Citation
West side recorder, November, 1966

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, November, 1966
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Voulme 3, Number 7
Published Monthly
November' 1966
Improvement Assn. Board Lauds New Construction
Relocation of Skid Row Inhabitants Being Carefully Planned
In preparing a comprehensive redevelopment program for the Skyline area, the--Denver Urban Renewal? Authority has completed two relocation plan§one for businesses and one for families and- individuals. A major objective these relocation plane is: to remove the major blighting influence of Skid Rbw without causing it to re-appear' dt: Other locations' in the city.
The relocation program for families and individuals is designed. to ftiid them decent, safe and, sanitary housing' that they, can- afford, and that is reasonably close to where they wish to live. There are 95 families and approximately 1800 unrelated individuals to be moved from Skyline. The Authority does not anticipate any serious problems in the relocation of the 95' families.
However, the problem of relocation with the estimated l80Q unrelated individuals is of cansiderc&le concern to the Authority, 'there: are two main group of individuals living prior near Stid Row as follows:
Hi 1. : il
1. "The Chronic Alcoholic". 11 There are usually; around' 500 { off these men on Skid Row. Most of them have chronic illnesses in addition to their | alcoholism. The Denver Urban Renewal Authority proposes of/to-establish/with the assistance of existing agencies, a Diagnostic' and Referral Center where- these men can be treated for their-- physical, mental, and alcoholic problems. This Center would be established very early in the Skyline program.
The Authority will encourage the? establishment of small dormitory-type housing; for these men. This housing would probably be located very close to the existing Skid Row area.
IS
The new Black and Decker building at West 7th Avenue and Kalamath Street \
James Martinez Chosen' Boys' Chib Boy of the Year
James Martinez was chosen Boy of the Tear by the Bby&' Clubs of Denver at their annual banquet held on November 15 at the Brown Palace Hotel. One hundred boys from the three branches of the Boys' Club attended?
James- ]'cv student'/at' West High School,- lives with his mother Shirley Martinez at 1256 West 10th Avenue. He has six brothers and sisters. He has been active with the Bbys' Club since 1961. Last Summer he volunteered to serve as a junior counselor at camp. Hb was sbnt to the Colorado Outward Bounds project and did impressively well. William Cope, Director of the Boys' Clubs of Denver, reports that James has been mdst helpful with younger Boys iii the club. He has been active in the games room program and iiiN the Keystone Club arid haS prcwen to be a good craffeman' in the shop program. He has boffi honored also by the DENVER POST and by Colorado Chiropractors fbr his outstanding contribution to youngsters in the neighborhood.
2. Elderly Individuals. There are approximately 300 elderly pensioners living in this area. Most of' these men are over 62 yedrs- old and are not "chronic alcoholics." The, Authority is recommending that two cr three elderly housing facilities be established, as near as possible, to the downtown area. TliiS' could be* either an existing,. Hotel1 or building or a} le-^ IL iXrdhld' hqvb tHe:; special services that eldbrly people require.
This., is a very brief summary of the family and individual relocation program. Other public and-private agencies will' be working with DURA to make this program a success* For additional information; please call the. Denver Urban Renewal Authority office at 629-7114.
HISTORICAL SOCIETY TO HOLD FINAL ANNUAL. MEETING
The West Denver Auraria Historical Society will disband. Members voted the disbandment action at their last meeting. in October, a move which
The disbandment move came after a long period of dwindling membership and support. According to August Newlander, president of-the Society, mem-
signals the end of the thir-1 bersHip was composed of a teen-year-old organization ded- majority of older residents, and icated to preserving the his-1 the combined problems-of lack tofy of West Denver and Au- of transportation and night Members will convene meetings limited attendance.
The Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Association recently voted to send letters to businesses and others occupying new buildings in the area, congratulating them for their part in making this a betted neighborhood. Letters are to be sent also to those doing major renovation.
Mr. Leslie j. Kalanquin, president of the Association, has sent letters of appreciation to Bausch and Lomb for their new building at 1277 Santa Fe Drive; Westinghouse, 516-520 Acoma; Saris Apartments, 410 Delaware; Scotfi's Drive-In, 959. W. 6th Avenue; Home Heating, 665 Kalamath; Livran Electric, 700 Kalamath Street; and Black and Decker, 675 Kalamath- Street. Letters also were sent to the Church of God, W. 5th Avenue and Fox, and the Wesley Methodist Church, 465 Galapago,, congratulating them for the fine job of renovation they, have done.
CHRONIC RD
(Respiratory Disease)
Isa Crippler
November 21 and 22 is the Turkey Contest at the Boys' Club. The turkey was furnished by Quality Poultry Co., 3758 Osage.
Monthly awards go to Boy of the Month, Ricky Rios; Boy for Football, Larry Gonzale^r Boy for Shop, George Garda.
EftipHysema, a chronic RD, is second among chfonic diseases far wblelr, year after year, workers are granted disability benefits. (Only heart disease exceeds it.) Tuberculosis, bronchitis and other chronic RDs add to the toll of respiratory cripples, In 1963 the Social Security Administration allowed disability Claims for: Emphysema, 14,897. Tuberculosis, 8,588. Bronchitis; 1,197.
Your Christmas Seat contribution .helps in thMight against chronic Bb. *
raria.
for the last time at their annual luncheon and Christmas party December 17.
The£ Society, organized' Feb* r.)Ac£Py 4, 1953; and^iriCorpbrated MOiy 18) 1954/ sought To per-, petuqte'' the history Of -Aurdriai arid* West Denver by preserving data; artifacts, and articles of the! area and by emphasizing West Denver's arid Auraria's; patriotic, religious; ediiCatiorial; cultural; and' so-ciaT heritage*
Auraria was an early settlement on the west side of Cherry Creek with boundaries at Chetry Creek, the. South, Platte, and the. area which is now West Sixth,: Avenue. In April, 1859, Denver and Auraria were consolidated into one municipality through action of the Legislative Assembly of Jefferson Territory. In 1862, Auraria; Denver, and Highlands (in North Denver) were incorporated as the City of Denver. The First Territorial Assembly of Colorado voted the* act.
( With, the disbandment. move, members; of -the Society were given' the privilege of; reclaim^ ing> qmy articles and historical data, contributed earlier to the Society. Other articles and artifacts, including the Society's scrapbook, were donated to the Western Division: of the Den-yef Public Library. The- scr-ap^ book is recognized as one of 1 the most comprehensive- of collections of- Colorardo's- early day. history.
Total membership this year was ninety-seven, and the group met monthly in the basement of the Byers. Library.
^yThe historical Society's rosT ter reads, life^a, "Whp's Whp" of the West Many, lopg-
time- area residents wei'e members arid several. Had/ served as officers- fpr the Society. Current Qfficersr are August Newr lander, 1.401 Fox, president; David- Clow* 278 So. Jasmine, vice-president; Mrs. Sarah Mundhenk, 1225 So. Federal Blvd., secretary; Mrs. Ann Mar-ica, Morrisqn, treasurer, and Mrs. Rose Ddwson, 235 Delaware, corresponding secretary.
Honorary members of the Society included former U.S. President arid Mrs. Dwight D. Eisefihower, and orchestra leader; Paul Whiteman. Formei Society presidents include Mrs. Velma Houghton, Mrs. Sarah Mundhenk, Mrs.Catherine New-, lander, Miss Winifred Wort-! man, Mrs. Katherine K. Wheeler, Frederick Babcock, and Mrs. Mamie Bennett.
The group's annual Luncheon .arid Christinas Party on December 17 vpU, be- held at. the Oxford Hotel, 1612 17th St, |at 12130 p.m. At this last mooting,, there will .be g: fifty-cent Chistmris gift! exchange. Guestsi are welcome- to. attend The luncheon which must be made by iDecember 10,: should1 be mailed ltd August Newlander, presir dent, 615 W. 14th Avenue.
Great Year In Football For West High Cowboys
On Friday, Nov. 11; the West High Cowboys firiished? .the football- year with; an 18-13 win o-vef South, ending the season with a record of 5 wins and 3 losses. This is the Cowboys' best season's record since 1940:
Several, boys are rated, high in. individual, statistics. Mark Hulse finished- second, or third in the league in' total offense (rushing and passing). Mike Leyba is- second in passes received. Wiljon JBrown, a halfback, finished third in the league in total scoring. It is anticipated; that nine lettermen will be back on next year's team;
SPECIAL TOUR OF WAX MUSEUM PLANNED FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
Metropolitan-area senior citizens are invited to visit Denver's Wax Museum November 26' in q tour sponsored by Co-ordinated1 Services for the Aging Project Community Center.
A special rate of 80 cents per person is being offered for the tour. The museum features
wax statues of famous national and Colorado figures in their historic settings.
Reservations, due by November 23, can be made by calling the project's Communty Center at 825-2190, extension 274. Transportation vhU leave" the Center, 1620 Meade Street, at 2 r30 p. m.
WEST SIDE Calendar
EVERY WEEK
SundaySjory, Hour, Denver Public Library, 1357 Broadway, 3:96 p, ni.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Nov. 18Auraria Community Cpriter Family- Night, 7:00-p.m.
Nov. Senior Qtizen trip
tp the. Wax Museum, transportation leaving ; 1620 Meade ; Street at 2:30 p. m.
Dec. 1 Lincoln Park Resident Council, 1438 Navajo, 10 a. m. to 2:30 p. m.
Dec. 8Baker P-TA Christmas Pot-luck, 1 p. m.
Dec. 14-Greenlee Board of Managers Christmas Luncheon, 12 noon.
Dec. 15St. Joseph's Grade School P-TA, 7:30 p. m.
Dec. .17Final annual luncheon of West Denver Auraria Historical Society, 12:30 p.m. at Oxford Hotel. Reservations required.


November, 1986
Page Two
THE RECORDER
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Sid% Improvement Association *
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Edikn*: Rachel Guedea
S| M Citizen
gelista! and fanmyV formerly of
3453 West Kentucky Avenue, j M^yi/c
have moved to 1251 Lipan
Afreet. Welcome to our new \ The purple asters and -eM-West Sifters. tumn foliage that decorated the
tables for the October 18 lunch-jeon of the Lincoln Park Senior Robert W. Spottswood Sr.; Citizens Club were from the of 1038 West 13th had quite flowerbeds of Mrs. Sue Won-an experience last month. His who, with Mrs. Anna son Robert W. Jr., and his O'Neill, acted as hostesses
&aff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings,
I' granddaughter, Jennifer, aged Twenty members were present Wmterhalder. 4_ || he went tato || moun-!and ^0 guests: Mrs, Amanda Mary navez. | near Parker to get fire- J Harvey of Wakeeney, Kansas,
place wood. They were driv- Mrs. Wonner's house guest for
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Gregory of 1328 West Colfax will have their sons Gary and Mike Gregory home for the holidays.
ing a jeep and planned to return home for supper. However they got stuck in a snow bank and were there for several hours. Their wives became concerned and got in
two weeks, and Mrs. Ruth La Moth.
5J? '. / S3
Thb business session after the luncheon was given over to the election of officers for
Gary and Mike will be com- i toAucJ? with the Rescue Squad |the coming year. Elected pres-
ing from Grand Junction,. Col orado.
at Parker. Soon the Spotts-woods were found and returned to Parker. Mr. Spottswood said although they Ben Gutierrez was recently weren't lost it was wonder-
home on leave from duty in ful for those folks in Parker
Viet Nam. While home, he( to come to their aid. He wants visited with his parents, to thank them, and assure
aunts, uncles, and other rela- them that he and his son are
fives. j indeed grateful for their un-
{.selfish act.
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Tafoya
of 1405 Lipan Street celebrat-1 SURPRISE BIRTHDAY PARTY ed their 25th wedding anni- Qn Saturday afternoon, Oc-versary on October 8. A re- | tober ^ a surprise birthday
| .party was given at 924 West iOth Avenue Apartments in honor of Mrs. Frances Nelson and Mrs. Bessie Grove who both have the same birthday.
ception and dance were held] in their honor and attended by members of the family and-friends. About 150. people attended and showered the couple with many lovely gifts. Mr. and Mrs. Tafoya had also planned a trip to celebrate their anniversary and left recently. They are on their way. to. .Mexico.
Mrs. Nelson celebrated her 92nd birthday and Mrs. Grove her 87th.
, Friends gathered in the recreation room for light refreshments and to shower them with beautiful cards to help Mrs. Louise Reilly of 255 celebrate their birthdays.
Cherokee is recuperating at Among those attending were home after eye surgery. Mrs. Lois Dykes, Dolly R6u-
i ton,,,. Irene Downs, Ida Baer,
! Pearl Thomas, Nettie Moss,
Sandi and Donna Winterhal- Mae Cortez, Mr. Hugh Duke, der, 226 W. 3rd Ave., attended Mrs. Eddie Mae Petttt was visited Stapleton Airport the a Senior High Presbyterian hostess and Mrs. Pearl Durettl afternoon of October 25. We
ident was Mrs. Grace Mu grove, 1348 Osage, vice-president, Mrs. Martha Olsen, 1406 Navajo St., secretary, Mrs.Faye Brott, 1426 Osage St., treasurer, Mrs. Lucia Gorman, 1427 Mariposa Street; Mrs. Anna Mims, 1423 Osage St., was appointed chairman of the Sunshine Committee, and Mrs. Elsie Lilienthal was asked to continue as decorations chairman.
Following the elections, Mrs. LaMoth showed colored slides taken on her repent vacation trip to Vancouver. The slides were beautiful, and her comments clear and interesting. Included were some fine views of Colorado, the Tetons, Yellowstone, and Glacier National Park.
Mrs. Grace Musgrove, president of the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club, is home again after a month spent in the east, visiting -her- son in Washington, D.C., and her sister in Coulmbus, Ohio.
>.
Twelve Lincoln Park Seniors
Conference held, at Estes Park i co-hostess, on October 28/ 1966.
Mr. and Mrs. Marshall White, LINCOLN PARK Marsha and Mike of 230 Cher-' nccinckjT rm I Kin I okee enjoyed a trip to Carls-; Kt*,UCm ^WINV-,L bad Caverns and El Paso, Tex-; The Resident Council of Linas during Teachers Conven- coin and South Lincoln Park tion. In El Paso they were Homes wishes to thank Mrs. guests of Mrs. White's sister, Mossman from the League of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Speik and Women Voters for answering
questions and also explaining the amendments for the Noy. 8 election. :
family.
Miss Janic§ Provost of 229 W. 3rd Ave., Mrs. Roy Winter-halder, Linda and Debra, of 226 W. 3rd Ave.# attended the First Avenue Presbyterian Retreat held at Evergreen, Colorado, on Oct 28, 29, 1966.
Our sincere sympathy is extended to Mrs. Flora Fenton, 358 Delaware Street, in her sorrow with the death of her husband# Mr. Arthur Fenton on October 10.
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Schon-borg of 1248 Lipan Street have returned home from Grand Canyon, Arizona. Mrs. Schon-borg's sister Grace Byrnes returned home with them. More recently they all spent a day in Fort Coilins visiting.
Mr. M. M. Churchill of 1209 Lipan Street was operarted on at Rocky Mountain Hospital on November 4th. Mr. Churchill is feeling better and expects to return Rome soon.
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes is going to have a Bake Sale on Dec. 7, 1966. We would like everyone to come. The place will be at 1438 Navajo and the time will be from 10 a. m. to 2:30 p. m. The money for this bake sale will go towards the children's Christmas party.
ATTENTION: The Resident Council of Lincoln Park arid South Lincoln Park Homes will have their election of new officers at the next meeting which will be on Dec. 1, 1966. The meeting will be held at 1438 Navajo at 7:30 p. m. We hope to see you there.
were all impressed by the greatly, expanded, up-to-date facilities, and enjoyed seeing planes loading, unloading, arid taking off. A pre-arranged stop for rest and coffee in the Western Airlines lounge was also very much enjoyed.
On Tuesday, November 1, twenty-three Lincoln Park Senior Citizens met for lunch. The tables were decorated with small carts and wicker baskets of plastic fruit in fall col-! ors. At the business meeting which followed, plans were .made for the Thanksgiving pptluck dinner to be held at noon, Tuesday, November 15. A trip to the Botanical Gardens November 8 was arranged, and plans for a sight seeing trip to Villa Italia were discussed.
The last hour of the meeting was in charge of our guest Mrs. Maizie Maihack, 1341 Navajo St, who exhibited some beautiful and inexpensive Christmas decorations and explained their construction.
We all deeply regretted the death,. October 25, of Mrs. Helen A. Ewing, 1351 Mariposa St She had recently moved into the Lincoln Park Homes, and joined the Senior Citizens Club only a few days before her fatal illness. Though we knew her so briefly, she was so cheerful and friendly we all felt her. death-was a I real loss to our club.
Boy Scout News
TROOP 200 NEWS PACK 200 NEWS RSsj
On Oct. 11th Troop 200 went on a flashlight hike at Cherry Creek Dam. The leaders, Mr. Morris and Mr. Maestas, drove tiie boys to the dam and then the boys hiked around the west side of the lake.
Oct 25th Troop 200 had their court of honor. Awards were given to Raul Ronce, instructor Badge, Public Health and Citizenship in the Home Merit Badge; Pete and Benny Maj, 1st Class; David Madril, 2nd Class and Assistant Senior Patrol Leader; Pete Maj, Patrol Leader and 2nd Class; Benny Maj, Assistant Patrol Leader and 2nd Class and Teddy Perales, 3 year pin. After" the court of honor the scouts had a pinewood derby race in which James Cothran won the pinewood derby ribbon for the Utes patrol and a trophy for himself. Raul Ronce won a trophy for the best designed car.
Oct 27th Troop 200 had their annual excursion. They started at 8 a. m. at Denver Tent and Awning; then they followed up with Ainsworth where precision scales are made, Denver Pipe and Brick, Duffy's Drinks, Goodwill warehouse, Robinson Dairy, Blue Hill and finally. Wonder Bread.
Nov. 8th Troop 200 went; to the airport to see the big jet planes. They got to go through a jet liner 727 and were shown the parts of the. plane and the new safety devices : to make flying safer.
Nov. 28th wiir be the next big Scout roller skating party at 1900 S. Broadway, cost 70c. We want to thank the Girl Scout Troop 726 and Boy Scout Troop 528 for coming to our last big party. Hope to see you all there.
St. Joseph's High
Red Cross members are collecting used, toys for the annual Santa Claus Shop. Anyone in the area could help make some needy children happy this Christmas by contributing toys to this city-wide drive. John Atencio, Red Cross president, is in charge at St. Joe's.
Bill Adamson and Vic Ortega, two St Joseph High seniors, were among forty speech students chosen to. participate in a three-day discussion symposium at Camp La Foret near .Colorado Springs on October 27-29. The topic of the meet, sponsored by the forensics directors at Colorado University, was "Civil Disobedience."
Mock elections, sponsored by the student council on November 8th, were preceded by a mock political rally in which candidates (both Republican and Democrat) were presented to tire student body through speeches prepared by, q group of seniors. Mr, James O'Hare, socictl studies teacher, gave the opening address at the assembly.
Parent Teacher conferences were held Nov. 9 and 10, when high school report cards were distributed. The stereo which is being raffled entertained the many parents, and refreshments were served by
members of the P.T.A.
Oct. 26 was .Ifee scene of In October, Pack 200 had ar Halloween party for the cubs. Mr. and Mrs. Bruffet, Mrs. Morris, Mrs. Gruby,. Mrs. Long,. Mr. Martinez and Mr. and. Mrs. Mena helped to have games, prizes, dpffy apples, cookies, cake and punch;. Apples were tied on springs, a scavenger hunt, spin the milk, bottle,. toss, the ball in the bucket, blow the candle out and flit the balloon over the net were played. Even if the weather was cold all had a good time. Brian Morris, Ronnie Rains and Douglas Martinez won scout slides for the> best costumes.
Auraria
Community Center
Club groups have: started. with gusto at Auraria Community Cfenter. Since many families came in to register* youngsters, all our school-aged club groups are active with. enthusiastic young people. A new group qt the Center this year is*"cf Couples^'Club. Several husbands and wives are enjoying an evening at the Center participating in activities they plan themselves. Mr., and Mrs. Medina of 1257 Lipan are the present chairman and secretary treasurer respectively of the goup. If others would like to join the group, they may contact the Medinas or Mr. Art DeMauro at Auraria Community Center.
* *
Halloween was the theme for the. first successful, family night at Auraria Community Center. On Friday, November 18, our second family night features a "Hootenanny," with folk singing, games, and refreshments.. We will begin the evening's-'festivities.) at about* 7:00 p.m.i This should be a fun night-'for the entire family, so pack up-the kids and come alongl
*.
We've all been, watching with interest the growth of the new Community Center building on the opposite comer from Auraria's present building.. Those of you who are presently active at the Center will appreciate how helpful the increasing amount of space will be. Some* who are new in the community or who have never been active-at ..the Center may want to take the opportunity of the o-pening of the new building to become acquainted with our activities. With some of our 'new" rooms, like a large wood-shop and a separate crafts and art room, we are looking for new ideas and resources to provide activities for the neighborhood. If you have ideas, we hope you will share them with the staff at the Center.


November, i 966
THE RECORDER
Pare Three
St. Elizabeth's
My Favorite Room There are many rooms in our house, but my favorite room is the kitchen. I like it because I can steal food at night. The-/kitchen has two glass dobrs through which you can see the dining room. When it is night, the doors are shut. I open the door and go by the big white stove and the inviting ice box which is near the sink. When I o-pen the cupboard, I usually wake up the dog. She wakes up my brother. I run though the room and hide and they never find out who it was. by Mary Guerue, 5th grade *
' My favorite room isn't very big, but it's big enough to play in. I like it because it has nice, soft beds to jump on. My bed, which is soft, is right iii front of you as soon as you step in the doorway. In the left comer is a small table which holds my mother's clothes and books. My room has a soft rug. When you walk barefoot on it, it feels like a thick foam. When you look in the right side of the room you see a big dresser which holds my mother's cosmetics. You'd' better watch out for the clothes on the door, or they'll cover you like a blanket. Oh! I forgot to tell you what my favorite room is it's my bedroom.
by David Alire, 5th grade ; ...
My favorite room is the living room. It has a comfortable couch and a loud record player which my brother is always playing. The heater makes .the, room more, cozy, and the. television always has an interesting movie. The drapes which separate the living room from1 our' bedroom are colorful. I like my bedroom because it is nice and cozy. When I gb to sleep at night I feel at home.
by Sandra Santillanez, 5th grade
clouds in/winterl Snow is white and it melts. ,It freezes the leaves oh the tree so they fall. That's why the tree is brown and when the leaves fall this season is called fail. The trees are getting ready
for snow. ,
by Joe MaestaS, 5th grade * * '
Snow is cold and is like chopped ice. It is- white arid very, very light. There are small and big snow flakes. They make trees and grass die. Before you see snow, you will see the leaves falling and
seeds from flowers will be getting dry.
by Alvin Sena, 5th grade * * *
Snow is a white, lovely, cold and frosty blanket that covers the earth. Its frosty coolness makes you feel very good about everything. You can
make little snowballs which are very fun to play with.
Snow is a sign of winter which mectns fun. If you ever see ^now, I'm sure you will feel this way.
by Sophie Gallegos, 5th grade
On Wednesday, November 2nd, 30 seventh and eighth gradlers from St. Elizabeth's School enjoyed the Denver Symphony Youth Concert at the City Auditorium. The following day, November 3rd, the entire fifth grade attended the same concert with ''buddies" from Sacred Heart and Blessed
SI. Cajetanfs
The Wind
By Sinforosa Gonzales 8th grade Blow wind blow With pockets full Now strengthnow gentleness Winter winds blow Like the growl of a bear. Summer winds Are like a lady With a bouquet of flowers in her hair.
v
The True Meaning of Freedom
By Frances Torres, 8th grade ... Are we really,. grateful for what, we hgyef,ds /Americans? Do We really treasure our freedom and make good use of it? Unless you can answer yes to these questions, don't pay attention, but if you have to say no you had better think about them. What would it be like if your freedom would suddenly be taken away from you? Most of us wouldn't dare to even think about it. We'd probably be too frightened to do or say anything. We're too used to having these things given to us. We didn't have to fight for our independence during the American Revolution. We should try to make good use of our freedom and love, treasure, secure and understand the true
meaning of it
* *
Thanksgiving
By Elizabeth Blea, 8th grade Once long ago the pilgrims walked this land.
West High
. Fall. term brings many activities to the students attending West High.'r'Among them was a banquet given by the German Club, on Wednesday, October 26, at the Alpine Village Inn. Thirty-nine students, parents and faculty attended. Miss Liselotte Kaufmann, sponsor, reported that it was the fall membership drive banquet. German food was served and everyone enjoyed themselves.
South High School was the setting for this year's City-Wide Orchestra Concert, Sunday, November 13. Representing^ West for. this affair were junior Gregory Dyes 'on the clarinet and sophomore Steve Gumbay, with the string bass. Guest conductor was Abraham Chavez, of the University of Colorado, and Mr. Eugene Hilloguse, guest clarinet soloist also from the University of- Colorado. Admission was free and the event was open to the public.
Eighty-six juniors and one senior were inducted into Spur Wednesday, November 16, in the social room ninth hour. Refreshments were served and the inductees were given carnations to wear. Spur is
"The Ravens," a band from 1^,orth High, played for the affair, which was the first dance sponsored by the Latin American Student Club- since its founding.
PTA College Night
PTA College Night was held Wednesday, November .2, in the West High Auditorium. Among the topics discussed were four year colleges^ technical training, private schools, apprenticeable trades, junior colleges, and Opportunity School.
St. Joseph's Elementary
Sacrament Schools. This trip i But they couldn't have sur-was a part of the. Elementary I vived this life and Secondary Education Act I Without God's helping hand. Title HI program. We thank the Lord for., our
Elizabeth^ Open House was held on Sunday,November 6th, from 2:00 to 4:00 p. m. Parents were invited to view children's work displayed in the Classrooms and a short program was presented by all of the classes.
On Thursday, November 10th, the children were treated to a Young Audiences program featuring a woodwind group. Whcrt Is Snow? {The primary and upper grades
Snow is like little ice crys-| were given separate performances so that all could learn
Thanks to all the friends of St. Joseph's, the Rummage Sale held November 5 was a huge success. Plans are going ahead to hold another sale early in January.
Christmas cards wlil be on sale on the second Sunday of December at all Masses.- Orders may be phoned in before this by calling 428-6776, and the cards will be delivered to your door.
Grade school P.T.A. will hold an academic club to which |a meeting at 7:30 p. m. in the
tals. It falls in winter in te north: It is really ice
crumbs that fall from the own level.
. a.gifts,.from- .above*-..
He did this because He had great love.
Veteran's Day By Kenneth Kishiyama,
8th grade
Veteran's Day is a day of tribute to the men and women who died to preserve the idea of democracy in the world. The cause they died for was not unknown to them, but it was hated by the enemy. War may be rather unfamiliar hap-
juniors and seniors who have held. a "B" average (3.0) or better. for two consecutive semesters are eligible.
Spur serves two unique purposes, the first being to encourage West High School sophomores, juniors, and seniors to work towards high academic grades; and the second, (yarding; the Veil deserved recognition to those students who have successfully attained high grades. .
Senior officers are Bob Simpson, president; Rick Leifing-well, vice-president, Claudia Frick, secretary; and Rocky Kemp, treasurer.
a the music on N BBH B countl7- bu!
Greenlee
On Wednesday, November! 2, in observance of Children's Book Week, an assembly was held at Greenlee School' in order to award, summer reading certificates to the children. Room 201 and their teacher, Mr. Michael Connors did a choral reading about Halloween. Yen Yen l Yin told a story "Caps for Sale" and Mrs. Davis led the group in many songs about books, some of which were written by sixth grade students in Room 102. Mrs. Ritzma, librarian at By-, ers Branch Library, spoke to. t1-'-? students about the rules, of thf* library and the many books that are available there. Seventy-three certificates were a-warded to Greenlee School boys and girls. The program was under the direction of Miss Anderson, school librarian.

Miss Sharon Knappe and her class, Room 115, took a trip to fie zoo recently. Mrs. Ryan
and Room 101 and Mr. Morris and Room 102 had an interesting visit at Stapleton Airfield several weeks' ago, since they are studying about the jet age. Mrs. Alexander and Mrs. McNasser took Rooms 112 and 113 to City Park Zoo. All of these field trips are taken in conjunction with a social studies topic which the classes are studying. .Many more, trips are planned for this month such as the Denver Art Museum, the Dumb Friends League, and the Planetarium.
Mrs. Florence, Joe has been employed ext Greenlee as a teacher aide. We find her help invaluable since her many duties include such things as checking papers, preparing bulletin boards, filing, typing,
those who have experienced it remember places like Pork Chop Hill in Korea, Bataan, Guantanamo Bay, Guam and some European countries. Today the war in Viet Nam will be marked by memories of the dead., and. the ideals for which they7 have died.
The purpose of Veteran's Day is to remember the gallant service of generous men and women. These people will never be forgotten as long as America fulfills her promise of life, liberiy, and the pursuit of happiness to all.
Veteran's Day By Charles Santillanez,
8th grade
Vetetan^s Day is the day we give, God our thanks For meii who fought 'in world wars, both foreign and of U. S. ranks.
Men who fought for freedom, liberty and thefr rights Some men are still living and some died in their fight.
On November 22, a group of 39 sophomore students at West will spend the day at Colorado University as part of the College Visitation program that was started three years ago at West. At C. U., the students will have the opportunity not only to visit classrooms, but also to talk with professors about their fields of interest. A chartered bus will transport them to and from the college; they will have lunch on the campus. Going along with this group will be Mrs. Broughton, college counselor at West, and Mr. Allison, counselor.
Mr. Paul, principal, and Mrs. Hearn, college counselor at West, have also scheduled college visitation trips for juniors and seniors later in the year. Any students planning to go on to college, or those
Church hall on Thursday, December 15, and their annual Christmas Party for students on Thursday, December 22.
Miss Agnes John, Visiting School Nurse, has completed the T.B. tests and vision screening for grade school students and is beginning hearing, tests and smallppx vaccinations wfrhi£t; Life; '.next few weeks. Mis£*ohn served with General MdcArthur in the Pacific during the last war, and has nursed ed^o in Minnesota, A-laska an^ as a missionary nurse in Central America. The West Side ; is very fortunate to have such an energetic and dedicated visiting nurse whose busy schedule includes visits to seven other parochial chools:
Baker Jr,
A Bake Sale, sponsored by the P.T. A. was held at Baker on Nov. 8. The P.T.A. wishes to express thanks to Vollmer's Bakery in donating a cake, helping to make the sale a success.
The Baker Junior High P.TJV. reports a big success on the Book Fair, held Nov. 7-10, in which paperback books were sold. Because it was such a success, the P.T.A. is planning to have another one in the near future/
"Respect for the Law' will be the theme of a program just thinking about possibly I which will be presented for going, are eligible to take part | the students at Baker on Nov.
helping to supervise pupils Thev might have fought at during assembly periods and different places, wars and
accompanying classes on field trips. We are very glad to have her_ as a part of our Greenlee family.
different times
But they all valued freedom so much, they were ready to give up their lives.
in this program and may get mofe information through their counselors.
Halloween was the occasion for gay festivities October 26, in the West High bovs' gym from 8 o'clock to 11:30.
"The Vampire's Night Out" was sponsored by the Latin American Student Club and was attended by over 300 students.
23. Sgt. Moore, of the Denver Police Department, will be in charge of a demonstration of police equipment. An added surprise is promised by Sgt Moore which should delight all students.
A Christmas Pot-Luck will be held at Baker on Dec. 8, at 1 p. m. Everyone is welcome. There will also be a gift exchange.


7
plage Four
THE RECORDER
November, 1966
^Itcbpintj 'Tips. .
BYERS THANKSGIVING BOOK REVIEWS
W. 7th Ave. & Santa Fe Drive tie down to work for, obey Hours: and if possible, cherish him
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fit 2-5:30 for the rest of his or her life, p.m. Sat. 10 a.m-12 noon and Though Mercy agreed with
1-5:30 p.m. days.
Closed W edn es-'
PICK THE PLENTIFULS. This month you'll find lots of turkeys and" raisins at your grocery storeplus big supplies of grapes,, pears, pork arid dry beans. In December, the U.S.. Department of Agriculture has broiler-fryers, canned salmon, grapes, raisins, pork, arid pears on its Plentiful Foods List.
THAT. THANKSGIVING TURKEY. Turkey's ,not only timely, v-.jlt's an excellent buy this month. If you can use it, buy a large turkeyone 16 pounds or more. You'll find it will cost less per pound, and there's more meat in proportion to bone. But, U. S, Department of Agriculture food economists warn, don't buy big unless your family will eat it allnow or later. No food is a bargain if it ends up in the garbage can.
TO OWN OR RENT. Thinking of buying a new home? You've probably thought of ail the reasons why you should. But have you considered the disadvantages, the things that might make homeowning NOT ior you? The U. S. Department cA Agriculture lists the pros and cons in CONSUMERS ALL, its 1965 yearbook. Among the, drawbacks you should consider are these. (1) Owning a home requires time and money for upkeep. (2) Property values may go down. (3) The family that owns becomes less mobile than .the one who rents. On the other hand, if you rent, you don't have to woriy about what might come next doorundesirable neighbors, d filling station. You can always move.
Your living requirements cchangefirst you have small children, then teenagers, then :none at all at home. TRb same house probably isn't suitable Tot all situations. If you rent, you can change as your situation change^.
Pilgrims Iri Paradise by Frank G. Slaughter
S 6317 pi
In 1647, Paul Sutton, a young doctor, signs on as a medical officer to a shipload of Pilgrims. Throughout the journey, Paul tries tohelp and understand his brother, Silas; for he knew the resolve that motivated the Puritan band to seek a new home.
Pilgrims in Paradise is a remarkable portrait of a religious zealot bent on carrying the cause of the nonconformists to the New World, of the settlement and rebellion against Silas' iron rule, of bigotry, superstition and passion, of war and trial for life.
Goodness and Mercy Jenkins by Bianca Bradbury
B 7195 go
Life as the dutiful Puritdn daughter in seventeenth century New Haven was: riot an easy one if all the rules were obeyed to the letter, or even if they weren't. Pretty sixteen-year old MerCy Jehkins knew she was expected' {& vrant only {6 obey any arid every dictate of hei elders, iriarry the man of their choice, and set-
this in principle at certain times, she disagreed over the suitability of sailor John Godwin as her future husband with some startling consequences.
Strange Wives by Shirley Barker
B 2418 st
The story of the New World Bravo family begins with an earthquake in Lisbbn, where more perilous than tremors, i religious persecution of the 1 Jews since the Inquisition had made necessary concealment of their faith. When word came to Portugal that in A-rrlerica, in a province called Rhode Island, one Roger Williams had proclaimed freedom of religion for all, Jews asked themselves why they should Stay in the Old World to worship underground, when they might worship openly in the New.
The trials of the marriage of Reuben Bravo, a Jew, and Jenny Tupper, a gentile, mirror the trials of people of various faiths to form this new nation.
Saints and Strangers by George Willison
974.4 W 675 sa From the mariy documents and letfers left by the Pilgrims, G. F. Willison has brought the story of th'e Pilgrim Fathers to\ life. UN tells of their families, with their friends and foes, of their wanderings in limbo, thbir final resurrection and rise to glory.
ASPIRIN IS ASPIRIN
CHURCH NEWS
On October 30, the Wesley "Methodist Church had a Fellowship dinner and masquerade party. The party was a "huge success and a wonderful time was had. Prizes were given for the nicest costume cmd for the ugliest one.
Look at what's happened to I aspirin! It's been buffered,] double-strengthened, super-powered, glorified, and time-released. It comes in assorted grains, shapes, and colors; it pours, and effervesces, and dissolves in your mouth, in your stomach, or holds off until it reaches the digestive tract. You can chew it. There are liquid, candied, and aspirin-cold tablets for children and an aspirin product for women only. In short, the old standby comfort for fevers arid grippe, aches, pains, and in-flamation has become so specialized you can give yourself a headache, hying to figure out the 60 some brands now on the market!
And while all, the aspirin products claim, fast, fast relief ^spme brands faster than othersthere's a hiige difference in what they cost. Not only does the price vary from Store to store and between cities, but national brands often sell for seven or eight times as much as the private labels. One national brand, for example, sells 100 tablets for $1.23 while a local brand, just as effective and safe, offers 100 for 13 cents.
Why this cost difference? Dr. William O'Brien of Yale University's School of Medicine says it's because of "the advertising campaigns and expenses involved." One manu-
facturer currently is spending $7 million to launch a; promotion pf his productadmittedly just aspirin. Pharmaceutical houses buy the same chemical (it's around 50 cents a pound) from the same suppliers/ compress the. aspirin into capsules and tablets, and sell it under their own names. "Essentially," said Dr. O'Brien, "it's the same stuff."
What about buffered aspirin, such as Buffeiin and Alka-Seltzer?, Dr. John Bonica and Dr. William F. Kennedy of the University of Washington College of Medicine say that tests showed buffered aspirin to be no ,rr)[pre effective than < plain aspirin.
If an antacid is needed for stomach' imtatibn,, Doctors Bon-ica 'dhd Kennedy ^figg£s& that "a small pinch Of bicarbonate of soaa With each aspirin tablet will cbritfol gastric irritation iritiCh more OffOctiVely thdtn. the 140-frig.- of antacid in a tablet of BuffOriti."
APC tablets, also cctlled CAP and PAC and sold as well under names stich as Em-pirin, Stariback, Excedrin, arid BC, should never be used for an extended time without a doctor's advice. A few years ago, a federal ruling was issued against one ingredient, phenabetin, for suspected kidney damage. According to the Medical Letter, APC has never
West Side Church Directory
CHURCH OF GOD 5th and Fox Street Phone 244-2339 |
Rev. Leroy Vance Sunday Service, 1L.
7:30. Sunday School, 10.
METROPOLITAN BAPTIST 910 Kalamath Street Rev. Salvador Cano Sunday Service, 11, 6:30. Sunday School. 10.
Denver Inner City Protestant Parish
910 Galapago Street Phone 244-2636 Rev. Russell S- Williams Miss Marilou TaggOrt Saturday Church School 10 a. m. (Children 6-12 years).
Sunday Worship11:00 cun; (Everyone welcome).
Apostolic Church of Jesus 1039 W. 13fh Avenue Rev. Toby Rampd pfebrie 244-2765 Rev. Lee Velasquez Sunday Service, 10:30, 12:00. Sunday School, 9:30.
ST. JOHift* LUTHERAN West 3rd Ave. and Acoma. Phone 733-3777 Paul G. Hansen and Roger A. Stiers, Pastors
Services: Sunday 8:30, 11:00 a. m\, 7:00 p, m,
Sunday School: 9:45 a. m.
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CATHOLIC CHURCH W. 6th Ave. and Galapago St Phone 534-4408 Rev. James Nugent, C. Ss. R. Pastor
ServicesSunday Mass: 6 7, 8:30, 10, 11:30.
Holy Days 6, 7, 3, 9, 12:15 6 p. m.
been proved to work better than aspirin.
It's a good idea to have only a two-tb-three months' stip^ly an hand and to keep it in ct cobl, dry place. Old aspirin i£ crumbly and smells bf Vihegdf; dfid in that condition the drug' loses its effectiveness and may be a stomach irritant.
Read and compare labels for drug content and compare prices; don't be persuaded by "personality^, "symbolic" packaging nor hypnotized by slogans and advertisements.When you come right down to it a plain bottle of plain aspirin at the lowest price is your best buy. Aspirin is aspirin.
Condensed with permission from Sumner 66 Everybody's Money, a magazine for credit union members. Copyright 1966 by EVERYBODY'S MONEY.
ST. CAJETAN 9th and Lawrence Phone 825-8059 Father Max Santamaria, t Pastor
SericesSunday Mass: 7:00, 8:30, 10:30, 12, 7 p. m.
Holy Days6:30, 8:30, 10:30, 7:00.
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST 935 W. 11th Avenue Phone 255-6152 Rev. Thomas Sepulveda ServiceSunday: 9:45, 11.
First Avenue Presbyterian 120 West 1st Avenue Phone 777-5325 Rev. A. J. Blomquist Sunday Service, 11 a. m.. 6:30 p, m. ,
Sunday School. 9:45.
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH 1000 Kdlamath Street Phone 255-3215 Rev. R. W. Nichols ServiceSunday: 11, 7:00. Sunday School9:30. |
ST. ELIZABETH 11th and- Curtife Streets Phone 255-9556'
ReV\ Fabian Flynn; Pastor ServicesSunday Mass: 6. 8, Up 11, 12:15;
Holy Days^ 6; 7, 8, 1 12:15. 5:45.
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL 126 West 2nd Avenue Ffione m$78i |
Rev. David Mintcai Ijoly Communion, ,8-00 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a. m. Sunday Service 11:00 a m.
52$ W$st Firsj: Ave.
Rev. O. 1. Crager Rhone 722-4888 \
Sunday services11.
Sunday School 1(4:00 cun.
Iglesia Betel De Las Asam-bleas De Dios
West 2nd Ave. dnd; Fox St Rev. Mike A. SalaXar, Pastor ServiceSunday, 10:00 and 7:30 p. m.
FIRST BETHANY LUTHERAN 215 West 5th Avenue Phone 825-4862 Rev. Fred A. Bloch Sunday Service, 11.
Sunday School 9 30.
West side Christian
668 Inca Street Phone: 623-3419 William K. Linton, Minister ; Sendees: Sunday Worship ,10:10 and 7:00 p.- m.
Bible Schbol: 9:00 a; m.
WESLEY METHODIST 465 Galapago Street Phone 222-3337 Rv. Job KShifttOft \ Sunday Sbkyide^ 11.
Sunday School 9:45.
FIRST MENNONIT8 CHURCH 885 Delaware Street Phone 2442093 Rev. Marcus Bishop Rev. John Ventura Sunday Service-9:00; Spanish Service 11:15; Sunday School 10:00; Evening Service 7:00.


Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Voulme 3, Number 7
Published Monthly
November' 1966
Improvement Assn. Board Lauds New Construction
Relocation of Skid Row Inhabitants Being Carefully Planned
In preparing a comprehensive redevelopment program for the Skyline area, the--Denver Urban Renewal? Authority has completed two relocation plan§one for businesses and one for families and- individuals. A major objective these relocation plane is: to remove the major blighting influence of Skid Rbw without causing it to re-appear' dt: Other locations' in the city.
The relocation program for families and individuals is designed. to ftiid them decent, safe and, sanitary housing' that they, can- afford, and that is reasonably close to where they wish to live. There are 95 families and approximately 1800 unrelated individuals to be moved from Skyline. The Authority does not anticipate any serious problems in the relocation of the 95' families.
However, the problem of relocation with the estimated l80Q unrelated individuals is of cansiderc&le concern to the Authority, 'there: are two main group of individuals living prior near Stid Row as follows:
Hi 1. : il
1. "The Chronic Alcoholic". 11 There are usually; around' 500 { off these men on Skid Row. Most of them have chronic illnesses in addition to their | alcoholism. The Denver Urban Renewal Authority proposes of/to-establish/with the assistance of existing agencies, a Diagnostic' and Referral Center where- these men can be treated for their-- physical, mental, and alcoholic problems. This Center would be established very early in the Skyline program.
The Authority will encourage the? establishment of small dormitory-type housing; for these men. This housing would probably be located very close to the existing Skid Row area.
IS
The new Black and Decker building at West 7th Avenue and Kalamath Street \
James Martinez Chosen' Boys' Chib Boy of the Year
James Martinez was chosen Boy of the Tear by the Bby&' Clubs of Denver at their annual banquet held on November 15 at the Brown Palace Hotel. One hundred boys from the three branches of the Boys' Club attended?
James- ]'cv student'/at' West High School,- lives with his mother Shirley Martinez at 1256 West 10th Avenue. He has six brothers and sisters. He has been active with the Bbys' Club since 1961. Last Summer he volunteered to serve as a junior counselor at camp. Hb was sbnt to the Colorado Outward Bounds project and did impressively well. William Cope, Director of the Boys' Clubs of Denver, reports that James has been mdst helpful with younger Boys iii the club. He has been active in the games room program and iiiN the Keystone Club arid haS prcwen to be a good craffeman' in the shop program. He has boffi honored also by the DENVER POST and by Colorado Chiropractors fbr his outstanding contribution to youngsters in the neighborhood.
2. Elderly Individuals. There are approximately 300 elderly pensioners living in this area. Most of' these men are over 62 yedrs- old and are not "chronic alcoholics." The, Authority is recommending that two cr three elderly housing facilities be established, as near as possible, to the downtown area. TliiS' could be* either an existing,. Hotel1 or building or a} le-^ IL iXrdhld' hqvb tHe:; special services that eldbrly people require.
This., is a very brief summary of the family and individual relocation program. Other public and-private agencies will' be working with DURA to make this program a success* For additional information; please call the. Denver Urban Renewal Authority office at 629-7114.
HISTORICAL SOCIETY TO HOLD FINAL ANNUAL. MEETING
The West Denver Auraria Historical Society will disband. Members voted the disbandment action at their last meeting. in October, a move which
The disbandment move came after a long period of dwindling membership and support. According to August Newlander, president of-the Society, mem-
signals the end of the thir-1 bersHip was composed of a teen-year-old organization ded- majority of older residents, and icated to preserving the his-1 the combined problems-of lack tofy of West Denver and Au- of transportation and night Members will convene meetings limited attendance.
The Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Association recently voted to send letters to businesses and others occupying new buildings in the area, congratulating them for their part in making this a betted neighborhood. Letters are to be sent also to those doing major renovation.
Mr. Leslie j. Kalanquin, president of the Association, has sent letters of appreciation to Bausch and Lomb for their new building at 1277 Santa Fe Drive; Westinghouse, 516-520 Acoma; Saris Apartments, 410 Delaware; Scotfi's Drive-In, 959. W. 6th Avenue; Home Heating, 665 Kalamath; Livran Electric, 700 Kalamath Street; and Black and Decker, 675 Kalamath- Street. Letters also were sent to the Church of God, W. 5th Avenue and Fox, and the Wesley Methodist Church, 465 Galapago,, congratulating them for the fine job of renovation they, have done.
CHRONIC RD
(Respiratory Disease)
Isa Crippler
November 21 and 22 is the Turkey Contest at the Boys' Club. The turkey was furnished by Quality Poultry Co., 3758 Osage.
Monthly awards go to Boy of the Month, Ricky Rios; Boy for Football, Larry Gonzale^r Boy for Shop, George Garda.
EftipHysema, a chronic RD, is second among chfonic diseases far wblelr, year after year, workers are granted disability benefits. (Only heart disease exceeds it.) Tuberculosis, bronchitis and other chronic RDs add to the toll of respiratory cripples, In 1963 the Social Security Administration allowed disability Claims for: Emphysema, 14,897. Tuberculosis, 8,588. Bronchitis; 1,197.
Your Christmas Seat contribution .helps in thMight against chronic Bb. *
raria.
for the last time at their annual luncheon and Christmas party December 17.
The£ Society, organized' Feb* r.)Ac£Py 4, 1953; and^iriCorpbrated MOiy 18) 1954/ sought To per-, petuqte'' the history Of -Aurdriai arid* West Denver by preserving data; artifacts, and articles of the! area and by emphasizing West Denver's arid Auraria's; patriotic, religious; ediiCatiorial; cultural; and' so-ciaT heritage*
Auraria was an early settlement on the west side of Cherry Creek with boundaries at Chetry Creek, the. South, Platte, and the. area which is now West Sixth,: Avenue. In April, 1859, Denver and Auraria were consolidated into one municipality through action of the Legislative Assembly of Jefferson Territory. In 1862, Auraria; Denver, and Highlands (in North Denver) were incorporated as the City of Denver. The First Territorial Assembly of Colorado voted the* act.
( With, the disbandment. move, members; of -the Society were given' the privilege of; reclaim^ ing> qmy articles and historical data, contributed earlier to the Society. Other articles and artifacts, including the Society's scrapbook, were donated to the Western Division: of the Den-yef Public Library. The- scr-ap^ book is recognized as one of 1 the most comprehensive- of collections of- Colorardo's- early day. history.
Total membership this year was ninety-seven, and the group met monthly in the basement of the Byers. Library.
^yThe historical Society's rosT ter reads, life^a, "Whp's Whp" of the West Many, lopg-
time- area residents wei'e members arid several. Had/ served as officers- fpr the Society. Current Qfficersr are August Newr lander, 1.401 Fox, president; David- Clow* 278 So. Jasmine, vice-president; Mrs. Sarah Mundhenk, 1225 So. Federal Blvd., secretary; Mrs. Ann Mar-ica, Morrisqn, treasurer, and Mrs. Rose Ddwson, 235 Delaware, corresponding secretary.
Honorary members of the Society included former U.S. President arid Mrs. Dwight D. Eisefihower, and orchestra leader; Paul Whiteman. Formei Society presidents include Mrs. Velma Houghton, Mrs. Sarah Mundhenk, Mrs.Catherine New-, lander, Miss Winifred Wort-! man, Mrs. Katherine K. Wheeler, Frederick Babcock, and Mrs. Mamie Bennett.
The group's annual Luncheon .arid Christinas Party on December 17 vpU, be- held at. the Oxford Hotel, 1612 17th St, |at 12130 p.m. At this last mooting,, there will .be g: fifty-cent Chistmris gift! exchange. Guestsi are welcome- to. attend The luncheon which must be made by iDecember 10,: should1 be mailed ltd August Newlander, presir dent, 615 W. 14th Avenue.
Great Year In Football For West High Cowboys
On Friday, Nov. 11; the West High Cowboys firiished? .the football- year with; an 18-13 win o-vef South, ending the season with a record of 5 wins and 3 losses. This is the Cowboys' best season's record since 1940:
Several, boys are rated, high in. individual, statistics. Mark Hulse finished- second, or third in the league in' total offense (rushing and passing). Mike Leyba is- second in passes received. Wiljon JBrown, a halfback, finished third in the league in total scoring. It is anticipated; that nine lettermen will be back on next year's team;
SPECIAL TOUR OF WAX MUSEUM PLANNED FOR SENIOR CITIZENS
Metropolitan-area senior citizens are invited to visit Denver's Wax Museum November 26' in q tour sponsored by Co-ordinated1 Services for the Aging Project Community Center.
A special rate of 80 cents per person is being offered for the tour. The museum features
wax statues of famous national and Colorado figures in their historic settings.
Reservations, due by November 23, can be made by calling the project's Communty Center at 825-2190, extension 274. Transportation vhU leave" the Center, 1620 Meade Street, at 2 r30 p. m.
WEST SIDE Calendar
EVERY WEEK
SundaySjory, Hour, Denver Public Library, 1357 Broadway, 3:96 p, ni.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Nov. 18Auraria Community Cpriter Family- Night, 7:00-p.m.
Nov. Senior Qtizen trip
tp the. Wax Museum, transportation leaving ; 1620 Meade ; Street at 2:30 p. m.
Dec. 1 Lincoln Park Resident Council, 1438 Navajo, 10 a. m. to 2:30 p. m.
Dec. 8Baker P-TA Christmas Pot-luck, 1 p. m.
Dec. 14-Greenlee Board of Managers Christmas Luncheon, 12 noon.
Dec. 15St. Joseph's Grade School P-TA, 7:30 p. m.
Dec. .17Final annual luncheon of West Denver Auraria Historical Society, 12:30 p.m. at Oxford Hotel. Reservations required.


November, 1986
Page Two
THE RECORDER
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Sid% Improvement Association *
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Edikn*: Rachel Guedea
S| M Citizen
gelista! and fanmyV formerly of
3453 West Kentucky Avenue, j M^yi/c
have moved to 1251 Lipan
Afreet. Welcome to our new \ The purple asters and -eM-West Sifters. tumn foliage that decorated the
tables for the October 18 lunch-jeon of the Lincoln Park Senior Robert W. Spottswood Sr.; Citizens Club were from the of 1038 West 13th had quite flowerbeds of Mrs. Sue Won-an experience last month. His who, with Mrs. Anna son Robert W. Jr., and his O'Neill, acted as hostesses
&aff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings,
I' granddaughter, Jennifer, aged Twenty members were present Wmterhalder. 4_ || he went tato || moun-!and ^0 guests: Mrs, Amanda Mary navez. | near Parker to get fire- J Harvey of Wakeeney, Kansas,
place wood. They were driv- Mrs. Wonner's house guest for
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Gregory of 1328 West Colfax will have their sons Gary and Mike Gregory home for the holidays.
ing a jeep and planned to return home for supper. However they got stuck in a snow bank and were there for several hours. Their wives became concerned and got in
two weeks, and Mrs. Ruth La Moth.
5J? '. / S3
Thb business session after the luncheon was given over to the election of officers for
Gary and Mike will be com- i toAucJ? with the Rescue Squad |the coming year. Elected pres-
ing from Grand Junction,. Col orado.
at Parker. Soon the Spotts-woods were found and returned to Parker. Mr. Spottswood said although they Ben Gutierrez was recently weren't lost it was wonder-
home on leave from duty in ful for those folks in Parker
Viet Nam. While home, he( to come to their aid. He wants visited with his parents, to thank them, and assure
aunts, uncles, and other rela- them that he and his son are
fives. j indeed grateful for their un-
{.selfish act.
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Tafoya
of 1405 Lipan Street celebrat-1 SURPRISE BIRTHDAY PARTY ed their 25th wedding anni- Qn Saturday afternoon, Oc-versary on October 8. A re- | tober ^ a surprise birthday
| .party was given at 924 West iOth Avenue Apartments in honor of Mrs. Frances Nelson and Mrs. Bessie Grove who both have the same birthday.
ception and dance were held] in their honor and attended by members of the family and-friends. About 150. people attended and showered the couple with many lovely gifts. Mr. and Mrs. Tafoya had also planned a trip to celebrate their anniversary and left recently. They are on their way. to. .Mexico.
Mrs. Nelson celebrated her 92nd birthday and Mrs. Grove her 87th.
, Friends gathered in the recreation room for light refreshments and to shower them with beautiful cards to help Mrs. Louise Reilly of 255 celebrate their birthdays.
Cherokee is recuperating at Among those attending were home after eye surgery. Mrs. Lois Dykes, Dolly R6u-
i ton,,,. Irene Downs, Ida Baer,
! Pearl Thomas, Nettie Moss,
Sandi and Donna Winterhal- Mae Cortez, Mr. Hugh Duke, der, 226 W. 3rd Ave., attended Mrs. Eddie Mae Petttt was visited Stapleton Airport the a Senior High Presbyterian hostess and Mrs. Pearl Durettl afternoon of October 25. We
ident was Mrs. Grace Mu grove, 1348 Osage, vice-president, Mrs. Martha Olsen, 1406 Navajo St., secretary, Mrs.Faye Brott, 1426 Osage St., treasurer, Mrs. Lucia Gorman, 1427 Mariposa Street; Mrs. Anna Mims, 1423 Osage St., was appointed chairman of the Sunshine Committee, and Mrs. Elsie Lilienthal was asked to continue as decorations chairman.
Following the elections, Mrs. LaMoth showed colored slides taken on her repent vacation trip to Vancouver. The slides were beautiful, and her comments clear and interesting. Included were some fine views of Colorado, the Tetons, Yellowstone, and Glacier National Park.
Mrs. Grace Musgrove, president of the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club, is home again after a month spent in the east, visiting -her- son in Washington, D.C., and her sister in Coulmbus, Ohio.
>.
Twelve Lincoln Park Seniors
Conference held, at Estes Park i co-hostess, on October 28/ 1966.
Mr. and Mrs. Marshall White, LINCOLN PARK Marsha and Mike of 230 Cher-' nccinckjT rm I Kin I okee enjoyed a trip to Carls-; Kt*,UCm ^WINV-,L bad Caverns and El Paso, Tex-; The Resident Council of Linas during Teachers Conven- coin and South Lincoln Park tion. In El Paso they were Homes wishes to thank Mrs. guests of Mrs. White's sister, Mossman from the League of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Speik and Women Voters for answering
questions and also explaining the amendments for the Noy. 8 election. :
family.
Miss Janic§ Provost of 229 W. 3rd Ave., Mrs. Roy Winter-halder, Linda and Debra, of 226 W. 3rd Ave.# attended the First Avenue Presbyterian Retreat held at Evergreen, Colorado, on Oct 28, 29, 1966.
Our sincere sympathy is extended to Mrs. Flora Fenton, 358 Delaware Street, in her sorrow with the death of her husband# Mr. Arthur Fenton on October 10.
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Schon-borg of 1248 Lipan Street have returned home from Grand Canyon, Arizona. Mrs. Schon-borg's sister Grace Byrnes returned home with them. More recently they all spent a day in Fort Coilins visiting.
Mr. M. M. Churchill of 1209 Lipan Street was operarted on at Rocky Mountain Hospital on November 4th. Mr. Churchill is feeling better and expects to return Rome soon.
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes is going to have a Bake Sale on Dec. 7, 1966. We would like everyone to come. The place will be at 1438 Navajo and the time will be from 10 a. m. to 2:30 p. m. The money for this bake sale will go towards the children's Christmas party.
ATTENTION: The Resident Council of Lincoln Park arid South Lincoln Park Homes will have their election of new officers at the next meeting which will be on Dec. 1, 1966. The meeting will be held at 1438 Navajo at 7:30 p. m. We hope to see you there.
were all impressed by the greatly, expanded, up-to-date facilities, and enjoyed seeing planes loading, unloading, arid taking off. A pre-arranged stop for rest and coffee in the Western Airlines lounge was also very much enjoyed.
On Tuesday, November 1, twenty-three Lincoln Park Senior Citizens met for lunch. The tables were decorated with small carts and wicker baskets of plastic fruit in fall col-! ors. At the business meeting which followed, plans were .made for the Thanksgiving pptluck dinner to be held at noon, Tuesday, November 15. A trip to the Botanical Gardens November 8 was arranged, and plans for a sight seeing trip to Villa Italia were discussed.
The last hour of the meeting was in charge of our guest Mrs. Maizie Maihack, 1341 Navajo St, who exhibited some beautiful and inexpensive Christmas decorations and explained their construction.
We all deeply regretted the death,. October 25, of Mrs. Helen A. Ewing, 1351 Mariposa St She had recently moved into the Lincoln Park Homes, and joined the Senior Citizens Club only a few days before her fatal illness. Though we knew her so briefly, she was so cheerful and friendly we all felt her. death-was a I real loss to our club.
Boy Scout News
TROOP 200 NEWS PACK 200 NEWS RSsj
On Oct. 11th Troop 200 went on a flashlight hike at Cherry Creek Dam. The leaders, Mr. Morris and Mr. Maestas, drove tiie boys to the dam and then the boys hiked around the west side of the lake.
Oct 25th Troop 200 had their court of honor. Awards were given to Raul Ronce, instructor Badge, Public Health and Citizenship in the Home Merit Badge; Pete and Benny Maj, 1st Class; David Madril, 2nd Class and Assistant Senior Patrol Leader; Pete Maj, Patrol Leader and 2nd Class; Benny Maj, Assistant Patrol Leader and 2nd Class and Teddy Perales, 3 year pin. After" the court of honor the scouts had a pinewood derby race in which James Cothran won the pinewood derby ribbon for the Utes patrol and a trophy for himself. Raul Ronce won a trophy for the best designed car.
Oct 27th Troop 200 had their annual excursion. They started at 8 a. m. at Denver Tent and Awning; then they followed up with Ainsworth where precision scales are made, Denver Pipe and Brick, Duffy's Drinks, Goodwill warehouse, Robinson Dairy, Blue Hill and finally. Wonder Bread.
Nov. 8th Troop 200 went; to the airport to see the big jet planes. They got to go through a jet liner 727 and were shown the parts of the. plane and the new safety devices : to make flying safer.
Nov. 28th wiir be the next big Scout roller skating party at 1900 S. Broadway, cost 70c. We want to thank the Girl Scout Troop 726 and Boy Scout Troop 528 for coming to our last big party. Hope to see you all there.
St. Joseph's High
Red Cross members are collecting used, toys for the annual Santa Claus Shop. Anyone in the area could help make some needy children happy this Christmas by contributing toys to this city-wide drive. John Atencio, Red Cross president, is in charge at St. Joe's.
Bill Adamson and Vic Ortega, two St Joseph High seniors, were among forty speech students chosen to. participate in a three-day discussion symposium at Camp La Foret near .Colorado Springs on October 27-29. The topic of the meet, sponsored by the forensics directors at Colorado University, was "Civil Disobedience."
Mock elections, sponsored by the student council on November 8th, were preceded by a mock political rally in which candidates (both Republican and Democrat) were presented to tire student body through speeches prepared by, q group of seniors. Mr, James O'Hare, socictl studies teacher, gave the opening address at the assembly.
Parent Teacher conferences were held Nov. 9 and 10, when high school report cards were distributed. The stereo which is being raffled entertained the many parents, and refreshments were served by
members of the P.T.A.
Oct. 26 was .Ifee scene of In October, Pack 200 had ar Halloween party for the cubs. Mr. and Mrs. Bruffet, Mrs. Morris, Mrs. Gruby,. Mrs. Long,. Mr. Martinez and Mr. and. Mrs. Mena helped to have games, prizes, dpffy apples, cookies, cake and punch;. Apples were tied on springs, a scavenger hunt, spin the milk, bottle,. toss, the ball in the bucket, blow the candle out and flit the balloon over the net were played. Even if the weather was cold all had a good time. Brian Morris, Ronnie Rains and Douglas Martinez won scout slides for the> best costumes.
Auraria
Community Center
Club groups have: started. with gusto at Auraria Community Cfenter. Since many families came in to register* youngsters, all our school-aged club groups are active with. enthusiastic young people. A new group qt the Center this year is*"cf Couples^'Club. Several husbands and wives are enjoying an evening at the Center participating in activities they plan themselves. Mr., and Mrs. Medina of 1257 Lipan are the present chairman and secretary treasurer respectively of the goup. If others would like to join the group, they may contact the Medinas or Mr. Art DeMauro at Auraria Community Center.
* *
Halloween was the theme for the. first successful, family night at Auraria Community Center. On Friday, November 18, our second family night features a "Hootenanny," with folk singing, games, and refreshments.. We will begin the evening's-'festivities.) at about* 7:00 p.m.i This should be a fun night-'for the entire family, so pack up-the kids and come alongl
*.
We've all been, watching with interest the growth of the new Community Center building on the opposite comer from Auraria's present building.. Those of you who are presently active at the Center will appreciate how helpful the increasing amount of space will be. Some* who are new in the community or who have never been active-at ..the Center may want to take the opportunity of the o-pening of the new building to become acquainted with our activities. With some of our 'new" rooms, like a large wood-shop and a separate crafts and art room, we are looking for new ideas and resources to provide activities for the neighborhood. If you have ideas, we hope you will share them with the staff at the Center.


November, i 966
THE RECORDER
Pare Three
St. Elizabeth's
My Favorite Room There are many rooms in our house, but my favorite room is the kitchen. I like it because I can steal food at night. The-/kitchen has two glass dobrs through which you can see the dining room. When it is night, the doors are shut. I open the door and go by the big white stove and the inviting ice box which is near the sink. When I o-pen the cupboard, I usually wake up the dog. She wakes up my brother. I run though the room and hide and they never find out who it was. by Mary Guerue, 5th grade *
' My favorite room isn't very big, but it's big enough to play in. I like it because it has nice, soft beds to jump on. My bed, which is soft, is right iii front of you as soon as you step in the doorway. In the left comer is a small table which holds my mother's clothes and books. My room has a soft rug. When you walk barefoot on it, it feels like a thick foam. When you look in the right side of the room you see a big dresser which holds my mother's cosmetics. You'd' better watch out for the clothes on the door, or they'll cover you like a blanket. Oh! I forgot to tell you what my favorite room is it's my bedroom.
by David Alire, 5th grade ; ...
My favorite room is the living room. It has a comfortable couch and a loud record player which my brother is always playing. The heater makes .the, room more, cozy, and the. television always has an interesting movie. The drapes which separate the living room from1 our' bedroom are colorful. I like my bedroom because it is nice and cozy. When I gb to sleep at night I feel at home.
by Sandra Santillanez, 5th grade
clouds in/winterl Snow is white and it melts. ,It freezes the leaves oh the tree so they fall. That's why the tree is brown and when the leaves fall this season is called fail. The trees are getting ready
for snow. ,
by Joe MaestaS, 5th grade * * '
Snow is cold and is like chopped ice. It is- white arid very, very light. There are small and big snow flakes. They make trees and grass die. Before you see snow, you will see the leaves falling and
seeds from flowers will be getting dry.
by Alvin Sena, 5th grade * * *
Snow is a white, lovely, cold and frosty blanket that covers the earth. Its frosty coolness makes you feel very good about everything. You can
make little snowballs which are very fun to play with.
Snow is a sign of winter which mectns fun. If you ever see ^now, I'm sure you will feel this way.
by Sophie Gallegos, 5th grade
On Wednesday, November 2nd, 30 seventh and eighth gradlers from St. Elizabeth's School enjoyed the Denver Symphony Youth Concert at the City Auditorium. The following day, November 3rd, the entire fifth grade attended the same concert with ''buddies" from Sacred Heart and Blessed
SI. Cajetanfs
The Wind
By Sinforosa Gonzales 8th grade Blow wind blow With pockets full Now strengthnow gentleness Winter winds blow Like the growl of a bear. Summer winds Are like a lady With a bouquet of flowers in her hair.
v
The True Meaning of Freedom
By Frances Torres, 8th grade ... Are we really,. grateful for what, we hgyef,ds /Americans? Do We really treasure our freedom and make good use of it? Unless you can answer yes to these questions, don't pay attention, but if you have to say no you had better think about them. What would it be like if your freedom would suddenly be taken away from you? Most of us wouldn't dare to even think about it. We'd probably be too frightened to do or say anything. We're too used to having these things given to us. We didn't have to fight for our independence during the American Revolution. We should try to make good use of our freedom and love, treasure, secure and understand the true
meaning of it
* *
Thanksgiving
By Elizabeth Blea, 8th grade Once long ago the pilgrims walked this land.
West High
. Fall. term brings many activities to the students attending West High.'r'Among them was a banquet given by the German Club, on Wednesday, October 26, at the Alpine Village Inn. Thirty-nine students, parents and faculty attended. Miss Liselotte Kaufmann, sponsor, reported that it was the fall membership drive banquet. German food was served and everyone enjoyed themselves.
South High School was the setting for this year's City-Wide Orchestra Concert, Sunday, November 13. Representing^ West for. this affair were junior Gregory Dyes 'on the clarinet and sophomore Steve Gumbay, with the string bass. Guest conductor was Abraham Chavez, of the University of Colorado, and Mr. Eugene Hilloguse, guest clarinet soloist also from the University of- Colorado. Admission was free and the event was open to the public.
Eighty-six juniors and one senior were inducted into Spur Wednesday, November 16, in the social room ninth hour. Refreshments were served and the inductees were given carnations to wear. Spur is
"The Ravens," a band from 1^,orth High, played for the affair, which was the first dance sponsored by the Latin American Student Club- since its founding.
PTA College Night
PTA College Night was held Wednesday, November .2, in the West High Auditorium. Among the topics discussed were four year colleges^ technical training, private schools, apprenticeable trades, junior colleges, and Opportunity School.
St. Joseph's Elementary
Sacrament Schools. This trip i But they couldn't have sur-was a part of the. Elementary I vived this life and Secondary Education Act I Without God's helping hand. Title HI program. We thank the Lord for., our
Elizabeth^ Open House was held on Sunday,November 6th, from 2:00 to 4:00 p. m. Parents were invited to view children's work displayed in the Classrooms and a short program was presented by all of the classes.
On Thursday, November 10th, the children were treated to a Young Audiences program featuring a woodwind group. Whcrt Is Snow? {The primary and upper grades
Snow is like little ice crys-| were given separate performances so that all could learn
Thanks to all the friends of St. Joseph's, the Rummage Sale held November 5 was a huge success. Plans are going ahead to hold another sale early in January.
Christmas cards wlil be on sale on the second Sunday of December at all Masses.- Orders may be phoned in before this by calling 428-6776, and the cards will be delivered to your door.
Grade school P.T.A. will hold an academic club to which |a meeting at 7:30 p. m. in the
tals. It falls in winter in te north: It is really ice
crumbs that fall from the own level.
. a.gifts,.from- .above*-..
He did this because He had great love.
Veteran's Day By Kenneth Kishiyama,
8th grade
Veteran's Day is a day of tribute to the men and women who died to preserve the idea of democracy in the world. The cause they died for was not unknown to them, but it was hated by the enemy. War may be rather unfamiliar hap-
juniors and seniors who have held. a "B" average (3.0) or better. for two consecutive semesters are eligible.
Spur serves two unique purposes, the first being to encourage West High School sophomores, juniors, and seniors to work towards high academic grades; and the second, (yarding; the Veil deserved recognition to those students who have successfully attained high grades. .
Senior officers are Bob Simpson, president; Rick Leifing-well, vice-president, Claudia Frick, secretary; and Rocky Kemp, treasurer.
a the music on N BBH B countl7- bu!
Greenlee
On Wednesday, November! 2, in observance of Children's Book Week, an assembly was held at Greenlee School' in order to award, summer reading certificates to the children. Room 201 and their teacher, Mr. Michael Connors did a choral reading about Halloween. Yen Yen l Yin told a story "Caps for Sale" and Mrs. Davis led the group in many songs about books, some of which were written by sixth grade students in Room 102. Mrs. Ritzma, librarian at By-, ers Branch Library, spoke to. t1-'-? students about the rules, of thf* library and the many books that are available there. Seventy-three certificates were a-warded to Greenlee School boys and girls. The program was under the direction of Miss Anderson, school librarian.

Miss Sharon Knappe and her class, Room 115, took a trip to fie zoo recently. Mrs. Ryan
and Room 101 and Mr. Morris and Room 102 had an interesting visit at Stapleton Airfield several weeks' ago, since they are studying about the jet age. Mrs. Alexander and Mrs. McNasser took Rooms 112 and 113 to City Park Zoo. All of these field trips are taken in conjunction with a social studies topic which the classes are studying. .Many more, trips are planned for this month such as the Denver Art Museum, the Dumb Friends League, and the Planetarium.
Mrs. Florence, Joe has been employed ext Greenlee as a teacher aide. We find her help invaluable since her many duties include such things as checking papers, preparing bulletin boards, filing, typing,
those who have experienced it remember places like Pork Chop Hill in Korea, Bataan, Guantanamo Bay, Guam and some European countries. Today the war in Viet Nam will be marked by memories of the dead., and. the ideals for which they7 have died.
The purpose of Veteran's Day is to remember the gallant service of generous men and women. These people will never be forgotten as long as America fulfills her promise of life, liberiy, and the pursuit of happiness to all.
Veteran's Day By Charles Santillanez,
8th grade
Vetetan^s Day is the day we give, God our thanks For meii who fought 'in world wars, both foreign and of U. S. ranks.
Men who fought for freedom, liberty and thefr rights Some men are still living and some died in their fight.
On November 22, a group of 39 sophomore students at West will spend the day at Colorado University as part of the College Visitation program that was started three years ago at West. At C. U., the students will have the opportunity not only to visit classrooms, but also to talk with professors about their fields of interest. A chartered bus will transport them to and from the college; they will have lunch on the campus. Going along with this group will be Mrs. Broughton, college counselor at West, and Mr. Allison, counselor.
Mr. Paul, principal, and Mrs. Hearn, college counselor at West, have also scheduled college visitation trips for juniors and seniors later in the year. Any students planning to go on to college, or those
Church hall on Thursday, December 15, and their annual Christmas Party for students on Thursday, December 22.
Miss Agnes John, Visiting School Nurse, has completed the T.B. tests and vision screening for grade school students and is beginning hearing, tests and smallppx vaccinations wfrhi£t; Life; '.next few weeks. Mis£*ohn served with General MdcArthur in the Pacific during the last war, and has nursed ed^o in Minnesota, A-laska an^ as a missionary nurse in Central America. The West Side ; is very fortunate to have such an energetic and dedicated visiting nurse whose busy schedule includes visits to seven other parochial chools:
Baker Jr,
A Bake Sale, sponsored by the P.T. A. was held at Baker on Nov. 8. The P.T.A. wishes to express thanks to Vollmer's Bakery in donating a cake, helping to make the sale a success.
The Baker Junior High P.TJV. reports a big success on the Book Fair, held Nov. 7-10, in which paperback books were sold. Because it was such a success, the P.T.A. is planning to have another one in the near future/
"Respect for the Law' will be the theme of a program just thinking about possibly I which will be presented for going, are eligible to take part | the students at Baker on Nov.
helping to supervise pupils Thev might have fought at during assembly periods and different places, wars and
accompanying classes on field trips. We are very glad to have her_ as a part of our Greenlee family.
different times
But they all valued freedom so much, they were ready to give up their lives.
in this program and may get mofe information through their counselors.
Halloween was the occasion for gay festivities October 26, in the West High bovs' gym from 8 o'clock to 11:30.
"The Vampire's Night Out" was sponsored by the Latin American Student Club and was attended by over 300 students.
23. Sgt. Moore, of the Denver Police Department, will be in charge of a demonstration of police equipment. An added surprise is promised by Sgt Moore which should delight all students.
A Christmas Pot-Luck will be held at Baker on Dec. 8, at 1 p. m. Everyone is welcome. There will also be a gift exchange.


7
plage Four
THE RECORDER
November, 1966
^Itcbpintj 'Tips. .
BYERS THANKSGIVING BOOK REVIEWS
W. 7th Ave. & Santa Fe Drive tie down to work for, obey Hours: and if possible, cherish him
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fit 2-5:30 for the rest of his or her life, p.m. Sat. 10 a.m-12 noon and Though Mercy agreed with
1-5:30 p.m. days.
Closed W edn es-'
PICK THE PLENTIFULS. This month you'll find lots of turkeys and" raisins at your grocery storeplus big supplies of grapes,, pears, pork arid dry beans. In December, the U.S.. Department of Agriculture has broiler-fryers, canned salmon, grapes, raisins, pork, arid pears on its Plentiful Foods List.
THAT. THANKSGIVING TURKEY. Turkey's ,not only timely, v-.jlt's an excellent buy this month. If you can use it, buy a large turkeyone 16 pounds or more. You'll find it will cost less per pound, and there's more meat in proportion to bone. But, U. S, Department of Agriculture food economists warn, don't buy big unless your family will eat it allnow or later. No food is a bargain if it ends up in the garbage can.
TO OWN OR RENT. Thinking of buying a new home? You've probably thought of ail the reasons why you should. But have you considered the disadvantages, the things that might make homeowning NOT ior you? The U. S. Department cA Agriculture lists the pros and cons in CONSUMERS ALL, its 1965 yearbook. Among the, drawbacks you should consider are these. (1) Owning a home requires time and money for upkeep. (2) Property values may go down. (3) The family that owns becomes less mobile than .the one who rents. On the other hand, if you rent, you don't have to woriy about what might come next doorundesirable neighbors, d filling station. You can always move.
Your living requirements cchangefirst you have small children, then teenagers, then :none at all at home. TRb same house probably isn't suitable Tot all situations. If you rent, you can change as your situation change^.
Pilgrims Iri Paradise by Frank G. Slaughter
S 6317 pi
In 1647, Paul Sutton, a young doctor, signs on as a medical officer to a shipload of Pilgrims. Throughout the journey, Paul tries tohelp and understand his brother, Silas; for he knew the resolve that motivated the Puritan band to seek a new home.
Pilgrims in Paradise is a remarkable portrait of a religious zealot bent on carrying the cause of the nonconformists to the New World, of the settlement and rebellion against Silas' iron rule, of bigotry, superstition and passion, of war and trial for life.
Goodness and Mercy Jenkins by Bianca Bradbury
B 7195 go
Life as the dutiful Puritdn daughter in seventeenth century New Haven was: riot an easy one if all the rules were obeyed to the letter, or even if they weren't. Pretty sixteen-year old MerCy Jehkins knew she was expected' {& vrant only {6 obey any arid every dictate of hei elders, iriarry the man of their choice, and set-
this in principle at certain times, she disagreed over the suitability of sailor John Godwin as her future husband with some startling consequences.
Strange Wives by Shirley Barker
B 2418 st
The story of the New World Bravo family begins with an earthquake in Lisbbn, where more perilous than tremors, i religious persecution of the 1 Jews since the Inquisition had made necessary concealment of their faith. When word came to Portugal that in A-rrlerica, in a province called Rhode Island, one Roger Williams had proclaimed freedom of religion for all, Jews asked themselves why they should Stay in the Old World to worship underground, when they might worship openly in the New.
The trials of the marriage of Reuben Bravo, a Jew, and Jenny Tupper, a gentile, mirror the trials of people of various faiths to form this new nation.
Saints and Strangers by George Willison
974.4 W 675 sa From the mariy documents and letfers left by the Pilgrims, G. F. Willison has brought the story of th'e Pilgrim Fathers to\ life. UN tells of their families, with their friends and foes, of their wanderings in limbo, thbir final resurrection and rise to glory.
ASPIRIN IS ASPIRIN
CHURCH NEWS
On October 30, the Wesley "Methodist Church had a Fellowship dinner and masquerade party. The party was a "huge success and a wonderful time was had. Prizes were given for the nicest costume cmd for the ugliest one.
Look at what's happened to I aspirin! It's been buffered,] double-strengthened, super-powered, glorified, and time-released. It comes in assorted grains, shapes, and colors; it pours, and effervesces, and dissolves in your mouth, in your stomach, or holds off until it reaches the digestive tract. You can chew it. There are liquid, candied, and aspirin-cold tablets for children and an aspirin product for women only. In short, the old standby comfort for fevers arid grippe, aches, pains, and in-flamation has become so specialized you can give yourself a headache, hying to figure out the 60 some brands now on the market!
And while all, the aspirin products claim, fast, fast relief ^spme brands faster than othersthere's a hiige difference in what they cost. Not only does the price vary from Store to store and between cities, but national brands often sell for seven or eight times as much as the private labels. One national brand, for example, sells 100 tablets for $1.23 while a local brand, just as effective and safe, offers 100 for 13 cents.
Why this cost difference? Dr. William O'Brien of Yale University's School of Medicine says it's because of "the advertising campaigns and expenses involved." One manu-
facturer currently is spending $7 million to launch a; promotion pf his productadmittedly just aspirin. Pharmaceutical houses buy the same chemical (it's around 50 cents a pound) from the same suppliers/ compress the. aspirin into capsules and tablets, and sell it under their own names. "Essentially," said Dr. O'Brien, "it's the same stuff."
What about buffered aspirin, such as Buffeiin and Alka-Seltzer?, Dr. John Bonica and Dr. William F. Kennedy of the University of Washington College of Medicine say that tests showed buffered aspirin to be no ,rr)[pre effective than < plain aspirin.
If an antacid is needed for stomach' imtatibn,, Doctors Bon-ica 'dhd Kennedy ^figg£s& that "a small pinch Of bicarbonate of soaa With each aspirin tablet will cbritfol gastric irritation iritiCh more OffOctiVely thdtn. the 140-frig.- of antacid in a tablet of BuffOriti."
APC tablets, also cctlled CAP and PAC and sold as well under names stich as Em-pirin, Stariback, Excedrin, arid BC, should never be used for an extended time without a doctor's advice. A few years ago, a federal ruling was issued against one ingredient, phenabetin, for suspected kidney damage. According to the Medical Letter, APC has never
West Side Church Directory
CHURCH OF GOD 5th and Fox Street Phone 244-2339 |
Rev. Leroy Vance Sunday Service, 1L.
7:30. Sunday School, 10.
METROPOLITAN BAPTIST 910 Kalamath Street Rev. Salvador Cano Sunday Service, 11, 6:30. Sunday School. 10.
Denver Inner City Protestant Parish
910 Galapago Street Phone 244-2636 Rev. Russell S- Williams Miss Marilou TaggOrt Saturday Church School 10 a. m. (Children 6-12 years).
Sunday Worship11:00 cun; (Everyone welcome).
Apostolic Church of Jesus 1039 W. 13fh Avenue Rev. Toby Rampd pfebrie 244-2765 Rev. Lee Velasquez Sunday Service, 10:30, 12:00. Sunday School, 9:30.
ST. JOHift* LUTHERAN West 3rd Ave. and Acoma. Phone 733-3777 Paul G. Hansen and Roger A. Stiers, Pastors
Services: Sunday 8:30, 11:00 a. m\, 7:00 p, m,
Sunday School: 9:45 a. m.
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CATHOLIC CHURCH W. 6th Ave. and Galapago St Phone 534-4408 Rev. James Nugent, C. Ss. R. Pastor
ServicesSunday Mass: 6 7, 8:30, 10, 11:30.
Holy Days 6, 7, 3, 9, 12:15 6 p. m.
been proved to work better than aspirin.
It's a good idea to have only a two-tb-three months' stip^ly an hand and to keep it in ct cobl, dry place. Old aspirin i£ crumbly and smells bf Vihegdf; dfid in that condition the drug' loses its effectiveness and may be a stomach irritant.
Read and compare labels for drug content and compare prices; don't be persuaded by "personality^, "symbolic" packaging nor hypnotized by slogans and advertisements.When you come right down to it a plain bottle of plain aspirin at the lowest price is your best buy. Aspirin is aspirin.
Condensed with permission from Sumner 66 Everybody's Money, a magazine for credit union members. Copyright 1966 by EVERYBODY'S MONEY.
ST. CAJETAN 9th and Lawrence Phone 825-8059 Father Max Santamaria, t Pastor
SericesSunday Mass: 7:00, 8:30, 10:30, 12, 7 p. m.
Holy Days6:30, 8:30, 10:30, 7:00.
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST 935 W. 11th Avenue Phone 255-6152 Rev. Thomas Sepulveda ServiceSunday: 9:45, 11.
First Avenue Presbyterian 120 West 1st Avenue Phone 777-5325 Rev. A. J. Blomquist Sunday Service, 11 a. m.. 6:30 p, m. ,
Sunday School. 9:45.
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH 1000 Kdlamath Street Phone 255-3215 Rev. R. W. Nichols ServiceSunday: 11, 7:00. Sunday School9:30. |
ST. ELIZABETH 11th and- Curtife Streets Phone 255-9556'
ReV\ Fabian Flynn; Pastor ServicesSunday Mass: 6. 8, Up 11, 12:15;
Holy Days^ 6; 7, 8, 1 12:15. 5:45.
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL 126 West 2nd Avenue Ffione m$78i |
Rev. David Mintcai Ijoly Communion, ,8-00 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a. m. Sunday Service 11:00 a m.
52$ W$st Firsj: Ave.
Rev. O. 1. Crager Rhone 722-4888 \
Sunday services11.
Sunday School 1(4:00 cun.
Iglesia Betel De Las Asam-bleas De Dios
West 2nd Ave. dnd; Fox St Rev. Mike A. SalaXar, Pastor ServiceSunday, 10:00 and 7:30 p. m.
FIRST BETHANY LUTHERAN 215 West 5th Avenue Phone 825-4862 Rev. Fred A. Bloch Sunday Service, 11.
Sunday School 9 30.
West side Christian
668 Inca Street Phone: 623-3419 William K. Linton, Minister ; Sendees: Sunday Worship ,10:10 and 7:00 p.- m.
Bible Schbol: 9:00 a; m.
WESLEY METHODIST 465 Galapago Street Phone 222-3337 Rv. Job KShifttOft \ Sunday Sbkyide^ 11.
Sunday School 9:45.
FIRST MENNONIT8 CHURCH 885 Delaware Street Phone 2442093 Rev. Marcus Bishop Rev. John Ventura Sunday Service-9:00; Spanish Service 11:15; Sunday School 10:00; Evening Service 7:00.