Citation
West side recorder, August, 1966

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, August, 1966
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3, Number 4
Published Monthly
August, 1966
wrong Way
RIGHT WAY
Small children can drown in seconds when left alone around water. Wading pools are won-deful fun and a fine way for Infants and children to get used to the water, but the youngsters NEVER SHOULD BE LEFT ALONE FOR A SECOND.
Mothers should supervise and encourage water play. The Red Cross gives progressive swim* ming courses, and has a manual, Teaching Johnny to Swim, designed for use by parents of young children to teach them to be at home in the water. Call your Red Cross for details.
Western Art At Museum
Western Frontier/' a super lative collection of the dramat ic, soul-stirring art of the early American West will be on view-through October 9 af the Denver Art Museum on Civic Center. Admission to 'Western Frontier is free. It is co-sponsored by the Assistance League of Denver.
This exhibition of 19th century paintings, sketches and sculpture documents the most exciting years in United States historythe 'periodof ^Western expansion. "Western Frontier' includes all the famous artists of that vigorous time, ddrihg^ men who came west to record a vanishing era and leave d heritage for those who came after.
In their paintings, prints and sculpture can be seen the drama of the pioneers in their covered wagons, the prospector of the Gold Rush, the fur trapper, the cowboy, the Indian wars all revealed ,in brilliant panorama by men who were there on the spot to record this exciting time in our nation's past.
DENTAL CARE AVAILABLE AT DGH
Complete dental care is available in the dental clinic at Denver General Hospital for all Denverites with charges on th basis of family size and income.
The dental clinics, which are open daily from 8 a.m. to 4:39 p. m., offer diagnosis of dental diseases, including x-ray service; extraction of teeth and oral surgery, as needed; filling of teeth, if required; false teeth on a limited basis. With a cfrdrge >fpE|M
children's dentistry; and cleaning of teeth by dental hygien
In addition, the dental interns are on call for real dental emergencies, such as fractures of the jaws and facial bones, and excessive bleeding of the mouth.
The clinics have six interns, two oral surgery residents, and two hygienists.
Persons desiring to make appointments for service at the dental clinics should call 244-6969, extension 431, 432, 433.
West Siders Confer With Truckers About Parking
About 40 people attended | a joint meeting of West Side Improvement Association Districts 3 and 4 at the Apostolic Faith Church on August 16 at West Tenth Avenue and Kcda-math. Miss Flora Dee Goforth, Director of District 3, presided. The meeting was called to give residents, business people, and workers in the area the chance to discuss with city officials ways of resolving differences of opinion as to what should be done about the parking of large moving vans on the streets in the Santa Fe Drive area from West 10th Avenue north. Mr. John Bruce of the Traffic Engineering Department and Councilman Leo Gemma were present
Mr. Haity Berman, owner of Amick Transfer & Storage Company and several people who live in the area and work lor Amick's spoke of the length of time the firm has been in the neighborhood and of the bene-dS wffih; ^ and
the West Side have obtained from the paychecks, earned by employees of Amick and out-of-town firms affiliated with North American Van Lines. Mr. Berman urged that some kind of compromise be worked out to meet the needs of his company and the concern of residents.
Councilman Speaks
Councilman Gemma stated that while he favored com-
Dangers Cited
Improvement Association Tackles Junk Cars
sympathies are ( leave a vehicle unoccupied with the motor running. If police are notified, they will ticket such vehicles. However, he remarked after the meeting that out-of-state drivers simply tear up tickets issued to them. He said that it is virtually impossi-lbe to collect on the tickets once the drivers have left the state/
At the end of the meeting Mr. Bruce said that large truck parking on West 10 th Avenue between Kalamath and Santa Fe would be removed and that it would be permitted again in the 1000 block of Santa Fe. He indicated that there might also be some minor adjustments elsewhere. He expressed the feeling that these changes might not be permanent but that he would like to give them a try to see how they resolve the controversy. People seemed willing to go along with Mr. Bruce's compromise. While there was considerable difference of opinion among those present the discussion was largely free of personal attacks.
promise, his with the people living in the area. He feels that they have a right to the enjoyment of their property just as much as do people living elsewhere. He also expressed the view that a firm which relies on such large trucks has some obligation to provide parking for them.
Rev. Randy Nichols, pastor of the Apostolic, Faith Church, complained about trucks parking next to his church on Sundays, preventing his congregation from parking. He also stated that moving vans parking on the street constitute a safety hazard because of the difficu-ty in seeing around them.
Residents were concerned about trucks taking up parking space and about the fact that they obscure buildings from the view of patrol cars passing through the area. Many residents seemed to feel that Amick had g responsibility to provide off-street parking for vans. Some complained thtjf drivers, especially in winter, begin to warm f^^^^^ecfrly in file morning and ieave the motors running for hours at a time.
Mr. Berman agreed that this was a problem and said that he would certainly work on having this practice stopped. Mr. Bruce pointed out that it is against the law for anyone to
Here are the bitter facts about Qolio/Jt take§. thousands of dollars, hundreds of hours of hand work, and an enormous determination to rehabilitate a polio victim, even partially. But there is one sweet fact: three Sabin sugar cubes can keep you from ever getting polio the rest of your lifel Be smart, see your doctor or the Denver Health Department right away for Sabin sugar cubes.
METRO STATE EXPANDS PROGRAM
Metropolitan State College's ogy has. four programs in on-
At its meeting on August 1, the Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Association voted to send a letter to City Councilman Leo Gemma urging him to support adoption of a new ordinance making it easier to rid the city of junk cars; The vote was in response to a letter from the Park Hill Action Committee requesting such action. The Park Hill group has asked Councilman Macintosh to introduce such an .ordinance.
For some years junk cars have been a problem in Denver,. including the West Side.
si

Mr. Julian Kreoger, presiding at meeting of the Board of Directors, West Side Improvement Association
AQTION COUNCIL MEETS
The next regular meeting of the Westside Action Council will be Thursday, August 25, at 7:30 p. m. at Auraria Community Center, 1178 Mariposa Street. Visitors are welcome.
1966-67 catalog is now available at the Office of Admissions and, ,Records, Forum Building, 250 West 14th Avenue, Denver.
Dr. Harold Benn, dean of college services and editor of the catalog, reports that it lists 86 faculty and staff members and d>56 courses.
Arts and sciences offerings., include anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, economics, education, English, French, (german, Spanish, geology, history, music, mathematics, philosophy, .physical -education, physics, political science, psychology, sociology and speech.
Considerable expansion is apparent in applied sciences programs which emphasize preparing individual s f6r occupations. In the fiejd pf business, options..are listed in accounting, general management, office management, data processing, marketing and secretarial science. The division of technen-
gineering technology civil, drafting, electrical / electronic and mechanical. Since catalog copy was prepared, a fifth program aerospace technology with professional pilot and air frame and powerplant options has been approved.
Other new applied sciences two-year programs authorized recently: are nursing and X-ray technology. A culinary arts program will also be started if adequate financing can be arranged. Subject to approval of the- Colorado Commission of > Higher Education, courses will' be added iri the fall quarter in; ornamented horticulture and police science, ?, .
Persons wishing to attend' the college in the fall .quarter are urged do submit, applications for admission as soon as possible. Forms m'ay be obtained at the Office of Admissions and Records either by a personal visit or calling 292-5190.


Page Two
THE RECORDER
August, 1966
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by WesS^Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa He 'Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
HetfMixfoet 'Hotel
Mr. and Mrs. Moses Haro and family, 233 West 3rd Avenue, are vacationing in California and visiting relatives. David Haro is one of the delivery boys for. the Recorder.
Miss Helen Martinez of 113 Fox left Denver on August 2nd to join the Poland Springs Job Corps in Maine. Helen, along with a group of other girls, went by plane as far as St. Louis, Missouri. But because of the airlines strike they had to continue by bus and were nearly a week en route to Maine. -Helen's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marcus Martinez, heard from her several times during her trip and have received word that she has arrived at her destination.
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.1
Mrs. Martha Smith, 365 So. Meade, daughter of Mrs. Dorothy Lindsay, wishes to express her appreciation for the kind thoughts of West Siders who sent condolences on the death of her husband, Airman 1/g Edward A. Smith. Airman Smith died on May 3Q in a motorcycle accident in Thai-; land.
Linda Winterhalder, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Winterhalder, 226 West 3rd Avenue, leaves for church camp at Lnsmont on August 21.
Mrs. Esther Sullivan of 282 Inca, a West Sider: for many years, has been confined, to. the Presbyterian Hospital- for surgery. Reports are that she has improved rapidly and hopes io be home soon.
Mrs. May Day of 138 West First Avenue, a pioneer of- the West Side, had a flying visit from Mr. and Mrs. Ivor Stoats of Bermuda. They were on their way to Hawaii. They remained overnight. Last year they visited Mrs. Day two weeks after the big flood and were most astonished at the sad sight of its destruction. They were enthused over the fact that Denver had done such a won^rful job in repairing the last year's damage.
Mrs. Faye Pratt of. 1107 T-i-pan Street had a visit from her niece and family this week. They were Mr. and Mrs. Norman Coggeshall and two children from Pittsburg, Pa. They spent several hours with Mrs. Pratt.
Jimmy Martinez, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Pacheco of 1253 Lipan Street is home on furlough from Fort Pendleton, California. Jimmy is with the Marine Corps. His leave is for twenty days.
Mr. and Mrs. Leander Rogers of 1311 Lipan Street had a visit from their daughter, Mrs. Don Brutch, of Minneapolis, Minn.
Mr. and_ Mrs. Floyd Bishop, son of the late Mrs. Phillips, gave a birthday party for Erwin Dearleck of 1433 Lipan Street. Mr. and Mrs. Kalan-quin were also guests.
A surprise party was given for Mrs. Minnie Mercer of 1229 Lipan Street on August 7th. It was given in honor of Mrs. Mercer's ninetieth birthday. She was a guest of honor at the home of Aldred Maggie of 1442 So. Knox Street. There were over fifty friends and relatives to honor Mrs. Mercer. She received many gifts but as she said it Was the surprise that was. the greatest gift of all. Mrs. Mercer is the mother of Stella Alstatt of 1229 Lipaa Street.
Emily Jones of 1456 Osage is a new. resident of the West Side. She is currently on a business trip to Seattle.
-Miss Judith Colleen Chavez of 1363 Mariposa is visiting her brother John in Oceanside, California, where she is learning how to surf. A year ago she vacationed on Lake Louise, boating and fishing.
J Mrs. Helen Aragon, 1363 ^griposa, is ncsttP* the grandmother of Natalie Renee Aragon, recently bom to Daniel and Nancy, former West Siders.
Miss Melody Dabrowski, of 1115 Inca, celebrated her 12th birthday on July 17 with a party. Cake and Ice cream were served to her guests, some of whom included Helen Romero, Famces Weiss and Nedra Crook. Melody also received some very nice gifts from her family and friends. She also has been busy with her accordion lately. Two more trophies have been added to her collection of musical awards. Melody recently competed in the Rocky Mountain Accordion Contest held at Regis College. One trophy was won in a quartet competition and one for band.
The Swiss ladies had their i cmniial bus ride-and party on | July 27th. They went to ,Estes j Park by chartered" bus. There | were thirty five ladies including j several guests. Mrs. Rose Anker was chairman. They had; their noon meal at the Range Restaurant in Estes Park. Mrs. Arthur K. Serumgard, one of the hostesses, kept the party going by singing Swiss songs and playing her harmonica. There were several ladies that are far from young. However the youngest lady was Mrs. Mary Gallr, ninety-three years young. She enjoyed every minute pf the trip. She is a former resident of the West Side. She never misses one of these outings and enjoys every one.
Mrs. Anne Molien of Anne's Beauty Salon, 971 Santa Fe Drive, entertained the Samba Group at a dinner Saturday, August 6th at her home.
Mrs. Henry Schonborg of 1248 Lipan Street returned home August 3rd. She has been visiting with her sister at Grand Canyon, Arizona.
Fairmont
Recreation Center
August 11 the Fairmont Recreation Center was host to~ a demonstration on how. police dogs are trained and used by the Denver Policer Department. Officer Pinder -with his dog Rex and Offtcers Kampmueller and Baron from the District One K-9 Corps told how the dogs are trained and showed the various commands and hand signals that the dogs respond to.
Over 100 children, young people and adults came to the' free show and all' seemed to enjoy watching the dogs heel, sit, and attack. Particularly interesting were the hand signals to which the dogs responded. After watching the dogs attack at the command of the officers, most people pres-, ent were quite convinced that the police dogs certainly mean business. The dogs are essentially one man dogs and are in the constant care of the officer who works with them. The dog responds to the command of his officer only and will come to the defense of his officer if he is threatened.
It was indeed an interesting and informative evening. Our thanks to Officers Rinder and Kampmueller, their, dpgs and the Fairmont Recreation Center.
Senior Citizens Club
There are no meetings scheduled for the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club during August. Our next meeting will be at 12 noon, Tuesday, September 6th, in the Lincoln Park Community Hall, 1438 Navajo St. The purpose of the club I is to provide an opik>rtunity for | older people of the Lincoln | Park area to become acquainted with their neighbors; to pro-I mote social relationships; to exchange ideas; and introduce new activities for the greater enjoyment of everyday living. We will be glad to welcome anyone who is interested to cur meetings which are held the j first and third Tuesdays of leach month except July and August. So come over and let's get acquainted.
EDITORIAL
Sometimes we do wonder how some land owners can really expect that fellow human beings could live in some of the places they advertise as being houses or apartments. Perhaps they do not bother to consider that their renters are people just as they are or perhaps they feel if people are willing to rent such places then why bother to fix up the "dump."
In answer to the last point it is frequently true, that these kinds of places may be the only thing available to some people for various reasons such as inability to pay for, a nicer place or being unable to rent nicer places because they have a large family.
It would seem that any landlord with even-a small amount of decency would feel compelled by that decency to see that his properties at least come up to the code ^established by the; Department o|: Health and Hospitals for the safety and health of tenants. Immediately we can hear many landlords saying, "But we do take care that our rentals, meet the requirements and I we also try to keep them neat and clean, but the tenants move in and leave the place in shambles when they move out" Everyone realizes, we think, that such people do exist and we are not suggesting that land owners should have to put up with this. At later date we will discuss what we consider the responsibilities of renters to be.
However, at this point we would like to suggest that in most cases if a landlord makes an effort to keep a place nice, so will the tenant. By this we don't mean slapping paint on a place that in the interests of
safety should be tom down. Or making it obvious that he,! the landlord, will spend only; the minimum time and money, to keep the place barely meeting the standards.. When a tenant is ready and willing to paint a place on his own time and then receives some mixture that hardly qualifies for the name of paint, and such a small- amountthat he cannot do the> job right, it is rather hard to believe that the owner really wants to keep the place in tip-top shape. Or take the landlord who expects that nothing .will ever be broken, damaged, etc., who thinks children should behave as adults, and who constantly reminds the tenant of every penny he pursi into the place! and of his generosity to his tenants. And We mustn't forget the landlord whb lives next door to his tenant and cannot resist the temptation to constantly watch the .tenant for real qt imagined destWctidri-.of property. From personal experience we feel this to be1 less than an ideal situation for both the landlord and the tenant although we realize that it may be inevitable.
We see this whole problem as coming down to two ideas. First is the need to respect others as equals, including our tenants. The second idea is that' one needs to give the best if he expects the best in return. We know that sometimes one can give the best and certainly receive less than best in return, but we still believe, from personal exxperience, that in the majority of cases, in all situations of life, we get back exactly what we invest in or give to any person or project.
Mr. Richard C. Mena, 427 Fox, helping Raul Ponce, 671 Fox, in rifle practice at Boy Scout Camp Tahosa.
Business Notes
Nate's Crown Liquors of 975 Santa Fe Drive announced new store hours. On Friday and Saturday they are staying open until midnight.
Pgndo's Barber Shop at 715 W. 8th Ave. is open six days a week- Monday through Saturday. from 8 a. m. to 6 p. m Ii is owned and operated by Danny .Vialpando./ His assistant is Mike Martinez,' which makes the service of two full time barbers available to their customers. Mr. Vialpando who has owned- the shop for 2V2 years is active in the GJ Fonim.
Boys' Club
A new Boys' Club Branch Director has been named for the Lincoln Park dub on 910 West 8th Avenue. Selected was Mr. Wayne McGhghy (Mac) who has been working over on West Kentucky as a shop director and at 33rd and Tejon at the Boys' Club Conoco Training Station. He has been with the Boys' Club in Denver since January 1966. He replaced Mr.. Ed Seqfeerf; who moved to the J. Churchill Owen Building over at 3480 W. Kentucky Avenue.
Mac reports that Lincoln Park Club will have a Boys' Club football team this year coached by Robert Garcia. The teams will start a physical fitness program Monday, the 15th. All boys between 12 and 15 belonging to the Boys dub are eligible.


August, 1966
THE RECOR fe'ET-l
Page Three
SCHOOLS OPEN SOON
Denver Public Schools
The two-week period, August 22 through September 2, is for registration of pupils new to the Denver Public Schools. ALL NEW pupils should register at the school they are to attend; this includes kindergarten pupils who must'be five (5) years old on or before November 30.
All new pupils should bring proof of age with them, either a birth certificate or other re-cord. Persons new to Denver can find out the name and location of the school they are to attend by calling v the
School Administration Building, 266-2255, or any Denver public school.
New high school registrants are urged to register as soon as possible to allow time for evaluation of their previous credits and possible testing.
FIRST DAYWEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7All Denver Public School pupils report to school at 8:45 a. m. for class assignments. Pupils wifl be dismissed by noon on this day to return at the regular time on Monday, September 12.
BYERSLIBRARY
LAST CHANCE FOR SUMMER READING
W. 7th Aye. & Santa Fe Drive Mon., Tues., Thurs./ Fri. 2-5:30 p. m. Sat., 10 a. m.-12 noon and 1-5:30 p. m. Closed Wednesdays.
TELL NO MANAdela Rogers St John/
Hank Gavin was. a-wealthy, successful young businessman, with a lovely wife. His whole world was astonished and dismayed when he gave it all up to enter the ministry. This long, searching novel explores the causes and results, .of- such a turnabout
THE COURAGE OF THE EARLY MORNING William Arthur Bishop.
A warm entertaining biography of that great Canadian air ace of Word War 1/Billy Bishop. This relives the tense, exciting days oi the Western Front when dog fights and dawn patrols were governed by a rigid code of honor and the air forces were building their own irmnortal legends.
TI# PteTTY PENNY J. D. Scott.
International crime and high adventure cut into a quiet, middle-class existence in suburban England. For a while Philip Foster gets a chance actually to live a dream life and become a daring, resourceful man who was famousa man who risked everything on one desperate throw. The contracts are effective and the action exciting.
THOSE WHO LOVEIrving Stone.
Over a period of years Irving Stone has managed to take biography and fiction and weave them into a skillfully blended reconstruction of a man's life and times. His latest effort was THE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY of Michael-angelo. Now Stone gives us a dual treatment of Abigail and
John Adams that brilliant, stubborn New Englander who dared defend the British soldiers on trial for the Boston Massacre and yet wound up as the second president of the infant republic of the_^ United States. For history enthusiasts and those readers who like long, intricate family sagas, I this is most satisfying.
A SUNDAY WORLDCamilla R. Bittle;
Have yop ever longed for the peace and serenity of your childhood? Roseirt&ry Story did and she attempted to re-, create that world. She tried to shut, out the racial unrest in a small Southern university town' -the CORE marches and the Civil-' Rights demonstrations but some things can't be ignored, especially when they end in a cruel, senseless murder. A thoughtful, sensitive novel of today.
FANTASTIC VOYAGEIsaac Asimov.
Science Fiction readers know Asimov as the masterly writer of excellent S. F. tales. Popular science readers know him as a prize-winning interpreter of scientific facts for the layman. Now both skills join in this amazing account of a journey through the blood stream of a man's body. Because wounded Jan Benes, brilliant refugee scientist, -has a vitally important^ secret locked, in his brain, a team of skilled doctors and technicians, together with their submarine, are shrunk and sent into Benes' circulatory system to repair the damage. They have only one hour to combat nature's weird marvels, complete their mission and re-enter the usual world before they and their equipment become life-sized. Exciting and very different.
LETS TAKE A TRIP TO THE CITY PARK
For the resident of the West Side who has no car why not a trip to the City Park. First take a number 50 bus. It w?!1 take you right to the City Park at 22nd and York Street.
Walking east by way of the tennis courts you enter the City Zoo. It has many things of interest for every age. A fifty cent, charge is made for the adults but it is well worth the money. In the zoo you find animals of interest for every age. From strutting roosters to begging monkeys, Leo the Lion to performing sea lions. When you can't walk any longer you can sit and watch the human animal and what he does when not realizing he is being watched. There are both tame and wild animals, camels, elephants, girgffe, rhinoceros; zebras and many more.
Now we are coming out of the zoo. Let us take a boat trip There is a launch and other small boats but the one that has the greatest possibility is the paddle boat with the stem wheel. There, with a willing partner, you can coast along and let him or her propel the boat all around the lake. Those paddle wheelers are indeed a lot of fun.
Now let us go to the museum, which is a very fine one. There you can seem to relive many ages of this old world of ours. There are birds and animals of prehistorical and present eras. The museum has many hours of visiting and you may-wish to cogie back and really look. There are many exhibits, all in a natural surrounding: Yes there is a heap of looking at the Phipps Building.
If you plan your trip you can stay and hear a concert near the lovely fountain where colored lights play on the spray of water.- This is unsurpassed and there are some real moments of relaxation.
i If you don't; have a snack with you, you can purchase a coke and something* to eat. If you have your lunch with you sit down on the grass under a shady tree and with other Denverites, enjoy this City Park of ours.
Margot Serumgard
A Guide To Good Eating
(Courtesy of the National Dairy Council) Use Daily:
MILK GROUP:
3 or more glasses milk-Children; smaller glasses for some chikren under 9.
4 or more glasses Teenagers 2 or more glassesAdults Cheese, ice cream and other milk-made foods can supply part of the milk.
MEAT GROUP:
2 or. more servings: Meats, fish, poultry, eggs, or cheese ||j-with dry beans, peas, nuts-as alternates £;V/:
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS:
4 or more servings: Include dark green or yellow vegetables, citrus fruit or tomatoes
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BREADS AND CEREALS:
4 or more servings: Enriched or whole grain. Added milk improves nutritional values.
New Price Scale At Denver General
Under the new payment scale worked out at Denver General Hospital, many low-income patients who before were billed for doctors' services will now be entitled to. receive these free. The cost of drugs is included in the charges for medical services, and many patients can get these free, too. Those who ,do have to. pay for services at Denver General do so on the basis of a sliding scale the cost depending on income and family size.
A streamlined procedure has been worked out so that a patient going to Denver General will have to make fewer trips to the cashier. These changes have been made so that medical help will be more available to those needing it, with less waiting.
This is the foundation for a good diet. Use more of these,. and other foods as needed for growth, for activity, and. for desirable weight.
A GUIDE TO GOOD EATING helps you plan or choosy pleasing and satisfying meals that provide good nutrition. It suggests minimum amounts of food from each of 4 food groups ,which should be included in each days meals. This menu plan shows one way to include the 4 important food groups in a day's meals:
Breakfast: Fruit, Cereal or Egg or Both, Toast or Roll and Butter, Milk, Coffee^ _/
Lunch: Main Protein Dish, Vegetable, Bread and Butter, Milk, Fruit.
Dinner:. Main Protein Dish, Vegetable, Potato, Bread or Roll and Butter, Milk,. Dessert.
Vary your menus to suit your taste. In using the dairy-foods for their important calcium .. . -
1 glass milk equals 8 ounces or Va quart 1 slice Amercan cheese (1 oz.) equals glass milk p| cup creamed cottage cheese equals Va glass milk V2 cup Mj pint) ice cream equals pi glass milk.
In the meat group 2 servings should ;give at least as much protein as^A ounces cooked lean meat (V3 pound raw1). About equal amounts of protein come from .
1 ounce cooked lean meat, poultry, or fish 1 egg
1 slice cheese, Amercan or Swiss (1 ounce)
2 tablespoons creamed cottage cheese (1 ounce)
2 tablespoons peanut butter (1 ounce)
V2 cup cooked dried beans or. peas
An average serving of vegetables or fruits is V2 cup: of bread, 1 slice; of cereal, V2 to % cup.
The nutritional statements made on this leaflet have been reviewed by he Council on Foods and Nutrition of the American Medical Association and found consistent with current authoritative medical -opinion.
New Building for Auraria Center
The new Auraria Community Center building under construction. Occupancy is planned for December.


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Pbge Fou
SJ5
THE RECORDER
August, 1966
£hoppiit(j lips .
SALES
SalesSales are held for many reasons.
To make room for new goods.
|Ta sell surplus or shopworn goods.
To get you into the store,
To introduce new products,
The best sales are held, by established stores. They yrgnt to keep your good will and your business.
When you buy at sales
Consider the time, energy and money costs of getting to, the sale. ..
vShop' at the start of the sale for /best selection.
Be sure the sale price is an actual reduction from the regular price.
-Watch for imperfect or damaged articles.
Check styles; items likely to go out of style may be poor buys.
Remember, nothing is a bargain unless you need it
Seasonal Sales. These usually come at the end of the season, Sometimes they come just be* fore the new season's stock arrives. Excellent bargains are frequently offered on appli calces', furniture, furs, apparel linens, rugs, and household accessories. Examples of seasoned' sales are: -
Januarywhite goods February and Augustfur-
niture
Aprilafter Easter clothing Julyspring and summer clothing.
YOUR RESPONSIBILITY
You are important. You and other consumers have power in influencing prices and market conditions. You help guide production by the things you buy. You can help yourself and others if you:
Try to be an informed shopper.
CHURCH NEWS
Wesley Methodist
Members and friends of Wesley Methodist Church enjoyed a picnic at Bamum Park' on July 31.
INNER CITY AND SUBURBAN CHILDREN CLEAN CITY LOTS During a two-week period of July 11-21, a program called Operation Crosstown" was carried out in which 10 and 11 year old youngsters from both Report your wants, likes, suburbia and 1 the inner city and dislikes to dealers and studied the meaning of being manufacturers so they can good neighbors together. One
serve you better.
Praise and buy from dealers who sell better goods and services at reasonable prices.
Avoid hasty buying which causes unnecessary returns.
Pay bills promptly.
-^-Inform proper agencies of dishonesty, fraud, or law violations.
Avoid impulse buying. Decide what you will buy before you get to a store. Spur-of-the-moment decisions can wreck your family spending plan. To avoid impulse buying:
Shop with a list.
Shop for food yourself, or train others in the family to shop wisely.
Ask questions such as When will T use it? Where will. I store it?'* Make a rule to sleep on" a major ipi^dhrfse. The offer should, be just as good the next day.
Beware of your mood when you shopwhen you are tired or hungry you are influenced easier.
Try not to shop when you have to hurry.
Have a spending plan for longer periods, and try to stick with it.
Include in your spending plan the amount you can spend just for fun."
SMART SHOPPING TIPS:
Read the label.
Count your change, watch weights and measures, check sales slips.
Read before you sign watch the fine print in purchase contracts.
West Side
Church
Directory
of their projects was to clean up some lots in West Denver which have long been eyesores to our community. Through the initiative of Mr. Earl McCoy at the West Side Improvement Association lots on Inca, under the viaduct by Mariposa and 6th, and along 8th Avenue were worked on by the young work crews.
Although the children could not thoroughly clean up every lot, they did work hard to remove trash, bottles, papers, and tree limbs from these places. A city truck was obtained to come and haul the trash away. Several people in the community watching the children work, offered rakes, hoes, and something cool to drink to the small workers.
The meaning of such work for these children went deeper than a few hours hard labor. For, through doing a job together, they discovered that many barriers "between 'pedjaie are superficial; that no matter where you: live, or what your race or background, -you can, share common fun and responsibilities.
The entire program was geared to expose all of the children to adult organizations in our Denver community whose main purpose is to help people. Anti Defamation League, West Side Improvement Association, and State Children's Home were among the places visited. Being responsible cit izens of a large metropolis was one of the main points of discussion.
The two-week program was sponsored by First Plymouth United Church of Christ, Temple Emmanuel, and the Inner City Protestant Parish.
Marilou Taggart
CHURCH OF GOD 5th and Fox Street Phone 244-2339 Rev. Leroy Vance Sunday Service, 11.
7:30. Sunday School, 10.
METROPOLITAN BAPTIST 910 Kalamath Street Rev. Salvador Cano Sunday Service, 11, 6:30. Sunday School. 19.
Denver Inner City Protestant Parish
910 Galapago Street Phone 244-2636 Rev. Russell S- Williams Miss Marilou Taggart Saturday Church School 10 a. m. (Children 6-12 years).
Sunday Worship11:00 a.uu (Everyone welcome).
Apostolic Church of Jesus 1039 W. 13th Avenue ZJtev* Toby Rampa ~ Phone 244-2765 Rev. Lee Velasquez Sunday Service, 10:30, 12:00. Sunday School, 9:30.
ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN West 3rd Aye. and Acoma Phone 733-3777 Paul G. Hansen and Roger A. Stiers, Pastors
Services: Sunday 8:30, 11:00 a. m., 7:00 p. m,
Sunday School: 9:45 a. m.
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH 1000 Kalamath Street Phone 255-3215 Rev. R. W. Nichols ServiceSunday: 11, 7:00. Sunday School-9:30. .
First Avenue Presbyterian 120 West 1st Avenue Phone 777-5325 Rev. A. J. Blomquist Sunday Service, II a. m.. 6:30 p, m. ,
Sunday School 9:45.
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CATHOLIC CHURCH W. 6th Ave. and Galapago $L Phone 534-4408
Rev. James Nugent, C. Ss. R. Pastor
^er\nces-Sunday Mass: 6.
7, 8:30, 10, 11-30.
Holy Days 6, 7, 3, 9, 12:15, 6 p. m.
ST. ELIZABETH 11th and Curtis Streets Phone 255-9556 Rev. Fabian Flynn, Pastor ServicesSunday Mass: 6*
8, 9:15, li, 12:15.
Holy Days: 6, 7. 8, 1 12:15. 5:45.
WRONG WAY
RIGHT WAY
. Every year, seme 40 million Americans fake to the water in 1 about 8 million boats. Boatihg Is SAFE fun when you follow the safety rules. This man, if he is a weak or non-swimmer, should be wearing a life jacket.
Safe procedures for weak.or non-swimmers is always to wesr a life jacket and observe tiie rules of the road. Learn how. Call your Red Cross and enroll in one of its small craft safety
FOOD COST RISE EXPLAINED
Greenlee Students in Exhibit
Plan to see the May D & F Exhibit at the Mfcry D & F August 22-27, 1966. There will be many items in the exhibit that have been made by Greenlee
pupils. There will also be a picture of the first grade boys and girls in room 110 in exhibit Please try and visit this during August 22-27.
In a speech delivered to the New York City Council on Auugst 4, 1966, U. S. Secretary of Agriculture Orville Freeman stated that recent increases in food costs to consumers cannot fairly, be laid at the feet of the farmer. Said Secretary Freeman,
Why have bread prices jumped a reported 3 cents a pound, rather than the. V2 cent that farm ..price increases would; justify and why has milk gone up 3.cents a quart instead of 1 cent?
'/This .very important question: deserves a prompt and factual answer.
So far, to. my knowledge, consumers have not received such an answer. But I am sure that the members of this Coun cil and many New York City consumers read with interest as did. the Secretary of Agriculture, a comparison ot the second quarters of; 1965 and 1966 in the July issuer of the
Wall Street Journal, which showed that profits of 12 unnamed groceiy chains are up 21 percent over-a year ago, and. profits of food products companies are up 16.5 percent."
Freeman also commented on the costs of prepared foods. Said the Secretary, Convenience foods, to the extent thev are purchased by a houewife, also add to her'food bill. A good example is the TV dinner, selling for' 60' cents. Prepared at home, it would cos f 20 cents; In this case the housewife pays about 40 cents fei' built-in services. These convenience foods free the housewife .for other activities and give her more time to spend with her family,. but they are an item in increased food costs which cannot be charged to the fanner. For a TV dinner,, for instance, the farmer receives only about 8 cents far his product out of the 60 cents retail cost"
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL 126 West 2nd Avenue Phone 722-8781 Rev. David Minton Sunday School 9:30 a. m. Sunday Service 11:00 a m-
WESLEYAN COVENANT
525 West First Ave.
Rev. O. L Crager Phone 722-4888 Sunday services^11;
Sunday School, 10:00 a.m.
Iglesia Betel De Las Asam-bteas De Dios
West St
Rev. Mike A. Pastor
ServiceSunday, 10:00 and 7:30 p. m;
FIRST BETHANY LUTHERAN 215 West 5th Avenue Phone 8125-4862 li Rev. Fred A. Bfodh Snxiday Service, 11.
Sunday School 930.
WEST SIDE CHRISTIAN 668 Inca Street Phone: 623-3419 William K. Linton, Minister Services: Sunday Worship 10:10 and 7:00 p. m.
Bible School: 9:00 a. m.
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST 935 W. 11th Avenue Phone 255-6152 Rev. Thomas Sepulveda ServiceSunday: 9:45, 11.
WESLEY METHODIST 465 Galapago Street Phone 222-3337 Rev. Joe Kamman Sunday Service, 11.
Sunday School 9:45.
ST. CAJETAN )
9th and Lawrence Phone 825-8059 Rev.. I. Ordinas, Pastor Father Max Santamaria, .
< Assistant Pastor : SericesSunday Mass: 7:00, 6:30, 10:30, 12, 7-p.. m. I Holy Days6:30, 8:30, 10:30, 7:00. ' = . .
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH 885 Delaware Street Phone 2442093 Rev. Marcus Bishop Rev. John Ventura Sunday Service9:00; Spanish Service 11:15; Sunday School 10:00; Evening *Srvic 7:08>


Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3, Number 4
Published Monthly
August, 1966
wrong Way
RIGHT WAY
Small children can drown in seconds when left alone around water. Wading pools are won-deful fun and a fine way for Infants and children to get used to the water, but the youngsters NEVER SHOULD BE LEFT ALONE FOR A SECOND.
Mothers should supervise and encourage water play. The Red Cross gives progressive swim* ming courses, and has a manual, Teaching Johnny to Swim, designed for use by parents of young children to teach them to be at home in the water. Call your Red Cross for details.
Western Art At Museum
Western Frontier/' a super lative collection of the dramat ic, soul-stirring art of the early American West will be on view-through October 9 af the Denver Art Museum on Civic Center. Admission to 'Western Frontier is free. It is co-sponsored by the Assistance League of Denver.
This exhibition of 19th century paintings, sketches and sculpture documents the most exciting years in United States historythe 'periodof ^Western expansion. "Western Frontier' includes all the famous artists of that vigorous time, ddrihg^ men who came west to record a vanishing era and leave d heritage for those who came after.
In their paintings, prints and sculpture can be seen the drama of the pioneers in their covered wagons, the prospector of the Gold Rush, the fur trapper, the cowboy, the Indian wars all revealed ,in brilliant panorama by men who were there on the spot to record this exciting time in our nation's past.
DENTAL CARE AVAILABLE AT DGH
Complete dental care is available in the dental clinic at Denver General Hospital for all Denverites with charges on th basis of family size and income.
The dental clinics, which are open daily from 8 a.m. to 4:39 p. m., offer diagnosis of dental diseases, including x-ray service; extraction of teeth and oral surgery, as needed; filling of teeth, if required; false teeth on a limited basis. With a cfrdrge >fpE|M
children's dentistry; and cleaning of teeth by dental hygien
In addition, the dental interns are on call for real dental emergencies, such as fractures of the jaws and facial bones, and excessive bleeding of the mouth.
The clinics have six interns, two oral surgery residents, and two hygienists.
Persons desiring to make appointments for service at the dental clinics should call 244-6969, extension 431, 432, 433.
West Siders Confer With Truckers About Parking
About 40 people attended | a joint meeting of West Side Improvement Association Districts 3 and 4 at the Apostolic Faith Church on August 16 at West Tenth Avenue and Kcda-math. Miss Flora Dee Goforth, Director of District 3, presided. The meeting was called to give residents, business people, and workers in the area the chance to discuss with city officials ways of resolving differences of opinion as to what should be done about the parking of large moving vans on the streets in the Santa Fe Drive area from West 10th Avenue north. Mr. John Bruce of the Traffic Engineering Department and Councilman Leo Gemma were present
Mr. Haity Berman, owner of Amick Transfer & Storage Company and several people who live in the area and work lor Amick's spoke of the length of time the firm has been in the neighborhood and of the bene-dS wffih; ^ and
the West Side have obtained from the paychecks, earned by employees of Amick and out-of-town firms affiliated with North American Van Lines. Mr. Berman urged that some kind of compromise be worked out to meet the needs of his company and the concern of residents.
Councilman Speaks
Councilman Gemma stated that while he favored com-
Dangers Cited
Improvement Association Tackles Junk Cars
sympathies are ( leave a vehicle unoccupied with the motor running. If police are notified, they will ticket such vehicles. However, he remarked after the meeting that out-of-state drivers simply tear up tickets issued to them. He said that it is virtually impossi-lbe to collect on the tickets once the drivers have left the state/
At the end of the meeting Mr. Bruce said that large truck parking on West 10 th Avenue between Kalamath and Santa Fe would be removed and that it would be permitted again in the 1000 block of Santa Fe. He indicated that there might also be some minor adjustments elsewhere. He expressed the feeling that these changes might not be permanent but that he would like to give them a try to see how they resolve the controversy. People seemed willing to go along with Mr. Bruce's compromise. While there was considerable difference of opinion among those present the discussion was largely free of personal attacks.
promise, his with the people living in the area. He feels that they have a right to the enjoyment of their property just as much as do people living elsewhere. He also expressed the view that a firm which relies on such large trucks has some obligation to provide parking for them.
Rev. Randy Nichols, pastor of the Apostolic, Faith Church, complained about trucks parking next to his church on Sundays, preventing his congregation from parking. He also stated that moving vans parking on the street constitute a safety hazard because of the difficu-ty in seeing around them.
Residents were concerned about trucks taking up parking space and about the fact that they obscure buildings from the view of patrol cars passing through the area. Many residents seemed to feel that Amick had g responsibility to provide off-street parking for vans. Some complained thtjf drivers, especially in winter, begin to warm f^^^^^ecfrly in file morning and ieave the motors running for hours at a time.
Mr. Berman agreed that this was a problem and said that he would certainly work on having this practice stopped. Mr. Bruce pointed out that it is against the law for anyone to
Here are the bitter facts about Qolio/Jt take§. thousands of dollars, hundreds of hours of hand work, and an enormous determination to rehabilitate a polio victim, even partially. But there is one sweet fact: three Sabin sugar cubes can keep you from ever getting polio the rest of your lifel Be smart, see your doctor or the Denver Health Department right away for Sabin sugar cubes.
METRO STATE EXPANDS PROGRAM
Metropolitan State College's ogy has. four programs in on-
At its meeting on August 1, the Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Association voted to send a letter to City Councilman Leo Gemma urging him to support adoption of a new ordinance making it easier to rid the city of junk cars; The vote was in response to a letter from the Park Hill Action Committee requesting such action. The Park Hill group has asked Councilman Macintosh to introduce such an .ordinance.
For some years junk cars have been a problem in Denver,. including the West Side.
si

Mr. Julian Kreoger, presiding at meeting of the Board of Directors, West Side Improvement Association
AQTION COUNCIL MEETS
The next regular meeting of the Westside Action Council will be Thursday, August 25, at 7:30 p. m. at Auraria Community Center, 1178 Mariposa Street. Visitors are welcome.
1966-67 catalog is now available at the Office of Admissions and, ,Records, Forum Building, 250 West 14th Avenue, Denver.
Dr. Harold Benn, dean of college services and editor of the catalog, reports that it lists 86 faculty and staff members and d>56 courses.
Arts and sciences offerings., include anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, economics, education, English, French, (german, Spanish, geology, history, music, mathematics, philosophy, .physical -education, physics, political science, psychology, sociology and speech.
Considerable expansion is apparent in applied sciences programs which emphasize preparing individual s f6r occupations. In the fiejd pf business, options..are listed in accounting, general management, office management, data processing, marketing and secretarial science. The division of technen-
gineering technology civil, drafting, electrical / electronic and mechanical. Since catalog copy was prepared, a fifth program aerospace technology with professional pilot and air frame and powerplant options has been approved.
Other new applied sciences two-year programs authorized recently: are nursing and X-ray technology. A culinary arts program will also be started if adequate financing can be arranged. Subject to approval of the- Colorado Commission of > Higher Education, courses will' be added iri the fall quarter in; ornamented horticulture and police science, ?, .
Persons wishing to attend' the college in the fall .quarter are urged do submit, applications for admission as soon as possible. Forms m'ay be obtained at the Office of Admissions and Records either by a personal visit or calling 292-5190.


Page Two
THE RECORDER
August, 1966
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by WesS^Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa He 'Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
HetfMixfoet 'Hotel
Mr. and Mrs. Moses Haro and family, 233 West 3rd Avenue, are vacationing in California and visiting relatives. David Haro is one of the delivery boys for. the Recorder.
Miss Helen Martinez of 113 Fox left Denver on August 2nd to join the Poland Springs Job Corps in Maine. Helen, along with a group of other girls, went by plane as far as St. Louis, Missouri. But because of the airlines strike they had to continue by bus and were nearly a week en route to Maine. -Helen's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marcus Martinez, heard from her several times during her trip and have received word that she has arrived at her destination.
i
.1
Mrs. Martha Smith, 365 So. Meade, daughter of Mrs. Dorothy Lindsay, wishes to express her appreciation for the kind thoughts of West Siders who sent condolences on the death of her husband, Airman 1/g Edward A. Smith. Airman Smith died on May 3Q in a motorcycle accident in Thai-; land.
Linda Winterhalder, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Winterhalder, 226 West 3rd Avenue, leaves for church camp at Lnsmont on August 21.
Mrs. Esther Sullivan of 282 Inca, a West Sider: for many years, has been confined, to. the Presbyterian Hospital- for surgery. Reports are that she has improved rapidly and hopes io be home soon.
Mrs. May Day of 138 West First Avenue, a pioneer of- the West Side, had a flying visit from Mr. and Mrs. Ivor Stoats of Bermuda. They were on their way to Hawaii. They remained overnight. Last year they visited Mrs. Day two weeks after the big flood and were most astonished at the sad sight of its destruction. They were enthused over the fact that Denver had done such a won^rful job in repairing the last year's damage.
Mrs. Faye Pratt of. 1107 T-i-pan Street had a visit from her niece and family this week. They were Mr. and Mrs. Norman Coggeshall and two children from Pittsburg, Pa. They spent several hours with Mrs. Pratt.
Jimmy Martinez, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Pacheco of 1253 Lipan Street is home on furlough from Fort Pendleton, California. Jimmy is with the Marine Corps. His leave is for twenty days.
Mr. and Mrs. Leander Rogers of 1311 Lipan Street had a visit from their daughter, Mrs. Don Brutch, of Minneapolis, Minn.
Mr. and_ Mrs. Floyd Bishop, son of the late Mrs. Phillips, gave a birthday party for Erwin Dearleck of 1433 Lipan Street. Mr. and Mrs. Kalan-quin were also guests.
A surprise party was given for Mrs. Minnie Mercer of 1229 Lipan Street on August 7th. It was given in honor of Mrs. Mercer's ninetieth birthday. She was a guest of honor at the home of Aldred Maggie of 1442 So. Knox Street. There were over fifty friends and relatives to honor Mrs. Mercer. She received many gifts but as she said it Was the surprise that was. the greatest gift of all. Mrs. Mercer is the mother of Stella Alstatt of 1229 Lipaa Street.
Emily Jones of 1456 Osage is a new. resident of the West Side. She is currently on a business trip to Seattle.
-Miss Judith Colleen Chavez of 1363 Mariposa is visiting her brother John in Oceanside, California, where she is learning how to surf. A year ago she vacationed on Lake Louise, boating and fishing.
J Mrs. Helen Aragon, 1363 ^griposa, is ncsttP* the grandmother of Natalie Renee Aragon, recently bom to Daniel and Nancy, former West Siders.
Miss Melody Dabrowski, of 1115 Inca, celebrated her 12th birthday on July 17 with a party. Cake and Ice cream were served to her guests, some of whom included Helen Romero, Famces Weiss and Nedra Crook. Melody also received some very nice gifts from her family and friends. She also has been busy with her accordion lately. Two more trophies have been added to her collection of musical awards. Melody recently competed in the Rocky Mountain Accordion Contest held at Regis College. One trophy was won in a quartet competition and one for band.
The Swiss ladies had their i cmniial bus ride-and party on | July 27th. They went to ,Estes j Park by chartered" bus. There | were thirty five ladies including j several guests. Mrs. Rose Anker was chairman. They had; their noon meal at the Range Restaurant in Estes Park. Mrs. Arthur K. Serumgard, one of the hostesses, kept the party going by singing Swiss songs and playing her harmonica. There were several ladies that are far from young. However the youngest lady was Mrs. Mary Gallr, ninety-three years young. She enjoyed every minute pf the trip. She is a former resident of the West Side. She never misses one of these outings and enjoys every one.
Mrs. Anne Molien of Anne's Beauty Salon, 971 Santa Fe Drive, entertained the Samba Group at a dinner Saturday, August 6th at her home.
Mrs. Henry Schonborg of 1248 Lipan Street returned home August 3rd. She has been visiting with her sister at Grand Canyon, Arizona.
Fairmont
Recreation Center
August 11 the Fairmont Recreation Center was host to~ a demonstration on how. police dogs are trained and used by the Denver Policer Department. Officer Pinder -with his dog Rex and Offtcers Kampmueller and Baron from the District One K-9 Corps told how the dogs are trained and showed the various commands and hand signals that the dogs respond to.
Over 100 children, young people and adults came to the' free show and all' seemed to enjoy watching the dogs heel, sit, and attack. Particularly interesting were the hand signals to which the dogs responded. After watching the dogs attack at the command of the officers, most people pres-, ent were quite convinced that the police dogs certainly mean business. The dogs are essentially one man dogs and are in the constant care of the officer who works with them. The dog responds to the command of his officer only and will come to the defense of his officer if he is threatened.
It was indeed an interesting and informative evening. Our thanks to Officers Rinder and Kampmueller, their, dpgs and the Fairmont Recreation Center.
Senior Citizens Club
There are no meetings scheduled for the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club during August. Our next meeting will be at 12 noon, Tuesday, September 6th, in the Lincoln Park Community Hall, 1438 Navajo St. The purpose of the club I is to provide an opik>rtunity for | older people of the Lincoln | Park area to become acquainted with their neighbors; to pro-I mote social relationships; to exchange ideas; and introduce new activities for the greater enjoyment of everyday living. We will be glad to welcome anyone who is interested to cur meetings which are held the j first and third Tuesdays of leach month except July and August. So come over and let's get acquainted.
EDITORIAL
Sometimes we do wonder how some land owners can really expect that fellow human beings could live in some of the places they advertise as being houses or apartments. Perhaps they do not bother to consider that their renters are people just as they are or perhaps they feel if people are willing to rent such places then why bother to fix up the "dump."
In answer to the last point it is frequently true, that these kinds of places may be the only thing available to some people for various reasons such as inability to pay for, a nicer place or being unable to rent nicer places because they have a large family.
It would seem that any landlord with even-a small amount of decency would feel compelled by that decency to see that his properties at least come up to the code ^established by the; Department o|: Health and Hospitals for the safety and health of tenants. Immediately we can hear many landlords saying, "But we do take care that our rentals, meet the requirements and I we also try to keep them neat and clean, but the tenants move in and leave the place in shambles when they move out" Everyone realizes, we think, that such people do exist and we are not suggesting that land owners should have to put up with this. At later date we will discuss what we consider the responsibilities of renters to be.
However, at this point we would like to suggest that in most cases if a landlord makes an effort to keep a place nice, so will the tenant. By this we don't mean slapping paint on a place that in the interests of
safety should be tom down. Or making it obvious that he,! the landlord, will spend only; the minimum time and money, to keep the place barely meeting the standards.. When a tenant is ready and willing to paint a place on his own time and then receives some mixture that hardly qualifies for the name of paint, and such a small- amountthat he cannot do the> job right, it is rather hard to believe that the owner really wants to keep the place in tip-top shape. Or take the landlord who expects that nothing .will ever be broken, damaged, etc., who thinks children should behave as adults, and who constantly reminds the tenant of every penny he pursi into the place! and of his generosity to his tenants. And We mustn't forget the landlord whb lives next door to his tenant and cannot resist the temptation to constantly watch the .tenant for real qt imagined destWctidri-.of property. From personal experience we feel this to be1 less than an ideal situation for both the landlord and the tenant although we realize that it may be inevitable.
We see this whole problem as coming down to two ideas. First is the need to respect others as equals, including our tenants. The second idea is that' one needs to give the best if he expects the best in return. We know that sometimes one can give the best and certainly receive less than best in return, but we still believe, from personal exxperience, that in the majority of cases, in all situations of life, we get back exactly what we invest in or give to any person or project.
Mr. Richard C. Mena, 427 Fox, helping Raul Ponce, 671 Fox, in rifle practice at Boy Scout Camp Tahosa.
Business Notes
Nate's Crown Liquors of 975 Santa Fe Drive announced new store hours. On Friday and Saturday they are staying open until midnight.
Pgndo's Barber Shop at 715 W. 8th Ave. is open six days a week- Monday through Saturday. from 8 a. m. to 6 p. m Ii is owned and operated by Danny .Vialpando./ His assistant is Mike Martinez,' which makes the service of two full time barbers available to their customers. Mr. Vialpando who has owned- the shop for 2V2 years is active in the GJ Fonim.
Boys' Club
A new Boys' Club Branch Director has been named for the Lincoln Park dub on 910 West 8th Avenue. Selected was Mr. Wayne McGhghy (Mac) who has been working over on West Kentucky as a shop director and at 33rd and Tejon at the Boys' Club Conoco Training Station. He has been with the Boys' Club in Denver since January 1966. He replaced Mr.. Ed Seqfeerf; who moved to the J. Churchill Owen Building over at 3480 W. Kentucky Avenue.
Mac reports that Lincoln Park Club will have a Boys' Club football team this year coached by Robert Garcia. The teams will start a physical fitness program Monday, the 15th. All boys between 12 and 15 belonging to the Boys dub are eligible.


August, 1966
THE RECOR fe'ET-l
Page Three
SCHOOLS OPEN SOON
Denver Public Schools
The two-week period, August 22 through September 2, is for registration of pupils new to the Denver Public Schools. ALL NEW pupils should register at the school they are to attend; this includes kindergarten pupils who must'be five (5) years old on or before November 30.
All new pupils should bring proof of age with them, either a birth certificate or other re-cord. Persons new to Denver can find out the name and location of the school they are to attend by calling v the
School Administration Building, 266-2255, or any Denver public school.
New high school registrants are urged to register as soon as possible to allow time for evaluation of their previous credits and possible testing.
FIRST DAYWEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7All Denver Public School pupils report to school at 8:45 a. m. for class assignments. Pupils wifl be dismissed by noon on this day to return at the regular time on Monday, September 12.
BYERSLIBRARY
LAST CHANCE FOR SUMMER READING
W. 7th Aye. & Santa Fe Drive Mon., Tues., Thurs./ Fri. 2-5:30 p. m. Sat., 10 a. m.-12 noon and 1-5:30 p. m. Closed Wednesdays.
TELL NO MANAdela Rogers St John/
Hank Gavin was. a-wealthy, successful young businessman, with a lovely wife. His whole world was astonished and dismayed when he gave it all up to enter the ministry. This long, searching novel explores the causes and results, .of- such a turnabout
THE COURAGE OF THE EARLY MORNING William Arthur Bishop.
A warm entertaining biography of that great Canadian air ace of Word War 1/Billy Bishop. This relives the tense, exciting days oi the Western Front when dog fights and dawn patrols were governed by a rigid code of honor and the air forces were building their own irmnortal legends.
TI# PteTTY PENNY J. D. Scott.
International crime and high adventure cut into a quiet, middle-class existence in suburban England. For a while Philip Foster gets a chance actually to live a dream life and become a daring, resourceful man who was famousa man who risked everything on one desperate throw. The contracts are effective and the action exciting.
THOSE WHO LOVEIrving Stone.
Over a period of years Irving Stone has managed to take biography and fiction and weave them into a skillfully blended reconstruction of a man's life and times. His latest effort was THE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY of Michael-angelo. Now Stone gives us a dual treatment of Abigail and
John Adams that brilliant, stubborn New Englander who dared defend the British soldiers on trial for the Boston Massacre and yet wound up as the second president of the infant republic of the_^ United States. For history enthusiasts and those readers who like long, intricate family sagas, I this is most satisfying.
A SUNDAY WORLDCamilla R. Bittle;
Have yop ever longed for the peace and serenity of your childhood? Roseirt&ry Story did and she attempted to re-, create that world. She tried to shut, out the racial unrest in a small Southern university town' -the CORE marches and the Civil-' Rights demonstrations but some things can't be ignored, especially when they end in a cruel, senseless murder. A thoughtful, sensitive novel of today.
FANTASTIC VOYAGEIsaac Asimov.
Science Fiction readers know Asimov as the masterly writer of excellent S. F. tales. Popular science readers know him as a prize-winning interpreter of scientific facts for the layman. Now both skills join in this amazing account of a journey through the blood stream of a man's body. Because wounded Jan Benes, brilliant refugee scientist, -has a vitally important^ secret locked, in his brain, a team of skilled doctors and technicians, together with their submarine, are shrunk and sent into Benes' circulatory system to repair the damage. They have only one hour to combat nature's weird marvels, complete their mission and re-enter the usual world before they and their equipment become life-sized. Exciting and very different.
LETS TAKE A TRIP TO THE CITY PARK
For the resident of the West Side who has no car why not a trip to the City Park. First take a number 50 bus. It w?!1 take you right to the City Park at 22nd and York Street.
Walking east by way of the tennis courts you enter the City Zoo. It has many things of interest for every age. A fifty cent, charge is made for the adults but it is well worth the money. In the zoo you find animals of interest for every age. From strutting roosters to begging monkeys, Leo the Lion to performing sea lions. When you can't walk any longer you can sit and watch the human animal and what he does when not realizing he is being watched. There are both tame and wild animals, camels, elephants, girgffe, rhinoceros; zebras and many more.
Now we are coming out of the zoo. Let us take a boat trip There is a launch and other small boats but the one that has the greatest possibility is the paddle boat with the stem wheel. There, with a willing partner, you can coast along and let him or her propel the boat all around the lake. Those paddle wheelers are indeed a lot of fun.
Now let us go to the museum, which is a very fine one. There you can seem to relive many ages of this old world of ours. There are birds and animals of prehistorical and present eras. The museum has many hours of visiting and you may-wish to cogie back and really look. There are many exhibits, all in a natural surrounding: Yes there is a heap of looking at the Phipps Building.
If you plan your trip you can stay and hear a concert near the lovely fountain where colored lights play on the spray of water.- This is unsurpassed and there are some real moments of relaxation.
i If you don't; have a snack with you, you can purchase a coke and something* to eat. If you have your lunch with you sit down on the grass under a shady tree and with other Denverites, enjoy this City Park of ours.
Margot Serumgard
A Guide To Good Eating
(Courtesy of the National Dairy Council) Use Daily:
MILK GROUP:
3 or more glasses milk-Children; smaller glasses for some chikren under 9.
4 or more glasses Teenagers 2 or more glassesAdults Cheese, ice cream and other milk-made foods can supply part of the milk.
MEAT GROUP:
2 or. more servings: Meats, fish, poultry, eggs, or cheese ||j-with dry beans, peas, nuts-as alternates £;V/:
VEGETABLES AND FRUITS:
4 or more servings: Include dark green or yellow vegetables, citrus fruit or tomatoes
r.
i.
BREADS AND CEREALS:
4 or more servings: Enriched or whole grain. Added milk improves nutritional values.
New Price Scale At Denver General
Under the new payment scale worked out at Denver General Hospital, many low-income patients who before were billed for doctors' services will now be entitled to. receive these free. The cost of drugs is included in the charges for medical services, and many patients can get these free, too. Those who ,do have to. pay for services at Denver General do so on the basis of a sliding scale the cost depending on income and family size.
A streamlined procedure has been worked out so that a patient going to Denver General will have to make fewer trips to the cashier. These changes have been made so that medical help will be more available to those needing it, with less waiting.
This is the foundation for a good diet. Use more of these,. and other foods as needed for growth, for activity, and. for desirable weight.
A GUIDE TO GOOD EATING helps you plan or choosy pleasing and satisfying meals that provide good nutrition. It suggests minimum amounts of food from each of 4 food groups ,which should be included in each days meals. This menu plan shows one way to include the 4 important food groups in a day's meals:
Breakfast: Fruit, Cereal or Egg or Both, Toast or Roll and Butter, Milk, Coffee^ _/
Lunch: Main Protein Dish, Vegetable, Bread and Butter, Milk, Fruit.
Dinner:. Main Protein Dish, Vegetable, Potato, Bread or Roll and Butter, Milk,. Dessert.
Vary your menus to suit your taste. In using the dairy-foods for their important calcium .. . -
1 glass milk equals 8 ounces or Va quart 1 slice Amercan cheese (1 oz.) equals glass milk p| cup creamed cottage cheese equals Va glass milk V2 cup Mj pint) ice cream equals pi glass milk.
In the meat group 2 servings should ;give at least as much protein as^A ounces cooked lean meat (V3 pound raw1). About equal amounts of protein come from .
1 ounce cooked lean meat, poultry, or fish 1 egg
1 slice cheese, Amercan or Swiss (1 ounce)
2 tablespoons creamed cottage cheese (1 ounce)
2 tablespoons peanut butter (1 ounce)
V2 cup cooked dried beans or. peas
An average serving of vegetables or fruits is V2 cup: of bread, 1 slice; of cereal, V2 to % cup.
The nutritional statements made on this leaflet have been reviewed by he Council on Foods and Nutrition of the American Medical Association and found consistent with current authoritative medical -opinion.
New Building for Auraria Center
The new Auraria Community Center building under construction. Occupancy is planned for December.


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THE RECORDER
August, 1966
£hoppiit(j lips .
SALES
SalesSales are held for many reasons.
To make room for new goods.
|Ta sell surplus or shopworn goods.
To get you into the store,
To introduce new products,
The best sales are held, by established stores. They yrgnt to keep your good will and your business.
When you buy at sales
Consider the time, energy and money costs of getting to, the sale. ..
vShop' at the start of the sale for /best selection.
Be sure the sale price is an actual reduction from the regular price.
-Watch for imperfect or damaged articles.
Check styles; items likely to go out of style may be poor buys.
Remember, nothing is a bargain unless you need it
Seasonal Sales. These usually come at the end of the season, Sometimes they come just be* fore the new season's stock arrives. Excellent bargains are frequently offered on appli calces', furniture, furs, apparel linens, rugs, and household accessories. Examples of seasoned' sales are: -
Januarywhite goods February and Augustfur-
niture
Aprilafter Easter clothing Julyspring and summer clothing.
YOUR RESPONSIBILITY
You are important. You and other consumers have power in influencing prices and market conditions. You help guide production by the things you buy. You can help yourself and others if you:
Try to be an informed shopper.
CHURCH NEWS
Wesley Methodist
Members and friends of Wesley Methodist Church enjoyed a picnic at Bamum Park' on July 31.
INNER CITY AND SUBURBAN CHILDREN CLEAN CITY LOTS During a two-week period of July 11-21, a program called Operation Crosstown" was carried out in which 10 and 11 year old youngsters from both Report your wants, likes, suburbia and 1 the inner city and dislikes to dealers and studied the meaning of being manufacturers so they can good neighbors together. One
serve you better.
Praise and buy from dealers who sell better goods and services at reasonable prices.
Avoid hasty buying which causes unnecessary returns.
Pay bills promptly.
-^-Inform proper agencies of dishonesty, fraud, or law violations.
Avoid impulse buying. Decide what you will buy before you get to a store. Spur-of-the-moment decisions can wreck your family spending plan. To avoid impulse buying:
Shop with a list.
Shop for food yourself, or train others in the family to shop wisely.
Ask questions such as When will T use it? Where will. I store it?'* Make a rule to sleep on" a major ipi^dhrfse. The offer should, be just as good the next day.
Beware of your mood when you shopwhen you are tired or hungry you are influenced easier.
Try not to shop when you have to hurry.
Have a spending plan for longer periods, and try to stick with it.
Include in your spending plan the amount you can spend just for fun."
SMART SHOPPING TIPS:
Read the label.
Count your change, watch weights and measures, check sales slips.
Read before you sign watch the fine print in purchase contracts.
West Side
Church
Directory
of their projects was to clean up some lots in West Denver which have long been eyesores to our community. Through the initiative of Mr. Earl McCoy at the West Side Improvement Association lots on Inca, under the viaduct by Mariposa and 6th, and along 8th Avenue were worked on by the young work crews.
Although the children could not thoroughly clean up every lot, they did work hard to remove trash, bottles, papers, and tree limbs from these places. A city truck was obtained to come and haul the trash away. Several people in the community watching the children work, offered rakes, hoes, and something cool to drink to the small workers.
The meaning of such work for these children went deeper than a few hours hard labor. For, through doing a job together, they discovered that many barriers "between 'pedjaie are superficial; that no matter where you: live, or what your race or background, -you can, share common fun and responsibilities.
The entire program was geared to expose all of the children to adult organizations in our Denver community whose main purpose is to help people. Anti Defamation League, West Side Improvement Association, and State Children's Home were among the places visited. Being responsible cit izens of a large metropolis was one of the main points of discussion.
The two-week program was sponsored by First Plymouth United Church of Christ, Temple Emmanuel, and the Inner City Protestant Parish.
Marilou Taggart
CHURCH OF GOD 5th and Fox Street Phone 244-2339 Rev. Leroy Vance Sunday Service, 11.
7:30. Sunday School, 10.
METROPOLITAN BAPTIST 910 Kalamath Street Rev. Salvador Cano Sunday Service, 11, 6:30. Sunday School. 19.
Denver Inner City Protestant Parish
910 Galapago Street Phone 244-2636 Rev. Russell S- Williams Miss Marilou Taggart Saturday Church School 10 a. m. (Children 6-12 years).
Sunday Worship11:00 a.uu (Everyone welcome).
Apostolic Church of Jesus 1039 W. 13th Avenue ZJtev* Toby Rampa ~ Phone 244-2765 Rev. Lee Velasquez Sunday Service, 10:30, 12:00. Sunday School, 9:30.
ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN West 3rd Aye. and Acoma Phone 733-3777 Paul G. Hansen and Roger A. Stiers, Pastors
Services: Sunday 8:30, 11:00 a. m., 7:00 p. m,
Sunday School: 9:45 a. m.
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH 1000 Kalamath Street Phone 255-3215 Rev. R. W. Nichols ServiceSunday: 11, 7:00. Sunday School-9:30. .
First Avenue Presbyterian 120 West 1st Avenue Phone 777-5325 Rev. A. J. Blomquist Sunday Service, II a. m.. 6:30 p, m. ,
Sunday School 9:45.
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CATHOLIC CHURCH W. 6th Ave. and Galapago $L Phone 534-4408
Rev. James Nugent, C. Ss. R. Pastor
^er\nces-Sunday Mass: 6.
7, 8:30, 10, 11-30.
Holy Days 6, 7, 3, 9, 12:15, 6 p. m.
ST. ELIZABETH 11th and Curtis Streets Phone 255-9556 Rev. Fabian Flynn, Pastor ServicesSunday Mass: 6*
8, 9:15, li, 12:15.
Holy Days: 6, 7. 8, 1 12:15. 5:45.
WRONG WAY
RIGHT WAY
. Every year, seme 40 million Americans fake to the water in 1 about 8 million boats. Boatihg Is SAFE fun when you follow the safety rules. This man, if he is a weak or non-swimmer, should be wearing a life jacket.
Safe procedures for weak.or non-swimmers is always to wesr a life jacket and observe tiie rules of the road. Learn how. Call your Red Cross and enroll in one of its small craft safety
FOOD COST RISE EXPLAINED
Greenlee Students in Exhibit
Plan to see the May D & F Exhibit at the Mfcry D & F August 22-27, 1966. There will be many items in the exhibit that have been made by Greenlee
pupils. There will also be a picture of the first grade boys and girls in room 110 in exhibit Please try and visit this during August 22-27.
In a speech delivered to the New York City Council on Auugst 4, 1966, U. S. Secretary of Agriculture Orville Freeman stated that recent increases in food costs to consumers cannot fairly, be laid at the feet of the farmer. Said Secretary Freeman,
Why have bread prices jumped a reported 3 cents a pound, rather than the. V2 cent that farm ..price increases would; justify and why has milk gone up 3.cents a quart instead of 1 cent?
'/This .very important question: deserves a prompt and factual answer.
So far, to. my knowledge, consumers have not received such an answer. But I am sure that the members of this Coun cil and many New York City consumers read with interest as did. the Secretary of Agriculture, a comparison ot the second quarters of; 1965 and 1966 in the July issuer of the
Wall Street Journal, which showed that profits of 12 unnamed groceiy chains are up 21 percent over-a year ago, and. profits of food products companies are up 16.5 percent."
Freeman also commented on the costs of prepared foods. Said the Secretary, Convenience foods, to the extent thev are purchased by a houewife, also add to her'food bill. A good example is the TV dinner, selling for' 60' cents. Prepared at home, it would cos f 20 cents; In this case the housewife pays about 40 cents fei' built-in services. These convenience foods free the housewife .for other activities and give her more time to spend with her family,. but they are an item in increased food costs which cannot be charged to the fanner. For a TV dinner,, for instance, the farmer receives only about 8 cents far his product out of the 60 cents retail cost"
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL 126 West 2nd Avenue Phone 722-8781 Rev. David Minton Sunday School 9:30 a. m. Sunday Service 11:00 a m-
WESLEYAN COVENANT
525 West First Ave.
Rev. O. L Crager Phone 722-4888 Sunday services^11;
Sunday School, 10:00 a.m.
Iglesia Betel De Las Asam-bteas De Dios
West St
Rev. Mike A. Pastor
ServiceSunday, 10:00 and 7:30 p. m;
FIRST BETHANY LUTHERAN 215 West 5th Avenue Phone 8125-4862 li Rev. Fred A. Bfodh Snxiday Service, 11.
Sunday School 930.
WEST SIDE CHRISTIAN 668 Inca Street Phone: 623-3419 William K. Linton, Minister Services: Sunday Worship 10:10 and 7:00 p. m.
Bible School: 9:00 a. m.
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST 935 W. 11th Avenue Phone 255-6152 Rev. Thomas Sepulveda ServiceSunday: 9:45, 11.
WESLEY METHODIST 465 Galapago Street Phone 222-3337 Rev. Joe Kamman Sunday Service, 11.
Sunday School 9:45.
ST. CAJETAN )
9th and Lawrence Phone 825-8059 Rev.. I. Ordinas, Pastor Father Max Santamaria, .
< Assistant Pastor : SericesSunday Mass: 7:00, 6:30, 10:30, 12, 7-p.. m. I Holy Days6:30, 8:30, 10:30, 7:00. ' = . .
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH 885 Delaware Street Phone 2442093 Rev. Marcus Bishop Rev. John Ventura Sunday Service9:00; Spanish Service 11:15; Sunday School 10:00; Evening *Srvic 7:08>