts, maps, plans ; 22 x 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Developmentally disabled -- Services for -- Colorado -- Grand Junction ( lcsh )
Mental retardation facilities -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Grand Junction ( lcsh )
Developmentally disabled -- Services for ( fast )
Mental retardation facilities ( fast )
Colorado -- Grand Junction ( fast )
Genre:
Designs and plans. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Designs and plans ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 103-105).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and Planning.
General Note:
"Rural Community Assistance Program, Center for Community Development and Design."
General Note:
"Funding for this project was made possible through a contract between the Department of Local Affairs, State of Colorado and the Center for Community Development and Design."
Statement of Responsibility:
prepared by E. Joanne Wahbeh.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
13279395 ( OCLC )
ocm13279395
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1985 .W336 ( lcc )

Full Text
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MESA DEVELOPMENTTAL SERVICFS
OFFICE & EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES-


I
MESA DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES
OFHCE AND EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES
An architectural thesis presented to the University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture
Fall 195
Prepared by:
E. Joanne Wahbeh
Rural Community Assistance Program
Center for Community Development and Design
University of Colorado at Denver
1100 Fourteenth Street
Denver, Colorado 80202
Funding for this project was made possible through a contract between the Department of Local Affairs, State of Colorado and the Center for Community Development and Design, University of Colorado at Denver.
CU-Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution.


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The thesis of E Joanne Wahbeh is approved.
University of Colorado at Denver
December, 1985


INTRODUCTION


The proposed facility for this thesis project is a building programmed and designed for Mesa
Developmental Services in Grand Junction, Colorado. The building shall house office and conference space for a staff of 30-35 in
combination with a pre-school and infant-
stimulation program for 40-45 developmentally delayed children. Square footage is estimated to be approximately 10,000-12,000 s.f. The project is under the auspices of the Center for Community Development and Design, University of Colorado at Denver.
The thesis project will include:
1. Developing a perceptive and realistic program for the facility taking into account the anticipated growth of the organization and children's program.
2. Analyzing and selecting a site from several given alternatives.
3. Designing a facility for Mesa Developmental Services that meets the goals and objectives of the organization.
^PROJECT DESCRIPTIONi
1


The concerns with providing programs to help the developmentally disabled deal with their handicaps is growing. The continuum entails not only educational and therapeutic programs but also the facilities to house and support these programs. The proposed facility for Mesa Developmental Services is two indirectly related problems. First spatial needs and relationships are to be established for the core organization, which includes office and conference space for upper level administration, management and support services. Presently client contact and use of this portion of the building is occasional and minimal. Secondly the preschool and infant stimulation programs for 0-5 year old children who are developmentally delayed presents a challenge to establish more specialized environmental needs.
This project will focus on one overriding hypothesis:
Architecture does play a role in the
educational, therapeutic and support process.
To support this concept three main ideas will be explored:
1) Generate linkage with the community
2) Provide a least restrictive environment
3) Create an environment to stimulate development and direct behavior.
Generate linkage with the community:
Mesa Developmental Services was created out of the deinstitutionalization movement begun 15-20 years ago in the mental health field here in the United States. Because it is the community and the community-based board that provides care and training for the developmentally disabled, it seems essential and fitting that the facility should relate to this community openly and promote understanding and acceptance.
The facility should provide foi* normal contacts with community life and should not be isolated.
THESIS STATEMENT
2
By siting the building adjacent to shopping districts, parks, and business or residential areas opportunities for contact are enhanced. The facility itself should be open and approachable to encourage participation and understanding in what goes on here. Linkages will also be enhanced by allowing views of certain activities from main public circulation paths and facilitating contact-creating activities.
In order to implement the overriding goal of normalization the community-based facility should have an intimate and approachable scale created by clustering within the larger facility. The proposed building should also be in scale with the neighborhood where it is located in order to become a part of it rather than being differentiated. The form and its details should relate to the surrounding context and existing architecture.
Ultimately public attitudes are affected by the implications of the physical building itself. Therefore it should present a positive image and enhance how services and the recipients of those services are perceived by the public. Selection of materials and quality of workmanship should convey a sense of permanence and the value of the organization and its services to the community.
Provide a least restrictive environment
The least restrictive environment does not mean as it may seem open plans and non-structured programming. Instead it is defined as:
Providing developmentally disabled the opportunity to live, work and play in an environment that is most compatible with individual social, emotional, physical and cognitive abilities, allows them to develop.1
Therefore beyond providing a physically barrier-free environment which makes available the conditions of everyday life that are like the mainstream of society, the architect must be sensitive and responsive to the individual limitations of each developmentally disabled


person. This indicates that the facility should be normal in appearance, but be specialized to the inadequacies and handicaps that affect their abilities to relate to and function in the
environment.
An example of this environmental specialization is how the retarded and emotionally disturbed can become disoriented by unusual spatial treatments and lack of spatial definition. There is universal agreement that it is necessary to avoid ambiguity and confusion when planning facilities for the developmentally disabled.2 The advice is to keep it simple. Spaces should be clearly defined through architectural treatments. Materials that simulate others should be avoided. Contrast should be provided in surroundings to aid in orientation and location identification.
The facility also needs to be designed to cater to a wide variety of individuals with many different dysfunctions and degrees of disabilities. Therefore, the spaces should be flexible and allow for change. However, for the developmentally disabled an unchanging environment is therapeutic, so the need for change must be cautiously met.3 Certain spaces should be allocated for certain functions, but they must allow for changes that are routine and purposeful.
The physical environment in order to be least restrictive should also encourage risk-taking as a normal part of life. By creating opportunities for taking risks that give real evidence to users of their ability to influence their physical condition they will gain varying degrees of independence and find a sense of self worth. If
users help to modify their environment, that environment will take on more meaning.
The purpose of living is to get the most out of life; the purpose of buildings is to help people get the most out of life.4
Create an Envi ronmerit to Stimulate Development and Direct Behavior
Environment should be looked at in its entirety as a complex system of factors that shape human behavior. The effect of the environment on behavior is specifically determined by color, space, noise, light, temperature, adjacencies, etc. interacting with social and human variables. Thus, the performance of the users is influenced by interpersonal stimuli and the opportunities and demands of the physical milieu. As an architect the challenge is to create learning and working environments that stimulate the individual to reach for new experiences and understandings.
Specifically, a greater sense of self can be enhanced by providing appropriate scale to surroundings. Sense of self would also be promoted by allowing the individual his/her own material belongings that are available constantly, as well as providing a personal private space in the work or educative setting.
Often times the developmentally disabled can't grasp the meaning of time in relation to space and movement. To provide a space/time continuum, we should avoid identical, repetitive elements in space and instead provide sequential experiences of graded complexity that enable the developmentally disabled to choose paced alternatives.5
In order to provide a sense of security and
comfort that in turn optimizes learning and
productivity, we must practice true use of
materials, avoid highly reflective materials and
carefully design large areas of glass, especially differentiating walls from doors and windows. Structural integrity should be maintained by avoiding cantilevers and appearances of defying gravity. Excess use of mirrors can be confusing, although some use of mirrors can be therapeutic. Identical layouts should not be utilized.
We are concerned here with how the physical environment affects the educational and therapeutic milieu. Differing forces according to individual developmental needs within specific yet
3


varied groups must be considered to ensure intellectual physical, social and emotional growth. The task is to manipulate the environment in all its dimensions to enable each person to maximize possibilities for growth.
The architect who creates the physical environment which in turn encompasses and penetrates the natural and social environment to a great extent determines the scope and ability of staff and children to achieve.6
When we view this project in these terms, then our approach should recall the role of the environment:
.....to be an educational tool, to be a
physical support or challenge, to encourage appropriate social interaction and to be therapeutic.7
4
i
i


Mesa Developmental Services Is a private nonprofit organization mandated by the Colorado Legislature to provide comprehensive services to developmentally disabled residents of Mesa County. The organization Is one of twenty-two Community Center Boards in Colorado. The Board Is governed by a voluntary Board of Directors representing a diverse group of local consumers and human service and business professionals concerned with Implementation of progressive, professional programs for the developmentally disabled. Mesa Developmental Services exists to provide a continuum of community-based programs assisting the developmentally disabled to develop to their fullest potential. Programs and services are funded through the Colorado Department of Institutions, Division of Developmentally Disabled, the Colorado Department of Social Services, the Colorado Department of Education and Mesa County. (See Appendix A.)
Present offices and preschool are located in Grand Junction Just off North Avenue. The rest of their operations are decentralized throughout the community.
"Having kids astound x minds us what ive'/ie kexe. box."
BACKGROUND


A developmentally disabled person has disabilities that originated during the developmental years and will generally expect to continue indefinitely. The disability constitutes a substantial handicap either physical or mental of such severity that the person requires specialized services for an extended period of time.
These disabilities affect three major areas of human development:
1) Physical disabilities including orthopedic handicaps, neurological impairments and mild motor-related disabilities.
2) Perceptual/Intellectual disabilities including general mental retardation, speech and communication impairments, hearing and visual limitations and specific learning disabilities.
3) Social/Emotional disabilities including personality disorders, interpersonal behavior difficulties and impaired social and emotional development.
Developmentally Disabled Defined


Deinstitutionalization as a movement was begun in the 1950's in Sweden. The basic premise upon which it Is based is that each handicapped person shall live as normal a life as possible. Therefore to achieve this normalization goal, communities must find and develop alternative methods of care and training. There should be opportunities provided to prepare the developmeritally disabled to function in the community setting through programs of habilitation and training. The community should establish and maintain residential environments that are responsive and return individuals to normal community living. It must be pointed out however that the process of deinstitutionalization requires a delicate balance as some segregation is not always bad. Not all disabled people have the emotional or physical strength to cope with normal living and independence.
Since 1970, 24 public institutions have been closed here in the United States; 17 have been closed since 1982. All this was brought about by lawsuits originally aimed at improving conditions in institutions and resulting in community placement and integration. The number of developmentally disabled in institutions has dropped from 200,000 in the 1960's to 120,000 in 1982.
Specifically in Grand Junction, the State Home and Training School had a peak number of residents in the mid 1960's of 913. Today they house approximately 300 resident/clients at their campus facility.
This process of deinstitutionalization and normalization has brought about the need for new types of facilities to house administrative offices and therapeutic/educational facilities such as the proposed building for Mesa Developmental Services.
Long range estimates have been based on projected growth as the deinstitutionalization trend continues and expands. In two years, Mesa Developmental Services has contracted to take over the infant stimulation program presently contracted out to Hilltop. Within the past 18 months Mesa Developmental Services has opened four 8-bed facilities and they anticipate doing the same within the next 18-24 months.
The State says they will continue to deinstitutionalize. Medicaid funding is based upon this theory. Rather than rebuilding on the present campus facility, the State Home has built eight homes in the community setting which act as a transitional facility for clients' development. They differ from MDS in that they have medical monitors and some facilities must be locked. MDS has no locked facilities nor can any of their resident facilities accommodate wheel chairs. The MDS residence populace is made up by a formula up that says that five clients come from the State Home and three clients come from the community.
DEINSTITUTIONALIZATION


PRESENT FACILITY
8
Mesa Developmental Services is presently located in a metal building Just off North Avenue In Grand Junction. This leased office space is spatially and functionally inadequate. Noise and glare are two of the biggest problems as is the lack of space and privacy. Offices have been partitioned in the corridor. The corridor also holds most of the file storage, confidential and otherwise. The check-in space for the residential .staff is located in the service/restroom area causing great confusion and congestion daily. The building has little or no insulation and is expensive to heat and cool.
The preschool is located behind the office .building in the same block. Office space is shared and is very cramped. Occupational therapy's space is directly open to the classroom space creating a distraction problem. The kitchen needs to be larger and the entry is too narrow causing circulation congestion.
The general location of the buildings is fairly centralized enabling the clients easy accessibility by foot or bicycle. The staff has indicated location here as desirable also.
The preschool building was constructed as a day care center. Because of this bathrooms are located in each classroom, but they all have adult-sized fixtures. The playground located on the north side of the building needs more bike paths and shade. Equipment is movable and will be used at the new facility.


Throughout the research process specific goals were established which shall be focused on during the design process.
1. Understand and relate to the context according to physical, social and environmental implications.
2. Develop an architectural program that meets not only physical and functional needs of the organization but takes into account the interactive human needs as well.
3. Select a site that serves client, staff and community geographically, physically and psychologically.
. Be sensitive to needs for change and flexibility within the organization as well as allowing for future expansion and growth.
5. Design for low maintenance facility with minimal life cycle costs by:
a. using quality durable materials that will last and require minimal upkeep.
b. responding to the local climate to reduce energy costs for heating, cooling, hot water and natural daylight.
c. utilizing native landscape materials to reduce watering and upkeep costs.
6. Provide form that presents a permanent, stable image for the organization.
7. Provide exterior spaces to encourage community understanding, interaction and participation in order to integrate the developmentally disabled into the mainstream.
GOALS


In July, 1984 a request was made by Cheryl Jacobsen, member of the Mesa Developmental Services Community Board of Directors to Jon Schler and the Colorado Department of Local Affairs to establish programmatic needs and plan design options for a new or remodeled office complex to house Mesa Developmental Services. The request was made because their present facility is totally inadequate spatially and functionally and their lease on this building will expire in October, 1985.
An initial interview session was held with Anita Piscotte, executive director of Mesa Developmental Services, Jon Schler, myself and two of the community board members in Grand Junction in early September. This meeting allowed a first hand look at present facilities and gave an initial overview of the problem. After this the problem was then researched with visits to similar facilities in the Denver area and readings on developmentally disabled and their needs.
In early October a return visit to Grand Junction was made to obtain more specific organizational information and relationships within a group meeting with the administration and unit directors. This was followed with individual interviews with each unit director to get more specific information concerning each unit's activities and relationships.
Questionnaires were used to direct these individual meetings and interviews which aided in completing spatial requirement and unit information. One entire morning was then spent observing the pre-school activity. This was followed by a discussion with the head teacher and therapists.
From these information-gathering sessions and research of similar office and preschool facilities and written offerings, the basic spatial needs contained within this program were established.
PROCESS
10


'Mo-it pAeichool-i aw not attached to o^tce complex.
CHILDREN'S SERVICES
SAFETY: Environment must balance safety and
supervision against challenge and freedom. Zone passive and active activities, provide soft surfaces and safe equipment.
ORIENTATION: Environment should be clearly
imageable and be clearly oriented according to
physical clues and landmarks.
ORDER AND CONSISTENCY: Avoid confusion for
ambiguity and complexity for anyone with learning or perceptual problem. With orderliness and consistency, environment will hopefully be
conducive to entire learning process.
BARRIER-FREE DESIGN: All areas of building must
be accessible to the handicapped. Also try to expand activities in which all can participate. RANGE OF SOCIAL SCALE: There is a need for
variety in size and configuration of spaces and social groups. Spaces for one child, 2+ children, larger groups and child-adult interaction should be provided.
PACED ALTERNATIVES: Provide stimulation and
advance Skills but do not put unreasonable demands on abilities and produce frustration.
OFFICE
STAFF COMMUNICATION: There is a critical need for easy communication between various staff members because each client is tracked individually. Therefore adjacencies of the offices become critical.
COST OF MAINTENANCE: Attention should be given to potential costs of heating, cooling and repair of the facility.
FLEXIBILITY: Some areas require adaptation as
changes in workload and work type changes occur. SELECT APPROPRIATE MATERIALS: Provide good
acoustical ceilings and walls to lessen noise and confusion. Choose non-slip floors to diminish risk of accident. Easy to clean materials for soiling and spills is recommended.
DESIGN ISSUES
11


CONTEXT


This western Colorado city is the county seat of Mesa County. It is located at the confluence of the Colorado and Gunnison rivers on the Denver, Rio Grande and Western Railroad and U.S. highways 1-70, 24 and 50, 199 miles WSW of Denver and 210 miles SE of Salt Lake City, Utah. Located in a fertile valley about 4500 feet above sea level, Grand Junction is an important railroad junction and shipping point. In the irrigated valley pears, peaches, apples, cherries, apricots, corn, oats, barley and sugar beets are grown. Principal industries include the processing of beet sugar, canned and frozen foods and dairy products. Nearby are petroleum and uranium deposits. With oil shale and energy development emerging in the late 70's it was anticipated that rapid growth would take place here. However, these anticipations have not materialized and presently there are many vacant buildings available. Being the largest city on the western slope of Colorado it has become a hub for governmental and business enterprise.
Colorado National Monument is six miles west of the city. Grand Junction is the headquarters of the Grand Mesa National Forest. The site of the city was a part of the Ute Indian Reservation which was opened for settlement in lbbl. Grand Junction was incorporated as a city in lbb2. The State Home and Training School was established in 1919. Current population is 2b,lib.
GRAND JUNCTION
12


Grand Junction is sited in a very picturesque setting with irregular topography of valleys, mountains, mesas and beautiful vistas of the bookcliffs and Colorado National Monument in the background. The fertile soils in the valley are of three types: red sandy; light sandy loam; and heavy clay. Bentonite and uranium tailings are also prevalent within the area so soils tests are imperative for a new facility.
NATURAL ENVIRONMENT
13
I


GRAND JUNCTION,COLOR ADO sese
Longitude:108' 27' Latitude :39'03' Altitude: 4760'
4.00
3.00
2.00 1.00
I
Grand Junction, Colorado is located in a large mountain valley at the junction of the Colorado and Gunnison Rivers. The climate has wide seasonal changes usual to interior localities at this latitude, but because of the protective topography, sudden or severe weather changes are infrequent. This protection also results in a long growing season permitting commercial growth of many fruits.
Temperature:
The temperature ranges from 105 degrees P to 23 degrees P but readings above 100 degrees P are infrequent and about one third of the winters have no readings below zero.
Precipitation:
Ringed by mountain on all sides results in low precipitation in all seasons. Therefore agriculture is dependent upon irrigation. Winter snows are fairly infrequent and tend to be light and melt off quickly. Blizzard conditions are extremely rare. Normal precipitation is 8" annually.
Relative Humidity
Because Grand Junction is not located near a major body of water, the relative humidity is low.
Wind:
Winds are usually light in the winter. Gusty surface winds are rather frequent in the spring and early summer. The prevailing wind is from the east-southeast due to the "valley breeze." The strongest winds are from the south and southwest and are associated with thunderstorms and pre-frontal weather.
Heating and Coollng Degree Days
Grand Junction experiences an average 5405 heating degree days in a year and 1140 cooling degree days.
CLIMATE DESCRIPTION


SUN ANGLES Lot.38 9am Noon 4pm
JUNE 22 ALTITUDE BEARING CO ^ 75 0 37 92
MAR. 21 ALTITUDE 3^ 52 23
SEPT. 24 BEARING 58 0 70
DEC. 22 ALTITUDE BEARING 15 42 29 0 m
Ramsey, & Sleeper, - (1970).
Solar Radiation
Sunny days are predominant in all seasons. This abundance of solar radiation makes it a strong design element to be considered. It is an asset during the cold months of November through March and a liability only during the hot summer months of July and August.
Solar orientation of the site and strong gusting winds are important climatic factors which should be considered during the building design process.


VUH4P .
Grand Junction is located in a temperate climate:
* Winter sun is low in the sky.
* High summer sun will significantly impact roof surfaces.
* Thermal influence in summer and winter is critical.
* Seasons are equal in length and distinctly different.
Early Building Responses:
* Buildings with flexible perimeter spaces such as porches that are screened in summer and glassed in winter.
* Wide diversity in buildings.
Desirable Site Characteristics:
* Massive materials with earth berming dampen the diurnal swing effects.
* Protect from winter winds but have access to summer breezes and winter sun.
* Provide shade in summer to south and west with deciduous trees over roofs.
Building Location on Site:
* Outdoor spaces to south for control of access to sun and facilitate summer breezes.
* Variety of outdoor space orientations for seasonal activity.
* Provide shade in summer to south and west above.
Plan and Volume:
* Insulate 2 feet deep around foundation perimeter to prevent heat/cold from being conducted out.
CLIMATE ANALYSIS


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17
* Elongate building along east-west axis for maximum solar gain In winter and north-south cross ventilation in summer.
Roofs:
* Summer solar gain more than 2 times that of east or west wall.
* Light colored roof materials reflect hot summer sun best.
* Attics helpful but must be well insulated in winter and well ventilated in summer.
* Moderately steep pitch to south for optimum winter solar gain.
* Sloping north roof reduces north shadow on landscape.
Skylights:
* Shade against direct summer sun.
* Avoid snow accumulation.
* Operable for ventilation.
Windows and Walls:
* Double glaze windows and insulate walls to reduce heating and cooling needs.
* Orient offices and classrooms to take advantage of daylighting.
* Summer requires shade for south and west walls.
* South wall best for solar gain in winter. Avoid potential freeze-thaw and glare problems on south walls.
Entry and Outdoor Spaces:
* Place entries to avoid snow build-up.


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* Provide double entry air lock between used spaces and exterior to minimize heat losses.
* Place outdoor spaces, such as playground main entries in sunny locations.
18


PROGRAM


Spatial allocations suggested here are based primarily on information obtained during staff and administrative interviews and completion of a questionnaire.
Intent of the building is to encourage positive interaction and cooperation within the agency. A warm, congenial environment for all users is also desired. Groups within the organization concerned usually operate under stressful situations. Thus, the building should attempt to alleviate this pressure and lessen frustrations and anxiety.
Through thoughtful, perceptive building design, increased communication and interagency coordination will be benefitted.
Because present facilities are inadequate and do not accommodate present needs nor allow for expansion and predicted growth, approximations have been established at optimal levels. Although these spaces have been specifically programmed, a certain amount of flexibility will be necessary as the organization's needs grow and change.
"What m need Is some. place that's moae -isolated. It's so cUstAaating hene."
'SPATIAL ASSESSMENTS
19


MESA DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES
20


Mesa Developmental Services is administered by a management team comprised of:
Executive Director Business Manager Residential Coordinator Case Management Supervisor Psychologist Program Director Inservice Coordinator
These persons work together to assure that policies set by the Board of Directors are adhered to. Each is responsible for supervising employees and programs in their respective areas. The team is coordinated by the Executive Director and meets once a week to discuss agency-wide goals and objectives, problems, progress and plans, as well as those which are specific to the team member's area of supervision.
UNIT
ADMINISTRATION
STAFF
Executive Director (1)
Inservice Coordinator/media(+1) Psychologist (1)
Conference:
Small (1)
Large (1)
Development Coordinator Total
250 s.f. 250 s.f. 150 s.f.
300 s.f. 900 s.f. 100 s.f. 1950 s.f.
PURPOSE & ACTIVITY
Administrative unit oversees coordination and organiza tion of Mesa Developmental Services staff and programs They act as liaison for group with community and board. They provide leadership and foresight in goals and services.
MEANS OF COMMUNICATION
o Conferences: individual, small group, large group o Telephone o Messages in boxes
o Occasional non-structured interaction with staff
SPECIAL QUALITY OF INTERACTION
Needs to be located at hub of activity, yet at times needs privacy
Easy access to department directors is desirable.
SPECIAL NEEDS
o Central location to rest of units, o Image that is stable, organized yet approachable
unit description


USER ACTIVITY
o Supervision of entire organization o Liaison to community board and communi ty
o Individual interviews o Small conferences 6-8
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Natural light combined with good task light o Good ventilation o Pleasant stable image o Hospitable and approachable yet conducive to privacy
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Carpeted, neutral o Background for user personalization
o Small conference table with 6 chai rs
o Desk and credenza and files
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Needs to accommodate 6-8 people o Centrally located so accessible to all units and conference spaces
o Adequate storage and bookshelves o Lower ceiling height 7'6"-8'0" o Closed plan
SPACE
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
250 s.f.
22
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Coordinates inservice training and information
o Organizes and is responsible for media equipment and library o Individual and small group instruction and training o Research
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Some natural light Easily controlled for equipment use. o Soundproof & quiet o Quiet HVAC system w/ good ventilation o Need for adequate electric outlets.
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Durable, low maintenance materials
o Desk and large table required
o One wall (12* x 8) with shelves for book storage
o Locked for security of equipment
o File storage for inservice modules
o Need carrels for individual study
o Storage cabinets
SPACE
INSERVICE COORDINATOR/ MEDIA CENTER
250 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Centrally located o Equipment storage includes 2 monitors 2 VCR's
1 overhead projector
2 slide projectors 1 movie projector screen
tripod
carts
o Utilized by six people or less o Combination office and library space
space requirements
.. .... 23


USER ACTIVITY SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS SPACE
o Testing and counseling o Easy to clean and durable PSYCHOLOGIST
o Evaluation documentation o Avoid distracting HVAC noise
o In and out frequently and fluorescent lighting o Desk with chair o Table and 2 chairs o File storage and bookshelves 150 s.f. adjacencies
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS o Direct access to program
test space
o Indirect connection to administra-
tion and educational facilities
o Lower ceiling 7'6"-8'0"
o Non-open plan / V- \
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER / 1
o Hospitable & friendly V
o Warm and comfortable
o Daylight and task lighting ^;
preferred
o Soundproof
24
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Utilized by staff, clients, parents and interested others in the community o Needs to be physically accessible to all o Meetings and conference of variety of group size and purpose.
o Frequency of use varies o Inservice staff trainings o Staffings
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Generally artificial lighting due to inconsistency of use o Pleasant and comfortable o Good acoustics: for large and smaller groups
o Controllable ventilation for large groups
o Light sink due to closed plan
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Floors carpeted o Low maintenance surfaces and materials
o Durable for heavy use o Credenza for coffee service o Blackboard and screen o Conference tables need to be flexible acc. # of people participating o Need 50 chairs
DESICN CONSIDERATIONS
o Space required for 50 maximum o Portable screen wall which is acoustically soundproof to divide into 2 smaller spaces for simultaneous use o Storage for 50 chairs o Relate near entry and receptionist o Handicap accessible (see constraints)
o Minimum ceiling height 8'0" o Overall accessibility o Interconnection between departments (shared)
SPACE
CONFERENCE
(large)
900 s.f.
ADJACENCIES
space requirements
25


USER ACTIVITY
o Utilized for staffings and meetings of 4-18 people o Board meetings o Slide and movie presentations o Private interviews
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Flat carpet Blackboard Movie screen
o Conference table for 10-12 o Chairs w/rollers (12)
+ flexible chairs to
accommodate larger groups
SPACE
CONFERENCE
(small)
300 s.f.
ADJACENCIES
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Generally lighting artificial due to inconsistency of use o Good acoustics, for small group interaction
o Light sink due to closed plan o Good ventilation
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Flexible space for small-medium sized groups
o Can be separate from larger conference room
o Minimum ceiling ht. 8'0" o Overall accessibility
26
space requirements


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
SPACE
USER ACTIVITY
o Fund raising o Out of office a lot o Telephoning o Reports and interviews o Occasionally receive community resource people
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Daylighting w/task lighting o Good ventilation o Good acoustics for telephoning
o Desk w/file
o Enclosed space for privacy
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Small private office required o Little interaction with staff or clients
o Coordination with executive director and community board o Ceiling height lower 7'6"-80"
DEVELOPMENT
COORDINATOR
100 s.f.
space requirement s
....27
=1


"Avoid, the. Intimidating barrier o& the deik. A malt table is less threatening and more supportive."
28


The Business Department is responsible for all accounting, budgeting, financial statements, payroll and payables for Mesa Developmental Services. Because personal financial information is handled, a certain amount of privacy is required. Their work is such that it requires concentration and therefore needs to be located in a quiet, out-of-the-way place.
UNIT
BUSINESS
STAFF
Business Manager (1) 150 s.f.
Bookeepers (2 + 1) 150 s.f.
Computer (1+1) 150 s.f.
Total
450 s.f.
PURPOSE & ACTIVITY
Business unit is responsible for all of Mesa Developmental Services' financial coordination including payroll, financial statements, budgeting and payables.
MEANS OF COMMUNICATION
Communication is primarily internal with little outside contact. Mostly it is direct verbal with some memos, phone, conferences, etc. with rest of organization._____________________________
SPECIAL OUALITY OF INTERACTION
Because daily interaction with rest of services is minimal, it seems important to provide some indirect means to allow occasional meeting and socializing, avoiding total isolation for this
SPECIAL NEEDS
o Quiet space for concentration
o Privacy for confidential financial information handled
o Adequate storage for computer printouts
unit description
29


USER ACTIVITY
o Supervision of all accounting, budgeting, financial, payroll and payable activities o Coordination w/rest of administrative staff o Small conferences and business staff meetings
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Natural light and good task lighting o Good accoustics and ventilation
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Carpeted floors o Pleasant background for manager to personalize o Desk w/file o Small table and 4 chairs
SPACE
BUSINESS MANAGER
150 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Needs private office w/space for 4 chairs o Minimal traffic o Flexibility required for annual visits by auditors, Medicare, et al.
o Needs to be able to see what's going on
o Prefer a window o Present set-up works o Lower ceiling ht. 7'6"-8'0" o Non-open plan
30
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o All accounting activities including payroll, payable and bookeeping.
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Enclosed to increase productivi ty o Good task lighting o Adequate outlets o Good ventilation o Soundproof acoustics to muffle machine noise o Internal heat gain problems
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Carpeted
o Two desks and chairs o File storage
SPACE
BOOKEEPERS
150 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Provide storage space for 2 files (4 x 4) and computer printouts (61)
o Each worker needs own work area/desk
o Minimum ceiling ht. 8'0"
o Open plan w/equipment and hookeeper's space
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Word processing o Accounting activities (6 hours/day) o Future might include client information
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Quiet space away from noise and interruptions for concentration o Good task lighting o Natural light undesirable because of heat-up factor o Requires individual HVAC zone to control temperature
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
SPACE
COMPUTER ROOM
150 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Noise created by equipment necessitates need for private soundproof spaces o Anticipation of acquiring a second computer indicates creating a space that can expand
o Storage of computer printouts should not be in computer room
o Need table and storage for supplies
o Centralized location to business personnel and case management, o Space could be used as
thermal buffer because of cool climate it requires o Closed plan
(
32
space requirements


Services link the client to appropriate services in a coordinated manner, according to each client's total intervention plan. Case Management includes planning with the client and his or her family for services, organizing resources around a service plan, motivating the client and the service providers to work toward attaining clients' goals and objectives, and controlling the outcomes of their work through regular, periodic evaluation of client progress and review and modification of the service plan.
Case management is client-centered and provides for coordination and accountability regarding individual needs. Case Managers facilitate the individual program planning and implementaton process. They are not responsible for overall program evaluation, which is the responsibility of the administration.
\ I
I ____________________________J
CASE MANAGEMENT
STAFF
Director (1)
Case Managers (4 + 2) Special Needs Asst. (1) Case Aide (+ 1)
Total
PURPOSE & ACTIVITY
Case management does individual client intakes, service plans and coordination plus monitoring plan and progress.
MEANS OF COMMUNICATION
Conferences and staff meetings Report writing
(held outside office presently)
Staffing and interviews Telephone
SPECIAL QUALITY OF INTERACTION
Work interfaces with residential services therefore it is desirable to provide some indirect relationship so staffs can interact informally.
SPECIAL NEEDS
o Stuffings with 4-15 people go on simultaneously, o Admission meetings require space for 20 people, o Should be located near file storage and possibly near computer room if client records are transferred to computer system.
200 s.f. 600 s.f. shared 15Q s>f_ space
950 s.f.
unit description
33


USER ACTIVITY
o Personnel management o Review and evaluations o Liaison to Executive Director and to other departments
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Natural daylight combined w/task 1ighting
o Good acoustical control o Adequate ventilation o Light sink due to closed plan
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Neutral background for personalizaton of space o Desk
o Table & 4 chairs
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Office to accommodate 4-5 people
o Easy access to case managers and other unit staff o Direct access to file storage o Requires some privacy yet approachable and open to staff o Non-open plan o Lower ceiling ht. 7'6"-8'0"
34
SPACE
DIRECTOR
CASE MANAGEMENT
200 s.f.
ADJACENCIES
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Monitor client programs o Call staffings (1/year minimum) o Keep records on each case o Do intakes
o Spend 50X of time out at site (vocational day program or residents)
o A great deal of time spent on telephone
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Good task light and general .
natural light o Good ventilation o Soundproof acoustics
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Neutral background for user personalization o Colors that calm and relax clients (eg. blues or greens in muted or grayed tones) o Desk and chair o 2 extra chairs
SPACE
CASE MANAGERS
4 (+2) @ 100 s.f. = 600 s.f.
DESICN CONSIDERATIONS
o Accommodate 1-2 chairs o Acoustically soundproof as clients can be loud and disruptive
o Door is necessity for privacy needs
o Closed plan
o Lower ceiling ht. 76"-8'0" o Accessibility to client optimum
space requirements1
35


USER ACTIVITY
Special Needs Assistant -Serves clients' exceptional needs including providing transportation. Out of office a lot.
Case Aide -
Assists Case Managers with client service. Out of office a lot.
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Functional and pleasant o Daylighting and task light desirable
o Higher ceiling promotes light flow and heat dissipation
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o 2 desks with file drawer o Special Needs Asst, needs drawer to lock for medications
SPACE
SPECIAL NEEDS ASST. CASE AIDE
150 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Adjacency to case managers and director desirable o Spend great deal of time out and away from desk o Open plan promotes natural light flow
36
space requirements


The residential program is the only program which Mesa Developmental Services provides directly to the clients served. It is administered by a team comprised of: Residential Coordinator ARS Housemanager ICP/MR Class II Housemanager ICP/MR Class III Housemanager Residential Administrative Assistant This team is coordinated by the Residential Coordinator and meets once weekly to discuss program goals and objectives, philosophies, problems, plans, and progress.
The MDS residential program is organized as a continuum of services. Presently it only serves developmentally disabled persons over the age of lb. Once accepted to the residential program, a person is placed in a facility according to his/her individual needs. This is determined by reviewing pre-admission information such as psychological, social history, therapies, medical needs, etc. Once in the residential program an individual may move forward or back in the continuum according to his/her changing needs and the availability of bed space. Our primary emphasis is to provide a home-like environment in which an individual can learn new skills and increase his/her level of indeDendence.

UNIT
RESIDENTIAL
STAFF Director (1)
Residential Supervisors 3 (+2) @ 100 s.f. Residential Staff Check-in Recreation Therapist 1 (+1) Therapy Assistant 1 (+1) Training Specialist 1 (+1) Check-in Space .Group Facilitator 1 Behavior Specialist 1
PURPOSE & ACTIVITY
Provides and maintains six eight-bed residences for developmentally disabled in the community. Also, oversees clients sharing apartments and living independently.
MEANS OF COMMUNICATION
All residential staff check in at MDS office facility to receive mail and messages.
Various staff meetings and inservice training provide direct communication.______________
SPECIAL QUALITY OF INTERACTION
Because work interfaces case management and the program unit, it is desirable to provide indirect informal interaction to promote better communica-f-ion and relations with other units.____________
SPECIAL NEEDS
Influx of direct-care staff at check-in time (from 12:00-2:00 p.m. daily) adds noise and confusion so need separate entrance and acoustical control.
200 s.f.
500 s.f. 50 s.f.
600 s.f.
50 s.f. 150 s.f.
1600 s.f.
unit description


USER ACTIVITY SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS SPACE
o Part of administrative staff o Neutral background for user
to oversee and direct personnel management personalization o Desk and chair RESIDENTIAL DIRECTOR
o Does reviews and evaluations o Small conference table with
o Liaison between Executive Director 4-6 chairs
and residential staff 200 s.f.

adjacencies

DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS \
o Accommodate 5-6 people
o Provide shelving and desk o Perhaps allow room for a computer eventually o Direct access to residential
supervisors and therapy/training l (2^7. / J /
staff
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER o Lower ceiling ht. 7'6"-8'0"
o Natural daylight and task light o Good ventilation
o Open yet flexible to provide privacy o Light sink due to closed plan AmssrUwe
38
space requirements



USER ACTIVITY
o 50% time in office 50% time out of office o Write policy, job descriptions, personnel evaluations, do inservice and training, conduct interviews and investigations, hire and recruit o Liaison between direct care staff and administration
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Natural light w/task lighting o Good ventilation and acoustics o Light sink due to closed plan
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Would like small table w/2-3 chairs for individual conferences and staff reviews o Desk w/chair
SPACE
RESIDENTIAL SUPERVISORS
3 (+2) 0 100 s.f. = 500 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Need private space to talk to staff individually o Close adjacency to therapy staff and director will aid in communication and coordination o Closed plan w/lowered ceiling
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Recreation Therapist 1 (+1) o Therapy Assistant 1 (+1) o Training Specialist 1 (+1)
o Planning and paperwork o Away from office a lot o Flexible hours (some evening activities
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Good task lighting combined with daylighting o Pleasant and flexible o Higher ceiling promotes
light flow and heat dissipation
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Desks w/file (4d.) for each worker
o Locked storage for recreation therapy includes:
Sleeping bags
Backpacks
bikes
camping gear sports equipment arts and crafts materials o Shelf space
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Open for communication and interaction
o In and out of office a lot o Storage for recreation equipment adjacent
o Open plan with shared office space
SPACE
THERAPISTS SPACE
600 s.f. +100 (storage)
ADJACENCIES
40
space requirements


SPACE
USER ACTIVITY
o Both are floaters and use space as home base
Group facilitator
o Planning and paperwork o Possibly use as test space
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o 2 desks and chairs
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Functional
o Adequate light, acoustics and ventilation
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Flexible space for changing needs and requirements o Adjacent to large therapy group space
o Might be included in group therapy office
BEHAVIOR SPECIALIST FACILITATOR
150 s.f.
space requirements
41
T


USER ACTIVITY
o Transition space o Residential staff (32) checks in daily to get messages and mail between 12-2:00
o Essential communication space
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Acoustically demanding as socialization and interaction predominates during staff check-in and out o Good lighting for reading and writing
o Good ventilation for smokers o Internal heat gain problems periodically
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Bulletin Board
o Mailboxes for each staff member to fit notebook
o Space to write notes and responses o Storage for larger items (eg. can of coffee) to be taken to residences o Couple of chairs
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Requires separate entry from outside
o Located near residential supervisory staff
42
space requirements


1
f

UNIT
PROGRAM
STAFF
Director (+1) 200 s.f.
Follow-along 1 (+1) @ 100 s.f. 200 s.f.
Vocational follow-along
(+2) @ 100 s.f. 200 s.f.
Nurse (+1) 100 s.f.
Occupational Therapist shared 150 s.f.
Speech Therapist
Test Space 2 @ 75 s.f. 150 s.f.
1000 s.f.
PURPOSE & ACTIVITY
This will be a new unit within the organization to handle new and expanded service. Will be responsible for all educational, therapy and training programs for the organization within the facility and out in the community. (This includes the children's program although they are included on separate page.)
MEANS OF COMMUNICATION
o Direct client communication (one-on-one) o Conferences and staffings
o Work closely with case management and residential
SPECIAL QUALITY OF INTERACTION
Provide important support services for case management and residential services, thus needs indirect relationship for informal interaction.
SPECIAL NEEDS
Conference space needs coordinate with case management.
unit description^
43


USER ACTIVITY
o Personnel management o Program development & training
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Natural ight with good task light
o Light sink due to closed Plan
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS'
o Neutral background for user personalization
o Conference table with 4-6 chairs
o Desk with chair and file space
o Bookshelves
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Needs to coordinate closely with residential and case management
o Close relationship to program staff
o Closed plan private yet approachable
o Lower ceiling 7'6"-8'0"
44
SPACE
PROGRAM DIRECTOR
200 s.f.
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Follow progress of vocational habilitation of adult clients o Much of time is spent out at work places
o Record-keeping and writing
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Good task lighting o Good ventilation o Excellent accoustical control desi red
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Desk w/chair and files o Chairs for clients who come to facility for evaluation and planning
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Located adjacent to Follow-Along offices and Program Director o Higher ceilings w/open shared space plan
46
T
SPACE
VOCATIONAL FOLLOW ALONG
2 <3 100 s.f. = 200 s.f.
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Shared space utilized by nurse, occupational therapist and speech therapist
o Clients will come to facility for assessment and therapy. Workers will also go to clients in community
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Good task lighting combined with daylight o Good ventilation o Client use indicates need for good acoustical control
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Desk for each worker w/file and some privacy screens o Seating for clients waiting o Test materials and documents shelf storage on 1-2 walls o Equipment and cart storage
SPACE
THERAPISTS
250 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Adjacency to shared testing rooms is essential
o Open plan w/higher ceiling
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
Testing and assessment by therapist or nurse
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Soundproof acoustics for clients who might be boisterous or loud
o Comfortable, relaxing color and setting
o Good lighting and ventilation
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Observation windows with sound desirable
o Table with 2+ chairs
SPACE TEST SPACE
150 S.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Adjacency to therapist and psychologist office necessary o Privacy important o Lower ceiling and non-open plan
*1
I
space requirements


Mesa Development Services provides the case management component to the children's program. The programs have an Inter-disciplinary team approach with a strong emphasis on parent support and involvement in the program and on the team.
Infant Stimulation:
Services children from birth to three years of age. It provides early identification of
developmental delays, one-to-one training for the child in the home and in a clinical group setting, and trains the parent(s) in therapeutic and
educational activities for the child. This program allows the child to receive early training which will allow for maximum development in the child with a disability as he or she gets older. Children who are diagnosed by a physician as being "at-risk" for significant developmental problems may also be enrolled in the program. Programming includes gross motor, fine motor, self-help, social, language and cognition skill development.
Developmental Preschool:
Services are for children three to five years of age. Educational and therapeutic services, offered in half-day programs, are provided to assist the child in developing the skills needed to enter the most appropriate level of education possible, with an emphasis on integration in the public school system.
UNIT
EDUCATION(program)
STAFF
Head Teacher: 1 Teacher 1 (+1)
Speech Therapist 1 (+1) offices
Occupational Therapist 1 (+1) Physical Therapist (+1) therapy
room
Infant Stimulation Coordinator (+1)
Infant Stimulation Teacher (+1)
Infant Stimulation Therapy Room
200 s.f. 300 s.f.
450 s.f.
225 s.f. 300 s.f.
PURPOSE & ACTIVITY
Provide therapeutic and educative program and environment for variety of ranges and types of disabilities and their parents. Purpose is to maximize each child's potential.
MEANS OF COMMUNICATION
Direct communication via staff meetings and inservice training.
Staffings, conferences and open houses provide parent contact. . . better to avoid daily contacts
SPECIAL QUALITY OF INTERACTION
Coordination and communication about children demands an open situation for teachers and staff yet each area needs some ability to close off acoustically and visually
SPECIAL NEEDS
If money is available provide both child scale and adult scale furniture and fixtures.
Each room needs separate controls for temperature and ventilation.
Needs to be located separate from office facility or at least provide separate entry.
unit description
49


USER ACTIVITY
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Transition space from outside to classrooms
o Waiting area for parents
o Low maintenance materials for easy upkeep
o Seating for waiting parents (3-4 chairs)
SPACE
ENTRY
75 s.f.
adjacencies
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Pleasant, welcome space with natural light o Good acoustics
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Easy orientation to classrooms o Heavy loaded circulation space o Clearly defined space that is easy to become oriented in and avoids ambiguity o See handicap code review in constraints section o Higher ceilings o Bus parking for loading and unloading

space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Program implementation with activity centers including: dramatic play science music quiet reading gross motor fine motor
o Program is highly structured and staff to child ratio is low (1:3)
o Limit of 15 children/session
o Disabilities vary from year to year
o Grouped according to ability
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Avoid fluorescent lights -utilize natural daylight but avoid glare
o Good ventilation and acoustics needed
o Many activities occur on the floor indicating need for radiant heat system
o skylights would be less distracting
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Low shelves for easy access for children
o Sinks at both child and adult heights
o Some carpeted areas and some vinyl areas (eating and art) o Observation room with sound o Walls easy to clean
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Need flexible space divided by low shelves on wheels o Windows should allow view out for children
o Adjacent to therapy spaces o Ceilings 10-11' high preferred o Give each classroom clearly defined identity
o Dutch doors would enable intercommunication yet control children
o Hope to integrate with normal pre-schoolers
o Provide stimulating structured environment
o Drain to hose-down vinyl floors o Cubbies for children's own possessions
o Movie screen and projector o 2-way doors at entry
SPACE
CLASSROOMS
4 @ 575 s.f. = 2300 s.f.
ADJACENCIES
space requirements
51


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
SPACE
USER ACTIVITY
o Curriculum planning and coordinating o Review and evaluative reports
o Testing and individual tutoring
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Natural daylight and task light o Good ventilation o Minimize noise from HVAC system
o Small table and chair for children o Adult-sized table and 3 chairs for parent conferences o Coat storage for staff
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Shared office w/2 desks o Files for curriculum and program material and client records o Accessible from classroom
PRESCHOOL TEACHERS
200 s.f.
52
space requirements*


USER ACTIVITY
o Utilized by both occupational therapy and physical therapy o Large equipment
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Good ventilation and acoustics o Natural light
Avoid fluorescent light fixtures
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Certain apparatus need to be hung from ceiling o Observation room with sound o Mirrors (Avoid excessive use)
SPACE THERAPY
450 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Might need to divide for simultaneous use. Should be acoustically soundproof and easy to operate o Needs to be near therapy office and classrooms

space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Planning and coordinating therapy program o Record keeping
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Functional task lignting and natural lighting
o Good ventilation and acoustics
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o 3 desks and chairs o File storage
SPACE THERAPISTS (OT PT SPEECH)
150 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Shared space providing desk and files for each therapist
o Located adjacent to large therapy room
54
space requirements*


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
SPACE
USER ACTIVITY
o Testing and therapy of individual children
o Report and evaluation writing
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Acoustically soundproof o Artificial lighting o Quiet HVAC system that does not distract
o Observation windows w/sound o Child-sized chair o Desk w/file and adult-sized chair
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Located near classrooms as therapist will need to bring children to and from these areas individually
TESTING
2 0 75 s.f. = 150 s.f.
( !
-... 11 ..................... .... | "" space requirements
55


USER ACTIVITY
o Groups of parents and children work together in class instruction o Individual therapy o Parent training
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Provide coat and bag storage for parents and children o Certain apparatus need to be hung from ceiling o Carpeted and vinyl areas o Observation window w/sound o Adult-sized chairs
SPACE
GROUP AREA INFANT STIMULATION
300 s.f.
ADJACENCIES
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Temperature controlled to provide for infants and therapy
o Natural daylight
Avoid fluorescent flicker distraction
o Radiant heat would provide most comfort for floor activities
o Storage for specialized equipment
o Activities take place on floor
56
i
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Stimulate and enhance development of infants and toddlers o Educate parents and create team effort *
o Small group and individual programming
o Presently 40 children serviced and 11 on the waiting list o On the phone a lot
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Temperature controllable as much of therapy occurs on floor (separate zoning) o Natural daylight Avoid fluorescent o Acoustical! soundproofing for individual programs
SPECIAL REQUIREMENT^
o Observation windows w/sound
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Flexible office treatment rooms for one-on-one therapy o Accommodate infant stim. staff and therapists and psychologist from other services o Closed plan w/lower ceilings 716"-8'0"
o Easily accessible from exterior and main circulation space o Simple direct orientation
SPACE
INFANT STIM THERAPY
3 @ 75 s.f. = 225 s.f.
ADJACENCIES
space requirements
57


USER ACTIVITY
o Preparation of snack o Staff lunches o Storage
o Cooking activities as programmatic element
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Stove
o Refrigerator/freezer o Dishwasher a must o Storage of food and utensils (Buy in bulk sometimes)
SPACE
PRESCHOOL KITCHEN
100 s.f.
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Proper ventilation o Separate from classroom o Good task light
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Might be utilized for training clients for snack preparation therefore must be handicapped access
............I' ................ space requirements
58


USER ACTIVITY
o Play and exploration in natural environment o Gross motor and fine motor development and challenge-*
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Provide shade and wind protection
o Access to winter sun is desirable
o Two ground surface types required
SPECIAL REQUIREMENT^
o Fence or protective screen requi red
o Wide trike path and two other surfaces (sand, grass, concrete)
o Equipment on present facility shall be utilized and gazebo built
o Safe equipment mandatory
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Provide graded challenges to avoid frustration and further development and self-confidence o For safety, supervision must have full visual access to entire playground o Direct access from classrooms is desirable
o Trike/bike path necessary
SPACE
OUTDOOR
3750 s.f.
(50 children @ 75 s.f.)
ADJACENCIES
space requirements
59


USER ACTIVITY
o Hygiene o Potty training
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Natural daylight o Good ventilation
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Drinking fountain on sink faucet at child's height o 1 adaptive toilet o 1 changing room w/sink o Child-sized fixtures required
SPACE
PRESCHOOL RESTROOMS
25 s.f. @ 4 = 100 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Child size fixtures desi rable
o Need doors for potty training
o Locate in each classroom
60
i
space requirements


The clerical unit is responsible for all typing, filing and record keeping in the organization. They also answer the phones, screen visitors, do copying and order and distribute supplies. They need to be centralized and located near the front of the building to monitor what is happening.
UNIT
CLERICAL
STAFF
Administrative Assistant (1) 100 s. f .
Secretary Pool (2 + 1) 225 s. f .
Receptionist (1) 75 s. f .
Lobby/entry 125 s. f .
File storage 125 s. f .
Total 650 s. f .

PURPOSE & ACTIVITY
Clerical unit is responsible for all typing, filing and clerical production for entire Mesa Developmental Services organization. They are also in charge of supply coordination, answering phones and greeting clients and visitors.
MEANS OF COMMUNICATION
Primarily receive and return work through mail box system, but occasionally directly channeled, o Direct communication between each other important
SPECIAL QUALITY OF INTERACTION
o Duties require being located near the hub of activity and executive director yet need uninterrupted space for concentrated tasks.
unit description
61
SPECIAL NEEDS


USER ACTIVITY
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Supervision of all typing, filing, clerical duties
o Supply coordination including ordering and distrubution o Personnel (clerical) interviews and evaluations
o Carpeted o Tackable wall o Shelves
o Desk w/typewriter o In-Out box
SPACE
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
100 s.f.
ADJACENCIES
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Functional, yet pleasant o Good task lighting o Adequate ventilation o More enclosed than open o Light colors to enhance activity level
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Requires private space o Wants to be centralized in building o Communication with organization staff is via phone or box system for typing and filing
o Info comes from all dep'ts. to be processed and then returned or filed o Needs to be close to secretarial pool and receptionist o Lower ceiling 7,6"-8'0'1
62
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Filing o Typing
o Clerical duties o Answers phones o Secures relief staff o Odds and ends such as makes keys, etc.
o Supply procurement and disbursement
o Occasionally answer telephones
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Good task and general 1ighting
o Enclosed for acoustical control
o Ventilation adequate o Functional and conducive to concentration o Adequate outlets o Higher ceiling promotes light flow and heat dissipation
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Carpet
o Functional and easy to maintain
o Provide background -
encouraging personalization by user.
o Bookshelves for Medicaid information
o Supply distribution on one wall
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o File storage and xerox machine easily accessible o Typewriter noise needs to be controlled
o Work flow through mailboxes except urgent
o Very little client contact o Supply distribution:
Needs visual access, but should not disrupt.
Storage w/slanted dividers would be ideal
Locate on one wall of secretarial pool
o Minimum ceiling ht. 8'0" o Public accessibility not necessary o Internal heat gain problems
SPACE
SECRETARY POOL /SUPPLY
225 s.f.
adjacencies
space requirements*
63


USER ACTIVITY
o Answers phones for office and education facilities o Does some case management paper work
o Copying and filing o Receives, screens and directs visitors
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Pleasant and functional creating good image of organization o Good task lighting o Internal heat gain problems o High ceiling promotes good light flow through space and heat escape
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Coordination w/lobby finishes o Easy to maintain o Desk or counter w/space for typewri ter
SPACE RECEPTION
75 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Needs to be near conference room and entry/lobby
o Space for check-in/check-out of facility staff
o Visual access to front door o Indirect access to offices desirable, especially case management and program area o Increased ceiling ht. o Open plan
o Direct access to major circulation
o Possible shared interdepartmental use
64
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Storage of client cases and administrative files o Filing o Research
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Functional
o Good lighting & ventilation o Lighting artificial o Light sink due to closed plan
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Simple minimal finishes o Table and chair
SPACE
FILE STORAGE/COPIER
125 s.f.
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Must keep client files for 5 years, 0-2 years should be readily accessible, 3-5 years can be stored more remotely, o Needs to be locked o Requires total shelf space for 400 clients (8 x 100' min.) o Proposal to organize in 3-ring binders on shelves for client files
o Administration files 4-4' files
(+2)
o Indirect access from case management and administration o Possibly group utility space o Public accessibility not necessary o Possible interconnection between departments.
space requirements
65


"Rui.de.niJal and cabe management jobb and Kupovibi.bjJjJU.eJ> inteAfiace."


USER ACTIVITY
o Waiting to see staff person o Transition from outside to inside o Screening of visitors o Forms filled out
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Pleasant and welcoming o Natural light for reduced heat gain
o Good ventilation o Normal appearance o High ceiling promotes good light flow and heat escape o Internal heat gain problems
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Low maintenance wall and floor surfaces
o Thresholds flush w/floor o Door easy to operate (see Handicap Code review)
o 3-4 chairs and table for seating o Coat storage o Automatic doors ($?)
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Air lock door system to prevent heat/cool losses o Adjacent to receptionist and conference o Higher ceiling o Open plan
o Direct access to major circulation o Shared interdept. use
SPACE
ENTRY/LOBBY
125 s.f.
adjacencies
space requirements
67


USER ACTIVITY
o Utilized by facilities employees only
o Eating/food preparation o Resting/relaxing o Conversaton/socialization o Smoking
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
o Warm textures and restful colors o Carpet
SPACE.
STAFF LOUNGE
150 s.f.
adjacencies
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Not real big o Cozy and comfortable o Casual o Natural Light
o Good ventilation controllable
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Table w/6 chairs
o Couch and comfortable chairs (3-4) o Pop machine o Refrigerator o Sink
o Coffee machine o Dishwasher? o Operable windows o Lower ceiling w/closed plan
"Sta(j() lounge, should be a place wheat people can convene on take time oat."
I
I
68
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
o Meal preparation and cleanup o Food and supply storage o Service of meals o Eating o Socialization
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
Meet fire code stds.
Provide access for wheelchairs o Easy to clean and maintain o Differentiated surfaces
SPACE
CLIENT KITCHEN
adjacencies
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Pleasant and homey o Functional with adequate storage
o Good task and general 1ighting
o Good ventilation
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Proposed as a work training project for clients. Provide space for preparation and meal service for luncheon meetings and others interested, for minimal price, o Kitchen would need stove/oven, sink, refrigerator, dishwasher and counter space, o Room for 3-4 tables for meal service
o Access to rear entry for service and delivery o Near conference rooms o Lower ceiling o Open plan
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
Hygiene
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS '
o Easy to clean and maintain o See handicapped codes in constraints sect.
SPACE
RESTROOMS
400 s.f. F (4 stalls) 225 s.f. M (1 + 1)
25 s.f. shower
650 s.f.
ADJACENCIES
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Adequate lighting,
preferrably some natural-o Good ventilation o Pleasant and functional
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Needs to be centralized and easily accessible by all users o Handicapped stalls in both men's and women's required o Shower shared by men and women (optional)
o Lower ceilings w/closed plan

N
70
space requirements


USER ACTIVITY
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
SPACE
o Minor repair to vehicles o Furniture repair o Residence maintenance
o Small desk and chair for minimal paperwork
o Work bench (6 x 4) on rollers o Storage of tools and materials, supplies
o 10' garage door (overhead) o 220 volt welder o Outlets every 6'
MAINTENANCE GARAGE (option)
1200 s.f.
ADJACENCIES
ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTER
o Good overhead light o Heated space o Good ventilation fan
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
o Could be located in facility if space is available (or perhaps at a residence if not) o 9' ceiling clearance o Storage adjacent for paints and parts
o Janitorial closet adjacent
space requirements*
71


Square Footage
Office Facility:
Administration
Executive Director Inservice Coordinator/media Psychologist Conference: Large
Small
Dev. Coordinator
Business Manager 1 Bookkeepers 2 Computer 1 (1)
Case Management Director 1
Case Managers 4 (2) x 100 Special Needs Assistant 1 Case Aide (1)
Residential Director 1
Residential Supervisors 3 (2)
Recreation Therapist 1 (1)
Therapy Assistant 1 (1) Training Specialist 1 (1) Storage for Recreation Therapy Behavior Specialist 1 Group Facilitator 1 + Residential Check-in
Program
Director 1 Follow Along 1 (1)
Vocational Follow Along (2) Nurse (1)
Occupational Therapist (1) Speech Therapist (1)
Testing Spaces (2)
Clerical
Administrative Assistant 1 Secretary Pool 2 (1)
Receptionist 1 File Storage and copier
250
250
150
900
300
100
1950
150
150
150
450
200
600
150
950
200
500
6 00
100
150
__50
1600
200
200
200
250
150
1000
100
225
75
125
525
72
Square Footage
Support
Lobby 125
Staff lounge 150
Client kitchen 220
Restrooms 650
Janitorial 30
1175
18% Circulation and mechanical 1500
Total s.f. for office facility 9150 s.f.
Education Facility:
Infant Stimulation
Office/treatment rooms (3) 225
Group therapy space (1) 300 525
Pre-school
Entry 75
Teacher offices 2 (1) Therapy offices Speech 1 (1) 200
O.T. 1(1) 300
P.T. (1)
Large therapy space Classrooms(including rest- 450
rooms)2 (2) 600 s.f. 2400
Kitchen 100
Adult restroom 100 4250
18% Circulation and mechanical 750
Total s.f. for educational
facility 5000 S.f.
Garage 1200
Totals: Office 9000
Education 5000
15200 S.f.
Playground (min) Parking 45 spaces 4000
at 400 s.f. each 18000
37,200 maximum
Minimum site square footage 40000
SPATIAL ALLOCATION SUMMARY


SITE A: PARK SITE
Originally there were several sites mentioned by MDS staff as potential for the new facility. Except for three, all were existing buildings to be adapted. Because of the parameters of this thesis project for UCD it was recommended that a new building be designed. Therefore, the site information here (other than the site matrix) deals with the three vacant sites only. The final selection of the Site A: Park site was made after evaluating the following site criteria.
Location/Zoning
o Within 1st and 15th, Ute and Patton for easy access by clients on foot or on ' bikes.
o Present allowable uses.
o Outdoor playground space @ 75 s.f./child = 4000 s.f. minimum.
Traffic and Circulation
o Existing vehicular traffic around site o Existing pedestrian access o Parking: 45 spaces need @ 400 s.f. =
18,000 s.f.
Budget and Timing
o Availability o Initial cost o Life-cycle cost o Phasing/growth
Environmental/Architectural o Existing utilities o Soil conditions o Topography o Significant features o Existing foliage o Sensory responses o Climate adaptation
RITE CRITERIA'


SITE A: PARK SITE
Pros
- Within accessible area for clients to come by
bike or on foot. '
- Sufficient room for parking (45 spaces required)
- Sufficient room for playground (4000 s.f. minimum)
- Adjacent to park
- City-owned property (potential donation)
- Passive-solar daylighting feasible
- Near present facility location (2 blocks away)
- Good view of Colorado National Monument and Bookcliffs.
- Zoning is for public use building for which MDS would qualify probably.
- Adequate space for expansion and growth.
Cons
- Near 1st Avenue and North Avenue heavy traffic.
- Far from downtown and other social services offices.
- Soils test may be issue.
- Utility right of ways may limit building location on site.
- Surrounded by light commercial and residential
SITE B: PETROLEUM BUILDING SITE Pros
- Close to downtown and other social service offices.
- Within the accessible area indicated (1st and 15th, Ute and Patton) for clients to come by foot or on bicycles.
- Ample space for parking (45 spaces)
- Ample space for playground (4000 s.f.)
- Zoning
- Passive solar daylighting feasible.
- Adequate space for expansion and growth.
SITE CONSIDERATIONS
74
Cons
- Located on Colorado Highway 50 with heavy truck traffic.
- Purchase of land necessary.
- Soil test may be an issue as Petroleum Building has shear cracks visible.
- Light commercial and residential surround site.
SITE C: 1ST AND TEXAS Pros
- Located at edge of designated accessible area for clients to come by foot or bike.
- Traffic on 1st Street moderate.
- Utilities and roadways/sidewalks developed.
Cons
- Total residential neighborhood except for junior high school nearby. Might be objections by homeowners.
- Not adequate space for parking.
- North-south orientation necessary because of site shape.
- Land purchase necessary.
- Far from other facilities shops, etc.
- Site not large enough for footprint of building parking and playground.


The selected site for this project Is adjacent to Sherwood Park just off of North Avenue and 1st Street. The site is owned by the city of Grand Junction and has never been platted. Its location description Is: #29^5113-00-9^5, T IS, R 1W. Secll, SW 1/i).
This location provides a tremendous opportunity for Mesa Developmental Services to create a facility to serve their client and staff needs. It Is located within the designated area desirable. The site has excellent solar access, moderate shrink-swell soil and tremendous views of the parks and surrounding mesas and mountains.
It is serviced by 12" cast iron water line on 1st Street, or 6" cast iron water line from W. Serwood. Sanitary sewer of 6" flow to the west in the alley as well as 8" and 12" in 1st and 2nd Streets respectively. A 36" storm drain through the right center of the site drains south to North avenue and then west.
Soil
General soils information indicates that the site probably contains Billings silty clay loam, 0 to 2% slopes. More specific soils informaton would have to be obtained prior to construction.
This soil covers nearly one-fifth of the Grand Junction, especially north of the Colorado River. Locally it is called adobe and occurs on the broad flood plains and gently sloping alluvial fans along the stream.
Surface soil consists of grey silty loam clay that is hard, massive and calcerous. The parent soil is alluvium from Mancos shale leaving a moderate concentration of salts. Moderately fine textured it supports deep rooted crops such as fruit trees and alfalfa. Runoff is slow and internal drainage is very slow. Its tilth and workability are fair with low organic matter content resulting in slight erosion hazards and high water holding capacity. A high water level occurs frequently. (Summer A1, Winter 10').
Access:
The site is easily accessible from 1st Avenue or 2nd Avenue just off North Avenue. North Avenue is a main artery running east-west. The site would be in biking or walking distance for many of the residential clients.
Vegetation:
Presently there is little vegetation on the site. The park to the north has an abundance of trees, both deciduous and coniferous, and grass. To keep maintenance and watering minimal, it is recommended that landscaping be done with native, arid-tolerant vegetation. The exception would be the pre-school playground.
Zoning:
The site, which is owned by the City of Grand Junction, is zoned P4. See the chart p. 88 for setback and other pertinent information. Parking: 1/350 s.f. Parking need is estimated @ *40-^5
spaces.
Drainage:
The site is basically flat with an approximate water table of 10 ft. in the winter and ^ ft. in the summer.
A storm sewer is located to the center east of the site and flows south to North Avenue and then west. The additional run-off resulting from the construction of the new building and parking lot must be released into the canal at the "historic rate."
SELECTED SITE DESCRIPTION
75


1st Avenue
76
2nd Avenue


CONTEXT GRAND JUNCTION
77


N 78


CONSTRAINTS


OFFICE BUILDING
CODE SEARCH Project Mesa Dev. Services
CHECKLIST Search by E.J-W._____________
Date November 1, 1984
1. APPLICABLE BUILDING CODES 2. ZONE City County *
Fire Marshall UBC *
Building Official Consulted__________
Address _____________________________
Phone________________________________
3. FIRE ZONE 4. OCCUPANCY GROUP (Table 5-A_
______________________B2---------
5. OTHER REGULATIONS Colo.
State Board of Health____State Dept.of Ed.___Sign Code____Elevator Other X Social
_______________________________________ ______________ __________________________Service
6. FLOOR AREA (Chapter 5 and Table 5-C)
Construction type YN V1HR III-iHR TTI N II FR
Occupancy type J32_ 82 82 _. 82 _B2
Basic Allow. Area (505a) Fire Zone 3 Increase (505b) 8.000 14.000 _18,8QD 02*000 39,900
Added Stories Increase (505b) 8.000 1.4QQQ_ -18*000 -12*000 39.90CL
Side(s) Separation Increase (506a)
Fire exiting System Increase (3802d) 32.000 56.000 _Z2_*QQQ 48.000 159.600
Total allowable area Non-sprink. . 16.000 28.000 36.000 24.000 29*800
ACTUAL BUILDING AREA Existing Proposed Future Total
- 8,000 2.000 10.000
FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS (Table 17-a , unless noted)
Construction Type V-N V-1HR III-IHR III-N IL-J-R
Exterior Bearing Walls N 1 4 4 4_
Interior Bearing Walls N 1 1 N 2
Ext. Non-Bearing Walls N 1 4 4 A..
Structural Frame N 1 1 N 2
Permanent Partitions N 1 1 N 1 .
Shaft Enclosures 1 1 1 2
Floors N 1 1 N 2
Roofs N 1 1 N 1
Exterior Doors & Windows N N N N N
Inner Court Walls (504c) N N 1 N 1
Parapets Required (1709a) yes yes yes yes yes
8. WALL & OPENING PROTECTION (103 Sections Chapter 6-15). (Type I. II & III Const, see Sections 1803, 1903 2003) & Type IV & V Const, see Table 50A & Sections 1103 & 2203)
Fire Resistance of Exterior Walls for B2 1 HR 20 ft. _________________________
Openings in Exterior Walls Not alTowed 9. BUILDING HEIGHT (Table 5-D)
Allowable Stories for B2 : 3 (V-1HR) ___________________
Fire Sprinkler Increase (507)_______1 story _______________12 (IIFR)
Total Allowable Space___________Maximum Height 50/40/60/55/160
10. OCCUPANT LOADS____________________ ____________
Story ________1_____________________________
Occupancy Group__________B2
Area ________________ 8,000
Sq.Ft. per Occupant (Table 33-A) TOO
Total Persons per Floor__________24CT
Total Number of Persons in Building 114 + 80 = 194
11. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (Chapter 33)
Number Exits Required Each Floor____2 _________
Number Exits Required Total Building 2 x # of stories
Required Exit Width ________________
Ramps Required yes
Corridor Widths (3305b) ~W _________J-
Dead End Corridor LimitrT?304f~j 20'___________________
Corridor Construction (3304q) 1 hr inin.___________
Stairway Widths (3305 b] 1 44"
Stairway Landing Depths ( ^330TT) 48"
Smoke Tower Required (3309) No
Exit Signs Required (3312b) Yes
Exit Signs Separate Circuit (3312c) Ye?
12. OCCUPANCY UNIT LIVE LOADS (Chapter 23 Table 23-A)
50 for B2
13. OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Separations between occupancies Fire Ratings & Const. (Table 5-b) 1 hr.
Light ('05 Sections, Chpt. 6-14) = l/io 6 FA___________________
Ventilation _______ ___________B2_ * 1/20 6 FA____________________________
Sanitation_________________________________________________
Fire Extinguishing System Required(3802hT~ yes___________________________________
Dry Standpipes Required (3803) see Table 38A___________________________________
Wet Standpipes Required (3805) see Table 38A___________________________________
14. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
Verify buildings compliance with detailed occupancy requirements (Chapters 6 15)
Verify building compliance with detailed const, requirements (Chapters 17-22)
Verify building compliance with detailed code requirements. (Chpt. 28-43, 4Z-54 & Appendix)
Verify building compliance with const, materials. (Chpt. 23-28)
15. ZONING
Zone Classification (No. 2 above)
Offstreet parking required______
Offstreet loading required___
Building Setback Requirements:
Front Yard______________________
Side Yard_______________________
Rear Yard_______________________
Minimum Lot Area________________
Maximum Lot Coverage____________
Maximum Building Height:
Stories ________________________
Feet
Landscaping Requirements _______
Other Requirements __________
UBC
CODE SEARCH


PRESCHOOL
CODE SEARCH Project Mesa Dev. Services
CHECKLIST Search by E.J.W.______________
Date November 1, 1984_____
Building Official Consulted^
Address _____________________
Phone ________
APPLICABLE BUILDING CODES
City County ___________
Fire Marshall UBC *
2. ZONE
3. FIRE ZONE 4.
OCCUPANCY GROUP (Table 5-A_
E-3_________
5. OTHER REGULATIONS Colo.
State Board of Health___State Dept.of Ed.____Sign Code___Elevator____Other X Social
________________________________________________________________Services
6. FLOOR AREA (Chapter 5 and Table 5-C)
Construction type Occupancy type Basic Allow. Area (505a)
Fire Zone 3 Increase (505b)
Added Stories Increase (505b)
Side(s) Separation Increase (506a)
Fire exiting System Increase (3802d)
Total allowable area Non-sprink.
IIF.R III-1HR 11 IN V 1HR VN
E3 E3 E3 E3 E3
45,200 20,200 13,500 15,700 9,100
45,200 20,200 13,500 15,700 9,100

90,400 40,400 27,000 31,400 18,200
ACTUAL BUILDING AREA Existing
Proposed
4,000
Future
1,000
Total
5,000
7.
Construction Type Exterior Bearing Walls Interior Bearing Walls Ext. Non-Bearing Walls Structural Frame Permanent Partitions Shaft Enclosures Floors Roofs
Exterior Doors & Windows Inner Court Walls (504c) Parapets Required (1709a)
, (Table 17-a , unless noted)
V-N V-1HR II FR III 1 HR III N
N 1 4 4 4
N 1 2 1 N
N 1 4 4 4
N 1 2 1 N
N 1 1 1 N
N 1 2 1 1
N 1 2 1 N
N 1 1 1 N
N N N N N
N N 1 N 1
yes yes yes yes yes
8. WALL & OPENING PROTECTION (103 Sections Chapter 6-15). (Type 1. II & III Const, see Sections 1803, 1903 & 2003) & Type IV & V Const, see Table 50A A Sections 1103 A 2203)
Fire Resistance of Exterior Walls 2 HRS 5 ft.; 1 HR less than 10 ft._______________
Openings in Exterior Walls Not allowed 5 ft.; protected less than 10 ft.___________
9.
BUILDING HEIGHT (Table 5-D)
Allowable Stories E3: 4(1IFR), 2 (111-1 hr), 1
Fire Sprinkler Increase (5071 1 story_______
Total Allowable Space__________ Maximum Height
(III-N)2(V-lhr),l (VN)
T6'07S57WW40
80
10. OCCUPANT LOADS_________________________________________
Story____________________1____________________________
Occupancy Group E3
Area 4000
Sq.Ft. per 0ccupant~7Table 33-A) 35 s.f.
Total Persons per Floor 114________________
Total Number of Persons in Building 114 + 80 194
11. EXIT REQUIREMENTS (Chapter 33)
Number Exits Required Each Floor 2____________________
Number Exits Required Total Building 2 x ti of stories
Required Exit Width _______________________________
Ramps Required yes___________________________________
Corridor Widths T3319) 449 11 ___________________
Dead End Corridor Limit i [3305 "T201
Corridor Construction (; 1305q) 1 hr min.
Stairway Widths (3306 a ) 44-
Stairway Landing Depths 1 [3306 f) 48
Smoke Tower Required (3309) No Exit Signs Required (3312b). Yes
Exit Signs Separate Circuit-(3312c) Yes~
12. OCCUPANCY UNIT LIVE LOADS (Chapter 23 Table 23-A)
_________________40 for E-3
13. OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Separations between occupancies Fire Ratings A Const. (Table 5-b) 1 hr.
Light ('05 Sections, Chpt. 6-14) E 3 = 1/10 6 FA________________________________
Ventilation___________________E 3 = 1/20 6 FA______________________________
Sanitation_________________________________________________________________
Fire Extinguishing System Required(3802b) yes
Dry Standpipes Required (3803) see Table 38A__________________________________
Wet Standpipes Required (3805) see Table 38A__________________________________
14. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS
Verify buildings compliance with detailed occupancy requirements (Chapters 6 15)
Verify building compliance with detailed const, requirements (Chapters 17-22)
Verify building compliance with detailed code requirements. (Chpt. 28-43, 47-54 A Appendix)
Verify building compliance with const, materials. (Chpt. 23-28)
15. ZONING
Zone Classification (No. 2 above)
Offstreet parking required______[
Offstreet loading required______
Building Setback Requirements:
Front Yard______________________
Side Yard_______________________
Rear Yard_______________________
Minimum Lot Area
Maximum Lot Coverage____________
Maximum Building Height:
Stories ________________________
Feet ___________________________
Landscaping Requirements _______
Other Requirements _____________
Plumbing requirements: WC Lav V
Adults 3 2 1
Children 3 5
(minimum 1 lav, 1 wc/15 children)


Program:
Outdoor play required.
Equipment child-sized w/safety factor of 5.
Provide personal space for each child for coat storage, etc.
Play materials kept on low open shelves. Special centers or rooms for following:
Art
Blocks
Books
Dramatic play Large muscle equipment Manipulative toys Musical equipment Science
Building:
Must comply with Colorado State Health Department, local fire department, and Colorado Division of Labor, Safety Section and local building codes.
All heating devices must have safety devices.
Temperature of 72 must be maintained at floor level.
Total window area must be at least 10$ of total floor area.
50% of window must be operable and screened (16 mesh/sq. inch)
Mechanical ventilation system must meet all codes.
Electrical wiring must meet State Board requirement.
Electric outlets must be covered.
Corridors, halls, stairs must be well lit. Toilets: minimum 1/15 children, separate
from play space.
Separate toilet facilities must be provided for adult workers.
and be
Fire Safety:
Exits must permit prompt escape free and unobstructed.
Built and operated to avoid undue danger to lives and safety of occupants.
Door hardware must be within children's reach.
Exits and egress paths must be well lit and marked.
Fire alarm system shall be provided.
Infant and Toddler Room:
Must be on grade level only.
Must be completely separate from other age children.
Allow 50 s.f./child.
Maximum of 10 children in any area.
Outdoor minimum of 400 s.f. which is fenced.
No wading or swim pools allowed.
Must provide both sunny and shady areas. Can't be used by other age groups. Equipment must be safe and sturdy.
Each child must be provided with own personal storage space.
Services:
Laundry facilities must be separate from food preparation and toilet facilities. Kitchen must have proper preparation and clean-up equipment.
If prepared for 13 must be approved by State Heath Department.
Office space must be separate from the play area.
Storage for records is a must.
Isolation area for children who become ill is necessary.
Sleeping cots of 2" pad w/cover should be provided for each child who stays more than 4 hours.
Window coverings must be provided to promote sleep.
CHILD CARE LICENSING SUMMARY
81


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Space and Safety:
Indoor space of 30 s.f./child exclusive of support and office spaces.
Egress from each room must be direct to the outside.
Must have 2 alternative, remotely located means of egress.
No child of less than 3rd grade shall be cared for above or below floor of egress.
Outdoor Area:
Must provide 75 s.f. child.
Must be fenced or have natural barriers. Must be easily visible and supervised.
Must be well-drained.
Must have two different types of surfaces at least.
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General
Parking Lots: 12' minimum width parking stall. Avoid making individual wheel or walk behind parked cars. Spaces should be easily accessible to facility.
Walks: 48" width minimum. 5% greatest desirable slope. Should be a continuing common surface with no level changes. Doorways should have level platform of 5x5 with 1' extension on each side of doorway if it swings out. If greater than 5% slope must have 32" handrail required on at least one side.
Ramps: Maximum slope 1:12 or 8.33%. Should have non-slip surface. 6' straight clearance at bottom. Level platforms every 30.
Curbs: Should not create barriers. Should not be higher than 6 1/2". Avoid stepped curbs.
Stairs: Should not have square nosing, but instead rounded or chamfered. Shall have 32" handrail that extends 18" beyond the top of the stair. Risers should not exceed 7". Minimum width 3'0". All steps should have uniform tread depth and riser height. Stairs should be lit at night for safety.
Entrances: One primary entrance shall be usable by wheelchairs.
Doors: Shall have clear opening of 32". Should be easy to operate with less than 8# pressure. Floor shall be level for a distance of 5' and extend 1' on each side. Thresholds shall be flush with floor. 10" kickplate shall be at bottom on each side.
Handicap Code Reviewi
83


Corridors: 5' minimum width.
Floors: Non-slip surfaces are necessary. Ramp connections shall be smooth. Floor texture change for blind desirable.
Sanitary Facilities
Toilet Stalls: One toilet/stall on a floor must be accessible to wheelchairs. 2 d" open clearance Door should swing out. Minimum stall dimensions 3'w x it* 10" Toilet installed 19" above floor and wall mounted. Grab bars (1 1/2" diameter) place 33" above floor.
Lavatories: Clear space below should be 26" above floor level.
Mirrors: Place so bottom edge not more than 3'above floor level.
Urinals: Wall mounted 19" above floor or floor mounted.
Towel Racks: Mounted no higher than 40" above floor.
Water Fountains:
Spouts no higher than 2'10" from
floor. Wall mounted or provide paper cup dispenser 3'V above floor.
Phones: No higher than Hd" above floor Provide volume controls and tactile instructions.
Graphics: Raised letters and identifying devices mounted i)'6" 5'6" above floor Minimum height of 7'0" for suspended signage from ceiling.


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Operating Mechanisms:
Switches and controls within reach of all. Fire alarms and emergency devices should be no higher than 4'0".
Classroom Facilities and Equipment
Physically Handicapped:
Two exit doors required
Low windows for easy vision to
outdoors
Toilet facilities should be located in classroom.
Provide sliding doors on cupboards.
Deaf: Classrooms to accommodate b-10
children with minimum space of 65 s.f./child
Testing spaces should be directly adjacent to classrooms.
Treatment of room acoustically very important.
Mentally Handicapped:
30-40' bulletin boards and chalkboards.
Windows should be low to see out. Provide adequate storage.
Avoid high ceilings.
Provide furniture and equipment with maximum flexibility.
Avoid furniture with sharp edges or protrusions.
Clearly define spaces.
Avoid highly reflective surfaces. Utilize true use of materials.
Avoid identical layouts.
Differentiate doors and window from walls.
Source: Barrier-Free School Facilities for Handicapped Students
85




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ENERGY CODE REVIEW
86
Mechanical Systems
Exterior design conditions
winter: 3 degrees F.D.B.
summer: 90 degrees F.D.B
Heating degree days: 5629
Degree North Latitude: 39 degrees 03'
Interior design conditions:
72 degrees F. for heating 76 degrees F. for cooling
Mechanical Ventilation:
Minimum of 15 CFM of outdoor air/person based on 10 people/1000 s. f.
Building Envelope Requirements:
Construction should provide required thermal performance of various components.
All joints and openings in building envelope shall be gasketed, caulked or sealed in an approved manner.
Design of Mechanical Systems:
Energy recovery system which will conserve energy.
Each HVAC system shall have at least one thermostat to regulate temperature.
Shall have maximum temperature setting of 65 degrees F and minimum low temperature setting of 55 degrees F.
Zoning for temperature control demands that each floor shall be a separate zone.
Energy for air delivery factor shall not be less than 4.0.
Cooling with outdoor air automatically whenever its use will result in lower usage of new energy.
Combustion heating equipment shall show a minimum combustion efficiency of 75% at maximum rated output.


Electrically operated systems components shall have a coefficient of performance (COP) cooling not less than energy code tables indicate.
Insulation of HVAC systems is required.
All piping within buildings shall be thermally insulated according to code.
All duct work shall be constructed in accordance with ASHRAE and SMACNA standards.
Service water heating shall be energy and heat saving.
Lavatories shall be equipped with outlet devices which limit flow of hot water to a maximum of 0.5 gpm. and with self-closing valves that limit delivery to a maximum of 0.25 gallons of hot water.
Electrical Systems
Power Factor: Utilization equipment, rated
greater than 15W with an inductive reactance load component shall have a power factor of not less than b5% under rated load conditions.
Voltage Drop: Maximum total voltage drop shall not exceed 3% in branch circuits or feeders for a total of 5% to the farthest outlet.
Lighting Switching:
Switching shall be provided for each circuit so that partial lighting required for effective complementry use of natural lighting may be operating selectively.
Task Lighting: Levels of illumination are defined for task areas in Engineers Handbook Std. Rs.b or at all usable portions of task surfaces.
General Lighting:
Average level of general lighting
Non-Critical shall be one third of the level for the tasks performed in the area, but not less than 20 footcandles. Lighting: In circulation and seating areas where no specific visual tasks occur, level of illumination shall be one third of the average general lighting but no less than 10 footcandles.
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Source: The Colorado Energy Code feu
residential buildings.
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USE MAX. HEIGHT STRUCTURES FRONT SETBACK SIDE YARD REAR YARD
Pub!ic 65' P 65' M 65' C 55' L 40' 0710' See Regs. 0710' See Regs.
P = Principal Arterial M = Minor Arterial C = Collector L = Local
All front setback dimensions are from the center-line of the right-of-way.
ZONING
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