Citation
West side recorder, June, 1966

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, June, 1966
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3, Number 2
Published Monthly
June, 1966
WSIA Still Hopes For R emoval Of Old Fire Station
Mayor and Aides Meeting
With WSIA On June 30
ACTION COUNCIL ELECTED, BEGINS WORK
Mayor Tom Currigan and other City officials will be present at a general meeting of the West Side Improvement Association on Thursday, June 30. The meeting will be held in the hall at St. Joseph's
Former Fire Station at 3rd Ave. and Cherokee
More than 1200 residents of, Martinez, 363 Cherokee Street the west Side voted on MayjSilfred L. Ramos, 1333 Cherokee
24 to elect twenty-one mem- .Street; Albert Roybal, 950 West church, 6th"~Avenue and~Sda-bers. of the Westside Action15th Ave.; Bernard Trujillo, 674 pago St., at 7:30 p. m. Every-Council. This is the first coin- Elati Street, munity action council elected in Agency Representatives: Mos-Denver, and will be used asj s Cisneros. Director, Fairmont an example for elections in Recreation Center; Mrs. Eliza-other parts of the city ."The num- beth Kester, Program Director, ber of residents who showed an Auraria Community Center; interest by voting is one of the Sister M. Ligiiori, Teacher, St. | man Leo Gemma, highest percentages of. re- Elizabeth's School; Reverend sponse shown anywhere in the James Nugent, Pastor, St. Jos-country far. a council related to eDh's Redemptorist Church; the War on Poverty programs. Reverend Max Santamaria, As-
one in the community is invited to attend. The meeting has been arranged by the Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Association, with the assistance of Council-
Main topics of the meeting will be trash collection, incinerators and clean-up. The Board
Much of-the credit for the elec-1 sistant Pastor, St. Cajetan s Pf the Improvement
Cars and furniture stored in the building
Cars and furniture are now MAYOR'S ANSWER: being stored in the old fire, w h station at West 3rd Avenue and1 J Mayor Currigan answered on Cherokee. The Cifty states that April 14, quoting the City At-the Pappy Fry Development fraeY:
Company signed a contract to! "bn January 14, 1966 an ac-purchase the property from -he tion was filed against the Pap-City, providing that the Com-jpy pjy Development Company pony would tear down the, tQ compel compliance with the building. The sale followed terms of sale of the building at requests by the West Side Im- West 3rd Avenue and Chero-provement Association to have] ^ street. In this suit it is the land cleared. Zoning at, SOUght to obtain an order re-3rd and Cherokee is R-3, which quiring the Fry Development does r>ot permit warehouse Company to remove the exist-storage use.
LETTER TO MAYOR:
On March 7, directors of W.
S.I.A. Districts 7 and 9 wrote the Mayor, saying,
"In a listing in The Daily Journal, October 9, 1965, we noted that this property was to be purchased by Pappy Fry Development Company with the stipulation that all buildings, structures and improvements were to be removed within 60 days.
"Also listed in The Daily Journal, January 20, 1966, in the District Court there was a case filed: City and County of Idol. Denver vs. Pappy Fry Development Co., et. a1-
ing building. On February 3,
tion and the local interest is due to the Planning Commit--tee which was elected at meetings in the five census tracts in late March. Mr. Albert Moore, 1201 Cherokee Street, was Chairman" of the committee. Thirty-nine residents- were candidates for the fourteen resident positions on the' Council. Seven representatives' of agencies, schools and churches were elected from a list of fourteen candidates.
Elected members of the West-side Action Council are listed
Resident P) Representatives: Frank J. Clay, 1-3.14 West 10th Ave.; Jim Contreras, 731 West 11 th Ave; Joyce Ellsworth, 423 West 13th Ave.; Don C. Field, 142 West 1st Ave.; Ralph Gaschler, 928 11th Street; Donald M. Gallegos, 1237 West 10th Ave.; William Haidon, 45 S. Elati Street; Mrs. Carmen Hodges, 1114 Mariposa Street; Tustice Jaramillo, 214 West 5th Ave.; Larry A. Lucero, 1316 West Colfax Ave., Jose "Dan"
Catholic Church; Reverend Thomas Sepulveda, Pastor First ^Danish. Methodist Church;, Reverend John Ventura, Minister, First Mennonite Church.
Council Members Installed June 1
The first organizational meeting of the Westside Action
Association has been working for the setting of standards for trash containers and other ways of improving alley clean up in the area. Other neighborhood problems will also be considered.
Among the City department heads expected at the meeting are William McNichols, Manager of Public Works; Harold Patton, Sanitary Services; Jack O'Fallon, Building Department;
Council was held on June 1 at | Douglas Wigle, Housing Sec-Aurari Community Center. Installation of members : of- the Council was conducted by
tion of the Department of Health .and Hospitals; Tony Jansen, Zoning Administrator;
Judge Ted-Rubin, Chairman> of J^ck Bruce, Traffic. Engineer*
POLICE DISTRICT OPENS NEW BUILDING
Police son, in
re-
Capt. Leonard John-charge of District 3, 1966 the defendants appeared announces the opening of their and filed a Motion to Dismiss, new quarters at Io^a Ave. and being j University Boulevard, just north of the Valley Highway. This location is more central for the District, which covers much of southeast Denver. The same service to the West Side, south of 6th Ave., will be continued, even though the station has moved from its former location on Center Ave. near Broadway.
the Community Relations Committee of Denver's War on Poverty. Moses Cisneros was elected Temporary Chairman
and Joyce Ellsworth was chos-j West Side en as Temporary Secretary. A By-Laws Committee was ap-| Calendar pointed, with Bernard Trujillo as Chairman. Ralph Gaschler,
Justice Jaramillo v and William haidon were designated as a committee to begin consideration of proposed programs affecting the area.
On June 8 the Council began discussion of the By-Laws.
Representatives of the Westside Action Council, were elected to
and Joe Barry, Community Development Agency.
EVERY WEEK
Monday-and Wednesday Typing Class for Adults West High School, 7-9 p.m.
Adult Education, Room 111, Baker Junior High, 7 p. m. Greenlee School, 7:00 p. m.
serve as members of the Board: Thursday
of Denver's War on Poverty, i
the case, their motion supported by a brief as quired by the rules.
"On April 7, 1966 the Motion to Dismiss filed by defendants was overruled and defendants were allowed 20 days to answer the complaint"
Adult Education Tutorial Program
St. Elizabeth's School 7:30 9:30 p.m.
\In the answer to the complaint, Pappy Fry Development Company denies that the City has the right to make such a contract, among other things. Because of the crowded court docket/ it will be some time before the case actually gets to
"It has been observed by residents of Districts 7 and 9 that trucks have been unloading furniture into the building. We are concerned about the public health and public safety of our neighborhood and interested in keeping our neighborhood nice and clean."
The Pappy Fry Development Company shares the Pappy Fxy name with other businesses, including a car dealership. The telephone book has three Pappy Fry listings, all at 300 Broadway, all sharing the phone number 744-1071. If you think this is bad for the neighborhood, call Pappy Fry, 744-1071
Inc. Williarh Haidon and Bernard Trujillo, the two delegates, began their service on the DWOP Board on June 9.
Meetings of the Westside Acr tion Council are open to the public. Regular time and place of meetings will be scheduled I1111 13-24Vacation Bible
SPECIAL EVENTS
later, but information about current meeting plans can- be obtained by calling 244-3301.
Residents who are planning to be away for vacations, whether a long week-end or a greater, length of time, should notify the police. Officers will give special attention to homes during the dates the residents are away if the police are informed of the vacation times.1 The police can also give other suggestions about ways to safeguard the properties such as discontinuing newspaper deliveries. People who live south of 6th Ave. should call District 3 at 297-2974; north of 6th Ave., the number to call is 297-2851, the office of District 1.
SQUARE DANCING SCHEDULED
Square Dancing at Platt Park Recreation Center is scheduled every Thursday during June, July and August. Lyle Baker and guest callers will; conduct a workshop from 7:30 to 8:30 p. m. each Thursday, to teach the basic movements, and regular square dancing will follow, from 8:30 to 10:30 p: m. The program -is sponsored by the Denver Recreation Department in cooperation with the Platt Park Center, located at the corner of1 South Sherman andj Florida. For more information call 935-3021, 297-2401 or
297-2715.
School, First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 9:00 to 11:30
a. m.
June 20Well Baby Clinic sponsored by Dept, of Health and Hospitals. Mennonite Youth Center, 430 West 9th Ave., 12:30-4:00 p. m.
June 21, 22, 23Free Chest X-Ray, City and County Bldgv 1437 Bannock St., 10 a. m. -1 p. in.; 2- 6 p. m.
June 24Free Chest X-Ray, City and County Bldg., 9 a. m. 3 p. m.
June 30 Mayor's Meeting, West Side Improvement Association in St. Joseph's Church Hall, 6th Ave. at Gcd* apago St., 7:30 p. m.


Page Two
RECORDER
June, 1966
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings,, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
TtoteA
Mrs. Martha Olsen, 1406 Navajo Street, and Mrs. Viola Smith, 1351 Mariposa St, who were f both hospitalized last month, are now at home and doing well, but still taking it easy.
Mr. and Mrs, Matt Walker of 669 Inca returned from a most enjoyable vacation. They were in California and Las Vegas, Nevada, visiting friends and relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Deter, Mrs. Bobbie Deter and Mrs. May Day motored to Greeley, Colorado where Mrs. Robert Deter's parents joined the party and they motored to" Ber-thoud, Colorado and enjoyed dinner at the Wayside Inn.
Mrs. May Day of 138 West 1st Ave. has recovered from a bout with laryngitis. She is feeling much better.
Mr. Joseph Bleb of 65 Acoma Street, a long time resident of the West Side, passed away Sunday, May 22nd.
Faye Nera of Anne's Beauty Salon, 971 Santa Fe Drive; went by train to Colorado Springs on May 21st. She vis ited the Zoo- and the Air Force Academy.
, Anne Molien of Anne's Beauty. Salon, 971 Santa Fe Drive, entertained five guests at dinner May 28th.
Mrs. Velva Farrow of 1114 West 13th Avenue spent Memorial Day at her cabin m Won-deron. She had Mr. and Mrs. B, C. McDonald and their two children, Chandra and Curtis as her guests. Mrs. McDonald is Mrs. Farrow's niece.
Mary. Quintana recently returned from the Los Angeles, California Job Corps. Two weeks later she got a job in Denver and is very glad to be home. She is with her folks at 1223 Lipan Street.
Julia Ortiz of 1314 lipan Street was in the hospital for two weeks. She is home now and feels much better.
Mrs. Emma Lockhart is here from California visiting Mr^. Patsy Fresquez of 1219 Lipan.
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Conway, who lived at 1430 Lipan Street, have moved to 200 South Bryant Street.
Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Bieberic^ Of- Waco, Texas, the sister of Mrs. M. M, 'Churchill or 1209 Lipan Street, and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Flowers of Houston, Texas, a cousin of Mrs. Churchill are visiting the Churchills.1 They had a wonderful time.
Miss Nora Garcia of 711 Kal-math. Street, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Emilio Garcia, became the bride of Ray Soriano on June 4. The couple was married at Cajetan's Catholic Church.
Mr. Soriano is the son oi Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Salazar. He is a student at Colorado State College at Greeley.
West Side Boy Marries In Germany
Hats Off!
by Robert Carlyle Recek
Our eye sight is the most precious thing that we may use, for with it we can see the winged bird in flight, a clear blue sky, the rainbow with its many colored hue£, a grasshopper in a giant leap, or children with rosy cheeks playing with their dreams. Fascinated by the game which they are in, we look with them toward the future. Yes, our eyes are most important for we can read with them and in reading takp pride in our local West Side paper, the West Side Recorder. It takes lots of work before it arrives at our doors, and because it concerns us West Sid-ers with local news of interest we should not only support it, we. should take pride in it. So the final tribute is to the staff of the West Side Recorder, to this we, as West Siders, say Hats Off and may they con-hup this fine work for many, many years to come.
CLUB NOTICE
West Denver Auraria Historical Society will hold their summer meeting in picnic style July 9th at 1 o'clock at the home of Mrs Ann Marica, 9825 W. Wesley Court, Morrison, Colorado. It is to be pot luck luncheon, and please call reservations to home of president August Newlander, after 6 p. m., phone 825-5750.
VINAPS Sponsor Rummage Sale
A rummage sale at 820 W. 8th Avenue on June 23 and 24 is being sponsored by the VINAPS. This is a voluntary group of women who organized a year ago to send parcels to service men in Viet Nam. VINAPS stands for Viet Nam Packages.
The proceeds from the rummage sale will be used for postage to send air parcel packages of foodstuffs to the service men. By sending the packages air posted they reach Viet Nam in 6 to 7 days.
The service men have also requested fruit, books, soap, toothbrushes and tooth paste, wash and dry towels, raisins and. cold drink mixes.
If l you have rummage you would like to donate to this group for their sale on June 23 and 24, please call Mrs. Val Jones, 757-6065 or Mrs. A. P. Thebus 756-2361 and they will arrange for pick up.
Mr. and Mrs. John Torres, Sr. of 1072 Decatur announce the marriage of their son SP/4 John R. Torres, Jr., to Doris Lud-ueg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Ledueg of Banburg, Germany.
The formal Catholic wedding rites took place May 20th in Banburg, after which the couple honeymooned in Switzerland on a 15 day furlough given the bridegroom. The new Mrs. Torres is a secretary for a construction company in Banburg.
John Torres graduated from West High Scohol in 1963, enlisting in the U. S. Army two years ago. He attended Military School in Ft. Gordon, Georgia and upon graduation was stationed in Banburg, Germany with the Military Police. John
LINCOLN PARK SENIOR CITIZENS CLUB
Mrs. Helen Johnson Club Reporter
The bi-monthly meeting of the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club was attended by eighteen members Tuesday, May 17th. The dessert luncheon was followed by a short business session at which participation m the special activities of Senior Citizen's Month, May, was discussed. A trip to the Botanical Gardens was planned for May 24th. An hour and a half of bingo for. "white elephant"
amusing examples of such misleading advertising. Follow:-ing\her talk plans for summer fun were discussed. A conducted tour of the Continental Baking Company was arranged for Tuesday, June 14th. Also a party to attend the Wednesday matinee at the Denham Theatre on June 22nd.
,
This was the last meeting that Mrs. Winnie Gilbert, Auraria Community Center coordinator of the Lincoln Park
prizes completed the afternoon s Senior Citizens, could be with program. us. Her husband, Rev. Charles
* D. Gilbert, having finished his
The gold and white quilt on which several of our ladies spent many hours of work this winter is now finished and
studies at D. U, has been assigned to the First Methodist Church of Arnold Perk, Iowa, and the family will leave Den-
ready to ship to the owner, ver June 11th. We all said
Mrs. Hastings of Juneau, Alaska.
* *
Cluster of hyacinths and a basket of daisies decorated the luncheon tables when the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club met on Tuesday, June 7 th. Seventeen members were present and a guest, Mrs. Nellie Mae Wright of 3351 W. Mon-crief Place, who for many years lived at 14th and Mariposa before the land was cleared to make way for the housing project.
,
A very interesting forty min-and his bride plan to return ute talk was given by Mrs. Hel-to Denver upon his completion: @n Keaveny of the U. S. Food of service with the U. S. Army j and Drug Department. She ex-Military Police, and hopes to plained how products are tak-continue in law enforcement en off the market because of work. I false claims, and showed some
Good Summer Reading At Byers Library
CONSTANTINE jan^ Nick Charles, the first of
By Frank G. Slaughter J the private eyes.
Frank Slaughter's many fans $ GIDEON'S BADGE will enjoy his latest exciting j J. }. Manic
good-bye most regretfully. Mrs. Lynn Bradley will replace Mrs. Gilbert.
Several'enjoyable trips have been reported by Lincoln Park Senior Citizens this month. Mrs. Elsie Lilienthal has been visiting relatives in California for a month. Mrs. Clara VancieE spent two weeks with friends near Woodland Park. Mrs. Faye Brott is visaing out of town friends, and Mrs. Helen Johnson, made q four day trip, to Sheridan, Wyoming, withi friends.
historical novel about the first Roman Emperor to adopt Christianity.
A CRACK IN THE SIDEWALK Ruth Wolff |
The Templeton parents have come from Kentucky and their values have been formed Ithere, but now they live upstairs over a seed store on Main Street where their children must leam the seasons of life through the sea of cement that bounds their world. A poignant, beautifully written tale of a close-knit family whose means are slender but whose love for one another is warm and overflowing.
THE HARDY BREED Giles A. Lutz
Based on an actual historical incident, this tells of an early attempt by American colonists to settle Texas. When Haden Edwards and his followers clashed with the renegades and outlaws in control of the area trouble was bound to follow. Even the Mexican Army finally was involved. An exciting new story of the Southwest.
THE NOVELS OF DASHIEL HAMMETT
It's about time that the creator of the modem suspense novel, now so popular, is once again in print for his old friends to reenjoy and for the new readers to discover. This collection includes DH's 5 complete
Followers of George Gideon, head of Scotland Yard's Criminal Investigation Department, will Yejoice at the prospect, of another round of tense, fast moving action between G. G. and: wrqng doerls, this 'time on ^ Atlantic and in New York amphitheater
Suggestions For Lincoln Park
by Margot Serumgard
We of the West Side are fortunate and proud of our beau-tuul Lincoln Park bounded by 11th and 13th Avenues and Mariposa and Osage Streets. Recently the Denver Parks Service has installed seven concrete tables and benches. These were badly needed and will help folks enjoy our park during the summer evenings.
We have a well kept balL park where many teams competed On the lawn, football and other sports keep our young folks occupied. There is.
that could be
City. Those who don t know utilized by all of us Our young Gideon will find that he is a folks play many musical in-vigorous, realistic police official struments and here would be a whose duties include guiding, chance during the summer and directing his men as well months to express themselves-, as catching criminals. Always and bring enjoyment to every-a good picture of back-stage! 0ne on the West Side. Other-police work, this episode shows groups could use the ample* its readers cooperative action stage for shows and other tal-between two great law enforce- ent expression, ment agencies-American and We must not forget the swim. British. ming pool. Here many West
POWER PLAY Side youngsters enjoy the
The Gordons [healthful pleasure of swim-
What happens when the. di-, ming,, undbr the proper super-rectorship of the F.B.I. is up for [vision of the Park Service. The grabs. This tense, exciting nov- j one thing that should be a pro-el shows wTiat can happen iect for the West Siders is to-when politicians, both the ded-, finance youngsters unable te icated and the ruthless, strug-; afford the small fee required, gle for control of an organizd-1 Let us organize a more abund-tion most Americans believe to ant use of this park of ours, be above power politics.. Sus- We have the talent and we pense, intrigue and daring have the facilities. We must soarkle through the pages of have leadership and planning this latest effort of a writing to, take advantage of this park, team famed for its mysteries.. Contact our members of the TIMMY VENTURA ~ j West Side Improvement Asso-
GOES HOME | cintiori and see what can be
Timmy Ventura, who was done in getting aid for the injured January 24, was able many community activities that to go home May 26. He will Lincoln Park has for all of us.
n r?tum to jjjif r! Do this at once before summer
novels: Red Harvest, The Dam ther surgery. Timmy s father,; _
Curse, The Maltese Falcon, The .Rev. John Ventura, is a minis- coms- Let us CM Put u Glass Key and The Thin "Man. .ter of the First Mennonite| shoulders to the wheel and do Come and meet Sam Spade | Church. this most important job


June, 1966
Page Three
School : Youth Activity : Recreation
Boys' Club
The Boys' Club just recently held -the Board Members Annual Meeting at the Brown Palace Hotel. J. C. Owens, president of the Board of Directors, spoke to theBoard arid 40 Boys' Club members who were guests at the dinner.
Six young men were granted scholarships to a month of hard work, and training at the Colorado Outward Bound School which is located above the smalltown of Marble. At this school, they will learn to hike, climb and live in the mountains.
The Boys' dub is ready to announce its summer program this year which consists of summer baseball, plaster of paris, leather work, wood work and many, Other interesting things to do.
Greenlee School
AWARD PROGRAM Closing of school activities included an assembly on June 3, in which awards were given to 136 pupils for faithful service performed in school organizations. These services included Student Council officerships, membership on 'the Color Guard, work as Safety Patrol members, Lunchroom Monitors,
Nurse's Helpers, Visual Monitors, Door Monitors, Auditorium Monitors; and Book Monitors.
Also awarded were certificates to the sixth grade basketball team members, who were runners-up in the championship playoffs in the Recreation League.
Ten boys and girls received certificates for perfect attendance and punctuality records during the school year.
The school was especially proud of Anthony Dves who received an award of honorable mention in,v a poster contest conducted nationallv by the American Humane Association in the area of kindness to animals.
SUMMER READING CENTER
A Summer Reading Improvement Center will again be conducted at Greenlee for boys and girls in grades 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. Classes will begin on Monday, June 20 and will continue until July 29. The specific purpose of this particular program will be to help pupils with reading problems to overcome' "theCr' difficulties:
A parallel program will be conducted dt the same time for those boys and girls who have no basic reading difficulties, but who need guidance in developing and widening their are:
.reading interests; | June 23r-"High Country Names
I 375 ho?* and girls' 'he; _Rocky Mountain Park." Lou-West area are enrolled for,, ... | . ~ i j
.. ... isa Ward Arps, Colorado au-
these activities. |
Mrs: Mary-Nelle Ryan, sixth thor. grade teacher at Greenlee, will june 30"The Historic Alpine be the Coordinator who will Tunnel." Dow Helmers, Pueblo head the Center.
WEST HIGH SCHOOL
Nancy Urtado
Gloria Recek
Larry Almanzar
West High Graduation Exercises
Past and Present Of Colorado The,me Of Library Program
"Colorful Colorado," the Denver Public Library's program series focusing- on the state's past and present, opened June j 9 in Wyer Auditorium of the! Main Library, 1,357 Broadway.
Outstanding guest speakers are featured in the free programs which also include fine films and slide presentations.
Held at 12:15 p. m. on six consecutive Thursdays in June and July, the programs are open to the public without charge and do not require tickets.' Remaining programs
Barbara Collins
Five of the graduates, who live in the West Side Improvement Association area, received scholarship awards.
ADAMS STATE COLLEGE Gloria Recek, 132 Galapago.
METROPOLITAN STATE COL-
West High School Alumni Meeting
Geraldine Hodges
PTA GIVES LUNCHEON FOR TEACHERS The Parent Teacher Association honored the staff of Greenlee School with a luncheon on Friday, June 10. Various parents contributed hot dishes, salads, vegetable dishes, and desserts which were enjoyed and appreciated by all who participated.
businessman, photo journalist and |former newspaperman.
July 7 Colorful Colorado Through the Eyes of the Movie Camera."
West's class of '1966 graduated 482 seniors at 7:45 p. m. on June 6 in the City Auditorium. Members of the school! board officiated at the ceremonies; The graduation theme "The Play Is The Thing," set the atmosphere for the com?* mencement.
Addressing the graduating class, six seniors followed the1 commencement theme. Giving" the invocation, Lydia Salazar |led the class and friends in> prayer. Jim Nushy, Senior Class'
USQTTMr-C V-niTF-F Rr,r PreSident' gaVe tHe Welcm
HAYINGS COLLEGE bar ackiress and introduced the bara Collins, 1455 Mariposa, 'following speakers: Act Ir TEXAS WOMAN'S COLLEGE Charles Davis; Act II, Sylvia Nancy Urtado, 508 West 8th Chavez; and Act III, Richard Avenue. I Greenwood. Leslie Peacock
___Sp Wmm 1 i .gave the benediction.
______________________ _ < ;. ? ;J. AANDAHL MEMORIAL j Under the direction of Mr.
LEGE^-Geraldine Hodges, 1114SCHOLARSHIPLarry Alman-;Cari Johnson, speech teacher, Mariposa Street. I zar, 135 West 3rd Avenue. the graduation speakers start-
1 > __j______ ed work in early January. Mr.
NEW PRINCIPAL 1 Johnson pointed out that West
Mr. Earl A. Paul, present'^ School | the only school
in Denver where the graduation speakers write their own speeches.. They, of: course, are-reviewed by a board of teachers for correct word usage and
association west, of the Mississippi.
At present, over 150 volunteers are working to build and July 14r"Ten Ways to the j strengthen the organization. At-Rockies." Roland F. Ruhoff,' tendance at the meeting Friday past president Ghost Town was approximately 250. The Club of Colorado, and membbr; oldest member present was a Rocky Mountain Railroad Club, man from the class of 1914.
principaihof Horace Mann Jun-' ior Higja. School, has been West High School's Eighty- named by the school board second Annual' Alumni meet-jas principal of West nextfall.
u tj r- j -ka on Replacing Mr. PauDwill be
mg ws held Friday, May MHi £ete shannori_ West's'ad- syntax
in the West auditorium. It is .nig ^rin is part of the largest turnover among principals in nineteen years.
ELMWOOD SCHOOL
First graders at Elmwood i School entertained a class from Carson School on May 27. Elmwood students presented a play, "Th^ Country Mouse and the City Mouse;" shown in the picture are Freddie Sanchez, Jovce Westbrook, Katherine Ortega and Carol Linton qs they took part in the play.
After the play the two classes went to Sunken Gardens for games and refreshments. I Planning for the special program was done by the Elmwood class under the direction of their teacher, Mrs. Julia Weaver, and followed a trip to Carson School by the same students in February.
AWARDS ASSEMBLY
Awards Assembly was presented Thursday, May 19, n West's Auditorium.
Awards were presented to
Mr. Nicholas Tacinas, whb; students who achieved
has been Assistant Principal at outstanding work in such fields Baker Junior High School wiHfas ^ speech. homemaking,, be the new Assistant Principal, and industrial arts. at West High School. i
TRAFFIC ENGINEER EXPLAINS "PEDESTRIAN DETECTOR" S§
A pedestrian detector is a button on a traffic signal pole. Generally one is located on each comer of a signalized intersection for use by pedestrians in crossing one of the two streets involved. In some cases the traffic signals are located in mid-block. The pedestrian detector or button is always accompanied by a sign mounted directly above the button stating, "To- cross street, push button and wait for 'green or 'walk' signal"
Wherever these buttons are, it is necessary to push the j button before crossing thb street. This pedestrian detector will then assure you, as a pedestrian, enough green or walk time to cross the street safely.
Elmwood First Graders Perform for Carson School Guests
upon the amount dt automobile traffic crossing the metal auto detector in the street. At some places the traffic signal' will never give a crossing time for the pedestrian unless the button is pushed. At other places* the Walk or Green signal may come on but not give enough time for a safe crossing By a pedestrian. Therefore, because of the .different types of traffic signals throughout the city, cr good rule of thumb to follow is: Where pedestrian detectors-(push buttons) are provided, always push them when the signal is red and wait for your Green or Walk signal. ALWAYS CROSS ON A FRESH GREEN LIGHT.
Pushing the button does not
If the button is not pushed, the make the light turn green any length of time for a pedestrian sooner. It does give more time to cross the street will .depend I to cross.


THE RECORDER
Page 'Foot ______
BUSINESS NEWS
Livran Electric Completes New Building
The Livran Electric Supply Company completed their new builaing at the comer of West 7th Avenue and Kalamath during March and moved from Santa Fe on March 19. The new property cost $175,000.
Livran Electric looked over a number of places around Denver before deciding on one. Mr. Gene Livran says that the firm chose their present location for several reasons: the area is handy to all parts of Denver because of 6th Avenue and the Valley Highway; it is not in the bottomland and subject to flooding; the heavy Kalamath traffic is expected to bring some business from people passing who see the handsome second-floor showroom of lighting fixtures; and, during the eleven-years that the firm has been in the area, they have developed a warm regard for their neighbors. Mr. Livran sees the West Side as an excellent area for wholesale businesses such as this. Livran Electric is a wholesale dealer in electrical fixtures and supplies for home and business; employing 26 people.
Livran Electric recently cov-| ered the West 7th Avenue side of their property with blacktop. They also plan to clear and blacktop the land formerly owned by Mr! and Mrs. Everett Mendoza next to them.
Church News
The churches of the South Broadway neighborhood sponsored a Vacation Bible School publicity parade held June 11th, at 10:00 a. m. Participating churches are The South Broadway Christian Church, 23 Lincoln St., The Foursquare- Gospel Church, 4th Ave. and Pennsylvania St, and the First Avenue Presbyterian Church, W. First Ave. and Acoma St.
VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL
Tne annual Vacation Bible School of the First Avenue Presbyterian Church is being held June 13 thru 24 with daily sessions from 9:00 to 11:30 a. m. These are classes for children of kindergarten age thru high school: A closing pro-
gram is scheduled for Thursday, June 23rd, at 7:30 p.m. 'Tbe school is being conducted -under the Co-Superintendency of Mrs. Sam Thomasson and ^2rs. Glen Lowe. All boys and Virls are welcome!
The 104th Annual Session of the Rocky Mountain Conference of the Methodist Church is being held in Denver June 14-17. Delegates from Methodist Churches in Colorado, Wyoming and Utah will gather at the University of Denver to conduct business for the 115,000 members of the Methodist denomination located in that three state area. Attending the Conference from Wesley Methodist Church are Reverend James L. Smith, pastor, and Mr. Frank Gumma, lay delegate.
LONG TIME WEST SIDE MARKET CLOSES DOORS
It was with regret that many i It had various owners and lo-Westsiders Teamed of the clos- cations before the Haug Broth-ing qf the Haug Brothers Gro-ers bought it in 1919. Frank eery on June 4th. Leo and Haug said they were still serv-Frank Haug had owned and | mg some of the families who operated the grocery at 1030 patronized the store before they W. Colfax for 47 years. Theyjbought. it. Both the brothers counted as regular customers, wish to thank their many cus-about 150 families, some who tomers for. their support over lived as Tar away as Ever-!the years. It became neces-green, Aurora, and- Englewood, sary to close the market be-The market itself was started ^ause of the illness of Frank around 1900 on Kalamath St. Haug.
. ^hopbine 'Tips .
SHOP THE ADS. You can put extra pennieseven dollars in your pocket if you read the grocery ads and take advantage of the specials. Home economists at the U. S. Department of Agriculture recently went shopping to test this theory. They were able to save 25 per cent by shopping the ads of stores in a single neighborhood. These people are pros, and matching skills with them is a real test. But, the experts say, you should be able to knock off $1 in $10 by planning meals around the ads.
JUNE PLENTIFULS. Raisins, split peas and .lentils, canned red salmon and seasonal vegetablesthese are the foods to shop, for in June. According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, all should be plentiful in supply.
CHICKEN DINNER? Here are some tips on buying chicken. Buy it whole and cut it up yourself. You can save from 2 to 4 cents a pound that way. And to get the most meat in proportion to bone, look for U. S. Grade A poultry.
Consumer Credit
Consumer credit comes from banks, credit unions, finance companies, and retail stores. Some charges are more than others. Have you shopped around to find where the cred-
it rate is the lowest and most convenient?
Do you know how much you are paying for the use of credit?
Is having, something now worth the added credit cost?
How does; your decision fit into your family's budget and .-plans?
Are you sure you can meet this pay merit, plus dll other monthly payments?
J^WWill you have money left fo* 'Emergencies ?
TYPICAL CREDIT CHARGES
If charges are based on the beginning amount owed and are included in the 12 < equal monthlv installments:
If Charged: Simple Annual
Rate Is:
$4 per $ 100 or 4% per year. 7.4 % $6 per $ 100 or 6% per year .11.1% $8 per $100 or 8% per year. 14.8% $10 per $100 or 10% per
year ................ 18.5%
1 % per month ........22.2%
If charged only on unpaid amount owed:
If Charged: Simple Annual
Rate Is:
3/ 4 of 1 % per -nonth on
unpaid balance ......... 9%
5/6 of 1 % per month on
unpaid balance..........10%
1 % per month on unpaid balance ...................... 12%
1*4% per month on unpaid
balance................. 15%
1%% per month on unpaid
balance ..............18%
2V^% per month on unpaid
balance ............. 30%
VOLUNTEERS HELP RECORDER
\jplunteers helping in distribution of the RECORDER who have not previously been listed include the following:
The Boy Scouts, under Mr. Richard Mena and Mr. C. G Naney, Mr. Frank Gumma, the children of Mr. and Mrs. Salvador Delgado, Mrs Chris Her-non, Mrs. Reuben Gomez, the children of Mr. and Mrs. Moses Haro, Mr. Dan Martinez, Fairmont Recreation Center, the children of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Winterhalder, and the children of Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Koy-ama.
CHURCH OF GOD 5th and Fox Street Phone 244-2339 Rev. Leroy Vance Sunday Service, 11.
7:30. Sunday School, 10.
METROPOLITAN BAPTIST 910 Kalamath Street Rev. Salvador Cano Sunday Service, 11, 6:30. Sunday School. 10.
Denver Inner City Protestant Parish
910 Galapago Street Phone 244-2636 Rev. Russelfef'S- Williams Miss Marilou Taggart Saturday Church School 10 a. m. (Children 6-12 years).
Sunday Worship11:00 a.m. (Everyone welcome).
Apostolic Church of Jesus 1039 W/'13th Avenue Rev. Toby Rampa Phone 244-2765 Rey. Lee Velasquez Sunday Service, 10:30, 12:00. Sunday School, 9:30.
ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN West 3rd Ave; and Acoma Phone 733-3777
Paul G. Hdnsen and Roger A. Stiers, Pastors
Services: Sunday 8:30, 11:00 a. m., 7:00 p. m,
Sunday School: 9:45 a. m.
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH 1000 Kalamath Street Phone 255-3215 Rev. R. W. Nichols ServiceSunday: 11, 7:00. Sunday School9:30.
Trujillo Speaks To School Board
Bernard Trujillo, 674 Elati Street, spoke for the New Elmwood Committee of the West Side Improvement Association at the Board of Education meeting of May 19. He presented petitions to the Board with over 400 names, ^urging a bond election and a new Elmwood school. Later that evening, the Board decided to hold a bond election for school construction on or before next March 31.
SCOUT RANCH DEDICATION
The Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch at Elbert, Colorado, acquired and being developed by the Denver Area Council, Boy Scouts of America, will be dedicated Sunday, June 19 at 3:00 p. m." said Paul Yetter, Dedication Chairman.
Scouters, contributors, and families will attend, the ceremony, hike the area, picnic, etc.
______ June, 1966 .
First Avenue Presbyterian | ^ 120 West? 1st Avenue Phone 777-5325 Rev. A. J. Blomquist Sunday Service, 11 a. m.. 6:30 p, m. ,
Sunday School 9:45.
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CATHOLIC CHURCH W. 6th Ave. and Galapago St. Phone 534-4408
Rev.. James Nugent, C. Ss. R. Pastor
ServicesSunday Mass: 6,
7, 8:30, 10, 11:30..
Holy Days 6, 7, 3, 9, 12:15, 6 p. m.
ST. ELIZABETH 11th and Curtis Streets Phone 255-9556 Rev. Fabian Flynn, Pastor ServicesSunday Mass: 6.
8, 9:15, 11, 12:15.
Holy Days: 6, 7, S, 1 12.15. 5:45. .
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL 126 West 2nd Avenue Phone 722-8781 Rev. David Minton Sunday School 9:30 a. m. Sunday Service 11:00 a m.
WESLEYAN COVENANT 525 West First Ave.
Rev. O. L. Crager Phone 722-4888 Sunday services11.
Sunday School, 10:00 a.m.
Iglesia Bethel De Las Assem-bleas De Dios
West 2nd Ave. and Fox St. Rev. Mike A. Salazar, Pastor Service-1Sunday, 10:00 and 7:30 p. m.
FIRST BETHANY LUTHERAN 215 West 5th Avenue Phone 825-4862 Rev. Fred A. Bloch Sunday Service, 11.
Sunday School 9 30.
WEST SIDE CHRISTIAN 668 Inca Street Phone: 623-3419 William K. Linton, Minister Services: Sunday Worship 10:10 and 7:00 p. m.
Bible School: 9:00 a. m.
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST 935 W. 11th Avenue Phone 255-6152 Rev. Thomas Sepulveda ServiceSunday: 9:45, 11.
WESLEY METHODIST 465 Galapago Street Rev. James Smith Sunday Service, 11.
Sunday School 9:45.
ST. CAJETAN l 9th and Lawrence Phone 825-8059 Rev. J. Ordinas, Pastor Father Max Santamaria, Assistant Pastor l SericesSunday Mass: 7:00, 8:30, 10:30, '12, 7 p. m.
Holy Days6:30, 8:30, 10:30, 7:00.
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH 885 Delaware Street Phone 2442093 Rev. Marcus Bishop Rev. John Ventura Sunday Service9:00; Spanish Service -11:15; Sunday School 10:00; Evening Service 7:00.


Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3, Number 2
Published Monthly
June, 1966
WSIA Still Hopes For R emoval Of Old Fire Station
Mayor and Aides Meeting
With WSIA On June 30
ACTION COUNCIL ELECTED, BEGINS WORK
Mayor Tom Currigan and other City officials will be present at a general meeting of the West Side Improvement Association on Thursday, June 30. The meeting will be held in the hall at St. Joseph's
Former Fire Station at 3rd Ave. and Cherokee
More than 1200 residents of, Martinez, 363 Cherokee Street the west Side voted on MayjSilfred L. Ramos, 1333 Cherokee
24 to elect twenty-one mem- .Street; Albert Roybal, 950 West church, 6th"~Avenue and~Sda-bers. of the Westside Action15th Ave.; Bernard Trujillo, 674 pago St., at 7:30 p. m. Every-Council. This is the first coin- Elati Street, munity action council elected in Agency Representatives: Mos-Denver, and will be used asj s Cisneros. Director, Fairmont an example for elections in Recreation Center; Mrs. Eliza-other parts of the city ."The num- beth Kester, Program Director, ber of residents who showed an Auraria Community Center; interest by voting is one of the Sister M. Ligiiori, Teacher, St. | man Leo Gemma, highest percentages of. re- Elizabeth's School; Reverend sponse shown anywhere in the James Nugent, Pastor, St. Jos-country far. a council related to eDh's Redemptorist Church; the War on Poverty programs. Reverend Max Santamaria, As-
one in the community is invited to attend. The meeting has been arranged by the Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Association, with the assistance of Council-
Main topics of the meeting will be trash collection, incinerators and clean-up. The Board
Much of-the credit for the elec-1 sistant Pastor, St. Cajetan s Pf the Improvement
Cars and furniture stored in the building
Cars and furniture are now MAYOR'S ANSWER: being stored in the old fire, w h station at West 3rd Avenue and1 J Mayor Currigan answered on Cherokee. The Cifty states that April 14, quoting the City At-the Pappy Fry Development fraeY:
Company signed a contract to! "bn January 14, 1966 an ac-purchase the property from -he tion was filed against the Pap-City, providing that the Com-jpy pjy Development Company pony would tear down the, tQ compel compliance with the building. The sale followed terms of sale of the building at requests by the West Side Im- West 3rd Avenue and Chero-provement Association to have] ^ street. In this suit it is the land cleared. Zoning at, SOUght to obtain an order re-3rd and Cherokee is R-3, which quiring the Fry Development does r>ot permit warehouse Company to remove the exist-storage use.
LETTER TO MAYOR:
On March 7, directors of W.
S.I.A. Districts 7 and 9 wrote the Mayor, saying,
"In a listing in The Daily Journal, October 9, 1965, we noted that this property was to be purchased by Pappy Fry Development Company with the stipulation that all buildings, structures and improvements were to be removed within 60 days.
"Also listed in The Daily Journal, January 20, 1966, in the District Court there was a case filed: City and County of Idol. Denver vs. Pappy Fry Development Co., et. a1-
ing building. On February 3,
tion and the local interest is due to the Planning Commit--tee which was elected at meetings in the five census tracts in late March. Mr. Albert Moore, 1201 Cherokee Street, was Chairman" of the committee. Thirty-nine residents- were candidates for the fourteen resident positions on the' Council. Seven representatives' of agencies, schools and churches were elected from a list of fourteen candidates.
Elected members of the West-side Action Council are listed
Resident P) Representatives: Frank J. Clay, 1-3.14 West 10th Ave.; Jim Contreras, 731 West 11 th Ave; Joyce Ellsworth, 423 West 13th Ave.; Don C. Field, 142 West 1st Ave.; Ralph Gaschler, 928 11th Street; Donald M. Gallegos, 1237 West 10th Ave.; William Haidon, 45 S. Elati Street; Mrs. Carmen Hodges, 1114 Mariposa Street; Tustice Jaramillo, 214 West 5th Ave.; Larry A. Lucero, 1316 West Colfax Ave., Jose "Dan"
Catholic Church; Reverend Thomas Sepulveda, Pastor First ^Danish. Methodist Church;, Reverend John Ventura, Minister, First Mennonite Church.
Council Members Installed June 1
The first organizational meeting of the Westside Action
Association has been working for the setting of standards for trash containers and other ways of improving alley clean up in the area. Other neighborhood problems will also be considered.
Among the City department heads expected at the meeting are William McNichols, Manager of Public Works; Harold Patton, Sanitary Services; Jack O'Fallon, Building Department;
Council was held on June 1 at | Douglas Wigle, Housing Sec-Aurari Community Center. Installation of members : of- the Council was conducted by
tion of the Department of Health .and Hospitals; Tony Jansen, Zoning Administrator;
Judge Ted-Rubin, Chairman> of J^ck Bruce, Traffic. Engineer*
POLICE DISTRICT OPENS NEW BUILDING
Police son, in
re-
Capt. Leonard John-charge of District 3, 1966 the defendants appeared announces the opening of their and filed a Motion to Dismiss, new quarters at Io^a Ave. and being j University Boulevard, just north of the Valley Highway. This location is more central for the District, which covers much of southeast Denver. The same service to the West Side, south of 6th Ave., will be continued, even though the station has moved from its former location on Center Ave. near Broadway.
the Community Relations Committee of Denver's War on Poverty. Moses Cisneros was elected Temporary Chairman
and Joyce Ellsworth was chos-j West Side en as Temporary Secretary. A By-Laws Committee was ap-| Calendar pointed, with Bernard Trujillo as Chairman. Ralph Gaschler,
Justice Jaramillo v and William haidon were designated as a committee to begin consideration of proposed programs affecting the area.
On June 8 the Council began discussion of the By-Laws.
Representatives of the Westside Action Council, were elected to
and Joe Barry, Community Development Agency.
EVERY WEEK
Monday-and Wednesday Typing Class for Adults West High School, 7-9 p.m.
Adult Education, Room 111, Baker Junior High, 7 p. m. Greenlee School, 7:00 p. m.
serve as members of the Board: Thursday
of Denver's War on Poverty, i
the case, their motion supported by a brief as quired by the rules.
"On April 7, 1966 the Motion to Dismiss filed by defendants was overruled and defendants were allowed 20 days to answer the complaint"
Adult Education Tutorial Program
St. Elizabeth's School 7:30 9:30 p.m.
\In the answer to the complaint, Pappy Fry Development Company denies that the City has the right to make such a contract, among other things. Because of the crowded court docket/ it will be some time before the case actually gets to
"It has been observed by residents of Districts 7 and 9 that trucks have been unloading furniture into the building. We are concerned about the public health and public safety of our neighborhood and interested in keeping our neighborhood nice and clean."
The Pappy Fry Development Company shares the Pappy Fxy name with other businesses, including a car dealership. The telephone book has three Pappy Fry listings, all at 300 Broadway, all sharing the phone number 744-1071. If you think this is bad for the neighborhood, call Pappy Fry, 744-1071
Inc. Williarh Haidon and Bernard Trujillo, the two delegates, began their service on the DWOP Board on June 9.
Meetings of the Westside Acr tion Council are open to the public. Regular time and place of meetings will be scheduled I1111 13-24Vacation Bible
SPECIAL EVENTS
later, but information about current meeting plans can- be obtained by calling 244-3301.
Residents who are planning to be away for vacations, whether a long week-end or a greater, length of time, should notify the police. Officers will give special attention to homes during the dates the residents are away if the police are informed of the vacation times.1 The police can also give other suggestions about ways to safeguard the properties such as discontinuing newspaper deliveries. People who live south of 6th Ave. should call District 3 at 297-2974; north of 6th Ave., the number to call is 297-2851, the office of District 1.
SQUARE DANCING SCHEDULED
Square Dancing at Platt Park Recreation Center is scheduled every Thursday during June, July and August. Lyle Baker and guest callers will; conduct a workshop from 7:30 to 8:30 p. m. each Thursday, to teach the basic movements, and regular square dancing will follow, from 8:30 to 10:30 p: m. The program -is sponsored by the Denver Recreation Department in cooperation with the Platt Park Center, located at the corner of1 South Sherman andj Florida. For more information call 935-3021, 297-2401 or
297-2715.
School, First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 9:00 to 11:30
a. m.
June 20Well Baby Clinic sponsored by Dept, of Health and Hospitals. Mennonite Youth Center, 430 West 9th Ave., 12:30-4:00 p. m.
June 21, 22, 23Free Chest X-Ray, City and County Bldgv 1437 Bannock St., 10 a. m. -1 p. in.; 2- 6 p. m.
June 24Free Chest X-Ray, City and County Bldg., 9 a. m. 3 p. m.
June 30 Mayor's Meeting, West Side Improvement Association in St. Joseph's Church Hall, 6th Ave. at Gcd* apago St., 7:30 p. m.


Page Two
RECORDER
June, 1966
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings,, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
TtoteA
Mrs. Martha Olsen, 1406 Navajo Street, and Mrs. Viola Smith, 1351 Mariposa St, who were f both hospitalized last month, are now at home and doing well, but still taking it easy.
Mr. and Mrs, Matt Walker of 669 Inca returned from a most enjoyable vacation. They were in California and Las Vegas, Nevada, visiting friends and relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Deter, Mrs. Bobbie Deter and Mrs. May Day motored to Greeley, Colorado where Mrs. Robert Deter's parents joined the party and they motored to" Ber-thoud, Colorado and enjoyed dinner at the Wayside Inn.
Mrs. May Day of 138 West 1st Ave. has recovered from a bout with laryngitis. She is feeling much better.
Mr. Joseph Bleb of 65 Acoma Street, a long time resident of the West Side, passed away Sunday, May 22nd.
Faye Nera of Anne's Beauty Salon, 971 Santa Fe Drive; went by train to Colorado Springs on May 21st. She vis ited the Zoo- and the Air Force Academy.
, Anne Molien of Anne's Beauty. Salon, 971 Santa Fe Drive, entertained five guests at dinner May 28th.
Mrs. Velva Farrow of 1114 West 13th Avenue spent Memorial Day at her cabin m Won-deron. She had Mr. and Mrs. B, C. McDonald and their two children, Chandra and Curtis as her guests. Mrs. McDonald is Mrs. Farrow's niece.
Mary. Quintana recently returned from the Los Angeles, California Job Corps. Two weeks later she got a job in Denver and is very glad to be home. She is with her folks at 1223 Lipan Street.
Julia Ortiz of 1314 lipan Street was in the hospital for two weeks. She is home now and feels much better.
Mrs. Emma Lockhart is here from California visiting Mr^. Patsy Fresquez of 1219 Lipan.
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Conway, who lived at 1430 Lipan Street, have moved to 200 South Bryant Street.
Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Bieberic^ Of- Waco, Texas, the sister of Mrs. M. M, 'Churchill or 1209 Lipan Street, and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Flowers of Houston, Texas, a cousin of Mrs. Churchill are visiting the Churchills.1 They had a wonderful time.
Miss Nora Garcia of 711 Kal-math. Street, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Emilio Garcia, became the bride of Ray Soriano on June 4. The couple was married at Cajetan's Catholic Church.
Mr. Soriano is the son oi Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Salazar. He is a student at Colorado State College at Greeley.
West Side Boy Marries In Germany
Hats Off!
by Robert Carlyle Recek
Our eye sight is the most precious thing that we may use, for with it we can see the winged bird in flight, a clear blue sky, the rainbow with its many colored hue£, a grasshopper in a giant leap, or children with rosy cheeks playing with their dreams. Fascinated by the game which they are in, we look with them toward the future. Yes, our eyes are most important for we can read with them and in reading takp pride in our local West Side paper, the West Side Recorder. It takes lots of work before it arrives at our doors, and because it concerns us West Sid-ers with local news of interest we should not only support it, we. should take pride in it. So the final tribute is to the staff of the West Side Recorder, to this we, as West Siders, say Hats Off and may they con-hup this fine work for many, many years to come.
CLUB NOTICE
West Denver Auraria Historical Society will hold their summer meeting in picnic style July 9th at 1 o'clock at the home of Mrs Ann Marica, 9825 W. Wesley Court, Morrison, Colorado. It is to be pot luck luncheon, and please call reservations to home of president August Newlander, after 6 p. m., phone 825-5750.
VINAPS Sponsor Rummage Sale
A rummage sale at 820 W. 8th Avenue on June 23 and 24 is being sponsored by the VINAPS. This is a voluntary group of women who organized a year ago to send parcels to service men in Viet Nam. VINAPS stands for Viet Nam Packages.
The proceeds from the rummage sale will be used for postage to send air parcel packages of foodstuffs to the service men. By sending the packages air posted they reach Viet Nam in 6 to 7 days.
The service men have also requested fruit, books, soap, toothbrushes and tooth paste, wash and dry towels, raisins and. cold drink mixes.
If l you have rummage you would like to donate to this group for their sale on June 23 and 24, please call Mrs. Val Jones, 757-6065 or Mrs. A. P. Thebus 756-2361 and they will arrange for pick up.
Mr. and Mrs. John Torres, Sr. of 1072 Decatur announce the marriage of their son SP/4 John R. Torres, Jr., to Doris Lud-ueg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Ledueg of Banburg, Germany.
The formal Catholic wedding rites took place May 20th in Banburg, after which the couple honeymooned in Switzerland on a 15 day furlough given the bridegroom. The new Mrs. Torres is a secretary for a construction company in Banburg.
John Torres graduated from West High Scohol in 1963, enlisting in the U. S. Army two years ago. He attended Military School in Ft. Gordon, Georgia and upon graduation was stationed in Banburg, Germany with the Military Police. John
LINCOLN PARK SENIOR CITIZENS CLUB
Mrs. Helen Johnson Club Reporter
The bi-monthly meeting of the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club was attended by eighteen members Tuesday, May 17th. The dessert luncheon was followed by a short business session at which participation m the special activities of Senior Citizen's Month, May, was discussed. A trip to the Botanical Gardens was planned for May 24th. An hour and a half of bingo for. "white elephant"
amusing examples of such misleading advertising. Follow:-ing\her talk plans for summer fun were discussed. A conducted tour of the Continental Baking Company was arranged for Tuesday, June 14th. Also a party to attend the Wednesday matinee at the Denham Theatre on June 22nd.
,
This was the last meeting that Mrs. Winnie Gilbert, Auraria Community Center coordinator of the Lincoln Park
prizes completed the afternoon s Senior Citizens, could be with program. us. Her husband, Rev. Charles
* D. Gilbert, having finished his
The gold and white quilt on which several of our ladies spent many hours of work this winter is now finished and
studies at D. U, has been assigned to the First Methodist Church of Arnold Perk, Iowa, and the family will leave Den-
ready to ship to the owner, ver June 11th. We all said
Mrs. Hastings of Juneau, Alaska.
*
Cluster of hyacinths and a basket of daisies decorated the luncheon tables when the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club met on Tuesday, June 7 th. Seventeen members were present and a guest, Mrs. Nellie Mae Wright of 3351 W. Mon-crief Place, who for many years lived at 14th and Mariposa before the land was cleared to make way for the housing project.
,
A very interesting forty min-and his bride plan to return ute talk was given by Mrs. Hel-to Denver upon his completion: @n Keaveny of the U. S. Food of service with the U. S. Army j and Drug Department. She ex-Military Police, and hopes to plained how products are tak-continue in law enforcement en off the market because of work. I false claims, and showed some
Good Summer Reading At Byers Library
CONSTANTINE jan^ Nick Charles, the first of
By Frank G. Slaughter J the private eyes.
Frank Slaughter's many fans $ GIDEON'S BADGE will enjoy his latest exciting j J. }. Manic
good-bye most regretfully. Mrs. Lynn Bradley will replace Mrs. Gilbert.
Several'enjoyable trips have been reported by Lincoln Park Senior Citizens this month. Mrs. Elsie Lilienthal has been visiting relatives in California for a month. Mrs. Clara VancieE spent two weeks with friends near Woodland Park. Mrs. Faye Brott is visaing out of town friends, and Mrs. Helen Johnson, made q four day trip, to Sheridan, Wyoming, withi friends.
historical novel about the first Roman Emperor to adopt Christianity.
A CRACK IN THE SIDEWALK Ruth Wolff |
The Templeton parents have come from Kentucky and their values have been formed Ithere, but now they live upstairs over a seed store on Main Street where their children must leam the seasons of life through the sea of cement that bounds their world. A poignant, beautifully written tale of a close-knit family whose means are slender but whose love for one another is warm and overflowing.
THE HARDY BREED Giles A. Lutz
Based on an actual historical incident, this tells of an early attempt by American colonists to settle Texas. When Haden Edwards and his followers clashed with the renegades and outlaws in control of the area trouble was bound to follow. Even the Mexican Army finally was involved. An exciting new story of the Southwest.
THE NOVELS OF DASHIEL HAMMETT
It's about time that the creator of the modem suspense novel, now so popular, is once again in print for his old friends to reenjoy and for the new readers to discover. This collection includes DH's 5 complete
Followers of George Gideon, head of Scotland Yard's Criminal Investigation Department, will Yejoice at the prospect, of another round of tense, fast moving action between G. G. and: wrqng doerls, this 'time on ^ Atlantic and in New York amphitheater
Suggestions For Lincoln Park
by Margot Serumgard
We of the West Side are fortunate and proud of our beau-tuul Lincoln Park bounded by 11th and 13th Avenues and Mariposa and Osage Streets. Recently the Denver Parks Service has installed seven concrete tables and benches. These were badly needed and will help folks enjoy our park during the summer evenings.
We have a well kept balL park where many teams competed On the lawn, football and other sports keep our young folks occupied. There is.
that could be
City. Those who don t know utilized by all of us Our young Gideon will find that he is a folks play many musical in-vigorous, realistic police official struments and here would be a whose duties include guiding, chance during the summer and directing his men as well months to express themselves-, as catching criminals. Always and bring enjoyment to every-a good picture of back-stage! 0ne on the West Side. Other-police work, this episode shows groups could use the ample* its readers cooperative action stage for shows and other tal-between two great law enforce- ent expression, ment agencies-American and We must not forget the swim. British. ming pool. Here many West
POWER PLAY Side youngsters enjoy the
The Gordons [healthful pleasure of swim-
What happens when the. di-, ming,, undbr the proper super-rectorship of the F.B.I. is up for [vision of the Park Service. The grabs. This tense, exciting nov- j one thing that should be a pro-el shows wTiat can happen iect for the West Siders is to-when politicians, both the ded-, finance youngsters unable te icated and the ruthless, strug-; afford the small fee required, gle for control of an organizd-1 Let us organize a more abund-tion most Americans believe to ant use of this park of ours, be above power politics.. Sus- We have the talent and we pense, intrigue and daring have the facilities. We must soarkle through the pages of have leadership and planning this latest effort of a writing to, take advantage of this park, team famed for its mysteries.. Contact our members of the TIMMY VENTURA ~ j West Side Improvement Asso-
GOES HOME | cintiori and see what can be
Timmy Ventura, who was done in getting aid for the injured January 24, was able many community activities that to go home May 26. He will Lincoln Park has for all of us.
n r?tum to jjjif r! Do this at once before summer
novels: Red Harvest, The Dam ther surgery. Timmy s father,; _
Curse, The Maltese Falcon, The .Rev. John Ventura, is a minis- coms- Let us CM Put u Glass Key and The Thin "Man. .ter of the First Mennonite| shoulders to the wheel and do Come and meet Sam Spade | Church. this most important job


June, 1966
Page Three
School : Youth Activity : Recreation
Boys' Club
The Boys' Club just recently held -the Board Members Annual Meeting at the Brown Palace Hotel. J. C. Owens, president of the Board of Directors, spoke to theBoard arid 40 Boys' Club members who were guests at the dinner.
Six young men were granted scholarships to a month of hard work, and training at the Colorado Outward Bound School which is located above the smalltown of Marble. At this school, they will learn to hike, climb and live in the mountains.
The Boys' dub is ready to announce its summer program this year which consists of summer baseball, plaster of paris, leather work, wood work and many, Other interesting things to do.
Greenlee School
AWARD PROGRAM Closing of school activities included an assembly on June 3, in which awards were given to 136 pupils for faithful service performed in school organizations. These services included Student Council officerships, membership on 'the Color Guard, work as Safety Patrol members, Lunchroom Monitors,
Nurse's Helpers, Visual Monitors, Door Monitors, Auditorium Monitors; and Book Monitors.
Also awarded were certificates to the sixth grade basketball team members, who were runners-up in the championship playoffs in the Recreation League.
Ten boys and girls received certificates for perfect attendance and punctuality records during the school year.
The school was especially proud of Anthony Dves who received an award of honorable mention in,v a poster contest conducted nationallv by the American Humane Association in the area of kindness to animals.
SUMMER READING CENTER
A Summer Reading Improvement Center will again be conducted at Greenlee for boys and girls in grades 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. Classes will begin on Monday, June 20 and will continue until July 29. The specific purpose of this particular program will be to help pupils with reading problems to overcome' "theCr' difficulties:
A parallel program will be conducted dt the same time for those boys and girls who have no basic reading difficulties, but who need guidance in developing and widening their are:
.reading interests; | June 23r-"High Country Names
I 375 ho?* and girls' 'he; _Rocky Mountain Park." Lou-West area are enrolled for,, ... | . ~ i j
.. ... isa Ward Arps, Colorado au-
these activities. |
Mrs: Mary-Nelle Ryan, sixth thor. grade teacher at Greenlee, will june 30"The Historic Alpine be the Coordinator who will Tunnel." Dow Helmers, Pueblo head the Center.
WEST HIGH SCHOOL
Nancy Urtado
Gloria Recek
Larry Almanzar
West High Graduation Exercises
Past and Present Of Colorado The,me Of Library Program
"Colorful Colorado," the Denver Public Library's program series focusing- on the state's past and present, opened June j 9 in Wyer Auditorium of the! Main Library, 1,357 Broadway.
Outstanding guest speakers are featured in the free programs which also include fine films and slide presentations.
Held at 12:15 p. m. on six consecutive Thursdays in June and July, the programs are open to the public without charge and do not require tickets.' Remaining programs
Barbara Collins
Five of the graduates, who live in the West Side Improvement Association area, received scholarship awards.
ADAMS STATE COLLEGE Gloria Recek, 132 Galapago.
METROPOLITAN STATE COL-
West High School Alumni Meeting
Geraldine Hodges
PTA GIVES LUNCHEON FOR TEACHERS The Parent Teacher Association honored the staff of Greenlee School with a luncheon on Friday, June 10. Various parents contributed hot dishes, salads, vegetable dishes, and desserts which were enjoyed and appreciated by all who participated.
businessman, photo journalist and |former newspaperman.
July 7 Colorful Colorado Through the Eyes of the Movie Camera."
West's class of '1966 graduated 482 seniors at 7:45 p. m. on June 6 in the City Auditorium. Members of the school! board officiated at the ceremonies; The graduation theme "The Play Is The Thing," set the atmosphere for the com?* mencement.
Addressing the graduating class, six seniors followed the1 commencement theme. Giving" the invocation, Lydia Salazar |led the class and friends in> prayer. Jim Nushy, Senior Class'
USQTTMr-C V-niTF-F Rr,r PreSident' gaVe tHe Welcm
HAYINGS COLLEGE bar ackiress and introduced the bara Collins, 1455 Mariposa, 'following speakers: Act Ir TEXAS WOMAN'S COLLEGE Charles Davis; Act II, Sylvia Nancy Urtado, 508 West 8th Chavez; and Act III, Richard Avenue. I Greenwood. Leslie Peacock
___Sp Wmm 1 i .gave the benediction.
______________________ _ < ;. ? ;J. AANDAHL MEMORIAL j Under the direction of Mr.
LEGE^-Geraldine Hodges, 1114SCHOLARSHIPLarry Alman-;Cari Johnson, speech teacher, Mariposa Street. I zar, 135 West 3rd Avenue. the graduation speakers start-
1 > __j______ ed work in early January. Mr.
NEW PRINCIPAL 1 Johnson pointed out that West
Mr. Earl A. Paul, present'^ School | the only school
in Denver where the graduation speakers write their own speeches.. They, of: course, are-reviewed by a board of teachers for correct word usage and
association west, of the Mississippi.
At present, over 150 volunteers are working to build and July 14r"Ten Ways to the j strengthen the organization. At-Rockies." Roland F. Ruhoff,' tendance at the meeting Friday past president Ghost Town was approximately 250. The Club of Colorado, and membbr; oldest member present was a Rocky Mountain Railroad Club, man from the class of 1914.
principaihof Horace Mann Jun-' ior Higja. School, has been West High School's Eighty- named by the school board second Annual' Alumni meet-jas principal of West nextfall.
u tj r- j -ka on Replacing Mr. PauDwill be
mg ws held Friday, May MHi £ete shannori_ West's'ad- syntax
in the West auditorium. It is .nig ^rin is part of the largest turnover among principals in nineteen years.
ELMWOOD SCHOOL
First graders at Elmwood i School entertained a class from Carson School on May 27. Elmwood students presented a play, "Th^ Country Mouse and the City Mouse;" shown in the picture are Freddie Sanchez, Jovce Westbrook, Katherine Ortega and Carol Linton qs they took part in the play.
After the play the two classes went to Sunken Gardens for games and refreshments. I Planning for the special program was done by the Elmwood class under the direction of their teacher, Mrs. Julia Weaver, and followed a trip to Carson School by the same students in February.
AWARDS ASSEMBLY
Awards Assembly was presented Thursday, May 19, n West's Auditorium.
Awards were presented to
Mr. Nicholas Tacinas, whb; students who achieved
has been Assistant Principal at outstanding work in such fields Baker Junior High School wiHfas ^ speech. homemaking,, be the new Assistant Principal, and industrial arts. at West High School. i
TRAFFIC ENGINEER EXPLAINS "PEDESTRIAN DETECTOR" S§
A pedestrian detector is a button on a traffic signal pole. Generally one is located on each comer of a signalized intersection for use by pedestrians in crossing one of the two streets involved. In some cases the traffic signals are located in mid-block. The pedestrian detector or button is always accompanied by a sign mounted directly above the button stating, "To- cross street, push button and wait for 'green or 'walk' signal"
Wherever these buttons are, it is necessary to push the j button before crossing thb street. This pedestrian detector will then assure you, as a pedestrian, enough green or walk time to cross the street safely.
Elmwood First Graders Perform for Carson School Guests
upon the amount dt automobile traffic crossing the metal auto detector in the street. At some places the traffic signal' will never give a crossing time for the pedestrian unless the button is pushed. At other places* the Walk or Green signal may come on but not give enough time for a safe crossing By a pedestrian. Therefore, because of the .different types of traffic signals throughout the city, cr good rule of thumb to follow is: Where pedestrian detectors-(push buttons) are provided, always push them when the signal is red and wait for your Green or Walk signal. ALWAYS CROSS ON A FRESH GREEN LIGHT.
Pushing the button does not
If the button is not pushed, the make the light turn green any length of time for a pedestrian sooner. It does give more time to cross the street will .depend I to cross.


THE RECORDER
Page 'Foot ______
BUSINESS NEWS
Livran Electric Completes New Building
The Livran Electric Supply Company completed their new builaing at the comer of West 7th Avenue and Kalamath during March and moved from Santa Fe on March 19. The new property cost $175,000.
Livran Electric looked over a number of places around Denver before deciding on one. Mr. Gene Livran says that the firm chose their present location for several reasons: the area is handy to all parts of Denver because of 6th Avenue and the Valley Highway; it is not in the bottomland and subject to flooding; the heavy Kalamath traffic is expected to bring some business from people passing who see the handsome second-floor showroom of lighting fixtures; and, during the eleven-years that the firm has been in the area, they have developed a warm regard for their neighbors. Mr. Livran sees the West Side as an excellent area for wholesale businesses such as this. Livran Electric is a wholesale dealer in electrical fixtures and supplies for home and business; employing 26 people.
Livran Electric recently cov-| ered the West 7th Avenue side of their property with blacktop. They also plan to clear and blacktop the land formerly owned by Mr! and Mrs. Everett Mendoza next to them.
Church News
The churches of the South Broadway neighborhood sponsored a Vacation Bible School publicity parade held June 11th, at 10:00 a. m. Participating churches are The South Broadway Christian Church, 23 Lincoln St., The Foursquare- Gospel Church, 4th Ave. and Pennsylvania St, and the First Avenue Presbyterian Church, W. First Ave. and Acoma St.
VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL
Tne annual Vacation Bible School of the First Avenue Presbyterian Church is being held June 13 thru 24 with daily sessions from 9:00 to 11:30 a. m. These are classes for children of kindergarten age thru high school: A closing pro-
gram is scheduled for Thursday, June 23rd, at 7:30 p.m. 'Tbe school is being conducted -under the Co-Superintendency of Mrs. Sam Thomasson and ^2rs. Glen Lowe. All boys and Virls are welcome!
The 104th Annual Session of the Rocky Mountain Conference of the Methodist Church is being held in Denver June 14-17. Delegates from Methodist Churches in Colorado, Wyoming and Utah will gather at the University of Denver to conduct business for the 115,000 members of the Methodist denomination located in that three state area. Attending the Conference from Wesley Methodist Church are Reverend James L. Smith, pastor, and Mr. Frank Gumma, lay delegate.
LONG TIME WEST SIDE MARKET CLOSES DOORS
It was with regret that many i It had various owners and lo-Westsiders Teamed of the clos- cations before the Haug Broth-ing qf the Haug Brothers Gro-ers bought it in 1919. Frank eery on June 4th. Leo and Haug said they were still serv-Frank Haug had owned and | mg some of the families who operated the grocery at 1030 patronized the store before they W. Colfax for 47 years. Theyjbought. it. Both the brothers counted as regular customers, wish to thank their many cus-about 150 families, some who tomers for. their support over lived as Tar away as Ever-!the years. It became neces-green, Aurora, and- Englewood, sary to close the market be-The market itself was started ^ause of the illness of Frank around 1900 on Kalamath St. Haug.
. ^hopbine 'Tips .
SHOP THE ADS. You can put extra pennieseven dollars in your pocket if you read the grocery ads and take advantage of the specials. Home economists at the U. S. Department of Agriculture recently went shopping to test this theory. They were able to save 25 per cent by shopping the ads of stores in a single neighborhood. These people are pros, and matching skills with them is a real test. But, the experts say, you should be able to knock off $1 in $10 by planning meals around the ads.
JUNE PLENTIFULS. Raisins, split peas and .lentils, canned red salmon and seasonal vegetablesthese are the foods to shop, for in June. According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, all should be plentiful in supply.
CHICKEN DINNER? Here are some tips on buying chicken. Buy it whole and cut it up yourself. You can save from 2 to 4 cents a pound that way. And to get the most meat in proportion to bone, look for U. S. Grade A poultry.
Consumer Credit
Consumer credit comes from banks, credit unions, finance companies, and retail stores. Some charges are more than others. Have you shopped around to find where the cred-
it rate is the lowest and most convenient?
Do you know how much you are paying for the use of credit?
Is having, something now worth the added credit cost?
How does; your decision fit into your family's budget and .-plans?
Are you sure you can meet this pay merit, plus dll other monthly payments?
J^WWill you have money left fo* 'Emergencies ?
TYPICAL CREDIT CHARGES
If charges are based on the beginning amount owed and are included in the 12 < equal monthlv installments:
If Charged: Simple Annual
Rate Is:
$4 per $ 100 or 4% per year. 7.4 % $6 per $ 100 or 6% per year .11.1% $8 per $100 or 8% per year. 14.8% $10 per $100 or 10% per
year ................ 18.5%
1 % per month ........22.2%
If charged only on unpaid amount owed:
If Charged: Simple Annual
Rate Is:
3/ 4 of 1 % per -nonth on
unpaid balance ......... 9%
5/6 of 1 % per month on
unpaid balance..........10%
1 % per month on unpaid balance ...................... 12%
1*4% per month on unpaid
balance................. 15%
1%% per month on unpaid
balance ..............18%
2V^% per month on unpaid
balance ............. 30%
VOLUNTEERS HELP RECORDER
\jplunteers helping in distribution of the RECORDER who have not previously been listed include the following:
The Boy Scouts, under Mr. Richard Mena and Mr. C. G Naney, Mr. Frank Gumma, the children of Mr. and Mrs. Salvador Delgado, Mrs Chris Her-non, Mrs. Reuben Gomez, the children of Mr. and Mrs. Moses Haro, Mr. Dan Martinez, Fairmont Recreation Center, the children of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Winterhalder, and the children of Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Koy-ama.
CHURCH OF GOD 5th and Fox Street Phone 244-2339 Rev. Leroy Vance Sunday Service, 11.
7:30. Sunday School, 10.
METROPOLITAN BAPTIST 910 Kalamath Street Rev. Salvador Cano Sunday Service, 11, 6:30. Sunday School. 10.
Denver Inner City Protestant Parish
910 Galapago Street Phone 244-2636 Rev. Russelfef'S- Williams Miss Marilou Taggart Saturday Church School 10 a. m. (Children 6-12 years).
Sunday Worship11:00 a.m. (Everyone welcome).
Apostolic Church of Jesus 1039 W/'13th Avenue Rev. Toby Rampa Phone 244-2765 Rey. Lee Velasquez Sunday Service, 10:30, 12:00. Sunday School, 9:30.
ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN West 3rd Ave; and Acoma Phone 733-3777
Paul G. Hdnsen and Roger A. Stiers, Pastors
Services: Sunday 8:30, 11:00 a. m., 7:00 p. m,
Sunday School: 9:45 a. m.
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH 1000 Kalamath Street Phone 255-3215 Rev. R. W. Nichols ServiceSunday: 11, 7:00. Sunday School9:30.
Trujillo Speaks To School Board
Bernard Trujillo, 674 Elati Street, spoke for the New Elmwood Committee of the West Side Improvement Association at the Board of Education meeting of May 19. He presented petitions to the Board with over 400 names, ^urging a bond election and a new Elmwood school. Later that evening, the Board decided to hold a bond election for school construction on or before next March 31.
SCOUT RANCH DEDICATION
The Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch at Elbert, Colorado, acquired and being developed by the Denver Area Council, Boy Scouts of America, will be dedicated Sunday, June 19 at 3:00 p. m." said Paul Yetter, Dedication Chairman.
Scouters, contributors, and families will attend, the ceremony, hike the area, picnic, etc.
______ June, 1966 .
First Avenue Presbyterian | ^ 120 West? 1st Avenue Phone 777-5325 Rev. A. J. Blomquist Sunday Service, 11 a. m.. 6:30 p, m. ,
Sunday School 9:45.
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CATHOLIC CHURCH W. 6th Ave. and Galapago St. Phone 534-4408
Rev.. James Nugent, C. Ss. R. Pastor
ServicesSunday Mass: 6,
7, 8:30, 10, 11:30..
Holy Days 6, 7, 3, 9, 12:15, 6 p. m.
ST. ELIZABETH 11th and Curtis Streets Phone 255-9556 Rev. Fabian Flynn, Pastor ServicesSunday Mass: 6.
8, 9:15, 11, 12:15.
Holy Days: 6, 7, S, 1 12.15. 5:45. .
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL 126 West 2nd Avenue Phone 722-8781 Rev. David Minton Sunday School 9:30 a. m. Sunday Service 11:00 a m.
WESLEYAN COVENANT 525 West First Ave.
Rev. O. L. Crager Phone 722-4888 Sunday services11.
Sunday School, 10:00 a.m.
Iglesia Bethel De Las Assem-bleas De Dios
West 2nd Ave. and Fox St. Rev. Mike A. Salazar, Pastor Service-1Sunday, 10:00 and 7:30 p. m.
FIRST BETHANY LUTHERAN 215 West 5th Avenue Phone 825-4862 Rev. Fred A. Bloch Sunday Service, 11.
Sunday School 9 30.
WEST SIDE CHRISTIAN 668 Inca Street Phone: 623-3419 William K. Linton, Minister Services: Sunday Worship 10:10 and 7:00 p. m.
Bible School: 9:00 a. m.
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST 935 W. 11th Avenue Phone 255-6152 Rev. Thomas Sepulveda ServiceSunday: 9:45, 11.
WESLEY METHODIST 465 Galapago Street Rev. James Smith Sunday Service, 11.
Sunday School 9:45.
ST. CAJETAN l 9th and Lawrence Phone 825-8059 Rev. J. Ordinas, Pastor Father Max Santamaria, Assistant Pastor l SericesSunday Mass: 7:00, 8:30, 10:30, '12, 7 p. m.
Holy Days6:30, 8:30, 10:30, 7:00.
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH 885 Delaware Street Phone 2442093 Rev. Marcus Bishop Rev. John Ventura Sunday Service9:00; Spanish Service -11:15; Sunday School 10:00; Evening Service 7:00.