Citation
West side recorder, October, 1966

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, October, 1966
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3/ Number 6
Published Monthly
October, 1966
Remember To Vote On Tuesday, November 8th!
AMENDMENT NO. 1
STATE GOVERNMENT REORGANIZATION Major Provisions
Requires that all executive and- administrative offices, agencies, and instrumentalities of the executive branch of: state government be allocated to not morelt^ctn 20 departments. Temporary commissions, are exempted from the 20-department limitation; Does not change the civil service system.
Those FAVORING Amendment No. 1 Say:
It clarifies areas of responsibility.
Tt makes government more accessible.
It provides for more effective and economical government.
It prevents haphazard growth.
Those OPPOSING Amendment j No. 1 sayj _
It might lead to a "little | cabinet" system.
It could reduce effectiveness (of present programs, j It does not define "tempor-j ary'' commissions.
Reorganization could be. accomplished by statutory action.
AMENDMENT NO. 5 ABOLISHMENT OF INVENTORY TAX Major Provisions
Places a 75-mill ceiling on property tax. Additional mill ievy requires a vote of property taxpayers. Bond issue mill-dge is in addition tp4 the 75-mill ceiling.*. Eliminates inventory taxes Over a ten-year period.
AMENDMENT NO. 2
SPECIFIC OWNERSHIP TAX ON MOBILE EQUIPMENT Major Provisions
Provides for state taxation, at time of licensing of mobile homes, trailer. coaches, arid mobile and self-propelled construction equipment. Eliminates county personal property tax on these.
Those FAVORING Amendment Those OPPOSING Amendment No. 2 say: -No. 2 say:
It updates the Constitution, Mobile property should be offering statewide uniformity subject to property tax. together with an efficient meth- j This tax would not reflect
Those FAVORING Amendment No. 5 say:
It gives the taxpayer a voice after taxes reach the ceiling.
It forces a more efficient i and economical government and a more balanced tax 1 structure.
It encourages new business, j
The inventory tax discriminates against certain businesses.
The loss will be made up by new business.
Those OPPOSING Amendment No. 5 say:
It will force legislators to find new tax sources.
Sparsely populated areas will be at a disadvantage.
Tax ceilings should not be written into the Constitution.
How the amendment would function in the present system of overlapping districts is not clear, even to experts.
It takes a revenue source away from local government and provides no new one.
Elections for state offices and for Congress will be held a* Tuesday, November 8. People will vote for Governor, Lieutenant-Governor^ State Attorney General, 'Secretary of State; U. S.'; Congressman, U. S. Senator, 4 State Senators, 18 State Representatives, 2 Regents to the University af Colorado, State Treasurer, anfl Judges for District Court and State Supreme Court In addition, thet voters will express their views on 5 proposed amendments to the state constitution and two laws re-jferred by the state legislature to the people. Information in this issue about the proposed amendments and the referred | laws is based on material supplied by the League of Women Voters of Colorado.
HOUSEWIVES'
REFERRED LAW NO. 1 DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME Ballot TitleProviding for daylight saving time in Colorado.
Major Provisions:
From the year 1967 and thereafter Colorado will have BOYCOTT daylight saving time from the last Saturday of April until th~ last Sunday of October.
od of collecting revenue. ;
It prevents delay in collecting takes.
local needs.
The owner of a mobile home should be taxed on the same basis at his stationary neighbor., j
AMENDMENT NO. 3
NON-POLTICAL SELECTION AND REMOyAL OF JUDGES Major Provisions
Provides for nomination of judges by commissions. Commissions are to be made up of a majority of non-lawyers and a minority of lawyers with members from Both parties. Provides, for a commissiori on qualifications for judges which may recommend to the Supreme Court removal of- any judge.. Provides, that people vote yes or no on re-election of a judge rather than choose between opposing candidates. Requires retirement of judges at 72 years of age.
Those FAVORING Amendment No. 3 say -
It minimizes pressures of party politics.
It attracts better qualified men as judges.
It offers a procedure for immediate removal of incompetent judges.
The best judges are not always the best campaigners.
Those OPPOSING Amendment No. 3 say -
It removes .direct selection from the hands of the people.
It makes removal of a bad judge more difficult.
It gives too- much authority to the Governor.
It bypasses the local party organization.
7% AMENDMENT NO. 4
LEGISLATIVE REDISTRICTING Major Provisions
The State Senate will consist of not more them 35 members; each elected from a separate district, and the House of Representatives will consist of not more than 65 members, each elected from a separate district. All districts must be as nearly equal in population as possible. The General Assembly is required to reapportion itself after every federal census. Penalties are set for failure to reapportion.
Those FAVORING Amendment No. 4 say:
It meets the "One Man One Vote" standard.
It gives voters more effective control over legislators.
It shortens the ballot.
ft emphasizes candidates rather than political parties.
It offers more representation to minorities.
REFERRED LAW NO. 2 CAPITAL PUNISHMENT Ballot TitleShall capital punishment be abolished?
Major Provisions:
Eliminates the death penalty in Colorado after January I 1967.
Housing Variance Denied
At their September 22 meeting, the Board of Health and Hospitals, denied a request by the pwner, Charles Ginsberg, for a variance on the terraces from 912 to 92Q W. 11th Avenue.' The effect of this denial is that Mr. Ginsberg will be required to comply fully with the orders issued by the Manager of; the Department of Health, arid Hospitals # ^td have the premises vacated. The-own-er; has 60 days after receiving the decision of the Board to comply with it. Since the last issue of the RECORDER, much of the junk that had been sitting behind the ,terraces' has been removed.
jWSIA BOARD i ELECTS OFFICERS
J At its meeting of Septem-| ber 26, the Board of Directors j of the West Side Improvement j Association elected Mr. Leslie Kalanquin, Director of District 1, as President of the Association. Mrs. Forrest Swanson, Director of District 7, was elected v V iee-president and Mrs. foy Hoehler, Director of District 9 became the new Secretary. ,
1 Other ^ district directors are Mrs. Lorens Olsen, District 2, Mr.. Pete Ulibarri, District 3, Mrs. Carmen Hodges, District
4, Mr. Harold Harrison, District
5. Mr. Harold Munson, District 6,. Mrs. Rose Gomez, District 8, Mr. Robert Recek, District 10, and Mr. Julian Kroeger, District 11.
Thpse OPPOSING Amendment No. 4 say:
It unduly restricts the field of selection on candidates.
It increases the influence of local pressure groups.
It lessens effective party control.
It would invite gerrymandering.
To -have districting; and apportionment done by an outside commissiori would be better.
. This week, October 17-22, marks the beginning of the boycott of five supermarket chains by the Housewives for Lower Food Prices. How much success this attempt will have no one knpws, but one store. Miller's, has lowered prices and has been removed from the boycott list
It is hoped that the boycott will bring permanent reduction of food prices arid that the movement will spark a nation-wide drive for lower prices.
Petitions are being circulated for housewives to sign to show their intentions of helping boycott these supermarket chains: Safeway, Red Owl, King Soop-ers and Furrs.. The boycotting housewives will shop at other places, such as neighborhood stores even though expensive,
1 hoping that the prices of the j chain stores will come down ifor good.
i Quite a few politicians have given their support to this [movement in view of the coming elections. However the housewives are not seeking the support of any particular party, but the support of all interested citizens who would, like to see the cost of living stop its upward climb.
.The West.'.Side Recorder is not aware of, any petitions being eircplated on the West Side. However & would be interesting to know how housewives in this area feel about the boycott and whether they intend- -to- help in it on their own. Anyone who is interested in helping circulate a petition in her area or who wants more information may contact Mrs. Paul West of 8361 East
Lehigh Drive, phone 771-3172.
UNITED WAY CAMPAIGN NOW IN PROGRESS
The West High School band conducted by George Layton played recently at the kickoff dinner for the annual Mile High United Way campaign. They were on a program that iricluded Sgt. Barry Sadler, U. S. Special Forces and com-
Green Beret," and Robert W. Samoff, president of RCA.
General Chairman Jerome E. Montague says that this year/s United Way goal is the largest ever established. However, he points out a major share of the increase is for
poser of "The Ballad of the I emergency needs of the agen-
cies j serving our fighting men in Viet Nam. It is also necessary to replenish the Red Cross disaster funds so seriously depleted by things such as the June 1965 floods that required almost a million drllars in the Denver area alone.


Page Two
THE RECORDER
October, 1966
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
Harry Larsen of 1127 Inca is in St.. Anthony's Hospital.
Richard Brunner of 928 West 14th Avenue, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brunner, graduated from C. TJ. at Boulder August 29, 1966. He is now at Scottsdale, Arizona, working for the Motorola Company.
in St. Luke's Hospital. -She fell and injured her back.

Mrs. Lulu Young, of 241 T . _ .. .. , Inca, was stricken quite ill
. Both Viola Smith, 1351 Mar-; in Oklahoma when she was
WEDDING BELLS \Boy Scouts
Mary jo Silva, daughter of Boy Scout Troop 528 is con-Caroline Silva of 3b37 Hum- ducting a continuous paper boldt Street, was married on drive to secure newspapers, September 24 at Sacred Heart magazines, handbills, and cat-Church to Richard'Chavez, son1 dogs. If you have any, call of Mrs. Alice Apodaca of 1244 255-8927 or 733-6009. .
Upon Street The bride wore1 Troop 528, which meets a gown of satin and Chantilly Mondays at 7 p. m. at 499 Fox lace, a quarter length veil is als conducting a member-.. . , ,, T I with sequined crown,' A wed- shiP drive. All boys ages 11 to
Mrs. Elizabeth McLachlan' breakfast Was given bv 13 wh -wish to join may call of 932 West 14th Avenue th^bridS molheT A w^g *e scoutmaster, C G. Naney,
reception for the; immediate d 733-6009 for further informa-
family was held at the groom's, . .
parents. The. couple left im-! The following scouts of Troop
mediately for California where|528,sped e weken£of ^ they will make their home.
iposa St., and Miss Maude Ganson, 1350 Osage St., were hospitalized for a few days in ou*
September. j
visiting there recently. She has recuperated and is able
w ^ w . I Mrs. Frances Z. Nelson, 924
Mrs. Grace Musgrove, 1348 West 10th Av will be 92 i Cteage St., left Saturday Oc-I oJd Qn October 29th. We ; ober 8, for a months trip in ish her a "Happy Birth-the east. ' day." |
tember 17-18 at the West District Boy Scout Camporee at .iv TP i ^ Indian Creek Campground in
, Priscilla Viola Garcia andjpike National Forest: Thomas I Raymond Henry Chavez were p Paul Sant Mike Val. ; married at Bethel Presbyter-1 ian Church at a candlelight
Tom Lucero, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hodges, 1114 Mari-
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Winterhalder, 1216 Lipan, attend-
posa, is home on leave after ed a Conference in St. Louis, 5 months in Saigon with thejMa Norman Winterhalder Sea Bees He plans to be in spent the week H| || Roy town till the end of the month.
Mrs. Grade Lofton and her
service on September 24. The Reverend David Cisneros officiated. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Garcia of Denver. The groom is'a son of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Chavez. The wedding party included Carla Cisneros, Lily
erio, and Steven Morehead.
Several troops of West Dis-trist attended. Several thousand trees were cleared by the j Mena, 623-1049. scouts as a conservation project
is interested in the Scouting program is invited. Cali 733-6009 or 934-9570 for further information.
Oh September 10 and 11 Troop 200 went on a campout near Beartracks Lake above Evergreen. Cooking and cleaning up was learned as well as hiking. The leaders were Mr. Morris and Mr. Mena.
On September 1,7th and 18th Troop 200 went to the West District Camp-o-ree and cut down trees for the forestry department and earned conservation hours towards their conservation badge.
Mr. Eugene Maestas has become the new assistant scout master and is doing a very; good job. Troop 200 would like to invite any boy from 11 years old on up that is interested in scouting to call1 R. Cl
Ruybal and Veronica Martin-
TA7. I 1 ,, , .i it i ez all of. Denver and Maria
Winterhalder family and Jerry m rp
tit, . , j ...1 u I Torres or Tomon, Mexico, lo-
Wmterhalder with his older Hi ________.._ A11_______'___
, .brother Bob. Bob Winterhalderixj F ^3^'
four children took a train trip 140 West 2nd Avenue, broke'M F d GaTclcZl Wlllie Cha
Chavez, Esther Garcia, Lydeefers are urged to attend the Brian Morris won the B' trophy;
West District Scout leaders Douglas Martinez, 2nd; Darrel Training sessions being held .Morris, 3rd. The C trophy was every Thursday at 7:30 p. m. won by Martin Vuksinich, Rich-
to Hot Sulphur Springs-September 4th, for a picnic.
Mr. and Mrs. Bennie Vas-quez of 1239 Lipan Street were surprised and very happy to welcome home their son, Cpl. Ronald Vasquez from Viet Nam.
Ray Martinez and family of Los Angeles, nephew of Mrs.
his ankle while playing football
Mrs. Helen Cochran, Mrs. Mattie Cochran, 242 Cherokee, and Mrs. Helen Burke, 226, Cherokee, enjoyed a Sunday Drive to Alamosa, Colorado on October 9.
Mrs. Helen Burke of 226
Alfonso Martinez of 1378 Mar-! Cherokee flew to Grand Island, iposa Street, came for a visit' Nebraska and then by auto to
Sargent,. Nebraska, for the 60th wedding anniversary celebration of her aunt and uncle, Mr. and. Mrs. Lester Thompson.
Mrs. Dolores Barringer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond
vez and Joe Garcia.
Boy Scout Leaders Training Sessions All fathers and Scout lead-
PACK 200 NEWS On September 29th Pack 200' had their first Fall pack meeting with a pine wood derby.
at St. Rose of Lima Church, 300 So. Navajo Street. C. G. Naney, staff member, says all phases of the Boy Scout program are covered in these
ard Vigil, 2n,d; and Timothy Gonzales, 3rd. Mr. Bruffet has become the new assistant cub master and Mrs. Long, Mrs. Bruffet and Mrs. Gruby are:
sessions and every man who the new den mothers.
EDITORIAL
A few months ago we talked I and walls, dirty, windows, about what we considered to broken, screens ripped apart,, be the responsibilities of land- drains clogged, lawns tom up
and in general property carelessly, yes and even some-
Carolyn Romero; and her husband Fred and their;Mary EIizabeth Yv shar_
son Shawn will be leaving for on GIenda ^
Germany in two weeks, where granddaughters, they will be stationed in Head-, m, ^ elberg with the Army. MM Romef s have 17 grand-
children and 8 great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Leslie Kalanquin of 1423 Lipan Street had to spend her vacation at Mercy Hospital. She is home now and back to work. Her sister, Mrs.
Mary Baker and family visited with her recently.
last week.
Mrs. Rachel Lopez of Mora,
New Mexico, visited her uncle,
Alfonso Martinez of 1378 Mariposa Street.
Mr. Jas. B. Knifton of 1039 West 14th Avenue is back from the hospital. He is feeling much better.
Jimmy Martinez, the son of Helen Apodaca and the grandson of Mr. and Mrs.
Adolph Pacheco of 1253 Lipan, is with the Marines at the Naval Station at Guantanamo.
H was, there during the Hurricane Inez last week, but is ok.
SK 3 Victor Mares has returned to the U. S. after a six months cruise in the Atantic.
His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Mares of 1020 West 13th Avenue expect him home during the Yuletide Season.
Mrs. Velva Farrow of 1114 West 13th Avenue enjoyed a visit from her daughter, Mrs.
Marion Gasser of Los Angeles,
California. Marion Gasser and Mrs. Farrow visited one afternoon with Mrs. Raymond Gasser from Bellflower, California, who was visiting her son Raymond Gasser and family of 349 Delaware Street
On Saturday evening Mr. and Mrs. Arthur K. Serumgard cel-1
, ebrated Lief Erikson Day at Thanks to Parks and Recreation the Cosmopolitan Hotel. The We want to thank the City celebration was sponsored by:Parks and Recreation Depart-Friends of Norway and the ment for putting the asphalt Scandinavian Society of Den- paving under the tables and ver. benches in Lincoln Park.
just recently. They have twoa*1* who his renl prefer-
daughters, Mrs. Elizabeth Chav- ^Y on time. Perhaps this ez and Mrs. Maria Trujillo, and l seems rather obvious and not
FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY
Our Lady of Guadalupe Church was the setting for the Golden Wedding Anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Romero.
The couple remewed their wedding vows. Married on September 11, 1916, in Antonito, Colo., lords- Now we would like Mr. and Mrs. Romero moved to consider the tenant's pari.
to Denver in 1945 where they first of all, nothing makes /times spitefully, destroyed. An~
Iived on the West Side until !a landlord happier than a ten-j other notion is that of how
one feels about himself and the place he lives in. If one has self-respect, he will want to keep the place he lives in looking nice even if he is only renting.
Last of all we would like to mention that the landlord-tenant relationship is a two-way street. Usually if a tenant is; truly willing to do some work on his own to improve a place,, most landlords are quite happy to provide supplies and equipment and maybe even a deduction on the rent. From our own experience again, we have' never regretted time and even money of our own invested in homes we have rented.
two, sons, Lee and Gilbert.
The bride was dressed in gold and had ten little girls for her court. The girls included Maryann, Joanne and Ger-i aldine Trujillo, Christine, Cheryl
Mr. M. M. Churchill of 1219 Lipan Street is home after several days at Mercy Hospital He is feeling pretty good now.
Diane Martinez of 1243 Kal-amath Street had a baby girl September 29. Mother and baby are doing real well.
Mrs. Howe of 879 Kalamath Street is in Rocky Mountain Hospital. She had a bad fall from a step ladder, and will be in the hospital for two weeks.
In Memoriam
Mrs. Minnie Hartman of 114$ Lipan Street passed away September 27, 1966. She was 84 years old and had lived at this address for over 50 years. She was bom in Sa-lemsville, Pa., in 1882 and came to Colorado in 1889. She is survived by one sister and two brothers.
Esther E. Cavanaugh of 1419 Kalamath Street passed away last month. She had several children and grandchildren. She was buried at Crown Hill Cemetery
Girl Scouts
necessary to mention. However when a. tenant rents a place, he should first consider whether the amount of the rent is within his ability to pay. Also, after he is living there, he must continue to figure the amount of his rent with his other expenses, when he is considering taking on additional financial responsibilities. Of course there are always those unexpected expenses, such as doctor bills, emergency car repair, etc., which can upset one's budget terribly. However, from our experience, we have found that most landlords are quite generous about waiting a week or even two for one to catch up, if you are a tenant who has a "good record" and is! known as one who meets his bills in all areas.
A second point, again seemingly obvious, is keeping the place one rents in good repair. However, we sense a feeling among many tenants that since they don't own the place they live in then it doesn't matter whether they take care of it. There are various ideas involved in this point One is the very basic notion of how one takes care of and handles things that do not belong to him. Certainly it would seem that one needs to remem-
Cadette Troop 726 went lodge camping at Flying G Ranch the weekend of October 7th.
All 24 girls, leaders and guests ker that this dwelling that is
had fun. They enjoyed hikes, songs, games and ceremonies. The Troop would like to thank Mrs. Walter Ochs, Miss Kathy Hanover and Miss Conna Franks for their help.
being rented belongs to someone else and should be taken care of and not be neglected or carelessly destroyed. Here we could recite endless cases
of tenants who leave floors i actmttes.
West High School
West High students from this area took part in a variety of learning experiences this summer. Albert Baldivia attended! Boys' State and Inge Jeike, Girls' State. Upward Bound, a program held at Colorado-Woman's College for students^ interested in going to college, was attended by Albert Baldivia, Ralph Candelaria, Kazuo Fullwood, Dave Gallegos, Carl Gonzales, Trace 'Karps, Bernard Lopez, and Susan Pacheco. Upward Bound students participated in weekend tours and sports programs, while taking college preparatory courses such as speedreading and psychology.
Howard Tsuchiya attended Outward Bound, a mountaineering camp held near Marble, Colorado. Outward Bound activities included mountain climbing, a two-day survival hike and other survival type


October, 1966
THE RECORDER
Page Three
School : Youth Activity : Recreation
Baker Jr, High
On Thusday, November 3 Baker Junior High invites all fathers to bring their sons to an evening meeting, of fun and refreshments with the men of our faculty, and a specially planned program.
We feel fortunate in being able to schedule an unusual group known as the Teenage Program of the Dale Carnegie Alumni Association. It has about twenty members, all prisoners at the Colorado State Penitentiary at Canon City. They represent former crimi: nal careers ranging from armed robbery through kidnapping and murder.
The program, new to Colorado, has been well received by the churches and schools that have used it. Under the sponsorship of the prison chaplain, Reverend Edwin J. Riske, groups of our prisoners are allowed to leave (the prison and accompany him to appear as guest speakers at programs such as ours. Several of these men have been in and out of penal institutions for many years so they can speak from direct experience and straight form the shoulder. Their stated purpose is to instruct and give the hard facts as they see them now. We, of the Baker staff, feel that the program will be beneficial to all of us who hear. them.
The program will start at 7:30 -p. m. When completed, everyone will go to the cafeteria^ for, je|reshmeiits,.,- A,. '.'fly-. er" with full details will be sent home with each Baker boy a few days before Father-Son Night. Reserve the evening, of November 3.
MY SUMMER. AT PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY. By Judy Tate
This summer I took a trip to the Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire.
I won a scholarship for full tuition of $700:00. I came about this information from Mr. Esquibel, an English teacher at Baker Junior JJigh School who attended there during the summer of. last year.
About April 6, 1966 I received notice that I would be accepted this summer. I picked for my courses: English Composition, Math (Algebra) and Harmony (Music theory).
I went to school six days a week. Five of which I attended until 1:00 p. m.. and Saturday until 12:30. In the afternoon,- .after lunch, we had an hour and a half of physical fitness and sports. The extra curricular activities I took part in were the chorus and orchestra.
By eight o'clock every night except Saturday, we had to be in our dorms for study hours.
Sunday we went on trips. I went to Boston, Maine, and parts of New Hampshire. The scenery up there was beautiful. I spent seven and a half weeks there. The experience was very rewarding and I hope to go again in the summer of 67.
St. Elizabeth's
Sister M. Rose Held is the new principal at St. Elizabeth's School. Sister Rose has. taught in both grade and high schools for over twenty-five years.: For the past ten years, Sister has held the position of principal in grade schools in Denver and in Scottsbluff, Nebraska. In 1962 Sister Rose received her Master's Degree from St. Bonaventure's University in New York.
Auraria Community Center
One of the staff members of Auraria Community Center this fall is Virginia Wilson. She comes to us from the Peace Corps where she was serving in Honduras, CentraJ America. Before joining the Peace Corps she graduated from the University of Chicago where she studied Social work..
At Auraria she is going to be working with the Auraria
! Neighborhood Group, the "Gad The Elementay and Second- Abouts," a special education ary Education Act of 1965 is group from Greenlee school funding several beneficial pro- and a group of 3rd and 4th
grade girls from Elmwood School.
grams at St: Elizabeth's this year.
Under Title I, thirty fourth, fifth and sixth graders receive two hours instruction in remedial reading daily from Mrs. Catherine Wall. All books and instumental materials for this program, as well as the teacher's salary, are paid by Title I funds.
Title I also pays tutors for seventh and eighth grade students who can benefit from extra help in Math, English, and Reading. Each tutor coaches five students in one subject for two hours: weekly. Classes are held after school and on Saturday mornings.
Title II of the Elementay and Secondary Education Act provided funds for the purchase of 300 library books which are available in the school library for the use of all stu-dents.'
Under Title III of the same Act, tKe fifth graders at St. Elizabeth's are participating in a research project on attitudes among various cultural groups. The program includes a TV Ser-. ies on the contributions to the" American' way of 'life made by the various cultural groups ^4-Negro American, Asian-A-merican, Spanish-sumamed A-merican, and Indian American found among Denver's population. A "buddy" porgram provides opportunity for the1 children to meet boys girls from other cultural backgrounds. The St. Elizabeth children will visit the State-Historical Society Museum, and attend a Denver Symphony concert with partners from Blessed Sacrament and Sacred Heart schools.
Her home originally was in Chicago but now she hopes to live in Denver for a long time to come.
Fairmont
mention.
Greenlee is proud of these!
On November 3, some of Fairmont's students will attend a Symphony Concert at the City Auditorium. A recognition program on November 16 will specially honor about 100 students who participated in the summer reading program. Everyone is invited.
A P. T. A. Board Meeting at 9:00 a. m. on November 16;who guided their ef{ortg will be a planning session! for the Christmas festivities.
Next candy apple sale on November 18. Don't forget, this is one of the P.T.A/s main rrfoney raising projects.
Virginia Wilson and Alex Vigil, new Auraria staff
St. Joseph's
Greenlee
Pupils Receive A war is | The 8th Grade Civics club
§9 , /-x i Is planning several good neigh-
Five pupils from Greenlee ( activities for Thanksgiv-School received recognition1§|| and Christmas. The offi-for art work submitted to the Cers are: Luanne Hofschulte Governors Committee on Em-1 (p^g jQ Hemon (Vice Pres.), ployment for the Handicapped,1 pa( KelIy (Sea)i Mike Martin, which met October 3-8. Those
. ez (Treas.) and Rex Padilla so recognized were David Es-; (Sergean, ^ Arms)i pinoza, who received a fourth.
place award, Ruby Gonzales, >> v ~~-----
Gloria Reyes, Casey Reyes, j -
and Joseph Gonzales, each of { By Dave Hastings
whom I received honorable! -'A 0i T A 0 I
This year St. Joseph s Grade
School football team has had
bit of hard luck. Out of the
, , . j .i a on oi nara iuck. v^ui ox uiw
boys and girls and ot their j j .. ___
Ml H three games played the team
teacher, Mrs. Gloria Wood
St. Cajetan
New Kindergarten Class
, has lost three. But who knows? j Maybe the season will perk :up, for the team has won all of its scrimmage games against Our Lady of Lourdes, Christ Since the Kindergarten wait- the King, and Baker Junior ing list was long enough to High.
Theteam has strong-backer class, plans We been! field consisting j| ||gH| made to do this by placing I gg* Gib Duran; hal£back.
Our Physical Fitness Program by Frances ^Torres, Grade 8
It's either shape-up or ship out at St. Cajetan's during our physical education program. Each i day we all have to get down to work and especially when Mr. and Mrs* Petrochko come to teach us exercise's;' Everyone has a chance to be
two morning sections on multiple session. One session will be held from 8:30. tp 10:30, the other from 10:30 to 12:30.'!
Jerry Martinez; fullback, Jeff Lopez; wingback; Chris Garcia, The line includes: center, Dave Hastings; right guard, Gerald
As soon as a part time teach-, Trujillo; ri ht |§|||
er is located to take- the ex
Jerry
Johnson; right wing, Charlie
il the class will be ~ dek^.a; BM John
established.
Padilla;, left tackle, Larry San-tistevan; left end, Steve' Gallegos. A
RETARDED CHILDREN'S SCHOOL
Classes at First Mennonite Church. Last year there was a total of 24 full time students with Mrs. Sharon Milton and Robert Smith as full-time teachers plus several aides provided by Neighborhood Youth Corps. There has been an increase this year with 42 students and two more teachers. 100 applicants had to be turned away because of lack of space. Mrs. Brown is a new teacher responsible for the preschool students meeting in the church basement. Mrs. Walters, also new, is teaching a class of 8 in the church
of
a leader calling out posi-programs going on at Green-tionsv and exercises. There, is 1 this year, largely made a difference between the boys and girls exercises. The girls program is not quite so vigorous and muscle-building, but from finger exercises to jumping-jacks they all take pep and energy. To be physically and mentally fit our bodies need the right kind of exercise so this way we get both enjoyment and a more sound body.
Special Programs
LA
Among the special types of pep
By Patrice Cortinez We at St. Joseph's Grade
possible through the use
Federal funds, are: School have a. pep club con-
1. Team Teaching in grades sisting of sixth, seventh and one and two. Three teach- eighth grade girls.
ers work with two classes and The officers and cheerlead-concenirate on the teaching of ers are: President, Claudia reading. Wickersham; Vice-president,
2. Reading improvement and Gathy MM Secretary, maintenance. An extra teach- Margie Dick; Cheerleaders, er has been added to the Pe^ Leva to, Sharon Kemm. staff to work with pupils in Pcrtncia Kel1^ Debra Garci
grades four, five, and six in
Substitutes, Patricia Lovato and
Autumn
by Jimmy Trujillo, Grade 7
The leaves are falling very fast Now we know that summer's pas) Some leaves are green, some are brown
Leaves big and bright carpet the ground.
While red and brown leaves rapidly fall
Green and orange calmly stall Squirrels are busy gathering nuts While bears are liberating In their huts.
When the trees and leaves start _ __ : to dry
basement. Mrs." Milton and 5rds and ducks scatter the sky. Mr. Smith will be working These gifts dent come in cans ,.t, i_.__ i_ Tnis is God's enormous plan
with two separate groups in We(|j good.bye summer, hello th Youth Center basement. J Pali
These groups ages are from' We're waiting for you. Winter, the 12 to 16 years. coldest of all.
the area of reading., The mo- §usan Gonzales., bile unit placed on our grounds Usually on the day the boys is used for this purpose. have their games, the Pep 3. Guidance and counseling Club has a special meeting service. A full time counselor and a pep rally to prepare helps pupils with their per- for the game, sonal problems that might affect their school work. .Fall Festival
________________ By Mike Kamerzell
DID YOU KNOW THAT the' ^ Fal1 Festival begem
Denver Public Library at 1357 .^d^ morning, October 6,
, , * lat 11:30 and ended Sunday
Broadway has a Story Hour nigh, October 8. At 11:30 Oc
every Sunday at 3:30 p. m. It is held in the Children's Library October through April for all ages. Here is a different way for your family to spend a Sunday aftenoon. See you there.
tober 6 the grade school children attended the Festival willing to spend their money and anxious to have fun. The children were allowed to stay until L30 so that they wouldn't miss out on their studies.


r
Page Four
THE RECORDER
October, 1966
. . lift.
LINCOLN PARK RESIDENT COUNCIL
The Resident Council of Lincoln Park and South Lincoln Park Homes wishes4 to thank Mr. Earl Paul, principal of West High School, Mr. Jack Beardshear, principal of Baker Junior High School, and Mrs. one Heleman, guidance counselor at Greenlee, for their very nice speeches at our last meeting. They were very enlightening and interesting. The attendance was good although we wish more parents could
Out of School Out of Work?
The Metropolitan Youth Education Center at 14th and Kai-amath is the result of co-operation between two school boards, those of Denver and Jefferson Counties, in an effort to meet the problems of unemployed and underemployed young people in the metropolitan area.
This center, which plans to open bn November 1st, will: try to help young people between
have attended. We would dike the ages of 16 and 24 who live
BYERS RENOVATION UNDER WAY
Work began the week of facing with blacktop in staff September 26 on a capital im- parking lot; and installation of provement project at Byers flood lights. Replanting of Neighborhood Library, W. Sev- lawn will be done next spring.
enth Ave. and Santa Fe Drive. Completion of the- remodeling
Modernization work inside the library building will in-
of 1966
is expected before the end volve; refinishing of cdl wood
work; overhauling of windows;
The project for the Denver: repairing and painting of walls Public Library agency, as ap-1 in entire main floor area, hall-proved by the City Council | way, stairway to basement, and the Denver Library Com-1 staff room, and rest rooms; mission, includes both exterior replacement of. lighting fixtures; and interior renovation. Cost installation of floor tile in of the work will be $11,575 most areas of the building; and will .be covered entirely renovation of basement staff
to see you at our next meet-1 in Denver and Jefferson Coun- hy a C^Y capital improvement room, staff rest room, and pub-ing which will be held No- j ties who need to finish their' allocation. Low bidder on the lie rest room, including installa-vember 3, 1966 at 7:30 p. m. I high school education or tojPrj^ was Snow Construe-, tiqn of new fixtures; and real 1438 Navajo Street. Hope j improve on the high school ed-1 Ln Oo ! moval of plaster from three
ucation they already have in Outside improvements will walls of the meeting room, order to get jobs or to get bet- include: replacement of front followed by application of
ter jobs.
More specifically those who
to see you there!
The Resident Council of Lincoln Park and South Lincoln Park Homes sponsored a Bake
PICK THE PLENTIFULS. Sale on October 5. The moneyj can get help at the Center are: Make your food dollar go fur- from this sale will go towards 1. Youth who have dropped ther by choosing foods in good i the children's Christmas par-, out of school in the two coun-supply. They usually are ty. cheaper. On the U. S. De-| partment of Agriculture list of
sidewalk, building steps and | waterproof cement and paintlanding, and installation of new ing.
doors; replacement of all eaves Originally opened in June, and downspouts; repair of all 1918 as the fifth extension walls and painting of the en- o{ ^ Denver
tire exterior; alteration ol grad- ... _ . .
Library system, Byers has been
need of repair and im-
plentiful foods for October are METRO COLLEGE pork, broiler fryers, apples, j ENROLLMENT DOUBLED grapes, pears, rice and drv |
beans. In November look for: At the end of the first week
ties mentioned above.
2. Youth who have dropped ing to improve drainage in-I out of school elsewhere but are1 of replacement chain m
now living in Denver or Jeffer-,hnk fence: gradmg and sur' Pavement for some years, son Counties.
I 3. Recent high school grad-< Mexcian Polio Epidemic; West Side Calendar
uates in these counties who
lots of raisins and turkeys classes, enrollment at Met- .. , . MHH ,/r>. ,
they're the featured itemson ropolitcm State Collgee had, Si t truths I Denyentes
the November list-also more1 reached 2,434, F. D. Lillie, dean and can benefit from the rung vacahons m^ Mexico this
! of students has announced. [guidance, education and place-, fall or winter should
grapes, pears, pork and dry beans.
FIGURE IT FAITHFULLY. Stop before you scream about
make
EVERY WEEK
SundayStory Hour, Denver Public Library, 1357 Broadway,
Compared with the final to- j tal of 1,189 students last fall
4. Recent high school grad- j full protection of Sabin oral | Monday and Wednesday
, , .. , r. , uates living in these countiesj polio vaccine", advises Dr. j Basic Adult Education, 7 to 9
during the college s first quar- ||| made false starts in John Sbarbaro, director of Dis- p. m., Baker Junior High and
your food bill. Chances are ter jff operation, the enrollment cojjege ancj have dropped out ease Control for the Denver Greenlee School.
you ve
got a lot of other things |to date f 011 increase of 105 would be inferested
besides food in your shopping Percent.
cart. According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, one-fifth of the money spent at grocery stores goes for nonfood itemslike soap, paper goods, pet foods, clothing, cos-
cational and other education
metres, cigarettes, holic beverages.
and alco-
Of the total enrolled, 1,399 available at the Center, are attending college for the. 5. "Underemployed" youth
first time, 731 former MSC stu-with ability to move up to bet-dents, 277 new transfers and 27 ter jobs but needing guidance special students. The rate ofand more education to do sb. men-to-women is 3 to 1. Repre-j The Center will try to work mentation of students from the with each person on an indi-
Denver Metropolitan area continues very high, 91 percent.
VISTAS At Lincoln
Four VISTA volunteers have
recently taken up residence in Lincoln Park Homes. They are:
Senior Citizens
Twenty members of the
vidual basis to help him with
Department of Health and Hospitals. "It appears that there is an epidemic of paralytic polio in northern Mexico, and it has spread into Texas."
Dr. Sbarbaro pointed out that a complete polio immunization, requires three doses of vaccine, in drops or on sugar cubes, or two doses of the
his specific needs. Areas to triple strength vaccine. The
be covered are Counselling and Guidance, Referral, Job Placement and Education.
The Education Programs will !work in these areas: basic ed-
Dan Sullivan of Princeton, New Lincoln | Park Senior Citizens ucation, primarily English, read-Jersey, David Brouner of New Glub met for lunch, a short | ing, writing and speech,^ and
doses should be a month or six weeks apart, so vacationers will need to plan ahead to be sure they are fully protected before they go into a possibly infected area. Only smallpox vaccination is required for
York,/ # Paul Newman of Bos-1 business session, and an after- math; social and cultural de- Americans who travel to Mex-
ton, Mass., and Martin Kling noon Lingo for prizes on1 velopment; and vocational ,ed- ico, but Dr. Sbarbaro also
of Washington. These four Tuesday, September 20th. We | ucation. We,commends typhoid and teta-
young men will assist in 'their*?, gladKto'. he Mrs, Lynn rf you are M any Qf the-nus shotSv . IS
Juvenile Court under Judge1 Lrcraiey, Auraria Community five groups mentioned above I Residents of Denver who Rubin for a year. . Center coordinator, with care interested in this pro- Lave not had. the complete,
, again; Mrs. Bradley has been being offered at the series of Sabin oral polio vac-
jon the inactive list following1 Center, you may register at cine may get it from their own Wpctcifflp t rf Inn ,a .7, injl?rY received. 5590 West 20th Street until No- family doctors or from the Dis-
.fast July. 1 *.;Iveniber 1st. If critical mate: ->case Control Immunization
-On October 13, the Westside; Eleven Lincoln Park Seniors !ials arrive r- time the Crriter. Clinic at 760 Cherokee Street.
Action Council met in a special attended the picnic, September! will open on November 1st, j______________
session to consider a revised 26, at Washington Park, spon-lafter which one may go direct-i proposal for Neighborhood. sored by the Coordinated Ser- ly to 14th and Kalamath for LAEF BENEFIT
SPECIAL EVENTS
October 22-23 ^ St. Joseph'? Grade School Paper Drive.
October 25 St. Joseph's Midgets vs. St. Catherine's, 46th and Grove.
October 27 '$$0$ St Joseph's Lightweights vs. St. Catherine's, 4Bth and Grove.
November 3Baker Father and Son Night, 7:30 p. m.
November 3Lincoln Park Homes Resident Council, 7:30 p. m., 1438 Navajo.
November 8Election Day.
November 13St. Joseph's Grade School parent-teacher conferences.
November 16Greenlee P. T. A. meeting, 7:00 p. m.
: November 17Latin American Educational Foundation supper, Baker Jr, High, 6:30 p. m.',
Centers for the target areas
vices for the Aging,
_ _ ___ ___ ______ 1620 additional information or to reg-
- nvST, Opportunity. This Meade Street. They reported a. ister. a revised version of one j wonderful day with plenty of w inn had not been approved good food and entertainment, by the various target area
Councils. The WAC approved
The first October meeting of
the revised proposal which ^ H W will go back to the Denver jTuesdc^' October 4. Sixteen 'Opportunity Board for approv-;members were present and two and submission to 'Kansas City Office of Economic Opportunity.
New appointments by the "Westside Action Council to -^/ork with Denver Opportunity Ore Sister Martinelle, chairman of WAC Committee on Youth Interests, to work with the Youth Programs Section of D. O., and Rachel Guedea, member of WAC Education Committee to serve on the Dl O. Education Committee.
Next scheduled meeting of the Westside Action Council is October 27th, 7:30 p. m., at St. Elizabeth's School.
thei guests, Mrs. Chavez, and her small daughter. After the dessert luncheon, Mrs. Chavez gave a very interesting demonstration of cake icing and decorating. Two projects planned for October are a tour of the Governor's mansion, October 11, and a visit to Stapleton Airfield, October 24.
Several ladies of the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club contributed to and assisted with the very successful Lincoln Park Tenant Council Bake Sale and Bazaar held in the Community Hall, 1438 Navajo, October 5.
SPIDERS, STUFFED FLUES HAZARDOUS
Bracing fall weather brings its problems, including field mice and black widow spiders in the house and stopped-up chimney flues which can cause carbon monoxide poisoning when the furnace is turned on, warns Dr. J. Douglas Mc-Cluskie, director of the Environmental Health Service of the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals. A black widow spider bite is poisonous and should be seen by the doctor. Furnaces and flues should be checked and cleaned out if necessary in late summer or early fall, before the heat is turned on.
AT BAKER
The Denver Spanish Ministerial Alliance will co-sponsor with the Baker Junior High School's P. T. A. a supper at Baker, 6:30 p. m., November 17 for the benefit of the Latin-Americgn Educational Foundation which has helped more than four hundred students with scholarships since its foundation.
Mrs. Sally Trujillo, Baker's PvT.A. president has been named general chairman; Rev. Thomas Sepulveda was named program chairman and Mrs. Thomas Sepulveda was named publicity chairman.
Baker's Glee Club and Band will participate in the program. Parents and all interested persons are urged to buy their tickets in plenty of time.
DIAL RD
Ronald A. Miller, Executive Director of the^ Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association of Denver and Tri-County today announced that the association will conduct a Dial R D (Respiratory Disease) Program beginning October 23, 1966, and continuing for two months. Anyone interested in learning more on the increasing seriousness of Respiratory Diseases may dial 3994)101 and a short message bn these health subjects will be broadcast.
Cdurch News
First Avenue Presbyterian
The Trustees of the First Avenue Presbyterian Church have accepted the resignation of the Church custodian Mr. John Sidrid. The Trustees have engaged Mr. John Conway of 107 Acoma St. as the new custodian.


Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3/ Number 6
Published Monthly
October, 1966
Remember To Vote On Tuesday, November 8th!
AMENDMENT NO. 1
STATE GOVERNMENT REORGANIZATION Major Provisions
Requires that all executive and- administrative offices, agencies, and instrumentalities of the executive branch of: state government be allocated to not morelt^ctn 20 departments. Temporary commissions, are exempted from the 20-department limitation; Does not change the civil service system.
Those FAVORING Amendment No. 1 Say:
It clarifies areas of responsibility.
Tt makes government more accessible.
It provides for more effective and economical government.
It prevents haphazard growth.
Those OPPOSING Amendment j No. 1 sayj _
It might lead to a "little | cabinet" system.
It could reduce effectiveness (of present programs, j It does not define "tempor-j ary'' commissions.
Reorganization could be. accomplished by statutory action.
AMENDMENT NO. 5 ABOLISHMENT OF INVENTORY TAX Major Provisions
Places a 75-mill ceiling on property tax. Additional mill ievy requires a vote of property taxpayers. Bond issue mill-dge is in addition tp4 the 75-mill ceiling.*. Eliminates inventory taxes Over a ten-year period.
AMENDMENT NO. 2
SPECIFIC OWNERSHIP TAX ON MOBILE EQUIPMENT Major Provisions
Provides for state taxation, at time of licensing of mobile homes, trailer. coaches, arid mobile and self-propelled construction equipment. Eliminates county personal property tax on these.
Those FAVORING Amendment Those OPPOSING Amendment No. 2 say: -No. 2 say:
It updates the Constitution, Mobile property should be offering statewide uniformity subject to property tax. together with an efficient meth- j This tax would not reflect
Those FAVORING Amendment No. 5 say:
It gives the taxpayer a voice after taxes reach the ceiling.
It forces a more efficient i and economical government and a more balanced tax 1 structure.
It encourages new business, j
The inventory tax discriminates against certain businesses.
The loss will be made up by new business.
Those OPPOSING Amendment No. 5 say:
It will force legislators to find new tax sources.
Sparsely populated areas will be at a disadvantage.
Tax ceilings should not be written into the Constitution.
How the amendment would function in the present system of overlapping districts is not clear, even to experts.
It takes a revenue source away from local government and provides no new one.
Elections for state offices and for Congress will be held a* Tuesday, November 8. People will vote for Governor, Lieutenant-Governor^ State Attorney General, 'Secretary of State; U. S.'; Congressman, U. S. Senator, 4 State Senators, 18 State Representatives, 2 Regents to the University af Colorado, State Treasurer, anfl Judges for District Court and State Supreme Court In addition, thet voters will express their views on 5 proposed amendments to the state constitution and two laws re-jferred by the state legislature to the people. Information in this issue about the proposed amendments and the referred | laws is based on material supplied by the League of Women Voters of Colorado.
HOUSEWIVES'
REFERRED LAW NO. 1 DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME Ballot TitleProviding for daylight saving time in Colorado.
Major Provisions:
From the year 1967 and thereafter Colorado will have BOYCOTT daylight saving time from the last Saturday of April until th~ last Sunday of October.
od of collecting revenue. ;
It prevents delay in collecting takes.
local needs.
The owner of a mobile home should be taxed on the same basis at his stationary neighbor., j
AMENDMENT NO. 3
NON-POLTICAL SELECTION AND REMOyAL OF JUDGES Major Provisions
Provides for nomination of judges by commissions. Commissions are to be made up of a majority of non-lawyers and a minority of lawyers with members from Both parties. Provides, for a commissiori on qualifications for judges which may recommend to the Supreme Court removal of- any judge.. Provides, that people vote yes or no on re-election of a judge rather than choose between opposing candidates. Requires retirement of judges at 72 years of age.
Those FAVORING Amendment No. 3 say -
It minimizes pressures of party politics.
It attracts better qualified men as judges.
It offers a procedure for immediate removal of incompetent judges.
The best judges are not always the best campaigners.
Those OPPOSING Amendment No. 3 say -
It removes .direct selection from the hands of the people.
It makes removal of a bad judge more difficult.
It gives too- much authority to the Governor.
It bypasses the local party organization.
7% AMENDMENT NO. 4
LEGISLATIVE REDISTRICTING Major Provisions
The State Senate will consist of not more them 35 members; each elected from a separate district, and the House of Representatives will consist of not more than 65 members, each elected from a separate district. All districts must be as nearly equal in population as possible. The General Assembly is required to reapportion itself after every federal census. Penalties are set for failure to reapportion.
Those FAVORING Amendment No. 4 say:
It meets the "One Man One Vote" standard.
It gives voters more effective control over legislators.
It shortens the ballot.
ft emphasizes candidates rather than political parties.
It offers more representation to minorities.
REFERRED LAW NO. 2 CAPITAL PUNISHMENT Ballot TitleShall capital punishment be abolished?
Major Provisions:
Eliminates the death penalty in Colorado after January I 1967.
Housing Variance Denied
At their September 22 meeting, the Board of Health and Hospitals, denied a request by the pwner, Charles Ginsberg, for a variance on the terraces from 912 to 92Q W. 11th Avenue.' The effect of this denial is that Mr. Ginsberg will be required to comply fully with the orders issued by the Manager of; the Department of Health, arid Hospitals # ^td have the premises vacated. The-own-er; has 60 days after receiving the decision of the Board to comply with it. Since the last issue of the RECORDER, much of the junk that had been sitting behind the ,terraces' has been removed.
jWSIA BOARD i ELECTS OFFICERS
J At its meeting of Septem-| ber 26, the Board of Directors j of the West Side Improvement j Association elected Mr. Leslie Kalanquin, Director of District 1, as President of the Association. Mrs. Forrest Swanson, Director of District 7, was elected v V iee-president and Mrs. foy Hoehler, Director of District 9 became the new Secretary. ,
1 Other ^ district directors are Mrs. Lorens Olsen, District 2, Mr.. Pete Ulibarri, District 3, Mrs. Carmen Hodges, District
4, Mr. Harold Harrison, District
5. Mr. Harold Munson, District 6,. Mrs. Rose Gomez, District 8, Mr. Robert Recek, District 10, and Mr. Julian Kroeger, District 11.
Thpse OPPOSING Amendment No. 4 say:
It unduly restricts the field of selection on candidates.
It increases the influence of local pressure groups.
It lessens effective party control.
It would invite gerrymandering.
To -have districting; and apportionment done by an outside commissiori would be better.
. This week, October 17-22, marks the beginning of the boycott of five supermarket chains by the Housewives for Lower Food Prices. How much success this attempt will have no one knpws, but one store. Miller's, has lowered prices and has been removed from the boycott list
It is hoped that the boycott will bring permanent reduction of food prices arid that the movement will spark a nation-wide drive for lower prices.
Petitions are being circulated for housewives to sign to show their intentions of helping boycott these supermarket chains: Safeway, Red Owl, King Soop-ers and Furrs.. The boycotting housewives will shop at other places, such as neighborhood stores even though expensive,
1 hoping that the prices of the j chain stores will come down ifor good.
i Quite a few politicians have given their support to this [movement in view of the coming elections. However the housewives are not seeking the support of any particular party, but the support of all interested citizens who would, like to see the cost of living stop its upward climb.
.The West.'.Side Recorder is not aware of, any petitions being eircplated on the West Side. However & would be interesting to know how housewives in this area feel about the boycott and whether they intend- -to- help in it on their own. Anyone who is interested in helping circulate a petition in her area or who wants more information may contact Mrs. Paul West of 8361 East
Lehigh Drive, phone 771-3172.
UNITED WAY CAMPAIGN NOW IN PROGRESS
The West High School band conducted by George Layton played recently at the kickoff dinner for the annual Mile High United Way campaign. They were on a program that iricluded Sgt. Barry Sadler, U. S. Special Forces and com-
Green Beret," and Robert W. Samoff, president of RCA.
General Chairman Jerome E. Montague says that this year/s United Way goal is the largest ever established. However, he points out a major share of the increase is for
poser of "The Ballad of the I emergency needs of the agen-
cies j serving our fighting men in Viet Nam. It is also necessary to replenish the Red Cross disaster funds so seriously depleted by things such as the June 1965 floods that required almost a million drllars in the Denver area alone.


Page Two
THE RECORDER
October, 1966
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
Harry Larsen of 1127 Inca is in St.. Anthony's Hospital.
Richard Brunner of 928 West 14th Avenue, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brunner, graduated from C. TJ. at Boulder August 29, 1966. He is now at Scottsdale, Arizona, working for the Motorola Company.
in St. Luke's Hospital. -She fell and injured her back.

Mrs. Lulu Young, of 241 T . _ .. .. , Inca, was stricken quite ill
. Both Viola Smith, 1351 Mar-; in Oklahoma when she was
WEDDING BELLS \Boy Scouts
Mary jo Silva, daughter of Boy Scout Troop 528 is con-Caroline Silva of 3b37 Hum- ducting a continuous paper boldt Street, was married on drive to secure newspapers, September 24 at Sacred Heart magazines, handbills, and cat-Church to Richard'Chavez, son1 dogs. If you have any, call of Mrs. Alice Apodaca of 1244 255-8927 or 733-6009. .
Upon Street The bride wore1 Troop 528, which meets a gown of satin and Chantilly Mondays at 7 p. m. at 499 Fox lace, a quarter length veil is als conducting a member-.. . , ,, T I with sequined crown,' A wed- shiP drive. All boys ages 11 to
Mrs. Elizabeth McLachlan' breakfast Was given bv 13 wh -wish to join may call of 932 West 14th Avenue th^bridS molheT A w^g *e scoutmaster, C G. Naney,
reception for the; immediate d 733-6009 for further informa-
family was held at the groom's, . .
parents. The. couple left im-! The following scouts of Troop
mediately for California where|528,sped e weken£of ^ they will make their home.
iposa St., and Miss Maude Ganson, 1350 Osage St., were hospitalized for a few days in ou*
September. j
visiting there recently. She has recuperated and is able
w ^ w . I Mrs. Frances Z. Nelson, 924
Mrs. Grace Musgrove, 1348 West 10th Av will be 92 i Cteage St., left Saturday Oc-I oJd Qn October 29th. We ; ober 8, for a months trip in ish her a "Happy Birth-the east. ' day." |
tember 17-18 at the West District Boy Scout Camporee at .iv TP i ^ Indian Creek Campground in
, Priscilla Viola Garcia andjpike National Forest: Thomas I Raymond Henry Chavez were p Paul Sant Mike Val. ; married at Bethel Presbyter-1 ian Church at a candlelight
Tom Lucero, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hodges, 1114 Mari-
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Winterhalder, 1216 Lipan, attend-
posa, is home on leave after ed a Conference in St. Louis, 5 months in Saigon with thejMa Norman Winterhalder Sea Bees He plans to be in spent the week H| || Roy town till the end of the month.
Mrs. Grade Lofton and her
service on September 24. The Reverend David Cisneros officiated. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Garcia of Denver. The groom is'a son of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Chavez. The wedding party included Carla Cisneros, Lily
erio, and Steven Morehead.
Several troops of West Dis-trist attended. Several thousand trees were cleared by the j Mena, 623-1049. scouts as a conservation project
is interested in the Scouting program is invited. Cali 733-6009 or 934-9570 for further information.
Oh September 10 and 11 Troop 200 went on a campout near Beartracks Lake above Evergreen. Cooking and cleaning up was learned as well as hiking. The leaders were Mr. Morris and Mr. Mena.
On September 1,7th and 18th Troop 200 went to the West District Camp-o-ree and cut down trees for the forestry department and earned conservation hours towards their conservation badge.
Mr. Eugene Maestas has become the new assistant scout master and is doing a very; good job. Troop 200 would like to invite any boy from 11 years old on up that is interested in scouting to call1 R. Cl
Ruybal and Veronica Martin-
TA7. I 1 ,, , .i it i ez all of. Denver and Maria
Winterhalder family and Jerry m rp
tit, . , j ...1 u I Torres or Tomon, Mexico, lo-
Wmterhalder with his older Hi ________.._ A11_______'___
, .brother Bob. Bob Winterhalderixj F ^3^'
four children took a train trip 140 West 2nd Avenue, broke'M F d GaTclcZl Wlllie Cha
Chavez, Esther Garcia, Lydeefers are urged to attend the Brian Morris won the B' trophy;
West District Scout leaders Douglas Martinez, 2nd; Darrel Training sessions being held .Morris, 3rd. The C trophy was every Thursday at 7:30 p. m. won by Martin Vuksinich, Rich-
to Hot Sulphur Springs-September 4th, for a picnic.
Mr. and Mrs. Bennie Vas-quez of 1239 Lipan Street were surprised and very happy to welcome home their son, Cpl. Ronald Vasquez from Viet Nam.
Ray Martinez and family of Los Angeles, nephew of Mrs.
his ankle while playing football
Mrs. Helen Cochran, Mrs. Mattie Cochran, 242 Cherokee, and Mrs. Helen Burke, 226, Cherokee, enjoyed a Sunday Drive to Alamosa, Colorado on October 9.
Mrs. Helen Burke of 226
Alfonso Martinez of 1378 Mar-! Cherokee flew to Grand Island, iposa Street, came for a visit' Nebraska and then by auto to
Sargent,. Nebraska, for the 60th wedding anniversary celebration of her aunt and uncle, Mr. and. Mrs. Lester Thompson.
Mrs. Dolores Barringer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond
vez and Joe Garcia.
Boy Scout Leaders Training Sessions All fathers and Scout lead-
PACK 200 NEWS On September 29th Pack 200' had their first Fall pack meeting with a pine wood derby.
at St. Rose of Lima Church, 300 So. Navajo Street. C. G. Naney, staff member, says all phases of the Boy Scout program are covered in these
ard Vigil, 2n,d; and Timothy Gonzales, 3rd. Mr. Bruffet has become the new assistant cub master and Mrs. Long, Mrs. Bruffet and Mrs. Gruby are:
sessions and every man who the new den mothers.
EDITORIAL
A few months ago we talked I and walls, dirty, windows, about what we considered to broken, screens ripped apart,, be the responsibilities of land- drains clogged, lawns tom up
and in general property carelessly, yes and even some-
Carolyn Romero; and her husband Fred and their;Mary EIizabeth Yv shar_
son Shawn will be leaving for on GIenda ^
Germany in two weeks, where granddaughters, they will be stationed in Head-, m, ^ elberg with the Army. MM Romef s have 17 grand-
children and 8 great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Leslie Kalanquin of 1423 Lipan Street had to spend her vacation at Mercy Hospital. She is home now and back to work. Her sister, Mrs.
Mary Baker and family visited with her recently.
last week.
Mrs. Rachel Lopez of Mora,
New Mexico, visited her uncle,
Alfonso Martinez of 1378 Mariposa Street.
Mr. Jas. B. Knifton of 1039 West 14th Avenue is back from the hospital. He is feeling much better.
Jimmy Martinez, the son of Helen Apodaca and the grandson of Mr. and Mrs.
Adolph Pacheco of 1253 Lipan, is with the Marines at the Naval Station at Guantanamo.
H was, there during the Hurricane Inez last week, but is ok.
SK 3 Victor Mares has returned to the U. S. after a six months cruise in the Atantic.
His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Mares of 1020 West 13th Avenue expect him home during the Yuletide Season.
Mrs. Velva Farrow of 1114 West 13th Avenue enjoyed a visit from her daughter, Mrs.
Marion Gasser of Los Angeles,
California. Marion Gasser and Mrs. Farrow visited one afternoon with Mrs. Raymond Gasser from Bellflower, California, who was visiting her son Raymond Gasser and family of 349 Delaware Street
On Saturday evening Mr. and Mrs. Arthur K. Serumgard cel-1
, ebrated Lief Erikson Day at Thanks to Parks and Recreation the Cosmopolitan Hotel. The We want to thank the City celebration was sponsored by:Parks and Recreation Depart-Friends of Norway and the ment for putting the asphalt Scandinavian Society of Den- paving under the tables and ver. benches in Lincoln Park.
just recently. They have twoa*1* who his renl prefer-
daughters, Mrs. Elizabeth Chav- ^Y on time. Perhaps this ez and Mrs. Maria Trujillo, and l seems rather obvious and not
FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY
Our Lady of Guadalupe Church was the setting for the Golden Wedding Anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Romero.
The couple remewed their wedding vows. Married on September 11, 1916, in Antonito, Colo., lords- Now we would like Mr. and Mrs. Romero moved to consider the tenant's pari.
to Denver in 1945 where they first of all, nothing makes /times spitefully, destroyed. An~
Iived on the West Side until !a landlord happier than a ten-j other notion is that of how
one feels about himself and the place he lives in. If one has self-respect, he will want to keep the place he lives in looking nice even if he is only renting.
Last of all we would like to mention that the landlord-tenant relationship is a two-way street. Usually if a tenant is; truly willing to do some work on his own to improve a place,, most landlords are quite happy to provide supplies and equipment and maybe even a deduction on the rent. From our own experience again, we have' never regretted time and even money of our own invested in homes we have rented.
two, sons, Lee and Gilbert.
The bride was dressed in gold and had ten little girls for her court. The girls included Maryann, Joanne and Ger-i aldine Trujillo, Christine, Cheryl
Mr. M. M. Churchill of 1219 Lipan Street is home after several days at Mercy Hospital He is feeling pretty good now.
Diane Martinez of 1243 Kal-amath Street had a baby girl September 29. Mother and baby are doing real well.
Mrs. Howe of 879 Kalamath Street is in Rocky Mountain Hospital. She had a bad fall from a step ladder, and will be in the hospital for two weeks.
In Memoriam
Mrs. Minnie Hartman of 114$ Lipan Street passed away September 27, 1966. She was 84 years old and had lived at this address for over 50 years. She was bom in Sa-lemsville, Pa., in 1882 and came to Colorado in 1889. She is survived by one sister and two brothers.
Esther E. Cavanaugh of 1419 Kalamath Street passed away last month. She had several children and grandchildren. She was buried at Crown Hill Cemetery
Girl Scouts
necessary to mention. However when a. tenant rents a place, he should first consider whether the amount of the rent is within his ability to pay. Also, after he is living there, he must continue to figure the amount of his rent with his other expenses, when he is considering taking on additional financial responsibilities. Of course there are always those unexpected expenses, such as doctor bills, emergency car repair, etc., which can upset one's budget terribly. However, from our experience, we have found that most landlords are quite generous about waiting a week or even two for one to catch up, if you are a tenant who has a "good record" and is! known as one who meets his bills in all areas.
A second point, again seemingly obvious, is keeping the place one rents in good repair. However, we sense a feeling among many tenants that since they don't own the place they live in then it doesn't matter whether they take care of it. There are various ideas involved in this point One is the very basic notion of how one takes care of and handles things that do not belong to him. Certainly it would seem that one needs to remem-
Cadette Troop 726 went lodge camping at Flying G Ranch the weekend of October 7th.
All 24 girls, leaders and guests ker that this dwelling that is
had fun. They enjoyed hikes, songs, games and ceremonies. The Troop would like to thank Mrs. Walter Ochs, Miss Kathy Hanover and Miss Conna Franks for their help.
being rented belongs to someone else and should be taken care of and not be neglected or carelessly destroyed. Here we could recite endless cases
of tenants who leave floors i actmttes.
West High School
West High students from this area took part in a variety of learning experiences this summer. Albert Baldivia attended! Boys' State and Inge Jeike, Girls' State. Upward Bound, a program held at Colorado-Woman's College for students^ interested in going to college, was attended by Albert Baldivia, Ralph Candelaria, Kazuo Fullwood, Dave Gallegos, Carl Gonzales, Trace 'Karps, Bernard Lopez, and Susan Pacheco. Upward Bound students participated in weekend tours and sports programs, while taking college preparatory courses such as speedreading and psychology.
Howard Tsuchiya attended Outward Bound, a mountaineering camp held near Marble, Colorado. Outward Bound activities included mountain climbing, a two-day survival hike and other survival type


October, 1966
THE RECORDER
Page Three
School : Youth Activity : Recreation
Baker Jr, High
On Thusday, November 3 Baker Junior High invites all fathers to bring their sons to an evening meeting, of fun and refreshments with the men of our faculty, and a specially planned program.
We feel fortunate in being able to schedule an unusual group known as the Teenage Program of the Dale Carnegie Alumni Association. It has about twenty members, all prisoners at the Colorado State Penitentiary at Canon City. They represent former crimi: nal careers ranging from armed robbery through kidnapping and murder.
The program, new to Colorado, has been well received by the churches and schools that have used it. Under the sponsorship of the prison chaplain, Reverend Edwin J. Riske, groups of our prisoners are allowed to leave (the prison and accompany him to appear as guest speakers at programs such as ours. Several of these men have been in and out of penal institutions for many years so they can speak from direct experience and straight form the shoulder. Their stated purpose is to instruct and give the hard facts as they see them now. We, of the Baker staff, feel that the program will be beneficial to all of us who hear. them.
The program will start at 7:30 -p. m. When completed, everyone will go to the cafeteria^ for, je|reshmeiits,.,- A,. '.'fly-. er" with full details will be sent home with each Baker boy a few days before Father-Son Night. Reserve the evening, of November 3.
MY SUMMER. AT PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY. By Judy Tate
This summer I took a trip to the Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire.
I won a scholarship for full tuition of $700:00. I came about this information from Mr. Esquibel, an English teacher at Baker Junior JJigh School who attended there during the summer of. last year.
About April 6, 1966 I received notice that I would be accepted this summer. I picked for my courses: English Composition, Math (Algebra) and Harmony (Music theory).
I went to school six days a week. Five of which I attended until 1:00 p. m.. and Saturday until 12:30. In the afternoon,- .after lunch, we had an hour and a half of physical fitness and sports. The extra curricular activities I took part in were the chorus and orchestra.
By eight o'clock every night except Saturday, we had to be in our dorms for study hours.
Sunday we went on trips. I went to Boston, Maine, and parts of New Hampshire. The scenery up there was beautiful. I spent seven and a half weeks there. The experience was very rewarding and I hope to go again in the summer of 67.
St. Elizabeth's
Sister M. Rose Held is the new principal at St. Elizabeth's School. Sister Rose has. taught in both grade and high schools for over twenty-five years.: For the past ten years, Sister has held the position of principal in grade schools in Denver and in Scottsbluff, Nebraska. In 1962 Sister Rose received her Master's Degree from St. Bonaventure's University in New York.
Auraria Community Center
One of the staff members of Auraria Community Center this fall is Virginia Wilson. She comes to us from the Peace Corps where she was serving in Honduras, CentraJ America. Before joining the Peace Corps she graduated from the University of Chicago where she studied Social work..
At Auraria she is going to be working with the Auraria
! Neighborhood Group, the "Gad The Elementay and Second- Abouts," a special education ary Education Act of 1965 is group from Greenlee school funding several beneficial pro- and a group of 3rd and 4th
grade girls from Elmwood School.
grams at St: Elizabeth's this year.
Under Title I, thirty fourth, fifth and sixth graders receive two hours instruction in remedial reading daily from Mrs. Catherine Wall. All books and instumental materials for this program, as well as the teacher's salary, are paid by Title I funds.
Title I also pays tutors for seventh and eighth grade students who can benefit from extra help in Math, English, and Reading. Each tutor coaches five students in one subject for two hours: weekly. Classes are held after school and on Saturday mornings.
Title II of the Elementay and Secondary Education Act provided funds for the purchase of 300 library books which are available in the school library for the use of all stu-dents.'
Under Title III of the same Act, tKe fifth graders at St. Elizabeth's are participating in a research project on attitudes among various cultural groups. The program includes a TV Ser-. ies on the contributions to the" American' way of 'life made by the various cultural groups ^4-Negro American, Asian-A-merican, Spanish-sumamed A-merican, and Indian American found among Denver's population. A "buddy" porgram provides opportunity for the1 children to meet boys girls from other cultural backgrounds. The St. Elizabeth children will visit the State-Historical Society Museum, and attend a Denver Symphony concert with partners from Blessed Sacrament and Sacred Heart schools.
Her home originally was in Chicago but now she hopes to live in Denver for a long time to come.
Fairmont
mention.
Greenlee is proud of these!
On November 3, some of Fairmont's students will attend a Symphony Concert at the City Auditorium. A recognition program on November 16 will specially honor about 100 students who participated in the summer reading program. Everyone is invited.
A P. T. A. Board Meeting at 9:00 a. m. on November 16;who guided their ef{ortg will be a planning session! for the Christmas festivities.
Next candy apple sale on November 18. Don't forget, this is one of the P.T.A/s main rrfoney raising projects.
Virginia Wilson and Alex Vigil, new Auraria staff
St. Joseph's
Greenlee
Pupils Receive A war is | The 8th Grade Civics club
§9 , /-x i Is planning several good neigh-
Five pupils from Greenlee ( activities for Thanksgiv-School received recognition1§|| and Christmas. The offi-for art work submitted to the Cers are: Luanne Hofschulte Governors Committee on Em-1 (p^g jQ Hemon (Vice Pres.), ployment for the Handicapped,1 pa( KelIy (Sea)i Mike Martin, which met October 3-8. Those
. ez (Treas.) and Rex Padilla so recognized were David Es-; (Sergean, ^ Arms)i pinoza, who received a fourth.
place award, Ruby Gonzales, >> v ~~-----
Gloria Reyes, Casey Reyes, j -
and Joseph Gonzales, each of { By Dave Hastings
whom I received honorable! -'A 0i T A 0 I
This year St. Joseph s Grade
School football team has had
bit of hard luck. Out of the
, , . j .i a on oi nara iuck. v^ui ox uiw
boys and girls and ot their j j .. ___
Ml H three games played the team
teacher, Mrs. Gloria Wood
St. Cajetan
New Kindergarten Class
, has lost three. But who knows? j Maybe the season will perk :up, for the team has won all of its scrimmage games against Our Lady of Lourdes, Christ Since the Kindergarten wait- the King, and Baker Junior ing list was long enough to High.
Theteam has strong-backer class, plans We been! field consisting j| ||gH| made to do this by placing I gg* Gib Duran; hal£back.
Our Physical Fitness Program by Frances ^Torres, Grade 8
It's either shape-up or ship out at St. Cajetan's during our physical education program. Each i day we all have to get down to work and especially when Mr. and Mrs* Petrochko come to teach us exercise's;' Everyone has a chance to be
two morning sections on multiple session. One session will be held from 8:30. tp 10:30, the other from 10:30 to 12:30.'!
Jerry Martinez; fullback, Jeff Lopez; wingback; Chris Garcia, The line includes: center, Dave Hastings; right guard, Gerald
As soon as a part time teach-, Trujillo; ri ht |§|||
er is located to take- the ex
Jerry
Johnson; right wing, Charlie
il the class will be ~ dek^.a; BM John
established.
Padilla;, left tackle, Larry San-tistevan; left end, Steve' Gallegos. A
RETARDED CHILDREN'S SCHOOL
Classes at First Mennonite Church. Last year there was a total of 24 full time students with Mrs. Sharon Milton and Robert Smith as full-time teachers plus several aides provided by Neighborhood Youth Corps. There has been an increase this year with 42 students and two more teachers. 100 applicants had to be turned away because of lack of space. Mrs. Brown is a new teacher responsible for the preschool students meeting in the church basement. Mrs. Walters, also new, is teaching a class of 8 in the church
of
a leader calling out posi-programs going on at Green-tionsv and exercises. There, is 1 this year, largely made a difference between the boys and girls exercises. The girls program is not quite so vigorous and muscle-building, but from finger exercises to jumping-jacks they all take pep and energy. To be physically and mentally fit our bodies need the right kind of exercise so this way we get both enjoyment and a more sound body.
Special Programs
LA
Among the special types of pep
By Patrice Cortinez We at St. Joseph's Grade
possible through the use
Federal funds, are: School have a. pep club con-
1. Team Teaching in grades sisting of sixth, seventh and one and two. Three teach- eighth grade girls.
ers work with two classes and The officers and cheerlead-concenirate on the teaching of ers are: President, Claudia reading. Wickersham; Vice-president,
2. Reading improvement and Gathy MM Secretary, maintenance. An extra teach- Margie Dick; Cheerleaders, er has been added to the Pe^ Leva to, Sharon Kemm. staff to work with pupils in Pcrtncia Kel1^ Debra Garci
grades four, five, and six in
Substitutes, Patricia Lovato and
Autumn
by Jimmy Trujillo, Grade 7
The leaves are falling very fast Now we know that summer's pas) Some leaves are green, some are brown
Leaves big and bright carpet the ground.
While red and brown leaves rapidly fall
Green and orange calmly stall Squirrels are busy gathering nuts While bears are liberating In their huts.
When the trees and leaves start _ __ : to dry
basement. Mrs." Milton and 5rds and ducks scatter the sky. Mr. Smith will be working These gifts dent come in cans ,.t, i_.__ i_ Tnis is God's enormous plan
with two separate groups in We(|j good.bye summer, hello th Youth Center basement. J Pali
These groups ages are from' We're waiting for you. Winter, the 12 to 16 years. coldest of all.
the area of reading., The mo- §usan Gonzales., bile unit placed on our grounds Usually on the day the boys is used for this purpose. have their games, the Pep 3. Guidance and counseling Club has a special meeting service. A full time counselor and a pep rally to prepare helps pupils with their per- for the game, sonal problems that might affect their school work. .Fall Festival
________________ By Mike Kamerzell
DID YOU KNOW THAT the' ^ Fal1 Festival begem
Denver Public Library at 1357 .^d^ morning, October 6,
, , * lat 11:30 and ended Sunday
Broadway has a Story Hour nigh, October 8. At 11:30 Oc
every Sunday at 3:30 p. m. It is held in the Children's Library October through April for all ages. Here is a different way for your family to spend a Sunday aftenoon. See you there.
tober 6 the grade school children attended the Festival willing to spend their money and anxious to have fun. The children were allowed to stay until L30 so that they wouldn't miss out on their studies.


r
Page Four
THE RECORDER
October, 1966
. . lift.
LINCOLN PARK RESIDENT COUNCIL
The Resident Council of Lincoln Park and South Lincoln Park Homes wishes4 to thank Mr. Earl Paul, principal of West High School, Mr. Jack Beardshear, principal of Baker Junior High School, and Mrs. one Heleman, guidance counselor at Greenlee, for their very nice speeches at our last meeting. They were very enlightening and interesting. The attendance was good although we wish more parents could
Out of School Out of Work?
The Metropolitan Youth Education Center at 14th and Kai-amath is the result of co-operation between two school boards, those of Denver and Jefferson Counties, in an effort to meet the problems of unemployed and underemployed young people in the metropolitan area.
This center, which plans to open bn November 1st, will: try to help young people between
have attended. We would dike the ages of 16 and 24 who live
BYERS RENOVATION UNDER WAY
Work began the week of facing with blacktop in staff September 26 on a capital im- parking lot; and installation of provement project at Byers flood lights. Replanting of Neighborhood Library, W. Sev- lawn will be done next spring.
enth Ave. and Santa Fe Drive. Completion of the- remodeling
Modernization work inside the library building will in-
of 1966
is expected before the end volve; refinishing of cdl wood
work; overhauling of windows;
The project for the Denver: repairing and painting of walls Public Library agency, as ap-1 in entire main floor area, hall-proved by the City Council | way, stairway to basement, and the Denver Library Com-1 staff room, and rest rooms; mission, includes both exterior replacement of. lighting fixtures; and interior renovation. Cost installation of floor tile in of the work will be $11,575 most areas of the building; and will .be covered entirely renovation of basement staff
to see you at our next meet-1 in Denver and Jefferson Coun- hy a C^Y capital improvement room, staff rest room, and pub-ing which will be held No- j ties who need to finish their' allocation. Low bidder on the lie rest room, including installa-vember 3, 1966 at 7:30 p. m. I high school education or tojPrj^ was Snow Construe-, tiqn of new fixtures; and real 1438 Navajo Street. Hope j improve on the high school ed-1 Ln Oo ! moval of plaster from three
ucation they already have in Outside improvements will walls of the meeting room, order to get jobs or to get bet- include: replacement of front followed by application of
ter jobs.
More specifically those who
to see you there!
The Resident Council of Lincoln Park and South Lincoln Park Homes sponsored a Bake
PICK THE PLENTIFULS. Sale on October 5. The moneyj can get help at the Center are: Make your food dollar go fur- from this sale will go towards 1. Youth who have dropped ther by choosing foods in good i the children's Christmas par-, out of school in the two coun-supply. They usually are ty. cheaper. On the U. S. De-| partment of Agriculture list of
sidewalk, building steps and | waterproof cement and paintlanding, and installation of new ing.
doors; replacement of all eaves Originally opened in June, and downspouts; repair of all 1918 as the fifth extension walls and painting of the en- o{ ^ Denver
tire exterior; alteration ol grad- ... _ . .
Library system, Byers has been
need of repair and im-
plentiful foods for October are METRO COLLEGE pork, broiler fryers, apples, j ENROLLMENT DOUBLED grapes, pears, rice and drv |
beans. In November look for: At the end of the first week
ties mentioned above.
2. Youth who have dropped ing to improve drainage in-I out of school elsewhere but are1 of replacement chain m
now living in Denver or Jeffer-,hnk fence: gradmg and sur' Pavement for some years, son Counties.
I 3. Recent high school grad-< Mexcian Polio Epidemic; West Side Calendar
uates in these counties who
lots of raisins and turkeys classes, enrollment at Met- .. , . MHH ,/r>. ,
they're the featured itemson ropolitcm State Collgee had, Si t truths I Denyentes
the November list-also more1 reached 2,434, F. D. Lillie, dean and can benefit from the rung vacahons m^ Mexico this
! of students has announced. [guidance, education and place-, fall or winter should
grapes, pears, pork and dry beans.
FIGURE IT FAITHFULLY. Stop before you scream about
make
EVERY WEEK
SundayStory Hour, Denver Public Library, 1357 Broadway,
Compared with the final to- j tal of 1,189 students last fall
4. Recent high school grad- j full protection of Sabin oral | Monday and Wednesday
, , .. , r. , uates living in these countiesj polio vaccine", advises Dr. j Basic Adult Education, 7 to 9
during the college s first quar- ||| made false starts in John Sbarbaro, director of Dis- p. m., Baker Junior High and
your food bill. Chances are ter jff operation, the enrollment cojjege ancj have dropped out ease Control for the Denver Greenlee School.
you ve
got a lot of other things |to date f 011 increase of 105 would be inferested
besides food in your shopping Percent.
cart. According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, one-fifth of the money spent at grocery stores goes for nonfood itemslike soap, paper goods, pet foods, clothing, cos-
cational and other education
metres, cigarettes, holic beverages.
and alco-
Of the total enrolled, 1,399 available at the Center, are attending college for the. 5. "Underemployed" youth
first time, 731 former MSC stu-with ability to move up to bet-dents, 277 new transfers and 27 ter jobs but needing guidance special students. The rate ofand more education to do sb. men-to-women is 3 to 1. Repre-j The Center will try to work mentation of students from the with each person on an indi-
Denver Metropolitan area continues very high, 91 percent.
VISTAS At Lincoln
Four VISTA volunteers have
recently taken up residence in Lincoln Park Homes. They are:
Senior Citizens
Twenty members of the
vidual basis to help him with
Department of Health and Hospitals. "It appears that there is an epidemic of paralytic polio in northern Mexico, and it has spread into Texas."
Dr. Sbarbaro pointed out that a complete polio immunization, requires three doses of vaccine, in drops or on sugar cubes, or two doses of the
his specific needs. Areas to triple strength vaccine. The
be covered are Counselling and Guidance, Referral, Job Placement and Education.
The Education Programs will !work in these areas: basic ed-
Dan Sullivan of Princeton, New Lincoln | Park Senior Citizens ucation, primarily English, read-Jersey, David Brouner of New Glub met for lunch, a short | ing, writing and speech,^ and
doses should be a month or six weeks apart, so vacationers will need to plan ahead to be sure they are fully protected before they go into a possibly infected area. Only smallpox vaccination is required for
York,/ # Paul Newman of Bos-1 business session, and an after- math; social and cultural de- Americans who travel to Mex-
ton, Mass., and Martin Kling noon Lingo for prizes on1 velopment; and vocational ,ed- ico, but Dr. Sbarbaro also
of Washington. These four Tuesday, September 20th. We | ucation. We,commends typhoid and teta-
young men will assist in 'their*?, gladKto'. he Mrs, Lynn rf you are M any Qf the-nus shotSv . IS
Juvenile Court under Judge1 Lrcraiey, Auraria Community five groups mentioned above I Residents of Denver who Rubin for a year. . Center coordinator, with care interested in this pro- Lave not had. the complete,
, again; Mrs. Bradley has been being offered at the series of Sabin oral polio vac-
jon the inactive list following1 Center, you may register at cine may get it from their own Wpctcifflp t rf Inn ,a .7, injl?rY received. 5590 West 20th Street until No- family doctors or from the Dis-
.fast July. 1 *.;Iveniber 1st. If critical mate: ->case Control Immunization
-On October 13, the Westside; Eleven Lincoln Park Seniors !ials arrive r- time the Crriter. Clinic at 760 Cherokee Street.
Action Council met in a special attended the picnic, September! will open on November 1st, j______________
session to consider a revised 26, at Washington Park, spon-lafter which one may go direct-i proposal for Neighborhood. sored by the Coordinated Ser- ly to 14th and Kalamath for LAEF BENEFIT
SPECIAL EVENTS
October 22-23 ^ St. Joseph'? Grade School Paper Drive.
October 25 St. Joseph's Midgets vs. St. Catherine's, 46th and Grove.
October 27 '$$0$ St Joseph's Lightweights vs. St. Catherine's, 4Bth and Grove.
November 3Baker Father and Son Night, 7:30 p. m.
November 3Lincoln Park Homes Resident Council, 7:30 p. m., 1438 Navajo.
November 8Election Day.
November 13St. Joseph's Grade School parent-teacher conferences.
November 16Greenlee P. T. A. meeting, 7:00 p. m.
: November 17Latin American Educational Foundation supper, Baker Jr, High, 6:30 p. m.',
Centers for the target areas
vices for the Aging,
_ _ ___ ___ ______ 1620 additional information or to reg-
- nvST, Opportunity. This Meade Street. They reported a. ister. a revised version of one j wonderful day with plenty of w inn had not been approved good food and entertainment, by the various target area
Councils. The WAC approved
The first October meeting of
the revised proposal which ^ H W will go back to the Denver jTuesdc^' October 4. Sixteen 'Opportunity Board for approv-;members were present and two and submission to 'Kansas City Office of Economic Opportunity.
New appointments by the "Westside Action Council to -^/ork with Denver Opportunity Ore Sister Martinelle, chairman of WAC Committee on Youth Interests, to work with the Youth Programs Section of D. O., and Rachel Guedea, member of WAC Education Committee to serve on the Dl O. Education Committee.
Next scheduled meeting of the Westside Action Council is October 27th, 7:30 p. m., at St. Elizabeth's School.
thei guests, Mrs. Chavez, and her small daughter. After the dessert luncheon, Mrs. Chavez gave a very interesting demonstration of cake icing and decorating. Two projects planned for October are a tour of the Governor's mansion, October 11, and a visit to Stapleton Airfield, October 24.
Several ladies of the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club contributed to and assisted with the very successful Lincoln Park Tenant Council Bake Sale and Bazaar held in the Community Hall, 1438 Navajo, October 5.
SPIDERS, STUFFED FLUES HAZARDOUS
Bracing fall weather brings its problems, including field mice and black widow spiders in the house and stopped-up chimney flues which can cause carbon monoxide poisoning when the furnace is turned on, warns Dr. J. Douglas Mc-Cluskie, director of the Environmental Health Service of the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals. A black widow spider bite is poisonous and should be seen by the doctor. Furnaces and flues should be checked and cleaned out if necessary in late summer or early fall, before the heat is turned on.
AT BAKER
The Denver Spanish Ministerial Alliance will co-sponsor with the Baker Junior High School's P. T. A. a supper at Baker, 6:30 p. m., November 17 for the benefit of the Latin-Americgn Educational Foundation which has helped more than four hundred students with scholarships since its foundation.
Mrs. Sally Trujillo, Baker's PvT.A. president has been named general chairman; Rev. Thomas Sepulveda was named program chairman and Mrs. Thomas Sepulveda was named publicity chairman.
Baker's Glee Club and Band will participate in the program. Parents and all interested persons are urged to buy their tickets in plenty of time.
DIAL RD
Ronald A. Miller, Executive Director of the^ Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association of Denver and Tri-County today announced that the association will conduct a Dial R D (Respiratory Disease) Program beginning October 23, 1966, and continuing for two months. Anyone interested in learning more on the increasing seriousness of Respiratory Diseases may dial 3994)101 and a short message bn these health subjects will be broadcast.
Cdurch News
First Avenue Presbyterian
The Trustees of the First Avenue Presbyterian Church have accepted the resignation of the Church custodian Mr. John Sidrid. The Trustees have engaged Mr. John Conway of 107 Acoma St. as the new custodian.