Citation
West side recorder, September, 1966

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, September, 1966
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
HEALTH AND HOSPITALS
SEEKS CODE COMPLIANCE
Sanitarians from' the'-.Housing;' Section. of, the Department of Health and Hospitals are again going, through blocks .now being inspected in the West Side Improvement Association area. Some notices have been issued and at least one, case taken to court.
In other action affecting the inspection area, a hearing was held by the Department of Health and Hospitals on July 12 on an appeal by Charles Ginsberg of orders to- correct certain deficiencies in Terraces from 912 to 920 West 11th Avenue. The decision from the hearing is pending* The orders against the property were issued on September 27, 19*63, while it was in the estate of his wife, and these were appealed' November 12, 1963. Mr. Ginsberg inherited the property in December, 1963.
Among the violations of the Housing Code charged in records .available in the County Clerk and Recorder's Office are:
,631.6-4 Pertaining to unsafe and inadequate heaters;
.631.6-6 Pertaining to1 unsafe wiring;
631.7-1 Pertaining to defective bricks and mortar; vv 631,7-3-. Pertaining-to defects ;in-, floors, interior walls, and ceilings;
. 631.9-1 Pertaining to cleanliness and sanitation of premises;
631.9-6 Pertaining to infestation by insects, and rodents.
In his appeal, Mr. Ginsberg states that there is "no true basis for the complaints made. Property has been maintained at times in an orderly matv ner." $
Wall of business property next to terrace, in same ownership
Terraces on W. 11th Avenue, -under Health and Hospitals Orders
Rubbish behind terraces on W. 11th Avenue
Charles Ginsberg, prominent Denver attorney
(Photo courtesy 'Denver Post)
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3, Number 5S
Published Monthly
September, 1966
free legal help available | jsjew Librarian At Byers
In cm effort to provide legal others can qualify if the pay- J
advice for those unrible ,to pay, the Denver City Cottir mission on Community Relations in cooperation, with the Denver Bar Association is sponsoring a service of. free, legal advice for those who qualify* *
On every Thursday everting from 7 p. m- to 9 p. m. at 1160 Federal Blvd. and at the Neighborhood Health Center, 29th and Welton, there are attorneys, available for legal consultation. If q case demands more attention than the consultation attorney can give, it is referred- by -a review committee tof the Denver Bar Association to a private attorney who handles the case free : of charge.. ,
There is, no hard and fast rule concerning who qualifies for this service. The guidelines are that anyone receiving wel-. fare payments qualifies and
.West Sider New Crossing Guard
ment of private attorney fees deprives the family of necessities. The applicants are expected- to pay minor court costs 'when there- are such./ If ;a. person does not. qualify he j is referred to either Legal Aid j-or to a private attorney who swill then charge a regular fee- ,
i Since May of this year near-j ly 200 cases have been han-j died b^ this service, reports 1 the. Commission on Community Relations Office located in ,tbe West Side Annex Building, West Colfax at Kalctmath, Room 260. Persons with questions are encouraged to contact the Commission office at 297-2622. If an expansion oi this service is indicated by future experience, this service may be expanded to other evenings or other locations.-
NEW MEMBERS SEATED ON ACTION COUNCIL
Improvement Association
.Mrs. Maxine Nunez of 837 Street is one of the new school crossing guards trained? under Title 5 funds from the Economic Opportunity Act? .pro* vicjed to the Driver' Departs ment of Public Welfare; Muchh o{ the training was ... dan** by the j&oiicer-
, Mrs. Nunez wiH. not. be ^Pricing the- first week at ^hcb| because she will ,be in the hospital to have her tonsils tout. She is enthusiastic about the crossing guard pros gram, The mother of a pres School girl, she said of the program, "It is a good thing-T hop^e it is there when my daughter goes to school."
S.ix new at-large, members were : seated at the ..August 25th meeting of the Westside Action Council. The six are Dr. Rachel Driver, a physician, Mr. Leonard1 Chadmck, rtianager of Lincoln and: South Lincoln Park.; Harness Mrs. Rose Gomez:v andr. Mr.: Ruperta Guedeov dr;, / neighl^^QQd'; ldertts, ':Ged^^>Cftov^rr
manager:-of the'' lbcGd: :SdfeJ
land : Johnson, an attorney With offices, in this area-The next, ineeting of the Council will be oq Sept. 29; at :7:30 p, m. at St Elizabeth School, 1020 11th Street, This is our Council, elected by us to work for improvement of our Community. Everyone of us should try and attend when possible to keep up with what is being done by our Council.
District Meetings
District 9
District 9 of the West Side Improvement Association will meet on Thursday, September 22, at 7:30 p. m. at the; First Avenue Presbyterian Church. The speaker will be Mr. Ralph Livingston of the Zoning Administration office, who will be present to answer questions related to the parking of moving vans in the vicinity; of West 2nd Avenue and Acoma and I other zoning matters. Officers will also be elected at this meeting, District 9 covers the area from West 1st Avenue to West "3rd Avenue and from Broadway to Elati.
District 1 1
Lieutenant Tom O'Neill of the Denver Police Department will speak at the meeting of District 1 of the West F.Side Improvement Association at Au-raria Community Center '7:30 p- m., Tuesday, September, 20. His topic is"Problems of disturbance of the peaceWhat can be done." Officers for the district will be eleetedct- this meeting; District 1 of the West Side Improvement. Association is : 'the area;, east of Lincoln Park Hgmes>and .north, oi ..West 4.^^,.Avenue;;, .. .....
0 District. 4? the.' West. Side-
Improvement Association meets at the West Side Improvement Association office; 768 Santa Fe Drive, on Thursday, September 22 at 7:30 p. m. The meeting is to hold the annual election of officers and to make plans for the coming year.. District 4 is the area north. of Wesit 8th Avenue, west of Santa Fe Drive, and south of west 12th Avenue, outside South Lincoln Park Homes.
Pastor Installed At St. Cajetan's Church
Mrs. Barbara Ritzma began work ds' the new library assistant at Byers Neighborhood Library on September 12. Mrs.
Rev. Max Santamaria. C. R mor f Wgi
has recently been named pas-1 ned a geologist. She tor of St. Cajetan's Church lo- g{afa?ed S *e U^rsity cated on 9th .and Lawrence f Uah and0.hs ig for Street. He was bom in Na- *e §|§i 04
varra, Spain, on May 16, 1927, gS Llbrar7 m Science and entered the Theatine Sem- ?id, iH 11 You?g inary of Palma Majorca, Spain, Adult sections and at the
in 1946. There he studied thru his novitiate and junior college years graduating in 1948. Later > he studied Philosophy and Theology at Gregorian University in Rome, 'Italy, and graduated from there in 1956. His ordination took place at St. John Lateran Cathedral in Rome, Italy, on March 17, 1956.
On March 19, 1956, he said his first mass at St. Andrea Church in Rome, Italy.
After his ordination he spent four years teaching in the Theatine Seminary, Our Lady of Castanar, located in Salamanca, Spain.
He came to the United States! on September 16, 1960, at which! time he was assigned to St. Cajetan's Church as assistant pastor, and has served there (since.
Rev. Max Santamaria comes from a.: family- rich in religious Vocations.-- He has an: uncle* Monsignor SilvctnO;. Bacpiedemov Trhor 4 chc^lgih irt -the ; Stat6 Hospital' ini Santa: Margarita, CalifamiteK-- Two atmto who are nuns, Sister Margarita and Sister Marcellina, both in1 Spain. A brother, Rev*. Jesus Santamaria, stationed in Cordova, Argentina, a sister Sister Eliza, stationed also in Spain, and at the present time he has a nephew in the seminary in Spain.
On April 29, 1966, he became a citizen of the United States.
Rev. Santamaria will replace Rev. John Ordinas who has been pastor at St. Cajetan's since 1937. We hope that he will be able to serve us as long as his predecessor-
South Holly and University Hills branches. She is looking forward to meeting local library patrons-
The former assistant, Mrs. Beverly Walker, is at the Cherry Creek Branch for six months, after which she goes to Main for six months. She will then receive a permanent assignment from the Denver Public Libarry. Mrs. Walker recently received her Master of Arts in library science from the University of Denver. She says she will miss the many, many friends she has made at Byers.
Basic Education For Adults To Continue
Basic education classes for adults are continuing at Greenlee School and at Baker Jun-k ig-rHigh. School. ..English, mathematics^ crncL other subjects are" taught to- smalt classes at the- two schools. Adults may register and begin study at any of the class sessions, which are held Monday and Wednesday, from 7 to 9 p.m. Teachers are provided by Opportunity School.
At Greenlee School the entrance is through the mean door., 1150 Lipan Street Mr* Crespin is the teacher. For the classes *at Baker Junior High School the door at the corner of 6th Ave. and Fox l St. is used. Mr. Augustine is again teaching at Baker.


Page Two
the Recorder
September, 1966
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsoredv by West Side Improvement) Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
i/iod Ttoted.
Robert Pace, a graduate from West High some twenty-five years ago, now living in Atascadero, California, has been visiting his relatives and friends in Colorado. He is the brother of John Pace of 647 Kalamath.
Velva Farrow spent over a week at her cabin at Wonder-vu getting it in shape for the
Mrs. Rose Hines of Chicago, ;I11., has been visiting her father,/ Mr. Gerald Glynn of 1253 Kalamath Street.
Sharon J. Bowers, age 10, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs-Edward Bowers, 1370 Kalamath Street, was one of many West Side children who received certificates from the Denver Library for completing the 1966 Vacation^ Reading Program. More than 56,000 children were enrolled.. The deadline for all completed reading was September 15th. Sharon had her picture and a nice write-up in the Denver Post of August 31. The West Side congratulates Sharon for this wonderful worthwhile effort. Sharon attends St- Elizabeth's School.
Caroline Ortiz Espinoza, wife of Abel Espinoza, the sister of Alice Apodaca of ,1244 Lipan Street, Denver, and the sister cf Austin and Jack' Ortiz1 of coming winter. While she I Los Angeles, California, passed was there her beautiful white away August 17, 1966,. in San cat ''Punkie'' was killed by a j Mateo; California. Friends dog. Mrs. Farrow was heart .please call 534-8576. broken but another cat adopt-1 ed Velva. This cat was being
chased by the same dog that killed Punkie. It was starved, and not what it could be, but Mrs- Farrow adopted him. She
Faye Nera from Anne's Beauty Salon, 971 Santa Fe Drive, spent a week in Albuquerque, New Mexico, visiting
calls the newest member of her aunt. She had a wonder-her family "Tiger" and broughtful time, him back to Denver. He now
resideswith Mrs. Farrow at 1114 West 13th Avenue.
Mrs. Ella Horan of 1352 Kalamath is enjoying a three weeks frip to Europe. She retired recently, from the Telephone Company. We all wish her a wonderful trip-
Wally Tipton and his wife Della of 838 Kalamath spent Labor Day in Colorado Springs and Walsenburg eating cantaloupe.
Diana Martinez of 1243. Kal-Qmath was given a baby shower by Judy Galqrdo.
Judy Sedbropk formerly of 1258 Kalamath Street has had a baby boy. He was born August 10th.
P. F. C. Arthur L- Guerrero, son of Elvira Guerreo of 729 Elati Street, is home from basic and' additional guerilla warfare trainingr'He will. be home for 30' days and is,.headed for Viet Nam. About the same time He leaves, Bob, his younger brother, will be leaving for basic training.
- Mr. and Mrs. John Pace oi 647 Kalamath just returned from a ten day trip to Oregon and California visiting relatives*
Two West Side girls left Denver on August 23rd as Women's Job Corps recruits Thev am Cinda Pena, 252 Inca Street, and Margaret Helen Romero, 917 Kalamath Street.
Mrs- Julia Pacheco 1 of 1253 Lipan' Street was iri Mercy Hospital for 17 days for surgery. She is home now and is doing real well.
Jimmy Mgrtiiiez, grandson of. Mrs. Adolph Pacheco.of 1253 Lipan; Street; 'virqs Hpme for four days': and left, to go tp North Carolina where he is now stationed.
Mr. Jerry Jaramillo of Stock-ton, California, visited his aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs- Eddie Quintana;. of*. 1233. Lipan Street, He was on his vacation and spent two weeks With his relatives in Colorado, He likes Colorado very much. ;
Mrs. Louise Churchill of 1209 Lipan Street reports that her grandson, Kenny Stark of Castle Rock,' is in boot camp at Fort Bliss, Texas. He visited his grandmother for ten days before returning to camp.
Mr- and Mrs. Henry Schon-borg of 1248 Lipan Street has as their house guests Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kensler of Pueb-1q, Colorado. The Schonborgs also visited Mrs. Limdq\iist who .is in. .the Swedish JNnrsing Home and W.Schumr at Lake-wood recently.
-Mrs. Alice, Apodaca of 1244 Lipan Street gave a bridal shower for her future daughter-in-law, Mary joe JSilva, on September 9th* There were thirty guests at the shower.
Mr. Joseph. Knifton of 1039 West 14th Avenue is back in
Mr. and Mrs. Rov Winter-hctlder and girls of 228 W. 3rd
Avenue and Mr. and Mrs. Tom, HI ~ HR
Winterhalder soor.t the week-!the llpl General Hospital end near Yampa, Colorado, jHe would like to have some fishing and Hiking. * visitors.
Paul Martinez, state chairman of th§ G. I. Forum, and his family, made a motor trip to California to attend the National G. I- Forum Convocation. He was joined by Laurence Martinez, Elmer Barela and family, Art Valdez arid family, John Romero, and State Representative Frank Anaya, who also attended the Convocation.
Mrs. Alfonzo Martinez went to California to- visit her brother and sister for 2V2 weeks.
Mrs. Lulu Young of 241 Inca left for southern Colorado to attend her granddaughter's Wedding. She then .went to Texas to visit other relatives-
Mrs. May Day of 138 W. 1 st Avenue has had a very busy. month. Her relatives from Utah came on a vacation with her. It was a most enjoyable visit' for three weeks. She was entertained: at a luncheon and canasta party by Mrs. Ann Prewill of L43 W. 1st Avenue. Mrs. Day also tdok a trip to Cheyenne, Wyoming, to visit friends and relatives. She also renewed her (Acquaintances with old scenes and faces. As a girl she often participated in the rodeos.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Maberry, 308 Inca, have been enjoying a vacation to Missouri and the Dakotas.
Four West Siders, Mrs. Olga Apple, 841 Galapago St,, Mrs-Emma Bradfield, 1359 Cherc> kee. St., Mrs. EtheL Jones, 1019 Bgnnoc.k St-, and .Helen Johnson, 1351: Mariposa St., were among the forty-one members rof the Denver Golden Age Club who. attended : the picnic given arihually by ; the G.A.C-of Fori .Collins vvon Sunday,' August 21st. Nearly one hundred and fifty were1 present, representing, besides Denver and Fort Collins, clubs from Cheyenne, Laramie, Greeley; and several smaller towns. After a truly bountiful potluck lunch, there 'was a program of music, singing, and dancing. Returning by chartered bus at 6:00 p. m., twelve of the Denver group had supper tor gether, then attended the outdoor : church service in the Greek Theatre of the Civic Center-
A daughter was bom to Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cordova on Sunday, September :4. IJer name is Suzanne Jo* M^s-Cordqva is flyne learner FtjLta Lucero. Moijjer andt,cd Bill Cecil of 814 W. Jlth Avenue, graduate .of West High School and University of Colorado, who has been taking postgraduate work at Colorado State University, completed his studies, receiving a master's degree in Psychology at commencement exercises, August 19 at CSU.
Miss Peggy Salas of 821 W. 14th Avenue has been busy representing West Denver at the Teen Age Fair held August 26 to September 4, 1966. Peggy finished ninth grade at Baker Junior High School and is a sophomore at West High.
Mr. Don Schissler of 281 Cherokee has graduated from the Art School in Denver and | has been hired by an advertising firm in Boulder. The family plqns to move to Boulder when they find suitable housing- Mrs; Schissler has been active! in the Baker Junior High School P.-T.A. and will be missed by many.
Mrs. Fay Brott of 1426 Osage St. was in McCook, Nebraska, for her daughter's silver wedding anniversary July 24th. After several weeks spent visiting relatives, she returned to j Denver and entered St. Joseph's Hospital for surgery August 26th- She is now convalescing at home.
Mrs. Grace Musgrove, 1346 Osage Street, and Mrs. Anne Petshauer, 1350 Osage St., enjoyed six wonderful days when they accompanied the Mile-Hi Senior Citizens Club, on their annual outing at Camp Handicamp, near Georgetown, August 28th to September 3rd.
S/Sgt. Alfonso Rias has left for overseas. He is the son-in-law of Mr- and Mrs. Alfonzo Martinez. He > is with the R/L-26 post of the Fifth Marine Division.
Helen Cochran of 242 Cherokee returned from a very-enjoyable vacation in Wisconsin. She also visited her brother Stuart and family in Chicago and brother Cliff and family in Omaha. Helen's trip was sponsored by Broadway, Baptist Church for a teachers' training and treasurers conference.
READERS' FORUM
Dear Sir:
At the LiHcPhi Park on the West side is a beautiful 26 foot Pine tree dedicated to the memory of a Pioneer Colorado Governor, that very few people know v about. Exactly 2 feet in front of the tree stands a Bronze plaque that reads, and I qubte, "Homesite of Alexander C.,: Hunt, Colorado Pioneer of '59, Judgepf Vigilante Committee, Territorial U. S. Marshall, Gifted Indian Diplomat, Governor, Colorado territory 1867-69, one of the Founders. of JHe Bfrilders of D-& R. Q. ^. jR^lrogid. Dedicate^ by; Daughters of Colorado 1932."
TJi tree sits, 60 feet in front pf a ,m^em building on the .confer of 12th and Marippsa Street. Tree neglected by ppp-pie, .jprmfres, dead branches, children climb tree and tear branches, Bronze Plaque all beaten up- Tree needs medical care (spraying). By the way who were the Daughters of Colorado? -
SFC. Del Gurule U.S.A.R.
1148 Mariposa Street
In Memoriam j
Benjamin (Ben) Cohen, 80, who operated Ben's Apparel Store, 825 Santa Fe Drive, for 24 years, died at Rose Memorial Hospital recently. "Ben" was bom in Leadville, Colorado, May 10, 1886. He went to Rapid City, South Dakota, as a child. He married Anna Cohen there and they came to Denver in 1935. Surviving are his widow Anna, daughter, Esther Hallen of Lake-wood, and five brothers: Dave, Charles, Lawrence, and Felix, all of Denver, and Harry, of Phoenix, Arizona-
George Cutrell, 430 W. 9 th Avenue, passed away on September 6. His ueath was sudden and unexpected since he. and his wife Frances had just moved into the apartment of the Mennonite Youth Center to serve as care.akers of. the church and youih center. He will be greatly missed by the First Mennonite Church, members and his many other friends.
Word was received- in Denver from Loveland, Colorado* of the death of Mrs. Rose Maberry, formerly of 244 Cherokee. Mrs., Maberry. has family in Denver and she will be-sadly missed by all..
News of, the passing recently of Nellie Brayton of 248 In-pa let all. of us old timers realize we Had lost a very dear friend and an upright citizen.. She was an old-time pioneer and was active in church and political affairs.
One-Man Crusade
Mr. W. R. Blanton, 1220 W. Colfax, is undertaking a one-man campaign for lower Tramway fares for Senior Citizens. This is a move that should be of interest to every older person .in Denver, and we wish him the best of luck;
Boys' Club
Ray Garcia, the president of. the 1 West Denver Keystone Club, recently flew to Washington, D. Q- He was representing the Boys' Club for the Rocky Mountain region in the National Youth Conference for Nature Beauty and Cppseryg-tioriL THe conference was opened on. the White House lawn, by. the President and. the First Lady.. Also, he .topk a tour of the White House and its gardens while he was there. During ..his four day... stay at the conference, they .dismissed matters on air pollution, anti-litter, water pollution, urban, renewal, for different cities of the United Stales* But it wasn't all work. In the morning He took different tours to the Washington Memorial, Lincoln Memorial, Capitol Building, and his evenings were filled with entertainment by the Back Porch Majority, the. Bitter Ehders, and other youngs people's groups.


September, 1966
THE RECORDER
Page Three
School Youth Activity : Recreation
St. Joseph's Elementary
What My School Means To Me What do you think schoo! is? To. me St. Joseph is a place of learning. School to others is just a building where you spend half of your day. When I wake up in the morning and get ready for school I wonder what kind of a day I will have, if it's a gqod day I hope it will never end; but if it is a bad one I tell my self tomorrow will be a better one. Don't think that school is just a building, step inside and look, look into the coming years of knowledge.
Claudia Wickersham Grade 8
Sisters Change Their Habits The Sisters of Mercy have changed their habits this year. Last year they had a black gown reaching from neck to ankle. They had a white coif with a long black veil. This year they changed to a short navy blue dress with a white collar. Around their head they have a, white band and a short black veil, a little of their hair shows.
Margie Dick Grade 8
Thank You For Painting, Our School
We at St. Joseph School would like to express our thanks to everyone who helped paint our school. It Was very generous of you to give your
time to help. We are grateful to Father James Nugent for getting the paint. We ask God to bless you for your generosity.
Deborah Johnson Grade- 6
Paper Drive
Stv Joseph's Grade School will have their first paper drive on September 17 and 18. They will take papers or magazines tied, or in boxes. The truck will be parked behind the grade school Saturday and Sunday.
We ; would like to make money to buy new books for our library.
If you can not help us this time we hope you will save papers for our next drive. Andres Lovato Grade 6 *
Fall Festival
(Some one! Comb all To our Fall Festival!
, It will be held -on October 6, .7, 8, and 9. This year Bin-go will be held in St|-Joseph's Church Hall, so the bingo players will have, q little privacy and 'We'll have more room fo^ 'booths, in the gym-There will be no dinner Served but there will. be sandwiches and drinks in.. the concession stand. The grand prize this year is a 1967 Ford Mustang. See you at. Qur Fall Festival !| Debbie- Sue Sullivan Grade *6
West High School
WEST WELCOMES NEW NEW TRAIL-MASTERS By- Bobbe 'Wells
A friendly^ white-haired man with twinkling eyes, Mr- Earl A. Paul, West's new principal, has already become acquainted with many Cowboys. For over thirty years' education^ has been Mr. Paul's line of work. Before coming to West, he was principal of1 Horace Mann Junior High. -
His teaching career began at North High arid from there he moved to Smiley Junior High. In 1935, Mr. Paul came to West where he: was a physical education teacher and baseball .coach- At West he also acted as assistant principal, After leaving West he continued on to become assistant principal. at Horace Mann. Next he became principal. of two elementary schools simultaneously at Cheltenham arid Cdlfax, and later Stevens and Ellsworth. After /serving as principal for Dora Moore Elementary and then Bradley Elementary, Mr. Paul Became principal of Horace Marin- This year Mr. Paul was selected to head Wesl after Mr. Harry L. Nicholson retired.as West's principal last semester.
Mr. -Paul, says he enjoys all sjcprts "tremendous? ly," but ljkes tnigh school sports better than any other level. He also enjoys fishing and working in his yard.
Mr-. Nicholas G. Tacinas, West's new assistant principal, comes here from Baker Junior High where he was assistant principal. He has been in jun-
ior high work since 1946 when he graduated from Denver University. In 1949", he received his ..Master's Degree at D .U. and started working on bis Doctorate' at Columbia University under a Ford Fellowship. Mr. Tacinas is- active on school committees and has held offices including president of the Employee's Council, president of be local Schoolmaster's Guild, chairman of the committee on the drive for educational television in Denver, and secretary-treasurer of the Colorado Schoolmaster's Guild-Mr. Tacinas has a wife, and two sons. Like Mr. Paul, he loves to fish.
The first West High School P-TA meeting will be held at 7:45 p. m-, Wednesday, October 5, at West High.
Among West High graduates from our area going on in school are Philip Archuleta, of 1026 Irica, who is at1 El Cain ino College, Hawthorne, California, 'whore, he. is majoring in Electronics, Betty Bailey, 1345 Lipan, attending Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, Ray Garcia, 536 Cherokee, at tefttiddd State Junior College, a!rrd Phyllis. Keithlyof 226 W. 2nd Avenue drid Shirley Romero of 1306 Navajo, both admitted to Metropolitan State College.
.Miss,.Myra Long, 281 Cherokee Street, a 1966 graduate of West High. School, is entering the Dental Hygienist Program at Opportunity School.
St. Elizabeth's I
Classes began at St. Elizabeth's Grade School September 1, with an enrollment of 204 in grades one through eight. This year St. Elizabeths has neither the Head Start] Program nor Kindergarten:' Sister Martinelle teaches First! grade- Mrs. Marguerite Che1-! varri has Third grade; Mrs.; Barbara Karr has Third grade; Miss Anita Dewleski, Fourth j grade; Sister Maryclare, Fifth; grade; Mrs- Anna Schwartz, Sixth grade; Sister Liguori, Seventh grade; Sister Rose, Eighth grade and Principal.
Sister Joenta teaches Social Studies in Seventh and Eighth Grades. Brother Nicholas has charge of the Physical Education Program ang Mr. Donald McKenney is thfe coach for the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Graders Soccer Team which is under the direction; of Father Jeremias and will be playing in the Parochial Leauge.
Baker Jr, High
The first regular meeting Of the Baker. Junior High P--T.A. will be held Thursday, September 22, at 7;30 p.m. This meeting is mainly for parents of seventh grade students. ,, Two Baker teachers, Mr. Ru? dolph and Mr. Larsori, OTe; back this year after a leave of absence'.
Auraria Center
Fairtndnt
... Trie Board .pi.. .Managers, of the..Fairmont P.T.A. meets at 9 a. m- October 19 to plan activities for;the year. The .first general PTA meeting will be October 24 at 7:30 p.m., which will be. back-to-school night.
The Junior League players will perform for Fairmont students on October 24. They will appear in the play, "The Reluctant Dragon."
Fairmont this year has ; 12 teachers new to Denver with from two to eight years of experience- There are also other teachers at Fairmont who have transferred from other Denver Schools.
Fairmont has two teaiji-teach-ing programs this v year for first and second graders and mobile reading classes for 30 pupils per day in upper grades. The average; class sizes are 26. Fairmont has IV2 days of speech classes per Week; and has a social worker 2Vz days per week.
The members and staff at Auraria Community Center i would like to express their gratiutde. to the Englewood M. D. T. A. upholstery class at 3298 S. Acoma for having the lounge chairs restored to life again. The couches were attractively,^ reupholstered this summer by the class and made atTgctive pieces of furniture-
The M.D-T.A. training school receives various types of old furniture to be restored and reupholstered, thus providing on-the-job experience for the students. Much of the finished work. of these students is sent out to various non-profit organizations such as orphanages, 'correctional institutions, and : other agencies.
Mr: Edward Aguirre of 1292 W. 11th Avenue, fataer of four, and Mr. Lloyd San.:!oval of 1021 Lipan, father of six, are both! students under the Manpower Development and Training Act since January of this year. They, received information concerning MDTA training at the Broadway Employ ment:; Office and ; were accepted in the school in January- Both of. ...the men, who have been progressing very, well, ho|De to, complete their training in December of this year. With their diploma in upholstery On effort will be made to find employment for these men in the various companies needing qualified and trained upholsterers. Both of vthe families .have been active.... in. Auraria'..Community Center programs-. Once again our gratitude to MDTA and pur best wishes to Mr. Aguirre and Mr. Sandoval.,
* *
The Auraria Neighborhood Group met Tuesday evening, August 30, to bid farewell to Darrel Mqy, the staff person from Auraria Community Center who has worked with the group this past year and who is now full time at the University of Denver School of
Resident Council
Social Work. Five women jwere present: Mrs, Dixon, Mrs. Barela, Mrs. Ball, and Mrs. Van Velkiriburgh. Mrs. Ball brought her daughter. The group played some games and chatted over watermelon and soft drinks. The women presented him with a' farewell card.
ALEX L VIGII^-NEW STAFF PERSON AT AURARIA
I lived in the neighborhood for about 16 years, moved to 675 Delaware Street in 1950* I attended St. Joseph's Grade School and graduated in 1957.
In 1957 I entered the Re-demptorist Minor Seminary to study' for the Redemptorist priesthood at St. Joseph's Preparatory College at Kirkwood, Missouri, and later .at Edge-ton, Wisconsin. T left the Novitiate at Mt. St. Clement's College at De Soto, Missouri# in 1963. I then entered Regis College of Denver in 1964. I was graduated with honors in May of 1966 with a major in Sociology and a minor in Education.. I plan to attend the University of Denver School of SociqJ Work and work towards my MSW (Master of..Social Work) so that I may be more capable of working, for my community at Auraria Community Center. : v
Registration will be held at the Auraria Community Center, 1178 Mariposa Street, phone 534-7ol4, for the program year. Dates / for vregisttai6ri are Tuesday, September 20, 10;00 rav m. to noon* and 3=00 to. 5:00 pr m.; Wednesday, September 213:00 to 5:00 p. m. and 7:00 -to 9:00 p. m.; and-Thursday, September 22, 10:00 a. m. to noon and 3:00 to 5:00 p, m- Auraria offers programs for all- ages, including preschool hecid start, club groups for elementary, junior, 'and senior high: and special e iuca-tion students^'-cindj ^programs for adults.
WEST'S VARSITY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
(All games at Stadlhm unless marked otherwise)
East vs. West Sept. 17 (Sat.) 1.1:00 a. m.
West vs- Manual Oct. 1 (Sat.) 2:00 £>. m. (at Manual) West Vs. Jefferson Oct. 8 (Sat.) 2:00 p.m- (at Manual) Lincoln vs. West Oct; 15 (Sat.) 11:00 a. m.
West vs. North Oct. 22 (Sat.) 11:00 a., in.
Kennedy vs. West Oct. 29 (Sat.) 1 :d0 p. m.
. ; Washington vs- West Nov. 5 (Sat.) 2:00 p. m. (at Manual) West vs. South Nov. 11 (Fri.) 2:30 p. m-
Girl Scouts
PARENTS!
Do you care what happens to "Johnny"- at school? What can you do to help? How can you. get help with "Johnny" when you need it?
Mr. Earl Paul, Principal of West High School, Mr- Jack Beardshear, Principal of Baker Junior High .School-; and Mrs.
Iohe Helemdn, guidance counselor of Greenlee Elementary School, are invited to Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Resident Council Meeting, October 6, 7:30 p: m., 1438 Navajo, to answer all questions you mdy have fcoiicettiiii& school fees, lunches, rules, how. War oil Poverty money Is being used in the schools, any other questions you may Have concerning school.
The school personnel are very anxious to meet you.
Please show your interest in "Johnny" by attending this meeting. Mark the date on your calendar now. All residents of Lincoln and South make some Lincoln Park are invited- happy.
The Girl Scout Cadetie Troop 726 needs help. We would like a volunteer, no experience necessary. Our meetings are on Saturday morning from 9:30 to 11:30 a. m. If anyone is interested,, please, call Mrs. Field at 237-1268, or -come: to the parents' meeting at South Broadway Christian Church at Ellsworth arid Lincoln or Friday, September 16, at 7 p. m. Any junior high school age girls interested in joining Girl Scouts are invited to come to the
parents' meeting Friday, September 16.
Help Needed
Many little girls would love to become Brownies but we don't have anyone who is willing to donate one hour a week to them- You don't need any experience as a leader. Anyone willing to help these little girls please call Mrs. Loretta Rhym, 255-4910, for more information. You can little girls very



THE RECORDER
1965
PrCK THE PLENTIFULS. Now is the time to buy plums. According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, produce markets are full of them. Also watch for spot sales of fresh butter. In September; there'll still be lots of turkeys, peanuts and peanut products, potatoes, and pears available plus a big crop of Tokay and Thompson seedless grapes-
LOOK FOR A YELLOW {JELLY. Thump a watermel-melon if you will, but also, look at its color and shape. Color, according fo the U. S. Department of Agriculture, is your best guide to ripeness. If, the underside of the melon is light yellowish, it's usually jready for eating. A good riielon also is well shaped with a dull rather than shiny surface-
BYERS BOOK REVIEWS
W. 7th Ave- & Santa Fe Drive Hours:
Mon., flies.:, Thurs., Fri. 2-5=30 p. m. Sat- 10 a.m.-12 noon and! 1-5:30 p. m. Closed Wednesdays.
The Anatomy of Success Nicolas Darvas .
A do-it-yourself handbook for the person who wants to succeed both personally and publicly. Some twelve stepsj are specifically spelled out for they reader together *with a multitude-.. o( case histories | illustrating the author's points-The second half of the book deals with the problems involved in holding on to the success one gained.
158.1 D257 an
Highland Masquerade Mary Elgin
A romance in the old fashioned style, this enjoyable lark is se!t (in the Scottish highlands of today with an impetuous heroine, a mysterious, rather domineering hero and various engaging supportive characters. A refreshing example of pleasurable hammock reading.
E 378 hi
The Paper Dolls L. P. Davies
Rodney Blake seemed just a rather quiet English schoolboy who was good in English composition and poor in math. Then came, I the sudden, violent death of a schoolmate and two v teachers .and Rodney's school began t& wonder- Their search, for the truth about Rodney led them to cc Series of /sbc^ge;; dhd horrify nig everifs that Willchill the Yead1-er's Blood. A good science figtion tale with suspense by a hew author worth watching.
D 28368 pa
Senior Citizens
One Whaling Family Harold Williams, editor
The Williams ^family was actively engaged in the whaling industry during its great heyday. This is an authentic account taken from the-diary of a ship captain's wife, Eliza Azelia Williams, who accompanied' her husband on a three-year voyage just before the Civil War. During this time two children, were : born aboard ship. The boy later wrote of his own experiences., whaling and that manuscript is also included in this volume. A fascinating view i cf an adventurous segment of American life.
910- 45 W 672 on
Rescue Mission Jjohn Ball
.. Forced down on a Caribbean i§le by hurricane warnings, Civil Air Patrol pilots Sylvester and Chang are pressured by circumstances to fly out an enormous crippled airline with a load of sick and anxious passengers. There is a goodly amount of flying information mixed with tense, anxious suspense in this adventure tale.
B 211 re
Devil's Steps
Arthur W. Upheld That, Intrepid Australian Detective inspector Napoleon Bonaparte is sent to the city of Melbourne on special assignment. This involves d mysterious German general, reported dead in action before the close of Worfd War It, npw staying, under. an assumed name at a luxurious resort hotel. Hrs murder ^ and that of. the policeman cMled to the scene, start off the action in another of Bony's exciting cases. A treat for mys1 tery fans-
U 667 dev M
Boy Scout; f4ews
Troop 200 is in much need of men who would like to work with boys two hours on Tuesday night- 6:30 to 8:30 at the First Avenue Presbyterian Onurch. If interested, contact Mr- Mend, 623d 049, after 5, p. rn- Troop 200 also would like to invite any boys 11 years old or up to join our troop.
Troop and Pack 200 are sponsoring their, first roller slwting party, September 26. Tickets are 40c for admission and 30c for skates. You can buy tickets at 427 Fox or 1990 S. Broadway September 26. Bring the whole family- See you there. .->1,.
August 28,-seven Boy Scouts from Troop 200 went on a hike up to Buffalo Bill's grave from Golden. / The trail was through milch brush and trees.1 Sometimes the trail was lost to them. On top the#- had their lunch and then went on d hunt for a make-believe lost Boy, which was a piece of ( crepe paper hidden ahead of time. This was found by Ben Maj. Then they practiced Morse code with flags and, trailing using rocks. They went down tl>e easy trail to Golden. Randy Mena- was the patrol leader with Pete and Ben Maj. Brad and Brian Morris, Everett Bear, and Raul Ponce made up the rest of file patrol.
After a two months vacation, the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens met for a dessert luncheon and business meeting Tuesday, September 6th. There were eighteen members present, and a new member, Mrs. Laura Gregory, 1328 W. Colfax, was welcomed into the club-
Small plastic carts filled with flowers decorated each end of the long table. The center-piece was a ten inch high scale model of an Indian loom complete with shuttles', spindles, a half finished blanket, and, seated before it, a doll dressed in the .costume of a Navajo woman. This fine souvenir entirely handmade by Navajo Indians,, was brought, back by Mrs. Grace Musgrove,- the club president, when she- returned from a month's visit with her son in' Farmington, New Mexico.
A birthday cake was presented to Mr. Leonard Chadwick, manager of the Lincoln Park Homes Housing Project. Everyone enjoyed ; a.- good laugh as he tried to blow out the trick candles that persisted in relighting themselves. They were finally extinguished with the help of Loren Olsen and Mrs- Elsie Lilienthal who also have September birthdays. '
Wesley Methodist
The Choir of the Wesley Methodist Church began choir practice September 14 at 7:30 p. m-
FREE EYE TESTS
Free glaucoma tests are being offered September 22 to persons 35 and over in the five-county metropolitan area.
The eye tests are sponsored 'by Coordinated Services for the Aging Project in cooperartion with the Colorado Society for the Prevention. of Blindness. Persons wishing to participate should come to the Project's Community Day Center at 1620 Meade Street, Denver, from 2:30 to 6:00 p.m-
Glaucoma, the leading cause of blindness' among adults in the United- States, usually | strikes in the- middle or later years. Although difficult to detect, in the first stages, it psually can;; be checked if caught early.
Symptoms include- inability to adjust eyes to darkened rooms, loss of side vision, blurred or foggy vision, rainbow-colored rings around lights, and frequent changes of glasses, none of which is satisfactory.
Calendar Dates Needed for Next Recorder
The Calendar will appear in the paper again in the next issue. Anyone wanting events listed should contact the West Side Improvement Association or one of the reporters.
West Side Church
Directory
CHURCH OR GOD 5th and Fox Street Phone 244-2339 Rev. Leroy Vance Sunday Service, II.
7:30. Sunday School, 10.
METROPOLITAN BAPTIST 910 Kalamath Street Rev. Salvador Cano Sunday Service, 11, 6:30. Sunday School. 19.
Denver Inner City Protestant Parish
910 Galapago Street Phone 244-2636 Rev. Russell S- Williams Miss Marilou Taggart Saturday Church School 10 a. m. (Children 6-12 years).
Sunday Worship11:00 a.in. (Everyone welcome).
Apostolic Church of Jesus 1039 W. 13th Avenue Rev. Toby Rampa 0 Phone 244f2765 Re Vi- Lee" V elasquez : Sunday Setvic&l 10:30, 12:00. Sunday Sdhool, 9:30^ "*
First Avenue Presbyterian 120 West 1st Avenue Phone'777-5325 Rev. A. J. Blomquist Sunday Service, 11 a. m.. 6^0 ,p, m. ' ,
Sunday School 9:45.
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CATHOLIC CHURCH W. 6th Ave. and Galapago St Phone 534-4408
Rev. James Nugent, C. Ss. R. Pastor
ServicesSunday Mass: 6,
7, 8:30, 10, 11:30.
Holy Days 6, 7, 3, 9, 12:15, 6 p. m.
ST. ELIZABETH 11th and Curtis Streets Phone 255-9556 Rev. Fabian Flynn, Pastor ServicesSunday Mass: 6*
8, 9:15, 11, 12:15.
Holy Days: 6, 7, 8, 1 12.15. 5:45.
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL 126 West 2nd Avenue Phone 722-8781 Rev. David Minton Sunday School 9:30 a. m. Sunday Service 11:00 a m.
WESLEYAN COVENANT
525 West First Ave.
Rev. O. L. Crqger Phone 7224888 Sunday services11 / 1 -Sunday School, 10:00 am.
Iglesia Betel De Las Asam-
bleas De Dios .
West,2nd' Ave. and Fox St' j Rev. Mike A. Scdazqr, Pastor Seivic^sSwxd^y, yU:00 andf 7:30 p.' m.v
ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN WbSt 3rd Ave? and Acoma Phone 733-3777-Paul G. Hansen and Roger A. Stiers, Pastors
Services: Sunday 8:30, 11:00 a. m., 7:00 p, m,
Sunday School: 9:45 a. m.
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH 1000 Kalamath Street Phone 255-3215 Rev. R. W. Nichols ServiceSunday: 11, 7:00. Sunday School9:30.
ST. CAJETAN 9th and Lawrence Phone 825-8059
Rev. J. Ordinas, Pastor Father Max Santamaria, Assistant Pastor SericesSunday Mass: 7:00, 8:30, 10:30, 12, 7 p. m.
Holy Days6:30, 8:30, 10:30 7:00..
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST 935 W§§ 1th Avenue Phone 255-6152 Rev. Thomas Sepulveda ServiceSunday: 9:45, 11..
FIRST BETHANY LUTHERAN
v 215. West 5fh Avenue
Phone 8254883 v. yi Rev. Fred A, Slobh ;.& \ Sunday Service/ 11. J-
Sunday School 9 30. }
WEST SIDE CHRISTIAN 668 Inca Street Phone: 623-3419 William K. Linton, Minister Services: Sunday Worship 10:10 and 7:00 p. m.
Bible School: 9:00 a. m.
WESLEY METHODIST 465 Galapago Street Phone 222-3337 Rev. loe Kamman Sunday Service, 11.
Sunday School 9:45.
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH 885 Delaware Street Phone 2442093 ,
Rev. Marcus Bishop Rev. John Ventura Sunday Seryice9:00; Spanish Service 11:15; Sunday School 10:00; Evening Service 7:00.
Everybody knows" mothers with small children' are always busy: But it's important not to-get busy enough to put off getting Sabin cubes for the children.. It isn't safe to wait until they go to school. Polio germs are still around, and still dangerous but three Sabin sugar cubes and a booster, later can keep a child safe from polio all his life. See your:, doctor or the Denver Health Department for Sabin 1 sugar cubes soon.
Here are the bitter facts about polio: It takes thousands of dollars, hundreds of hours of hard work, and enormous determination to rehabilitate a polio victim, ..even partially. But there's one sweet fact: three Sabin sugar cubes can keep you from ever getting polio the rest of your life! Be smart, see your doctor or the Denver Health Department right away for Sbbip sugar cubes.


Full Text
HEALTH AND HOSPITALS
SEEKS CODE COMPLIANCE
Sanitarians from' the'-.Housing;' Section. of, the Department of Health and Hospitals are again going, through blocks .now being inspected in the West Side Improvement Association area. Some notices have been issued and at least one, case taken to court.
In other action affecting the inspection area, a hearing was held by the Department of Health and Hospitals on July 12 on an appeal by Charles Ginsberg of orders to- correct certain deficiencies in Terraces from 912 to 920 West 11th Avenue. The decision from the hearing is pending* The orders against the property were issued on September 27, 19*63, while it was in the estate of his wife, and these were appealed' November 12, 1963. Mr. Ginsberg inherited the property in December, 1963.
Among the violations of the Housing Code charged in records .available in the County Clerk and Recorder's Office are:
,631.6-4 Pertaining to unsafe and inadequate heaters;
.631.6-6 Pertaining to1 unsafe wiring;
631.7-1 Pertaining to defective bricks and mortar; vv 631,7-3-. Pertaining-to defects ;in-, floors, interior walls, and ceilings;
. 631.9-1 Pertaining to cleanliness and sanitation of premises;
631.9-6 Pertaining to infestation by insects, and rodents.
In his appeal, Mr. Ginsberg states that there is "no true basis for the complaints made. Property has been maintained at times in an orderly matv ner." $
Wall of business property next to terrace, in same ownership
Terraces on W. 11th Avenue, -under Health and Hospitals Orders
Rubbish behind terraces on W. 11th Avenue
Charles Ginsberg, prominent Denver attorney
(Photo courtesy 'Denver Post)
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3, Number 5S
Published Monthly
September, 1966
free legal help available | jsjew Librarian At Byers
In cm effort to provide legal others can qualify if the pay- J
advice for those unrible ,to pay, the Denver City Cottir mission on Community Relations in cooperation, with the Denver Bar Association is sponsoring a service of. free, legal advice for those who qualify* *
On every Thursday everting from 7 p. m- to 9 p. m. at 1160 Federal Blvd. and at the Neighborhood Health Center, 29th and Welton, there are attorneys, available for legal consultation. If q case demands more attention than the consultation attorney can give, it is referred- by -a review committee tof the Denver Bar Association to a private attorney who handles the case free : of charge.. ,
There is, no hard and fast rule concerning who qualifies for this service. The guidelines are that anyone receiving wel-. fare payments qualifies and
.West Sider New Crossing Guard
ment of private attorney fees deprives the family of necessities. The applicants are expected- to pay minor court costs 'when there- are such./ If ;a. person does not. qualify he j is referred to either Legal Aid j-or to a private attorney who swill then charge a regular fee- ,
i Since May of this year near-j ly 200 cases have been han-j died b^ this service, reports 1 the. Commission on Community Relations Office located in ,tbe West Side Annex Building, West Colfax at Kalctmath, Room 260. Persons with questions are encouraged to contact the Commission office at 297-2622. If an expansion oi this service is indicated by future experience, this service may be expanded to other evenings or other locations.-
NEW MEMBERS SEATED ON ACTION COUNCIL
Improvement Association
.Mrs. Maxine Nunez of 837 Street is one of the new school crossing guards trained? under Title 5 funds from the Economic Opportunity Act? .pro* vicjed to the Driver' Departs ment of Public Welfare; Muchh o{ the training was ... dan** by the j&oiicer-
, Mrs. Nunez wiH. not. be ^Pricing the- first week at ^hcb| because she will ,be in the hospital to have her tonsils tout. She is enthusiastic about the crossing guard pros gram, The mother of a pres School girl, she said of the program, "It is a good thing-T hop^e it is there when my daughter goes to school."
S.ix new at-large, members were : seated at the ..August 25th meeting of the Westside Action Council. The six are Dr. Rachel Driver, a physician, Mr. Leonard1 Chadmck, rtianager of Lincoln and: South Lincoln Park.; Harness Mrs. Rose Gomez:v andr. Mr.: Ruperta Guedeov dr;, / neighl^^QQd'; ldertts, ':Ged^^>Cftov^rr
manager:-of the'' lbcGd: :SdfeJ
land : Johnson, an attorney With offices, in this area-The next, ineeting of the Council will be oq Sept. 29; at :7:30 p, m. at St Elizabeth School, 1020 11th Street, This is our Council, elected by us to work for improvement of our Community. Everyone of us should try and attend when possible to keep up with what is being done by our Council.
District Meetings
District 9
District 9 of the West Side Improvement Association will meet on Thursday, September 22, at 7:30 p. m. at the; First Avenue Presbyterian Church. The speaker will be Mr. Ralph Livingston of the Zoning Administration office, who will be present to answer questions related to the parking of moving vans in the vicinity; of West 2nd Avenue and Acoma and I other zoning matters. Officers will also be elected at this meeting, District 9 covers the area from West 1st Avenue to West "3rd Avenue and from Broadway to Elati.
District 1 1
Lieutenant Tom O'Neill of the Denver Police Department will speak at the meeting of District 1 of the West F.Side Improvement Association at Au-raria Community Center '7:30 p- m., Tuesday, September, 20. His topic is"Problems of disturbance of the peaceWhat can be done." Officers for the district will be eleetedct- this meeting; District 1 of the West Side Improvement. Association is : 'the area;, east of Lincoln Park Hgmes>and .north, oi ..West 4.^^,.Avenue;;, .. .....
0 District. 4? the.' West. Side-
Improvement Association meets at the West Side Improvement Association office; 768 Santa Fe Drive, on Thursday, September 22 at 7:30 p. m. The meeting is to hold the annual election of officers and to make plans for the coming year.. District 4 is the area north. of Wesit 8th Avenue, west of Santa Fe Drive, and south of west 12th Avenue, outside South Lincoln Park Homes.
Pastor Installed At St. Cajetan's Church
Mrs. Barbara Ritzma began work ds' the new library assistant at Byers Neighborhood Library on September 12. Mrs.
Rev. Max Santamaria. C. R mor f Wgi
has recently been named pas-1 ned a geologist. She tor of St. Cajetan's Church lo- g{afa?ed S *e U^rsity cated on 9th .and Lawrence f Uah and0.hs ig for Street. He was bom in Na- *e §|§i 04
varra, Spain, on May 16, 1927, gS Llbrar7 m Science and entered the Theatine Sem- ?id, iH 11 You?g inary of Palma Majorca, Spain, Adult sections and at the
in 1946. There he studied thru his novitiate and junior college years graduating in 1948. Later > he studied Philosophy and Theology at Gregorian University in Rome, 'Italy, and graduated from there in 1956. His ordination took place at St. John Lateran Cathedral in Rome, Italy, on March 17, 1956.
On March 19, 1956, he said his first mass at St. Andrea Church in Rome, Italy.
After his ordination he spent four years teaching in the Theatine Seminary, Our Lady of Castanar, located in Salamanca, Spain.
He came to the United States! on September 16, 1960, at which! time he was assigned to St. Cajetan's Church as assistant pastor, and has served there (since.
Rev. Max Santamaria comes from a.: family- rich in religious Vocations.-- He has an: uncle* Monsignor SilvctnO;. Bacpiedemov Trhor 4 chc^lgih irt -the ; Stat6 Hospital' ini Santa: Margarita, CalifamiteK-- Two atmto who are nuns, Sister Margarita and Sister Marcellina, both in1 Spain. A brother, Rev*. Jesus Santamaria, stationed in Cordova, Argentina, a sister Sister Eliza, stationed also in Spain, and at the present time he has a nephew in the seminary in Spain.
On April 29, 1966, he became a citizen of the United States.
Rev. Santamaria will replace Rev. John Ordinas who has been pastor at St. Cajetan's since 1937. We hope that he will be able to serve us as long as his predecessor-
South Holly and University Hills branches. She is looking forward to meeting local library patrons-
The former assistant, Mrs. Beverly Walker, is at the Cherry Creek Branch for six months, after which she goes to Main for six months. She will then receive a permanent assignment from the Denver Public Libarry. Mrs. Walker recently received her Master of Arts in library science from the University of Denver. She says she will miss the many, many friends she has made at Byers.
Basic Education For Adults To Continue
Basic education classes for adults are continuing at Greenlee School and at Baker Jun-k ig-rHigh. School. ..English, mathematics^ crncL other subjects are" taught to- smalt classes at the- two schools. Adults may register and begin study at any of the class sessions, which are held Monday and Wednesday, from 7 to 9 p.m. Teachers are provided by Opportunity School.
At Greenlee School the entrance is through the mean door., 1150 Lipan Street Mr* Crespin is the teacher. For the classes *at Baker Junior High School the door at the corner of 6th Ave. and Fox l St. is used. Mr. Augustine is again teaching at Baker.


Page Two
the Recorder
September, 1966
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsoredv by West Side Improvement) Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
i/iod Ttoted.
Robert Pace, a graduate from West High some twenty-five years ago, now living in Atascadero, California, has been visiting his relatives and friends in Colorado. He is the brother of John Pace of 647 Kalamath.
Velva Farrow spent over a week at her cabin at Wonder-vu getting it in shape for the
Mrs. Rose Hines of Chicago, ;I11., has been visiting her father,/ Mr. Gerald Glynn of 1253 Kalamath Street.
Sharon J. Bowers, age 10, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs-Edward Bowers, 1370 Kalamath Street, was one of many West Side children who received certificates from the Denver Library for completing the 1966 Vacation^ Reading Program. More than 56,000 children were enrolled.. The deadline for all completed reading was September 15th. Sharon had her picture and a nice write-up in the Denver Post of August 31. The West Side congratulates Sharon for this wonderful worthwhile effort. Sharon attends St- Elizabeth's School.
Caroline Ortiz Espinoza, wife of Abel Espinoza, the sister of Alice Apodaca of ,1244 Lipan Street, Denver, and the sister cf Austin and Jack' Ortiz1 of coming winter. While she I Los Angeles, California, passed was there her beautiful white away August 17, 1966,. in San cat ''Punkie'' was killed by a j Mateo; California. Friends dog. Mrs. Farrow was heart .please call 534-8576. broken but another cat adopt-1 ed Velva. This cat was being
chased by the same dog that killed Punkie. It was starved, and not what it could be, but Mrs- Farrow adopted him. She
Faye Nera from Anne's Beauty Salon, 971 Santa Fe Drive, spent a week in Albuquerque, New Mexico, visiting
calls the newest member of her aunt. She had a wonder-her family "Tiger" and broughtful time, him back to Denver. He now
resideswith Mrs. Farrow at 1114 West 13th Avenue.
Mrs. Ella Horan of 1352 Kalamath is enjoying a three weeks frip to Europe. She retired recently, from the Telephone Company. We all wish her a wonderful trip-
Wally Tipton and his wife Della of 838 Kalamath spent Labor Day in Colorado Springs and Walsenburg eating cantaloupe.
Diana Martinez of 1243. Kal-Qmath was given a baby shower by Judy Galqrdo.
Judy Sedbropk formerly of 1258 Kalamath Street has had a baby boy. He was born August 10th.
P. F. C. Arthur L- Guerrero, son of Elvira Guerreo of 729 Elati Street, is home from basic and' additional guerilla warfare trainingr'He will. be home for 30' days and is,.headed for Viet Nam. About the same time He leaves, Bob, his younger brother, will be leaving for basic training.
- Mr. and Mrs. John Pace oi 647 Kalamath just returned from a ten day trip to Oregon and California visiting relatives*
Two West Side girls left Denver on August 23rd as Women's Job Corps recruits Thev am Cinda Pena, 252 Inca Street, and Margaret Helen Romero, 917 Kalamath Street.
Mrs- Julia Pacheco 1 of 1253 Lipan' Street was iri Mercy Hospital for 17 days for surgery. She is home now and is doing real well.
Jimmy Mgrtiiiez, grandson of. Mrs. Adolph Pacheco.of 1253 Lipan; Street; 'virqs Hpme for four days': and left, to go tp North Carolina where he is now stationed.
Mr. Jerry Jaramillo of Stock-ton, California, visited his aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs- Eddie Quintana;. of*. 1233. Lipan Street, He was on his vacation and spent two weeks With his relatives in Colorado, He likes Colorado very much. ;
Mrs. Louise Churchill of 1209 Lipan Street reports that her grandson, Kenny Stark of Castle Rock,' is in boot camp at Fort Bliss, Texas. He visited his grandmother for ten days before returning to camp.
Mr- and Mrs. Henry Schon-borg of 1248 Lipan Street has as their house guests Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kensler of Pueb-1q, Colorado. The Schonborgs also visited Mrs. Limdq\iist who .is in. .the Swedish JNnrsing Home and W.Schumr at Lake-wood recently.
-Mrs. Alice, Apodaca of 1244 Lipan Street gave a bridal shower for her future daughter-in-law, Mary joe JSilva, on September 9th* There were thirty guests at the shower.
Mr. Joseph. Knifton of 1039 West 14th Avenue is back in
Mr. and Mrs. Rov Winter-hctlder and girls of 228 W. 3rd
Avenue and Mr. and Mrs. Tom, HI ~ HR
Winterhalder soor.t the week-!the llpl General Hospital end near Yampa, Colorado, jHe would like to have some fishing and Hiking. * visitors.
Paul Martinez, state chairman of th§ G. I. Forum, and his family, made a motor trip to California to attend the National G. I- Forum Convocation. He was joined by Laurence Martinez, Elmer Barela and family, Art Valdez arid family, John Romero, and State Representative Frank Anaya, who also attended the Convocation.
Mrs. Alfonzo Martinez went to California to- visit her brother and sister for 2V2 weeks.
Mrs. Lulu Young of 241 Inca left for southern Colorado to attend her granddaughter's Wedding. She then .went to Texas to visit other relatives-
Mrs. May Day of 138 W. 1 st Avenue has had a very busy. month. Her relatives from Utah came on a vacation with her. It was a most enjoyable visit' for three weeks. She was entertained: at a luncheon and canasta party by Mrs. Ann Prewill of L43 W. 1st Avenue. Mrs. Day also tdok a trip to Cheyenne, Wyoming, to visit friends and relatives. She also renewed her (Acquaintances with old scenes and faces. As a girl she often participated in the rodeos.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Maberry, 308 Inca, have been enjoying a vacation to Missouri and the Dakotas.
Four West Siders, Mrs. Olga Apple, 841 Galapago St,, Mrs-Emma Bradfield, 1359 Cherc> kee. St., Mrs. EtheL Jones, 1019 Bgnnoc.k St-, and .Helen Johnson, 1351: Mariposa St., were among the forty-one members rof the Denver Golden Age Club who. attended : the picnic given arihually by ; the G.A.C-of Fori .Collins vvon Sunday,' August 21st. Nearly one hundred and fifty were1 present, representing, besides Denver and Fort Collins, clubs from Cheyenne, Laramie, Greeley; and several smaller towns. After a truly bountiful potluck lunch, there 'was a program of music, singing, and dancing. Returning by chartered bus at 6:00 p. m., twelve of the Denver group had supper tor gether, then attended the outdoor : church service in the Greek Theatre of the Civic Center-
A daughter was bom to Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cordova on Sunday, September :4. IJer name is Suzanne Jo* M^s-Cordqva is flyne learner FtjLta Lucero. Moijjer andt,cd Bill Cecil of 814 W. Jlth Avenue, graduate .of West High School and University of Colorado, who has been taking postgraduate work at Colorado State University, completed his studies, receiving a master's degree in Psychology at commencement exercises, August 19 at CSU.
Miss Peggy Salas of 821 W. 14th Avenue has been busy representing West Denver at the Teen Age Fair held August 26 to September 4, 1966. Peggy finished ninth grade at Baker Junior High School and is a sophomore at West High.
Mr. Don Schissler of 281 Cherokee has graduated from the Art School in Denver and | has been hired by an advertising firm in Boulder. The family plqns to move to Boulder when they find suitable housing- Mrs; Schissler has been active! in the Baker Junior High School P.-T.A. and will be missed by many.
Mrs. Fay Brott of 1426 Osage St. was in McCook, Nebraska, for her daughter's silver wedding anniversary July 24th. After several weeks spent visiting relatives, she returned to j Denver and entered St. Joseph's Hospital for surgery August 26th- She is now convalescing at home.
Mrs. Grace Musgrove, 1346 Osage Street, and Mrs. Anne Petshauer, 1350 Osage St., enjoyed six wonderful days when they accompanied the Mile-Hi Senior Citizens Club, on their annual outing at Camp Handicamp, near Georgetown, August 28th to September 3rd.
S/Sgt. Alfonso Rias has left for overseas. He is the son-in-law of Mr- and Mrs. Alfonzo Martinez. He > is with the R/L-26 post of the Fifth Marine Division.
Helen Cochran of 242 Cherokee returned from a very-enjoyable vacation in Wisconsin. She also visited her brother Stuart and family in Chicago and brother Cliff and family in Omaha. Helen's trip was sponsored by Broadway, Baptist Church for a teachers' training and treasurers conference.
READERS' FORUM
Dear Sir:
At the LiHcPhi Park on the West side is a beautiful 26 foot Pine tree dedicated to the memory of a Pioneer Colorado Governor, that very few people know v about. Exactly 2 feet in front of the tree stands a Bronze plaque that reads, and I qubte, "Homesite of Alexander C.,: Hunt, Colorado Pioneer of '59, Judgepf Vigilante Committee, Territorial U. S. Marshall, Gifted Indian Diplomat, Governor, Colorado territory 1867-69, one of the Founders. of JHe Bfrilders of D-& R. Q. ^. jR^lrogid. Dedicate^ by; Daughters of Colorado 1932."
TJi tree sits, 60 feet in front pf a ,m^em building on the .confer of 12th and Marippsa Street. Tree neglected by ppp-pie, .jprmfres, dead branches, children climb tree and tear branches, Bronze Plaque all beaten up- Tree needs medical care (spraying). By the way who were the Daughters of Colorado? -
SFC. Del Gurule U.S.A.R.
1148 Mariposa Street
In Memoriam j
Benjamin (Ben) Cohen, 80, who operated Ben's Apparel Store, 825 Santa Fe Drive, for 24 years, died at Rose Memorial Hospital recently. "Ben" was bom in Leadville, Colorado, May 10, 1886. He went to Rapid City, South Dakota, as a child. He married Anna Cohen there and they came to Denver in 1935. Surviving are his widow Anna, daughter, Esther Hallen of Lake-wood, and five brothers: Dave, Charles, Lawrence, and Felix, all of Denver, and Harry, of Phoenix, Arizona-
George Cutrell, 430 W. 9 th Avenue, passed away on September 6. His ueath was sudden and unexpected since he. and his wife Frances had just moved into the apartment of the Mennonite Youth Center to serve as care.akers of. the church and youih center. He will be greatly missed by the First Mennonite Church, members and his many other friends.
Word was received- in Denver from Loveland, Colorado* of the death of Mrs. Rose Maberry, formerly of 244 Cherokee. Mrs., Maberry. has family in Denver and she will be-sadly missed by all..
News of, the passing recently of Nellie Brayton of 248 In-pa let all. of us old timers realize we Had lost a very dear friend and an upright citizen.. She was an old-time pioneer and was active in church and political affairs.
One-Man Crusade
Mr. W. R. Blanton, 1220 W. Colfax, is undertaking a one-man campaign for lower Tramway fares for Senior Citizens. This is a move that should be of interest to every older person .in Denver, and we wish him the best of luck;
Boys' Club
Ray Garcia, the president of. the 1 West Denver Keystone Club, recently flew to Washington, D. Q- He was representing the Boys' Club for the Rocky Mountain region in the National Youth Conference for Nature Beauty and Cppseryg-tioriL THe conference was opened on. the White House lawn, by. the President and. the First Lady.. Also, he .topk a tour of the White House and its gardens while he was there. During ..his four day... stay at the conference, they .dismissed matters on air pollution, anti-litter, water pollution, urban, renewal, for different cities of the United Stales* But it wasn't all work. In the morning He took different tours to the Washington Memorial, Lincoln Memorial, Capitol Building, and his evenings were filled with entertainment by the Back Porch Majority, the. Bitter Ehders, and other youngs people's groups.


September, 1966
THE RECORDER
Page Three
School Youth Activity : Recreation
St. Joseph's Elementary
What My School Means To Me What do you think schoo! is? To. me St. Joseph is a place of learning. School to others is just a building where you spend half of your day. When I wake up in the morning and get ready for school I wonder what kind of a day I will have, if it's a gqod day I hope it will never end; but if it is a bad one I tell my self tomorrow will be a better one. Don't think that school is just a building, step inside and look, look into the coming years of knowledge.
Claudia Wickersham Grade 8
Sisters Change Their Habits The Sisters of Mercy have changed their habits this year. Last year they had a black gown reaching from neck to ankle. They had a white coif with a long black veil. This year they changed to a short navy blue dress with a white collar. Around their head they have a, white band and a short black veil, a little of their hair shows.
Margie Dick Grade 8
Thank You For Painting, Our School
We at St. Joseph School would like to express our thanks to everyone who helped paint our school. It Was very generous of you to give your
time to help. We are grateful to Father James Nugent for getting the paint. We ask God to bless you for your generosity.
Deborah Johnson Grade- 6
Paper Drive
Stv Joseph's Grade School will have their first paper drive on September 17 and 18. They will take papers or magazines tied, or in boxes. The truck will be parked behind the grade school Saturday and Sunday.
We ; would like to make money to buy new books for our library.
If you can not help us this time we hope you will save papers for our next drive. Andres Lovato Grade 6 *
Fall Festival
(Some one! Comb all To our Fall Festival!
, It will be held -on October 6, .7, 8, and 9. This year Bin-go will be held in St|-Joseph's Church Hall, so the bingo players will have, q little privacy and 'We'll have more room fo^ 'booths, in the gym-There will be no dinner Served but there will. be sandwiches and drinks in.. the concession stand. The grand prize this year is a 1967 Ford Mustang. See you at. Qur Fall Festival !| Debbie- Sue Sullivan Grade *6
West High School
WEST WELCOMES NEW NEW TRAIL-MASTERS By- Bobbe 'Wells
A friendly^ white-haired man with twinkling eyes, Mr- Earl A. Paul, West's new principal, has already become acquainted with many Cowboys. For over thirty years' education^ has been Mr. Paul's line of work. Before coming to West, he was principal of1 Horace Mann Junior High. -
His teaching career began at North High arid from there he moved to Smiley Junior High. In 1935, Mr. Paul came to West where he: was a physical education teacher and baseball .coach- At West he also acted as assistant principal, After leaving West he continued on to become assistant principal. at Horace Mann. Next he became principal. of two elementary schools simultaneously at Cheltenham arid Cdlfax, and later Stevens and Ellsworth. After /serving as principal for Dora Moore Elementary and then Bradley Elementary, Mr. Paul Became principal of Horace Marin- This year Mr. Paul was selected to head Wesl after Mr. Harry L. Nicholson retired.as West's principal last semester.
Mr. -Paul, says he enjoys all sjcprts "tremendous? ly," but ljkes tnigh school sports better than any other level. He also enjoys fishing and working in his yard.
Mr-. Nicholas G. Tacinas, West's new assistant principal, comes here from Baker Junior High where he was assistant principal. He has been in jun-
ior high work since 1946 when he graduated from Denver University. In 1949", he received his ..Master's Degree at D .U. and started working on bis Doctorate' at Columbia University under a Ford Fellowship. Mr. Tacinas is- active on school committees and has held offices including president of the Employee's Council, president of be local Schoolmaster's Guild, chairman of the committee on the drive for educational television in Denver, and secretary-treasurer of the Colorado Schoolmaster's Guild-Mr. Tacinas has a wife, and two sons. Like Mr. Paul, he loves to fish.
The first West High School P-TA meeting will be held at 7:45 p. m-, Wednesday, October 5, at West High.
Among West High graduates from our area going on in school are Philip Archuleta, of 1026 Irica, who is at1 El Cain ino College, Hawthorne, California, 'whore, he. is majoring in Electronics, Betty Bailey, 1345 Lipan, attending Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, Ray Garcia, 536 Cherokee, at tefttiddd State Junior College, a!rrd Phyllis. Keithlyof 226 W. 2nd Avenue drid Shirley Romero of 1306 Navajo, both admitted to Metropolitan State College.
.Miss,.Myra Long, 281 Cherokee Street, a 1966 graduate of West High. School, is entering the Dental Hygienist Program at Opportunity School.
St. Elizabeth's I
Classes began at St. Elizabeth's Grade School September 1, with an enrollment of 204 in grades one through eight. This year St. Elizabeths has neither the Head Start] Program nor Kindergarten:' Sister Martinelle teaches First! grade- Mrs. Marguerite Che1-! varri has Third grade; Mrs.; Barbara Karr has Third grade; Miss Anita Dewleski, Fourth j grade; Sister Maryclare, Fifth; grade; Mrs- Anna Schwartz, Sixth grade; Sister Liguori, Seventh grade; Sister Rose, Eighth grade and Principal.
Sister Joenta teaches Social Studies in Seventh and Eighth Grades. Brother Nicholas has charge of the Physical Education Program ang Mr. Donald McKenney is thfe coach for the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Graders Soccer Team which is under the direction; of Father Jeremias and will be playing in the Parochial Leauge.
Baker Jr, High
The first regular meeting Of the Baker. Junior High P--T.A. will be held Thursday, September 22, at 7;30 p.m. This meeting is mainly for parents of seventh grade students. ,, Two Baker teachers, Mr. Ru? dolph and Mr. Larsori, OTe; back this year after a leave of absence'.
Auraria Center
Fairtndnt
... Trie Board .pi.. .Managers, of the..Fairmont P.T.A. meets at 9 a. m- October 19 to plan activities for;the year. The .first general PTA meeting will be October 24 at 7:30 p.m., which will be. back-to-school night.
The Junior League players will perform for Fairmont students on October 24. They will appear in the play, "The Reluctant Dragon."
Fairmont this year has ; 12 teachers new to Denver with from two to eight years of experience- There are also other teachers at Fairmont who have transferred from other Denver Schools.
Fairmont has two teaiji-teach-ing programs this v year for first and second graders and mobile reading classes for 30 pupils per day in upper grades. The average; class sizes are 26. Fairmont has IV2 days of speech classes per Week; and has a social worker 2Vz days per week.
The members and staff at Auraria Community Center i would like to express their gratiutde. to the Englewood M. D. T. A. upholstery class at 3298 S. Acoma for having the lounge chairs restored to life again. The couches were attractively,^ reupholstered this summer by the class and made atTgctive pieces of furniture-
The M.D-T.A. training school receives various types of old furniture to be restored and reupholstered, thus providing on-the-job experience for the students. Much of the finished work. of these students is sent out to various non-profit organizations such as orphanages, 'correctional institutions, and : other agencies.
Mr: Edward Aguirre of 1292 W. 11th Avenue, fataer of four, and Mr. Lloyd San.:!oval of 1021 Lipan, father of six, are both! students under the Manpower Development and Training Act since January of this year. They, received information concerning MDTA training at the Broadway Employ ment:; Office and ; were accepted in the school in January- Both of. ...the men, who have been progressing very, well, ho|De to, complete their training in December of this year. With their diploma in upholstery On effort will be made to find employment for these men in the various companies needing qualified and trained upholsterers. Both of vthe families .have been active.... in. Auraria'..Community Center programs-. Once again our gratitude to MDTA and pur best wishes to Mr. Aguirre and Mr. Sandoval.,
* *
The Auraria Neighborhood Group met Tuesday evening, August 30, to bid farewell to Darrel Mqy, the staff person from Auraria Community Center who has worked with the group this past year and who is now full time at the University of Denver School of
Resident Council
Social Work. Five women jwere present: Mrs, Dixon, Mrs. Barela, Mrs. Ball, and Mrs. Van Velkiriburgh. Mrs. Ball brought her daughter. The group played some games and chatted over watermelon and soft drinks. The women presented him with a' farewell card.
ALEX L VIGII^-NEW STAFF PERSON AT AURARIA
I lived in the neighborhood for about 16 years, moved to 675 Delaware Street in 1950* I attended St. Joseph's Grade School and graduated in 1957.
In 1957 I entered the Re-demptorist Minor Seminary to study' for the Redemptorist priesthood at St. Joseph's Preparatory College at Kirkwood, Missouri, and later .at Edge-ton, Wisconsin. T left the Novitiate at Mt. St. Clement's College at De Soto, Missouri# in 1963. I then entered Regis College of Denver in 1964. I was graduated with honors in May of 1966 with a major in Sociology and a minor in Education.. I plan to attend the University of Denver School of SociqJ Work and work towards my MSW (Master of..Social Work) so that I may be more capable of working, for my community at Auraria Community Center. : v
Registration will be held at the Auraria Community Center, 1178 Mariposa Street, phone 534-7ol4, for the program year. Dates / for vregisttai6ri are Tuesday, September 20, 10;00 rav m. to noon* and 3=00 to. 5:00 pr m.; Wednesday, September 213:00 to 5:00 p. m. and 7:00 -to 9:00 p. m.; and-Thursday, September 22, 10:00 a. m. to noon and 3:00 to 5:00 p, m- Auraria offers programs for all- ages, including preschool hecid start, club groups for elementary, junior, 'and senior high: and special e iuca-tion students^'-cindj ^programs for adults.
WEST'S VARSITY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
(All games at Stadlhm unless marked otherwise)
East vs. West Sept. 17 (Sat.) 1.1:00 a. m.
West vs- Manual Oct. 1 (Sat.) 2:00 £>. m. (at Manual) West Vs. Jefferson Oct. 8 (Sat.) 2:00 p.m- (at Manual) Lincoln vs. West Oct; 15 (Sat.) 11:00 a. m.
West vs. North Oct. 22 (Sat.) 11:00 a., in.
Kennedy vs. West Oct. 29 (Sat.) 1 :d0 p. m.
. ; Washington vs- West Nov. 5 (Sat.) 2:00 p. m. (at Manual) West vs. South Nov. 11 (Fri.) 2:30 p. m-
Girl Scouts
PARENTS!
Do you care what happens to "Johnny"- at school? What can you do to help? How can you. get help with "Johnny" when you need it?
Mr. Earl Paul, Principal of West High School, Mr- Jack Beardshear, Principal of Baker Junior High .School-; and Mrs.
Iohe Helemdn, guidance counselor of Greenlee Elementary School, are invited to Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Resident Council Meeting, October 6, 7:30 p: m., 1438 Navajo, to answer all questions you mdy have fcoiicettiiii& school fees, lunches, rules, how. War oil Poverty money Is being used in the schools, any other questions you may Have concerning school.
The school personnel are very anxious to meet you.
Please show your interest in "Johnny" by attending this meeting. Mark the date on your calendar now. All residents of Lincoln and South make some Lincoln Park are invited- happy.
The Girl Scout Cadetie Troop 726 needs help. We would like a volunteer, no experience necessary. Our meetings are on Saturday morning from 9:30 to 11:30 a. m. If anyone is interested,, please, call Mrs. Field at 237-1268, or -come: to the parents' meeting at South Broadway Christian Church at Ellsworth arid Lincoln or Friday, September 16, at 7 p. m. Any junior high school age girls interested in joining Girl Scouts are invited to come to the
parents' meeting Friday, September 16.
Help Needed
Many little girls would love to become Brownies but we don't have anyone who is willing to donate one hour a week to them- You don't need any experience as a leader. Anyone willing to help these little girls please call Mrs. Loretta Rhym, 255-4910, for more information. You can little girls very



THE RECORDER
1965
PrCK THE PLENTIFULS. Now is the time to buy plums. According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, produce markets are full of them. Also watch for spot sales of fresh butter. In September; there'll still be lots of turkeys, peanuts and peanut products, potatoes, and pears available plus a big crop of Tokay and Thompson seedless grapes-
LOOK FOR A YELLOW {JELLY. Thump a watermel-melon if you will, but also, look at its color and shape. Color, according fo the U. S. Department of Agriculture, is your best guide to ripeness. If, the underside of the melon is light yellowish, it's usually jready for eating. A good riielon also is well shaped with a dull rather than shiny surface-
BYERS BOOK REVIEWS
W. 7th Ave- & Santa Fe Drive Hours:
Mon., flies.:, Thurs., Fri. 2-5=30 p. m. Sat- 10 a.m.-12 noon and! 1-5:30 p. m. Closed Wednesdays.
The Anatomy of Success Nicolas Darvas .
A do-it-yourself handbook for the person who wants to succeed both personally and publicly. Some twelve stepsj are specifically spelled out for they reader together *with a multitude-.. o( case histories | illustrating the author's points-The second half of the book deals with the problems involved in holding on to the success one gained.
158.1 D257 an
Highland Masquerade Mary Elgin
A romance in the old fashioned style, this enjoyable lark is se!t (in the Scottish highlands of today with an impetuous heroine, a mysterious, rather domineering hero and various engaging supportive characters. A refreshing example of pleasurable hammock reading.
E 378 hi
The Paper Dolls L. P. Davies
Rodney Blake seemed just a rather quiet English schoolboy who was good in English composition and poor in math. Then came, I the sudden, violent death of a schoolmate and two v teachers .and Rodney's school began t& wonder- Their search, for the truth about Rodney led them to cc Series of /sbc^ge;; dhd horrify nig everifs that Willchill the Yead1-er's Blood. A good science figtion tale with suspense by a hew author worth watching.
D 28368 pa
Senior Citizens
One Whaling Family Harold Williams, editor
The Williams ^family was actively engaged in the whaling industry during its great heyday. This is an authentic account taken from the-diary of a ship captain's wife, Eliza Azelia Williams, who accompanied' her husband on a three-year voyage just before the Civil War. During this time two children, were : born aboard ship. The boy later wrote of his own experiences., whaling and that manuscript is also included in this volume. A fascinating view i cf an adventurous segment of American life.
910- 45 W 672 on
Rescue Mission Jjohn Ball
.. Forced down on a Caribbean i§le by hurricane warnings, Civil Air Patrol pilots Sylvester and Chang are pressured by circumstances to fly out an enormous crippled airline with a load of sick and anxious passengers. There is a goodly amount of flying information mixed with tense, anxious suspense in this adventure tale.
B 211 re
Devil's Steps
Arthur W. Upheld That, Intrepid Australian Detective inspector Napoleon Bonaparte is sent to the city of Melbourne on special assignment. This involves d mysterious German general, reported dead in action before the close of Worfd War It, npw staying, under. an assumed name at a luxurious resort hotel. Hrs murder ^ and that of. the policeman cMled to the scene, start off the action in another of Bony's exciting cases. A treat for mys1 tery fans-
U 667 dev M
Boy Scout; f4ews
Troop 200 is in much need of men who would like to work with boys two hours on Tuesday night- 6:30 to 8:30 at the First Avenue Presbyterian Onurch. If interested, contact Mr- Mend, 623d 049, after 5, p. rn- Troop 200 also would like to invite any boys 11 years old or up to join our troop.
Troop and Pack 200 are sponsoring their, first roller slwting party, September 26. Tickets are 40c for admission and 30c for skates. You can buy tickets at 427 Fox or 1990 S. Broadway September 26. Bring the whole family- See you there. .->1,.
August 28,-seven Boy Scouts from Troop 200 went on a hike up to Buffalo Bill's grave from Golden. / The trail was through milch brush and trees.1 Sometimes the trail was lost to them. On top the#- had their lunch and then went on d hunt for a make-believe lost Boy, which was a piece of ( crepe paper hidden ahead of time. This was found by Ben Maj. Then they practiced Morse code with flags and, trailing using rocks. They went down tl>e easy trail to Golden. Randy Mena- was the patrol leader with Pete and Ben Maj. Brad and Brian Morris, Everett Bear, and Raul Ponce made up the rest of file patrol.
After a two months vacation, the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens met for a dessert luncheon and business meeting Tuesday, September 6th. There were eighteen members present, and a new member, Mrs. Laura Gregory, 1328 W. Colfax, was welcomed into the club-
Small plastic carts filled with flowers decorated each end of the long table. The center-piece was a ten inch high scale model of an Indian loom complete with shuttles', spindles, a half finished blanket, and, seated before it, a doll dressed in the .costume of a Navajo woman. This fine souvenir entirely handmade by Navajo Indians,, was brought, back by Mrs. Grace Musgrove,- the club president, when she- returned from a month's visit with her son in' Farmington, New Mexico.
A birthday cake was presented to Mr. Leonard Chadwick, manager of the Lincoln Park Homes Housing Project. Everyone enjoyed ; a.- good laugh as he tried to blow out the trick candles that persisted in relighting themselves. They were finally extinguished with the help of Loren Olsen and Mrs- Elsie Lilienthal who also have September birthdays. '
Wesley Methodist
The Choir of the Wesley Methodist Church began choir practice September 14 at 7:30 p. m-
FREE EYE TESTS
Free glaucoma tests are being offered September 22 to persons 35 and over in the five-county metropolitan area.
The eye tests are sponsored 'by Coordinated Services for the Aging Project in cooperartion with the Colorado Society for the Prevention. of Blindness. Persons wishing to participate should come to the Project's Community Day Center at 1620 Meade Street, Denver, from 2:30 to 6:00 p.m-
Glaucoma, the leading cause of blindness' among adults in the United- States, usually | strikes in the- middle or later years. Although difficult to detect, in the first stages, it psually can;; be checked if caught early.
Symptoms include- inability to adjust eyes to darkened rooms, loss of side vision, blurred or foggy vision, rainbow-colored rings around lights, and frequent changes of glasses, none of which is satisfactory.
Calendar Dates Needed for Next Recorder
The Calendar will appear in the paper again in the next issue. Anyone wanting events listed should contact the West Side Improvement Association or one of the reporters.
West Side Church
Directory
CHURCH OR GOD 5th and Fox Street Phone 244-2339 Rev. Leroy Vance Sunday Service, II.
7:30. Sunday School, 10.
METROPOLITAN BAPTIST 910 Kalamath Street Rev. Salvador Cano Sunday Service, 11, 6:30. Sunday School. 19.
Denver Inner City Protestant Parish
910 Galapago Street Phone 244-2636 Rev. Russell S- Williams Miss Marilou Taggart Saturday Church School 10 a. m. (Children 6-12 years).
Sunday Worship11:00 a.in. (Everyone welcome).
Apostolic Church of Jesus 1039 W. 13th Avenue Rev. Toby Rampa 0 Phone 244f2765 Re Vi- Lee" V elasquez : Sunday Setvic&l 10:30, 12:00. Sunday Sdhool, 9:30^ "*
First Avenue Presbyterian 120 West 1st Avenue Phone'777-5325 Rev. A. J. Blomquist Sunday Service, 11 a. m.. 6^0 ,p, m. ' ,
Sunday School 9:45.
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CATHOLIC CHURCH W. 6th Ave. and Galapago St Phone 534-4408
Rev. James Nugent, C. Ss. R. Pastor
ServicesSunday Mass: 6,
7, 8:30, 10, 11:30.
Holy Days 6, 7, 3, 9, 12:15, 6 p. m.
ST. ELIZABETH 11th and Curtis Streets Phone 255-9556 Rev. Fabian Flynn, Pastor ServicesSunday Mass: 6*
8, 9:15, 11, 12:15.
Holy Days: 6, 7, 8, 1 12.15. 5:45.
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL 126 West 2nd Avenue Phone 722-8781 Rev. David Minton Sunday School 9:30 a. m. Sunday Service 11:00 a m.
WESLEYAN COVENANT
525 West First Ave.
Rev. O. L. Crqger Phone 7224888 Sunday services11 / 1 -Sunday School, 10:00 am.
Iglesia Betel De Las Asam-
bleas De Dios .
West,2nd' Ave. and Fox St' j Rev. Mike A. Scdazqr, Pastor Seivic^sSwxd^y, yU:00 andf 7:30 p.' m.v
ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN WbSt 3rd Ave? and Acoma Phone 733-3777-Paul G. Hansen and Roger A. Stiers, Pastors
Services: Sunday 8:30, 11:00 a. m., 7:00 p, m,
Sunday School: 9:45 a. m.
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH 1000 Kalamath Street Phone 255-3215 Rev. R. W. Nichols ServiceSunday: 11, 7:00. Sunday School9:30.
ST. CAJETAN 9th and Lawrence Phone 825-8059
Rev. J. Ordinas, Pastor Father Max Santamaria, Assistant Pastor SericesSunday Mass: 7:00, 8:30, 10:30, 12, 7 p. m.
Holy Days6:30, 8:30, 10:30 7:00..
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST 935 W§§ 1th Avenue Phone 255-6152 Rev. Thomas Sepulveda ServiceSunday: 9:45, 11..
FIRST BETHANY LUTHERAN
v 215. West 5fh Avenue
Phone 8254883 v. yi Rev. Fred A, Slobh ;.& \ Sunday Service/ 11. J-
Sunday School 9 30. }
WEST SIDE CHRISTIAN 668 Inca Street Phone: 623-3419 William K. Linton, Minister Services: Sunday Worship 10:10 and 7:00 p. m.
Bible School: 9:00 a. m.
WESLEY METHODIST 465 Galapago Street Phone 222-3337 Rev. loe Kamman Sunday Service, 11.
Sunday School 9:45.
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH 885 Delaware Street Phone 2442093 ,
Rev. Marcus Bishop Rev. John Ventura Sunday Seryice9:00; Spanish Service 11:15; Sunday School 10:00; Evening Service 7:00.
Everybody knows" mothers with small children' are always busy: But it's important not to-get busy enough to put off getting Sabin cubes for the children.. It isn't safe to wait until they go to school. Polio germs are still around, and still dangerous but three Sabin sugar cubes and a booster, later can keep a child safe from polio all his life. See your:, doctor or the Denver Health Department for Sabin 1 sugar cubes soon.
Here are the bitter facts about polio: It takes thousands of dollars, hundreds of hours of hard work, and enormous determination to rehabilitate a polio victim, ..even partially. But there's one sweet fact: three Sabin sugar cubes can keep you from ever getting polio the rest of your life! Be smart, see your doctor or the Denver Health Department right away for Sbbip sugar cubes.