Citation
West side recorder, December, 1966

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, December, 1966
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3, Number 8
Published Monthly
December, 196$
CHURCHES PLAN FOR CHRISTMAS
Men -working on street resurfacing,, preparing for the new Santa Fe-Kalamath one-way street system, With Byers Li-library, newly remodelled, in the background:
One-Way System Postponed Till Spring
. is .^u^ to ;-the ^old,
. i-W&y'^'s'^terh will | W^t^er brewll
not bo put into meet the re.sur;
May,-, according to Jack Bruce,
Traffic Engineer. The post- feemg. n Kalama'h.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM IN DANGER!
BYERS LIBRARY OPEN HOUSE
Byers Neighborhood Library is celebrating the completion, of remodeling' with an open house on Thursday, January T2, from 3:30 to 5 p. m.
Remodelling of the library located at W. 7 th Avenue and Santa Fe Drive has been extensive, inside and out,, including a bright new lighting system, new painting and cement work, refinishing of woodwork, new floor tiling, etc. Mr. John T. Eastlick, head Librarian for the City and County of Denver, also assures us that the lawn will be replanted this coming spring.
Mrs. Barbara Ritzma, the library assistant in charge at Byers, wishes to extend a special invitation to all readers of the RECORDER to attend the open house. Refreshments will be served.
Unless something happens .to -provide additional money by December : 3Tst, the four programs in th.e; public schools that are. funded through the Denver School Board by the OEO: will come to an end. TheSeidour programs are the Beading Rooms providing' remedial redding, the Study Halls provided in the evenings at various ...locations in the community, the Orientation Rooms and the Youth Motivation groups.
The main reasons foi.v this happening are that OEO funds to Denver Opportunity have been cut back and education programs are no longer considered top priority, by Washington. For this reason there is nearly no hope of obtaining additional funds for this program from OEO. However, we feel there is still a possibility of. obtaining locally the funds to continue these programs until the > end of the school year in June, 1-967. Two places where these funds might come from arer' other programs funded by OEO that might have a little extra here and there that could be extracted and from, the 1967 budget of the Denver School Board. There is a certain amount of money in the Board's budget that is not designated for a specific project. Of course there are other worth-
while projects that are hoping to be funded from budget item of $600,000.
This brings us to the reason why we are putting this article in the paper. If you are alarmed, as we are, by the prospect of these important programs ending on December 31st, there I-S something you can do. We think that if every
W S I A Plans Urban Renewal Meeting
-The Skyline Urban .Renewal Project, and possible effects., on the West Side. Will be the topic of a :' General Meeting of the West Side Improvement. .Association'" to be held, an Sunday, January 8, 1967.- The., meeting/; wrl'l-^b^ We^ey
Methodist Church/. W. 5th Avenue and Galapago, at 2:30 p. m.
. Plans for the Skyline Project, '- in the lower downtown area, are being prepared to encourage development of a modern business area.. Voters at the municipal election on May 16 will have the opportunity to vote .for or against the: Project. The January 8 meeting is scheduled to present information about the proposal.
At the general meeting, members of the Improvement Association will also vote on a proposed change in the By-Laws, extending the area of
HELP KEEP HOMES i INTACT %
parent and resident who wants
to see these programs cpntin- improvement Association ue, would take .dime to write south from West First Avenue at least a short letter to the!to include both sides of Ells-Denver Opportunity Board and wortj1 Avenue, to the Denver School Board! telling them of their feeling on thjs, that there is great possibility the programs could be saved.
Schools in our area that have all or some of these programs] are: Fairmont, Elmwood, Greenlee and Baker. We know that Christmas and all the rush that goes with it is now here, but surely each one of us could take time out for two short letters. Certainly nothing is more important than an adequate education for our children, and we feel that these programs are. part of that adequate education.
The places to send your letters are the Denver Opportunity Board, 810 14th Street and the Denver School Board, 414 14th Street.
Let's let them know how we, the people they serve, feel.
Christmas is for giving and sharing. Help share happiness with a gift of good health your contribution1 to Christmas Seals. Do it today!
FIGHT TB AND OTHER RESPIRATORY DISEASES
APOSTOLIC CHURCH OF JESUS, 1039 West 13th Avenue Dpc| 24Christmas Program, 7.30 p. m.
Dec, 25Sunday School, 9:30 a. m.
Worship Service, 10:30 a. m.
Evening Service, 7:30 p. m.
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH,1 1000 Kcrlamath Street *-Dec. 25Sunday School Program, 9:30 a. m.
Musical and Worship Service, 11:00 a. m. Evening Service, 7:00 p. m.
CHURCH OF GOD, 5th Avenue and Fox Street.
Dec. 16Christmas Program, 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 25Christmas Service, 10:00 a. m.
FIRST AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 120 W. 1st Are, Dec. 18Choir Candlelight Service, 7:00 p. m.
Dec. 22Sunday School Christmas Program, 7:30 p m*
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH, 430 West 9th Avenue Dec. 18Worship Service, 9:00 a. m.
Christmas Program by children All musical program presented by church choirsi "A Ceremony of Carols" by Benjamin Britten will include also voices from the Children's Choir, 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 25:iWorship Service, 9:00 a. m.
No evening service
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST CHURCH, 935 W. 11th Av, Dee. 19Christmas Program, 11:00 a. m.
Dec.- 25-Christmas Service, 9:45 a. m., 11:00 a. m.
IGLESIA BETEL DE LAS ASSAMBLEAS DE DIOS,
West 2nd Avenue and Fox Street
Dec. 25Worihip Service, 10:00 a. m.
ST. CAJETAN'S CATHOLIC CHURCH, 9th and Lawrence St Dec.. 18Parishioners are asked to donate items such as food, clothing;, toys, money, candy, nuts, etc., which will go towards filling Christmas baskets for needy which will. he -distributed Christmas eve. These. iterns will be.; collected after each mass^or ^ ; brought ^ to the church.
~D^b/ '/231£^hfess&b^ wfll bdTieard any time throughout the day up until 9 p. m.
Dec. 24Confessions will be heard any time throughout the day up until 9 p. m.
St. Cajetan School Chorus will sing Christmas Carols at 11:30 p. m.
Solemn High Mass will follow at midnight Dec. 25Masses: 7, 8, 9, 10:30, 12 noon, 7:00 p. m.
ST. ELIZABETH'S CATHOLIC CHURCH, 11th and Curtis St Dec. 24Confessions 3:30, 6:00 p. m., 7:30, 9:00 p. m.
St Elizabeth's School students will sing Christ-. mas Carols before Midnight Mass, 11:00 p. m*
under direction of Sister Mary Claire.
Dec. 25'Masses 6, 8, 9:15, 11 a. m., 12:15 p. m.
ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN CHURCH, West 3rd Ave. and Acoma Dec.- 18"All My Heart This Night Rejoices." Conceit by St. John's Junior Choirs 7£10 p. m.
Dec. 24"O Holy Night." Christmas Pageant by the children 5:00 and 7:00 p. m.
"Christmas Wheels. 'Carol and Candlelight Service, 11:00' p. m. .
Dec. 25-jf'Child of God." 8:30 and 11:00 a. m., 9:45 a. m. at chapel B
"The Shepherds Returned" 7:00 p m.
Dec. 26German Service 9:30 a. m.
Dec 31"A Quick Change" 7:30 p. m Jan. .1"A Glorious Year" 8:30 and 11:00 a. m., 9:45 a. in. at Chapel.
"God, Our Help" 7;00 p. m. \
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CHUftCH,
West 6fh Avenue at Galapago Street
Confessions Tuesdays after Novena .Service 3v 5:30 p. m.7:30 p. m.
Dec: 23^-Confessions 3 .to 5:30 p.-. m>., 7:30-8:30 p. m.
Solemn Midnight Mass follpwed by two Shep-* herd Masses
Dec. 25Masses, 6, 7, 8:30/ 10, 11:30 a. m.
Jan. 1 Masses: 6, 7, 8:30, 10, 11:30 a. m.
WESLEYAN COVENANT CHURCH, 525 West 1st Avenue I^ec. IBChristmas Program, 7:00 p. m.
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH, 465 Galapago Street Dec. 24Christmas Eve Candelight Service, 7:00 p. m. Dec.- 25Christmas DaySunday Service, f Dec; 31New Year's Eve Communion, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 p.m.


Page Two
THE. RECORD EH
December, 1966
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244*3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
'fteifAfonfaad 'Hotea
Emma Hodapp was in auto accident and has been very ill. She is in a nursing home at 5822 So. Lowell Way, Littleton, Colorado. She would appreciate cards from her West Side friends.
Mrs. May Day of 138 West 1st Ave., has returned from a 6-weeks vacation visiting relatives and friends. She was in Utah, Las Vegas, Nevada, Arizona and Burley, Idaho.
Mrs. William Newton has been confined'to her home at .147 West 1st Avenue for 2V2 months. She is slowly improving and is able to be out some.
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Peterson of Ogden, Utah, paid a short visit to Mrs. May Day while en route to Miami, Florida. They had dinner at the Top of the Rockies and a pleasant ride through and around Denver seeing the sights.
Richard Looney of 545 Gal-apago will leave Jan. 1 for service in Viet Nam.
Mr. and Mrs. William Hof-schulte, Jr., and family from Seattle, Washington, spent Thanksgiving with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hofschulte of 534 Inca.
Stella Faber is staying with her father Mr. A1 DeHerrera of 518 Galapago while her husband, Sgt. Faber, is in the service overseas.
Mr. and Mrs. Alvarado of 1314 Kalamath Street will have a very Merry ^Christmas this year. Their three daughters and their families will be home for the holidays and they will all celebrate Christmas together. One daughter, Charlotte Romero and her two children will arrive on Christmas Day from Los Angeles and will be here for ten days.
Gloria Gay Recek is coming home for the holidays from Adams State College at Alamosa on the 16th of December. She will be with her parents Mt. and Mrs. Robert Recek of 130 Galapago.
Rev. Joe Kamman and family will have an open house!
WEST SIDE Calendar
Dec. 167:30 p. m., Atiraria Community Center Dedication Dec. 1610 a. m.,-2 p. m.,
EDITORIAL
This issue of the Recorder marks the beginning of my third year as the .editor. When I first started as editor my family and I had been in
Denver and on the West Side i West High Singing Christmas only 6 months. However, we j Tree
already felt at that time like! Dec 19Lincoln Park Chil-
we belonged and this was dren's Christmas Party, 1438
where we wanted to stay, j Navajo, 1:00 p.m., 3:45 p.m. This was the fifth state we! Dec. ig_7;30 p. m West
had lived in and were so well High Singing Christmas Tree satisfied with West (Denver j Dec 20_7;30 | West
that we just decided to stay.lffigh singing Christmas Tree We now feel like the West' Dec. 217:30 p. in.. West Side is our community and High Singing Christmas Tree that we are part of it. We have D 21Noon Greenlee PTA
seen that one needs only to D Hh n' SBPi show he's interested in improv- Bod fM'mag^Meeting
Dec. 21 7:00-8:30 p. m., Elati Head. Start Open House Dec. .227:30 p. m.. West
ing his community and there will be more things for him to do than he can find the
the 18th of December at 1542 time for. In just these few
Wolff Street. Rev. Kamman is the minister of the Wesley Methodist Church at 5th and Galapago. Refreshments will be served and everyone is invited to enjoy their hospitality.
Mr. Ryan Jones is coming home for the holidays December 19th from the Illinois Institute of Technology. He will be with his parents Mr. and Mrs. Albert Jones.
Dave Shoemaker, Sunday School Superintendent of the Wesley Methodist Church at 5th and Galapago, has announced that the Sunday School Christmas party will be held December 18th at the church. All are invited to enjoy the program and gifts.
Mr. M. M. Churchill of 1209 Lipan Street is back in the hospital. He is at St. Luke's Hospital where he underwent another operation. Mr. Churchill is feeling better.
Sgt Major William McCorkle, son of Mrs. Mary Chavez, will be home for the Christmas holidays after three years service in Alaska. He is a career man in the army and has been in the service 19 years. Sgt Major McCorkle, his wife and two children are on their way to Fort Campbell, Ky.
Mrs. Mary Chavez recently went to Sacramento, California, to visit relatives. While there she spoke to local War on Poverty officials.
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Nickerson of Westminster, Colorado, are the proud parents of their first child, 7 lb. 15 oz. girl, bom December 2nd at St. Joseph's Hospital. The baby, named Holly Lynn, is the first granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Nickerson, 638 Inca Street, the paternal grandparents. Felix (Pete) Nickerson is a graduate of West High School.
Charlene Francis of 1259 Kql-amath had Thanksgiving with-her brother Jerry Francis and family in Aurora.
Allen Larsen flew in to surprise his mother Mrs. Grace Byrnes and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Schonborg of 1248 Lipan Street. Allen has to be back on board the USS Wasp December 16th.
years I have seen many improvements and hope to see more.
Occasionally people I know wonder why I continue living in West Denver when it appears obvious to them there are certainly better places in Denver to live. In reply to this I state that my family and 1 like living here and I point with pride to our West Side Improvement Association, the West Side Action Council and our schools. Granted, none of these organizations are perfect, but in each I see dedicated and interested people striving to make their West Side an even better community. Just last month I had the privilege of hearing the band at Baker Junior High play. I was amazed and delighted at the quality of playing by those young people. No, I don't need to apologize for where I live. All around me are friends and neighbors with whom I hope to continue to work to. make our West Side an even better place to live.
Mrs. Rachel Guedea
High Singing Christmas Tree Dec. 22St. Joseph's Grade School Christmas Party Jan. 7Rummage Sale 9:30-4 p.m., at St. Joseph's.
Jan. 8 General Meeting, West Side Improvement Association at Wesley Methodist Church, W. 5th and Galapago, at 2:30 p. m.
Jan. 9Denver County PTO Meeting at West High lunchroom, 7:30 p. m.
Jan. 11Parent-Teacher conferences, Greenlee, 3 p. m.-Jan. 12 St. Joseph's High School PTA Meeting.
Jan. 18Parent-teacher conferences, Greenlee, 3 p. m.
BYERS BOOK REVIEWS
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Glynn of 1253 Kalamath had Thanksgiving dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Tom Chanay at 538 Kalamath.
JUNK CAR AID RECEIVED
I very much appreciate efforts of West Side Improvement Association in their continued determination to help me in having removed from the premises an old dilap-dated junk automobile, a very unsightly and unwanted decoration on the vacant lots for over 7 months, proving again that with effort, determination and cooperation vacant lots can be kept pleasing to the eye and not look like the city dump. Through the efforts of the West Side Improvement Association a law has been uncovered that protects property owners from the deposit of junk automobiles on private property without permission. The law provides removal by police without cost to the property owner.
Anthony F. Sadusky
Mr. Davenport has written a witty and learned introduction on various methods of murder and has made perceptive comments on each of the thirteen stories. Here is a book that will win the admiration of the connoisseur of intellectual homicide.
MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY, MEN AGAINST THE SEA, and
W. 7th Ave. & Santa Fe Drive Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 2-5:30 p.m. Sat 10 a.m.-12 noon and 1-5:30 p.m. Closed Wednesdays.
HIGHWAY ROBBERY by Sam Crowther and Irwin Winehouse
Here, documented fully for the first time, is a revelation HHH of all the different kinds of j PITCAIRN S ISLAND swindles that can cost you! by Charles Nordhoff and James moneyto say nothing of ag? j Norman .Hall giravation and even agony. In) This exciting trilogy completes Highway Robbery, you will j the tale of the Bounty's muti-leam: jneers. The actual sea voyage
How the new tires you buy and mutiny that leads them can turn your car into a cof- to Tahiti and their esablish-fin. merit of a tiny kingdom on an
Where the speed traps are. island completely cut off from How car repair gyps flourish the world makes an extraor-under the law; the different dinary chronicle, ways mechanics will try to BEgT DETECTIVE swindle you cold how to pro*. Qp THE YEAR
tect yourself.
The new and used-car dealers' tricks to swindle suckers.
*How the "time payment" rackets work.
Why you take a risk when you park your car in an indoor public garage.
How "fake" accidents are staged.
These are some of the many areas of fraud covered by this startling book.
13 WAYS TO DISPOSE OF A BODY
An Anthology Compiled and Edited by Basil Davenport
In this, Anthony Boucher's fourth collection of the best in mystery and suspense short fiction, the New York Times critic proves again that a good mystery story is a work of art. The range of stories is wide.
Rest In Peace
Lola Templeton
Funeral services ;for Mrs. Lola S. Templeton were held November 25th from, Olinger's Mortuary, Speer Blvd. & Sherman, with interment in Fort Logan Cemetery.
Mrs. Templeton, who resided at 830 Kalamath, died November 21st en route to the hospital as an emergency patient. She had been ill only a few weeks. She was 45 years of age.
Bom on October 9, 1921 at Oak Creek, Colorado, the family moved to Denver where she attended West Denver schools, Elmwood, Baker Junior High and West High. She was married to Edgar Tem-qleton July 24, 1941 in Denver.
A keen interest in the community's PTA's, Cub Scout and Boy Scout organizations was displayed by Mrs. Templeton. She and her husband were awarded a special plaque, a clock, with their names engraved, for twenty-five years of service in Scouting. The Boy Scout Troop for which they did most of their work was Troop 200.
Mrs. Templeton was employed by the Bennett Distributing Company for the past seven years.
Surviving in addition to her husband, Edgar, are three sons, Donald T. and Roger T. of Denver and Michael T., U. S. Army, Ft. Bliss, Texas; her mother Mrs. Ethel Lucas, Denver; her mother-in-law, Mrs. Mary Templeton, Denver; two* sisters Margaret Mura Denver and Mae D. Long, Arvada, and four grandchildren.
The family of Lola Templeton wishes to thank the many friends and neighbors for their kind thoughts and helping hands during the recent bereavement of their loved one. Edgar Templeton, sons, and mother, Mrs. Ethel Lucas;. 830 Kalamath and Mrs. Mary Templeton, 412 Santa Fe Drive.
Becky Conners
Becky Conners of 3185 So. Sherman who used to work for the Francis Curtain Cleaners passed away December 2nd, in Porter's Hospital. She had been ill for several months.
Meeting On Handicapped Children
The Denver County Parent Teacher Organization will hold, their next meeting January 9th in the West High School lunchroom at 7:30 p. m.
"The Legislative Unmet Needs In The Education Of Handicapped Children" will be the subject of the program. The speaker will be U. S. Representative Hugh L. Carey (N.Y.) who will present his plans for-a legislative package to be introduced at the next Congress. Rep. Carey is on the Congressional committee for Education
From Frank McAuliffe comes 011(1 Labor* an example of a wholly amoral Invitations have been sent to crime story. In contrast, Chris- state legislators and also tianna Brand provides a story 1 parents and groups of all in which justice triumphsbut handicapped children, through
that triumph is as shocking as any of injustice. Then Henry Cecil shows that even so awesome a .person as an English judge may be a victims of his own words.
out the state.
The organization is composed of parents and teachers of children in the Special Education or developmental classes of the Denver Public Schools..



December, 1966
Greenlee
CHRISTMAS PROGRAM
The annual Greenlee Christmas program will be-held'December 16ih under the direc-; tion of Mrs. Joyce Davis. The theme will be "Greenlee Sing-Out at Christmasrtime" with all fourth, fifth' and- sixth grade students participating. Cindy Rampa will sing ct solo and the bellringers will be Rosal-Va Valdez, Mary Williams, and Jane Suekama,. The 2:00 p. m. performance is open to the public.
Head Start
CHRISTMAS TREE
A large Christmas tree has been placed in the main hall of Greenlee upon which decorations will be placed that are-made by pupils in all of the grades. Parents are invited to come by and see these unusual and interesting trimmings created from all sorts of materials.
PTA BOARD OF ; MANAGERS LUNCHEON
The Board of Managers of the Greenlee PTA will hold a luncheon at Greenlee School on December 21, at 12:00 noon. Meat will be furnished by the PTA and each person is asked to bring a side dish. Also, those wishing to exchange gifts may bring one costing no more than $1.00.
SIXTH GRADE SING-OUT
All sixth graders and the Greenlee chorus held a sing-out on December 9th. Patriotic songs were sung and those students who gave readings were Diane Lucero, Manuel Grge, Rose' Tafoya, Becky Padilla, Cindy Rampa and Yen Yen Yin. The purpose of the sing-out was to give the students an opportunity to express their feelings of citizenship, patriotism and human" relationships. The program was under the direction of Mr. Mike Connors and Mrs. Joyce Davis. The guitar was played by Miss Margaret Casey.
LIBRARY PLAY
The fifth grade students in Mrs. Mary Sharpe's room will present a play "Christmas in Ozland." 1 The play will be given in the. library under the direction of Miss Eleanor Anderson. Those pupils who have leading parts are Debbie. Jaramillo, David Nadeau, Mdrgie Lim^lin, Benjie Trujillo, Debra Lehman, Joseph Francosa. The program will be presented for the primary grades.
LARASA Workshop
LARAS A sponsored an allday Workshop at Baker Junior High School1 on Dec. 10. The workshop was about the problems of Spanish-speaking people housing, unemployment, dirj. -imination, etc. It was at-ten :':ed by representatives from about 30 Spanish-American organizations.
Guest speakers were Dr. Campa of the University of Denver and Dr. Daniel Valdes from Metropolitan State College.
Mrs. Thomas P Sepulveda, teacher at Greenlee led a panel discussion on "Problems and Solutions in Elementary Education."
The parents of youngsters who attend the Elati Head Start Center at 228 Elati Ja&eet. are planning a Christmas Open House., The Open House will be held on Wednesday evening, December 21, frpiri 7:30-8:30 p. m.
The parents and teachers at the Center hope that interested neighbors will come to visit the Center and get acquainted with the activities of the Center. Refreshments will be served. The Head Start Project at 228 Elati is sponsored by Auraria Community Center.
St. Cajetan's
The children of Saint Cajetan's School presented a Christmas Program for parents and friends on December '15ih at 7:30 p. m. in the school cafeteria.
The P.T.A. will sponsor a Christmas Party for the children on December 22nd. Classes will be dismissed 1 for the holidays on Dec. 22nd.
CHRISTMAS IS NEAR By Ricky Medina, grade 7 -1,
The snow is now- falling and Christmas is near
The children are happy and smiling with cheer
The children are planning in what they will get
A toy car, a pretty doll, or even a pet.
CHRISTMAS AND THE GIFT By Chris Trujillo, grade 8 Christmas is a time .of happiness Happiness; in our home and in our faith .
Faith in God's Promise. God formed a new family on Christmas night He gave us the Gift A special gift from heaven
THE RECORDER yT Y v
Page Three 'l
Lincoln Park Resident Council
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes had its annual election of officers on Thursday, Dec. 1, 1966. We wish to welcome three of our VISTA volunteers to our Board of Directors. We would like also to welcome all of the VISTA volunteers in our area.
We will have the Children's Christmas Party on Dec. 19 at 1438 Navajo. We will have two parties, one for younger children at 1:00 p.. m. and the other for older children' at 3:45 p. m.
Women's Job Corps
Colorado is very proud of tne number of girls who have taken advantage of the Women's Job Corps Training opportunities. WTCS (Women in Community Service) the volunteer group of women recruit- j ing girls between the age of 16 and 21 years have Sent more than 350 girls to Job Corps Training Centers, according to Mrs. Lucille Qan-riin, Project Director.
WTCS are now engaged in a campaign to recruit girls desiring to take advantage of the educational and job training opportunities offered by the Job Corps. Interested girls may contact the WICS office, Suite .507, University Building, 910 16th Street. Phone 623-4349.
Colorado graduates have been successful in obtaining employment, Mrs. Clannin said. Among the graduates now working are: Virginia Perez, 1325 Lipan Street, Mary E. Quintana, 1223 Lipan Street, Sharon Romero, 917 Kalamath Street, Mary Ramirez, 1324 Lipan Street.

West High
West High will present its annual Singing Christmas Tree December 16th through 22nd. The theme will be "On the Street of Christmas Dreams." On December 16th performances will be at 10:00 a. m. and 2:00 p. m. On December 19th, 20th, 21st and 22nd there will be performances at 7:30 p. m. The concert on December 20th is for invited guests only.
The Concert Choir, the largest ever with 102 voices, will be under the direction of Mr. James Fluckey. The coveted position ;pf the star at the top1 of the tree will be given to a different person for each performance. The "star" also singe a solo,
Although the Choir presents the actual program many other people and organizations work behind the scenes so that West's Singing Christmas Tree becomes a whole school project.
Over-all chairman is Mr. William Kingsley. Publicity is handled by Mrs. June Nich-olds and Mr. Don Nelson. Other groups and people .who help are: Mr. John Karamigios and his stage ci;ew who set up the tree, mfembers of the art classes who, under the direction of MissMyrtice Patty, Mr. Abel Vigil and Mrs. Lulu Jacobs, idesign program and invitation covers, decorate the collars worn by the Choir members and v spray the boughs; the clothing classes directed by Mrs. Mary Ann
Parthum made the collars; the health department that gives physicals to choir, members and the print shop prints programs and invitations under the guidance of Mr. William Grove. Also participating are the journalism students of Mrs, June Nicholds and the. ROTC which serves I asI ushers.
On December 12th the Varsity Football Team of West High and the coaches were honored guests at a banquet held in El Oro Room at the Tiffin Inn. West's best football season in 26 years was the reason for the banquet. Mr. Earl Paul, principal, was the Master of Ceremonies and Mr. Gilbert Cruter was the guest speaker.
Head coach of the team is Mr. Mike Huddleston and cp-captairis-are Dennis Haas and BemiS Lopez.
A large number of school organizations contributed money to make possible this banquet for their team wh6m they obviously felt deserved this honor fpr their success this year. Organizations helping to provide for the dinner. were the Cheerleaders, the Lariattes,. Pep Club, Pom Poms, Optimist Club, Student Council, the Sophomore, Junior and Senior Classes, the Girls Gymnastics and the W Club.
Congratulations to this West High Football Team and may next year be even better!
Elmwood
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park homes; will have its next meeting on Jam 5, 1967/ at 7:30 p. m. This meeting will consist of installing newly elected officers. We. hope to see you there.
* *
Toys for the Children's Christmas Party at Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes have been provided this year through donation by William Blackburn, a local businessman. Helping to wrap the toys have been Mrs. George Qribari, Mrs. Charles Chavez, Mrs. Mary Chavez, Miss Mary Blackburn and Miss Judy Chavez.
We wish you a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
The sixth grade, class at Elmwood School has just finished taking part in an exciting program. The program was called PACE (Project to Advance Creativity in Education).
We had the opportunity of meeting and working with the sixth grade boys and girls from Lincoln and Wyatt Elementary Schools. Each boy and girl in our room had a buddy from each of the two schools. We received their telephone number so that we cOuld call them and get ac-
quainted arid discuss the trips tfyat we would take.
We went with our buddies on four trips to the Chappel House to view articles and learn how the Hispanic, Negro, Indian, and Asian Americans have all made contributions to our way of life. On each trip we were able to meet three people from each culture. We got to see weaving, pottery making, sculpturing and wood carving demonstrated by each group.
Auraria Community Center
Auraria Community Center ana the Denver Housing Authority will dedicate their new building, at 1200 Mariposa Street, on Friday, December 16th at 7:30 p m. The dedication of the new building' will be conducted by the; Denver Housing. Authority, in conjunction with Auraxia's Christmas Family Night.
Entertainment will be pro-i vided by the elementary age club groups-, who will present a Christmas Program, and tlie Greenlee School Chorus, under the direction of Mrs. Davis.
Conducted tours of the building and refreshments will follow- the program.
Auraria Community Center cordially invites West Side residents to visit the new center arid to attend the Christmas Program.
The Auraria-.. Neighborhood Group had an exciting Christmas Party last Tuesday, December 13th. The group invited 10 gentlemen from the Salvation Army Social Service Center to Auraria. to join in the festivities. All present enjoyed bingo, singing, Christmas cards, dancing and refreshments. The refreshments and decoration committee consisted of Mrs. Rosemary Galindo, Mrs. Pauline Barella, and Mrs. Florence Joe.
The Auraria Neighborhood Group meets each Tuesday evening at 7:30 p. m., at the Auraria Community Center.The group is working at finding ways for low income and ADC
Scout News
GIRL SCOUTS
Girl Scout Troop 726 has had a busy schedule through November and December with a Court of Honor Campout November 5 .and ,6 near Conifer. There was much planning, training ani fun that week and on November 19th our Troop went to Eventide of Longmont to entertain the senior citizens for Thanksgiving with songs, table decorations,, cookies and punch. The girls, also enjoyed personal visits with the ladies and gentlemen.
Dec. 17 the girls are invited to a Christmas party of a Senior Troop in Arvada.
BOY SCOUTS
Troop 200 had their first'; winter campout at Tahosa December 10 and 11. Twelve-boys and three adults made the camp cub scouts'Jimmy Dale and Richard Bruffet, Joey Maj, Brian Morris and Richard Zike, and Boy Scouts Mike Rellum, James Cothran, Randy Mena, Brad Morris, Pete and Benny Mdj and Robert Santi-llanez. Leaders were Jim Bruffet, assistant cub master; Eugene Maestas, assistant scout master; and Richard Mena, temporary scout master. Almost all the boys had to cook at least three meals as well as clean up after, make their beds and be sure to have warm enough clothes4 to wear.
December 6 Troop 200 had a chance to learn about the stars.
families to reestablish credit for]by visiting Chamberlin's Obser-
a charge account at reputable stores; Mrs. Gracie Lofton has been teaching some knitting skills at each meeting.
vatory. The sky was not clear, so they did not get to use the telescope, but were invited to come back at a later date.


THE RECORDER
December, 1966
Page Four
. £ltoJ?p ivtcj lifS ,
"If you owe money on something, you can pay a dollar a month/ and if the creditor refuses to accept it, the debt is paid in full." DON'T YOU BELIEVE IT! This old wive's tale has been kicking around for a long time, but IT'S JUST NOT SO! A creditor has a right to demand payment in full whenever it is due, and he can change his mind at any time and demand full payment even if he has accepted part payment before. If you owe money, the law says those you owe it to can collect.
PLEATS TO GROW ON, When. you shop for children's clothes this winter, shop for clothes that will grow with the child, say clothing specialists at the U. S. Department of Agriculture. For little girls, buy dresses that are gathered, pleated or circular, dresses without belts or definite waistlines and with big hems and seams, roomy armholes and short sleeves without cuffs or bands.
HALF A HAM. To get the most for your money when buying a ham, buy it either whole or by the half. That way you know you'll get those meaty center slices. According. to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, a "ham half" must be exactly that. A piece of ham labeled butt or shank "end" or "portion" means the butcher has removed the center slices' (and probably sold them separately, for more mon ey).
Merchants Revitalize Spruce Lane
In September, 1965, the mer-.owners and the landlords was chants on Broadway, between enlisted, many of whom spent
First and Bayaud, held a series of meetings and decided ;o form an association of the businessmen to solve a growing problem in the area. This problem was one of vacant buildings, filthy streets/falling sales, and in general, a drab, dreary business area. The solution was to make the area an attractive, safe, well-lighted and convenient place to shop. They did not want the area to become another lower downtown Denver.
The first step was to start a comprehensive beautification program in the area. At the expense of each merchant, the association bought individual spruce trees to border the area. A conscientious "clean-up" and "light-up" program was initiated and the merchants responded by leaving more window lights on longer and trying to keep the sidewalks, curbs, and gutters cleaner.
The Christmas light program was expanded cmd this year the merchants are purchasing the most beautiful decorations ever installed in the area.
The help of the building
a great deal of money refacing, repainting, remodeling,. or tearing down old property.
An advertising campaign was also started to advertise the individual businesses and to promote the area. Seasonal promotions included a Thanksgiving turkey drawing and a Christmas drawing.
The association has many aggressive plans for the future that include street lighting that will be four times brighter than the present lighting, additional parking facilities, more trees and additional items for beautification, more and better advertising, filling of vacant offices, rooms, and buildings and
Safety First At Christmas Time
A little forethought and planning for Christmas toys and decorations can prevent accidental injury or poisoning,' advises Dr. John Connell, Director of. Denver General Hospital's Pediatric Service and Poison Control Center.
"Toys should be appropriate for the child they're given to," says Dr. Connell. "For instance, a chemistry set is a good present for a 12 year old boy who is reliable about reading instructions and following them. A seven year old could not be depended on to use the set safely, and he might burn or poison himself with the same set."
The same precaution goes for all electrical toys such as
m I_________HR trams and woodbummg sets,
more seasonal promotion pro- . 5 ,
tut vw rockets, gasoline-powered mod-
els, guns of all sorts, knives, dart sets and bows and ar-
grams. All of this is not pos sible without the full support of all the merchants in the area. The member-merchants are at present paying a $1.00 per month per. front foot for beautification, advertising, and promotion and an additional $1.00 per front foot per year for Christmas lighting. This is the expense they gladly pay when they examine the results that have been achieved so far.
CHRISTMAS HINTS
TURKEY TIP. Here's a helpful hint that will put the homemaker in the living room a little sooner on Christmas Day.
U. S. Department of Agriculture food specialists suggest cooking the stuffing separately, then roasting it the last hour that the turkey cooks. For a moist stuffing, baste occasionally with pan drippings from the roasting turkey. A turkey roasted without stuffing tastes
just as good as a stuffed tur- well-watered, urges the U. key, USD A research shows.
TREE TEST. Bounce it, whack it, sniff it. If the Christmas tree you select can pass these testsbuy it. Choose a tree for its shape and size. But check before you buy to be sure it's fresh, say USD A tree specialists. A quick bounce on the frozen ground can give
you the answer. The needles will fly if it's dry. Or take a whack at the branches and see how well the needles hold. Then smell the tree. A newly-cut tree will have that fresh-from-the-f orest smell. However, please remember to reserve the rougher tests for the tree you think you will buy.
FOR MORE FRAGRANCE.
For a healthy, fire-resistant Christmas tree, keep your tree
mm
Department of Agriculture. A 6-foot tree may take up as much as a quart of water a day when first brought indoors. This water is needed to replace the moisture given off by. the needles in the warm atmosphere qf your home. And did you know? The more moisture the needles give off, the more fragrant your tree.
rows. Young children often swallow small pieces of toys or choke on them, so such toys should be given only to children old enough to know better. Even then, parents should be -careful not to let the baby in the family get an older borther's or sister's small toys;. Eyes ,of stuffed toys should be firmly attached, and if they are not, mother should take them off and sew on. buttons with strong twine.
Tree- lights should be inspected for frayed wires and broken sockets before they are used, broken tree balls should be discarded, and Christmas trees should be where a small child can see and enjoy them, but not touch them. Many careful parents put the tree on a table or even inside the play pen when there's a toddler in the house.
BUYING MEN'S SHIRTS
Labels and handtags list the quality of a shirt. The
exact fiber identifications and explicit laundering instructions. These are your clues to fabric performance. A shirt labeled "100% cotton" will be long-wearing, comfortable, absorbent and inexpensive. However, it will rumple easily and require careful ironing. M shirts are to be sent to a commercial laundry, a 100% cotton shirt without special finishes is an excellent choice.
A "100% polyester" (dacron, fortrel, kodel, or vycron) shirt will be less absorbent and
best workmanship is found on the more expensive shirts, but look for high standards of workmanship on any shirt you buy. Even the best fabric is no good if the shirt itself falls apart.
Before you buy, ask the clerk to let you examine the shirt. Look for:
^Closely woven fabrics. Symmetrical lines throughout th shirtfabric cut on the grain, collar points the same length, plaids' and stripes carefully matched.'
more expensive than cotton, Even, short stitches, espec-
but it will be wrinkle-free, dry in a few hours, and require no ironing. "65% polyster35% cotton" fabrics combine the best qualities of cotton and synthetics strong, absorbent, and wrinkle-free. Because of their superior strength, these are the fabrics most often treated with "wash-and-wear" and "permanent press" chemical processes.
"EASY-CARE" FINISHES
ially on collars.1 Longest stitches on "wash-and-wear" and "permanent press" fabrics to prevent seem puckering.
Sleeves inserted at an angle to allow freedom of movement. Sleeves cut in One piece rather than pieced on the underside. Fullness of the sleeve inserted at an angle to allow freedom of movement. Sleeves cut in one piece rather than I gathered. Sleeve placket with
, I mm at feast a 6-inch opening. Con-W ash-and-wear and per- ^nUous
WHAT'S PLENTIFUL? There's lots of good eating ahead for the family who follows the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Plentiful Foods List for Decern-1 ber. Food shops will be full of broiler-fryers, canned sal-:mon> grapes, raisins, pork and -winter pears. And here's what you can look forward to in Januaryoranges (they're the featured item on the list), more pears and broiler-fryers, grapefruit, dry beans and green split peas.
MISLEADING LABELS. The label that deceives rather than describes is nothing new. The 1928 Yearbook of Agriculture points a critical finger at manufacturers who. use containers designed to "blind the eye" and "labels so ornate and so designed to appeal to our sense family.
of the aesthetic rather than our \ common sense." It shows a large false-sided bottle of vanilla extract beside a smaller, straight-sided bottle that contains twice as much. The author urges consumers to "read" the label. "Sharp eyes, she said, "will prove a distinct advantage to the buyer.". How true. Even todayalmost 40 years later.
PENNIES DO COUNT. A few cents, saved here and there at the grocery store, can cut your weekly food bill anywhere from 10 to 15 percent, USD A food economists find. Try it and see. Take breads and cereais as a starter. As you. shop, remember: Bread is, less expensive than rolls. Day-old bread, if available, is even cheaper. Hot cereals cost less than ready-to-eat varieties; Unsweetened cereals less than sugared. Whole grain enriched or fortified cereal products usually are less expensive (and more wholesome) than fancy crackers and spe cial breads. Figure the cost and then decide which is for your
FREE LEGAL SERVICES FOR THE WEST SIDE
Free legal services will be available Monday evenings at 1438 Navajo Street in Lincoln Park. The office will be staffed by VISTA Volunteers living in Lincoln Park, three of whom have degrees in law, along with Denver lawyers from the Neighborhood Law Center at 333 23rd Street. On Monday evenings from 7 to 9 the office will be staffed by the VISTA Volunteers who will interview clients and arrange meetings with lawyers who will be at the office on Monday evenings. Appointments with the lawyers can be made only on Monday nights. The VISTAs are not members of the Colorado Bar and therefore cannot give legal advice or represent clients in court. However, the legal training they have had in other states will enable them to assist the Denver lawyers in providing legal services to the people of the Lincoln Park area. The services are not limited to the residents of Lincoln and South Lincoln Housing Project but rather are available to all people in the neighborhood.
manent press finishes add $2 to the cost of a shirt, but the easy-care qualities (savings on laundry bills or ironing time), comfort, and day-long, wrinkle-free appearance make them desirable.
Unfortunately, these qualities often come at the expense lof fabric durability. The- necessary chemicals and high heat in curing ovens weakens fabrics, especially cotton. Collars and cuffs tend to fray along the edge and at points of abrasion. Ofl stains are hard, if not impossible to remove. Fabrics may feel "stiff" to the touch. Seams may pucker, and require touch-up ironing. (If there is to be seam puckering on a "permanent press" shirt, you can see it before you buy. On "wash-and-wear" shirts, it shows up only after laundering.)
As for advertising claims of "no ironing," it is generally agreed that "wash-and-wear" shirts do require touch-up ironing. "Permanent press" shirts require rio ironing, if tumble dried. The effectiveness and durability of these finishes may vary, depending on the quality of the shirt.
WORKMANSHIP
The workmanshiphow a garment is cut, sown, and finished helps you determine
facing on sleeve placket of -'wash-and-wear" and "permanent press" shirts to reduce seam puckering. Cuff stitching around top of cuff or through center to hold lining in place.
-^Matching buttons,' of uniform thickness, rustproof, and firmly sewn with rid loose threads. Buttonholes firmly stitched and reinforbed at each end.
LONGER-LASTING SHIRTS
Proper laundering can make shirts last longer and look better. Cotton shirts should be washed after each wearing in hot water and heavy-duty detergent for 10 minutes, "Wash-and-wear" and "permanent press" shirts shouldfee washed in cold or warm water (to prevent wrinkling) for 5 minutes. Collars and cuffs should be pre-treated with a liquid detergent. Check hangtags before using chlorine biecHa on synthetic fabrics. A fabric softener helps prevent graying and yellowing. "Wash-and-wear" and "permanent press" shirts should be removed from dryer promptly. The heat of the dryer may set wrinkles permanently.
Condensed from Summer 66 | EVERYBODY'S MONEY, a magazine for credit union members. Copyright 1966 by Everybody's Money.


Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3, Number 8
Published Monthly
December, 196$
CHURCHES PLAN FOR CHRISTMAS
Men -working on street resurfacing,, preparing for the new Santa Fe-Kalamath one-way street system, With Byers Li-library, newly remodelled, in the background:
One-Way System Postponed Till Spring
. is .^u^ to ;-the ^old,
. i-W&y'^'s'^terh will | W^t^er brewll
not bo put into meet the re.sur;
May,-, according to Jack Bruce,
Traffic Engineer. The post- feemg. n Kalama'h.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM IN DANGER!
BYERS LIBRARY OPEN HOUSE
Byers Neighborhood Library is celebrating the completion, of remodeling' with an open house on Thursday, January T2, from 3:30 to 5 p. m.
Remodelling of the library located at W. 7 th Avenue and Santa Fe Drive has been extensive, inside and out,, including a bright new lighting system, new painting and cement work, refinishing of woodwork, new floor tiling, etc. Mr. John T. Eastlick, head Librarian for the City and County of Denver, also assures us that the lawn will be replanted this coming spring.
Mrs. Barbara Ritzma, the library assistant in charge at Byers, wishes to extend a special invitation to all readers of the RECORDER to attend the open house. Refreshments will be served.
Unless something happens .to -provide additional money by December : 3Tst, the four programs in th.e; public schools that are. funded through the Denver School Board by the OEO: will come to an end. TheSeidour programs are the Beading Rooms providing' remedial redding, the Study Halls provided in the evenings at various ...locations in the community, the Orientation Rooms and the Youth Motivation groups.
The main reasons foi.v this happening are that OEO funds to Denver Opportunity have been cut back and education programs are no longer considered top priority, by Washington. For this reason there is nearly no hope of obtaining additional funds for this program from OEO. However, we feel there is still a possibility of. obtaining locally the funds to continue these programs until the > end of the school year in June, 1-967. Two places where these funds might come from arer' other programs funded by OEO that might have a little extra here and there that could be extracted and from, the 1967 budget of the Denver School Board. There is a certain amount of money in the Board's budget that is not designated for a specific project. Of course there are other worth-
while projects that are hoping to be funded from budget item of $600,000.
This brings us to the reason why we are putting this article in the paper. If you are alarmed, as we are, by the prospect of these important programs ending on December 31st, there I-S something you can do. We think that if every
W S I A Plans Urban Renewal Meeting
-The Skyline Urban .Renewal Project, and possible effects., on the West Side. Will be the topic of a :' General Meeting of the West Side Improvement. .Association'" to be held, an Sunday, January 8, 1967.- The., meeting/; wrl'l-^b^ We^ey
Methodist Church/. W. 5th Avenue and Galapago, at 2:30 p. m.
. Plans for the Skyline Project, '- in the lower downtown area, are being prepared to encourage development of a modern business area.. Voters at the municipal election on May 16 will have the opportunity to vote .for or against the: Project. The January 8 meeting is scheduled to present information about the proposal.
At the general meeting, members of the Improvement Association will also vote on a proposed change in the By-Laws, extending the area of
HELP KEEP HOMES i INTACT %
parent and resident who wants
to see these programs cpntin- improvement Association ue, would take .dime to write south from West First Avenue at least a short letter to the!to include both sides of Ells-Denver Opportunity Board and wortj1 Avenue, to the Denver School Board! telling them of their feeling on thjs, that there is great possibility the programs could be saved.
Schools in our area that have all or some of these programs] are: Fairmont, Elmwood, Greenlee and Baker. We know that Christmas and all the rush that goes with it is now here, but surely each one of us could take time out for two short letters. Certainly nothing is more important than an adequate education for our children, and we feel that these programs are. part of that adequate education.
The places to send your letters are the Denver Opportunity Board, 810 14th Street and the Denver School Board, 414 14th Street.
Let's let them know how we, the people they serve, feel.
Christmas is for giving and sharing. Help share happiness with a gift of good health your contribution1 to Christmas Seals. Do it today!
FIGHT TB AND OTHER RESPIRATORY DISEASES
APOSTOLIC CHURCH OF JESUS, 1039 West 13th Avenue Dpc| 24Christmas Program, 7.30 p. m.
Dec, 25Sunday School, 9:30 a. m.
Worship Service, 10:30 a. m.
Evening Service, 7:30 p. m.
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH,1 1000 Kcrlamath Street *-Dec. 25Sunday School Program, 9:30 a. m.
Musical and Worship Service, 11:00 a. m. Evening Service, 7:00 p. m.
CHURCH OF GOD, 5th Avenue and Fox Street.
Dec. 16Christmas Program, 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 25Christmas Service, 10:00 a. m.
FIRST AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 120 W. 1st Are, Dec. 18Choir Candlelight Service, 7:00 p. m.
Dec. 22Sunday School Christmas Program, 7:30 p m*
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH, 430 West 9th Avenue Dec. 18Worship Service, 9:00 a. m.
Christmas Program by children All musical program presented by church choirsi "A Ceremony of Carols" by Benjamin Britten will include also voices from the Children's Choir, 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 25:iWorship Service, 9:00 a. m.
No evening service
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST CHURCH, 935 W. 11th Av, Dee. 19Christmas Program, 11:00 a. m.
Dec.- 25-Christmas Service, 9:45 a. m., 11:00 a. m.
IGLESIA BETEL DE LAS ASSAMBLEAS DE DIOS,
West 2nd Avenue and Fox Street
Dec. 25Worihip Service, 10:00 a. m.
ST. CAJETAN'S CATHOLIC CHURCH, 9th and Lawrence St Dec.. 18Parishioners are asked to donate items such as food, clothing;, toys, money, candy, nuts, etc., which will go towards filling Christmas baskets for needy which will. he -distributed Christmas eve. These. iterns will be.; collected after each mass^or ^ ; brought ^ to the church.
~D^b/ '/231£^hfess&b^ wfll bdTieard any time throughout the day up until 9 p. m.
Dec. 24Confessions will be heard any time throughout the day up until 9 p. m.
St. Cajetan School Chorus will sing Christmas Carols at 11:30 p. m.
Solemn High Mass will follow at midnight Dec. 25Masses: 7, 8, 9, 10:30, 12 noon, 7:00 p. m.
ST. ELIZABETH'S CATHOLIC CHURCH, 11th and Curtis St Dec. 24Confessions 3:30, 6:00 p. m., 7:30, 9:00 p. m.
St Elizabeth's School students will sing Christ-. mas Carols before Midnight Mass, 11:00 p. m*
under direction of Sister Mary Claire.
Dec. 25'Masses 6, 8, 9:15, 11 a. m., 12:15 p. m.
ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN CHURCH, West 3rd Ave. and Acoma Dec.- 18"All My Heart This Night Rejoices." Conceit by St. John's Junior Choirs 7£10 p. m.
Dec. 24"O Holy Night." Christmas Pageant by the children 5:00 and 7:00 p. m.
"Christmas Wheels. 'Carol and Candlelight Service, 11:00' p. m. .
Dec. 25-jf'Child of God." 8:30 and 11:00 a. m., 9:45 a. m. at chapel B
"The Shepherds Returned" 7:00 p m.
Dec. 26German Service 9:30 a. m.
Dec 31"A Quick Change" 7:30 p. m Jan. .1"A Glorious Year" 8:30 and 11:00 a. m., 9:45 a. in. at Chapel.
"God, Our Help" 7;00 p. m. \
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CHUftCH,
West 6fh Avenue at Galapago Street
Confessions Tuesdays after Novena .Service 3v 5:30 p. m.7:30 p. m.
Dec: 23^-Confessions 3 .to 5:30 p.-. m>., 7:30-8:30 p. m.
Solemn Midnight Mass follpwed by two Shep-* herd Masses
Dec. 25Masses, 6, 7, 8:30/ 10, 11:30 a. m.
Jan. 1 Masses: 6, 7, 8:30, 10, 11:30 a. m.
WESLEYAN COVENANT CHURCH, 525 West 1st Avenue I^ec. IBChristmas Program, 7:00 p. m.
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH, 465 Galapago Street Dec. 24Christmas Eve Candelight Service, 7:00 p. m. Dec.- 25Christmas DaySunday Service, f Dec; 31New Year's Eve Communion, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 p.m.


Page Two
THE. RECORD EH
December, 1966
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244*3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
'fteifAfonfaad 'Hotea
Emma Hodapp was in auto accident and has been very ill. She is in a nursing home at 5822 So. Lowell Way, Littleton, Colorado. She would appreciate cards from her West Side friends.
Mrs. May Day of 138 West 1st Ave., has returned from a 6-weeks vacation visiting relatives and friends. She was in Utah, Las Vegas, Nevada, Arizona and Burley, Idaho.
Mrs. William Newton has been confined'to her home at .147 West 1st Avenue for 2V2 months. She is slowly improving and is able to be out some.
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Peterson of Ogden, Utah, paid a short visit to Mrs. May Day while en route to Miami, Florida. They had dinner at the Top of the Rockies and a pleasant ride through and around Denver seeing the sights.
Richard Looney of 545 Gal-apago will leave Jan. 1 for service in Viet Nam.
Mr. and Mrs. William Hof-schulte, Jr., and family from Seattle, Washington, spent Thanksgiving with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hofschulte of 534 Inca.
Stella Faber is staying with her father Mr. A1 DeHerrera of 518 Galapago while her husband, Sgt. Faber, is in the service overseas.
Mr. and Mrs. Alvarado of 1314 Kalamath Street will have a very Merry ^Christmas this year. Their three daughters and their families will be home for the holidays and they will all celebrate Christmas together. One daughter, Charlotte Romero and her two children will arrive on Christmas Day from Los Angeles and will be here for ten days.
Gloria Gay Recek is coming home for the holidays from Adams State College at Alamosa on the 16th of December. She will be with her parents Mt. and Mrs. Robert Recek of 130 Galapago.
Rev. Joe Kamman and family will have an open house!
WEST SIDE Calendar
Dec. 167:30 p. m., Atiraria Community Center Dedication Dec. 1610 a. m.,-2 p. m.,
EDITORIAL
This issue of the Recorder marks the beginning of my third year as the .editor. When I first started as editor my family and I had been in
Denver and on the West Side i West High Singing Christmas only 6 months. However, we j Tree
already felt at that time like! Dec 19Lincoln Park Chil-
we belonged and this was dren's Christmas Party, 1438
where we wanted to stay, j Navajo, 1:00 p.m., 3:45 p.m. This was the fifth state we! Dec. ig_7;30 p. m West
had lived in and were so well High Singing Christmas Tree satisfied with West (Denver j Dec 20_7;30 | West
that we just decided to stay.lffigh singing Christmas Tree We now feel like the West' Dec. 217:30 p. in.. West Side is our community and High Singing Christmas Tree that we are part of it. We have D 21Noon Greenlee PTA
seen that one needs only to D Hh n' SBPi show he's interested in improv- Bod fM'mag^Meeting
Dec. 21 7:00-8:30 p. m., Elati Head. Start Open House Dec. .227:30 p. m.. West
ing his community and there will be more things for him to do than he can find the
the 18th of December at 1542 time for. In just these few
Wolff Street. Rev. Kamman is the minister of the Wesley Methodist Church at 5th and Galapago. Refreshments will be served and everyone is invited to enjoy their hospitality.
Mr. Ryan Jones is coming home for the holidays December 19th from the Illinois Institute of Technology. He will be with his parents Mr. and Mrs. Albert Jones.
Dave Shoemaker, Sunday School Superintendent of the Wesley Methodist Church at 5th and Galapago, has announced that the Sunday School Christmas party will be held December 18th at the church. All are invited to enjoy the program and gifts.
Mr. M. M. Churchill of 1209 Lipan Street is back in the hospital. He is at St. Luke's Hospital where he underwent another operation. Mr. Churchill is feeling better.
Sgt Major William McCorkle, son of Mrs. Mary Chavez, will be home for the Christmas holidays after three years service in Alaska. He is a career man in the army and has been in the service 19 years. Sgt Major McCorkle, his wife and two children are on their way to Fort Campbell, Ky.
Mrs. Mary Chavez recently went to Sacramento, California, to visit relatives. While there she spoke to local War on Poverty officials.
Mr. and Mrs. Pete Nickerson of Westminster, Colorado, are the proud parents of their first child, 7 lb. 15 oz. girl, bom December 2nd at St. Joseph's Hospital. The baby, named Holly Lynn, is the first granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Nickerson, 638 Inca Street, the paternal grandparents. Felix (Pete) Nickerson is a graduate of West High School.
Charlene Francis of 1259 Kql-amath had Thanksgiving with-her brother Jerry Francis and family in Aurora.
Allen Larsen flew in to surprise his mother Mrs. Grace Byrnes and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Schonborg of 1248 Lipan Street. Allen has to be back on board the USS Wasp December 16th.
years I have seen many improvements and hope to see more.
Occasionally people I know wonder why I continue living in West Denver when it appears obvious to them there are certainly better places in Denver to live. In reply to this I state that my family and 1 like living here and I point with pride to our West Side Improvement Association, the West Side Action Council and our schools. Granted, none of these organizations are perfect, but in each I see dedicated and interested people striving to make their West Side an even better community. Just last month I had the privilege of hearing the band at Baker Junior High play. I was amazed and delighted at the quality of playing by those young people. No, I don't need to apologize for where I live. All around me are friends and neighbors with whom I hope to continue to work to. make our West Side an even better place to live.
Mrs. Rachel Guedea
High Singing Christmas Tree Dec. 22St. Joseph's Grade School Christmas Party Jan. 7Rummage Sale 9:30-4 p.m., at St. Joseph's.
Jan. 8 General Meeting, West Side Improvement Association at Wesley Methodist Church, W. 5th and Galapago, at 2:30 p. m.
Jan. 9Denver County PTO Meeting at West High lunchroom, 7:30 p. m.
Jan. 11Parent-Teacher conferences, Greenlee, 3 p. m.-Jan. 12 St. Joseph's High School PTA Meeting.
Jan. 18Parent-teacher conferences, Greenlee, 3 p. m.
BYERS BOOK REVIEWS
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Glynn of 1253 Kalamath had Thanksgiving dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Tom Chanay at 538 Kalamath.
JUNK CAR AID RECEIVED
I very much appreciate efforts of West Side Improvement Association in their continued determination to help me in having removed from the premises an old dilap-dated junk automobile, a very unsightly and unwanted decoration on the vacant lots for over 7 months, proving again that with effort, determination and cooperation vacant lots can be kept pleasing to the eye and not look like the city dump. Through the efforts of the West Side Improvement Association a law has been uncovered that protects property owners from the deposit of junk automobiles on private property without permission. The law provides removal by police without cost to the property owner.
Anthony F. Sadusky
Mr. Davenport has written a witty and learned introduction on various methods of murder and has made perceptive comments on each of the thirteen stories. Here is a book that will win the admiration of the connoisseur of intellectual homicide.
MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY, MEN AGAINST THE SEA, and
W. 7th Ave. & Santa Fe Drive Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 2-5:30 p.m. Sat 10 a.m.-12 noon and 1-5:30 p.m. Closed Wednesdays.
HIGHWAY ROBBERY by Sam Crowther and Irwin Winehouse
Here, documented fully for the first time, is a revelation HHH of all the different kinds of j PITCAIRN S ISLAND swindles that can cost you! by Charles Nordhoff and James moneyto say nothing of ag? j Norman .Hall giravation and even agony. In) This exciting trilogy completes Highway Robbery, you will j the tale of the Bounty's muti-leam: jneers. The actual sea voyage
How the new tires you buy and mutiny that leads them can turn your car into a cof- to Tahiti and their esablish-fin. merit of a tiny kingdom on an
Where the speed traps are. island completely cut off from How car repair gyps flourish the world makes an extraor-under the law; the different dinary chronicle, ways mechanics will try to BEgT DETECTIVE swindle you cold how to pro*. Qp THE YEAR
tect yourself.
The new and used-car dealers' tricks to swindle suckers.
*How the "time payment" rackets work.
Why you take a risk when you park your car in an indoor public garage.
How "fake" accidents are staged.
These are some of the many areas of fraud covered by this startling book.
13 WAYS TO DISPOSE OF A BODY
An Anthology Compiled and Edited by Basil Davenport
In this, Anthony Boucher's fourth collection of the best in mystery and suspense short fiction, the New York Times critic proves again that a good mystery story is a work of art. The range of stories is wide.
Rest In Peace
Lola Templeton
Funeral services ;for Mrs. Lola S. Templeton were held November 25th from, Olinger's Mortuary, Speer Blvd. & Sherman, with interment in Fort Logan Cemetery.
Mrs. Templeton, who resided at 830 Kalamath, died November 21st en route to the hospital as an emergency patient. She had been ill only a few weeks. She was 45 years of age.
Bom on October 9, 1921 at Oak Creek, Colorado, the family moved to Denver where she attended West Denver schools, Elmwood, Baker Junior High and West High. She was married to Edgar Tem-qleton July 24, 1941 in Denver.
A keen interest in the community's PTA's, Cub Scout and Boy Scout organizations was displayed by Mrs. Templeton. She and her husband were awarded a special plaque, a clock, with their names engraved, for twenty-five years of service in Scouting. The Boy Scout Troop for which they did most of their work was Troop 200.
Mrs. Templeton was employed by the Bennett Distributing Company for the past seven years.
Surviving in addition to her husband, Edgar, are three sons, Donald T. and Roger T. of Denver and Michael T., U. S. Army, Ft. Bliss, Texas; her mother Mrs. Ethel Lucas, Denver; her mother-in-law, Mrs. Mary Templeton, Denver; two* sisters Margaret Mura Denver and Mae D. Long, Arvada, and four grandchildren.
The family of Lola Templeton wishes to thank the many friends and neighbors for their kind thoughts and helping hands during the recent bereavement of their loved one. Edgar Templeton, sons, and mother, Mrs. Ethel Lucas;. 830 Kalamath and Mrs. Mary Templeton, 412 Santa Fe Drive.
Becky Conners
Becky Conners of 3185 So. Sherman who used to work for the Francis Curtain Cleaners passed away December 2nd, in Porter's Hospital. She had been ill for several months.
Meeting On Handicapped Children
The Denver County Parent Teacher Organization will hold, their next meeting January 9th in the West High School lunchroom at 7:30 p. m.
"The Legislative Unmet Needs In The Education Of Handicapped Children" will be the subject of the program. The speaker will be U. S. Representative Hugh L. Carey (N.Y.) who will present his plans for-a legislative package to be introduced at the next Congress. Rep. Carey is on the Congressional committee for Education
From Frank McAuliffe comes 011(1 Labor* an example of a wholly amoral Invitations have been sent to crime story. In contrast, Chris- state legislators and also tianna Brand provides a story 1 parents and groups of all in which justice triumphsbut handicapped children, through
that triumph is as shocking as any of injustice. Then Henry Cecil shows that even so awesome a .person as an English judge may be a victims of his own words.
out the state.
The organization is composed of parents and teachers of children in the Special Education or developmental classes of the Denver Public Schools..



December, 1966
Greenlee
CHRISTMAS PROGRAM
The annual Greenlee Christmas program will be-held'December 16ih under the direc-; tion of Mrs. Joyce Davis. The theme will be "Greenlee Sing-Out at Christmasrtime" with all fourth, fifth' and- sixth grade students participating. Cindy Rampa will sing ct solo and the bellringers will be Rosal-Va Valdez, Mary Williams, and Jane Suekama,. The 2:00 p. m. performance is open to the public.
Head Start
CHRISTMAS TREE
A large Christmas tree has been placed in the main hall of Greenlee upon which decorations will be placed that are-made by pupils in all of the grades. Parents are invited to come by and see these unusual and interesting trimmings created from all sorts of materials.
PTA BOARD OF ; MANAGERS LUNCHEON
The Board of Managers of the Greenlee PTA will hold a luncheon at Greenlee School on December 21, at 12:00 noon. Meat will be furnished by the PTA and each person is asked to bring a side dish. Also, those wishing to exchange gifts may bring one costing no more than $1.00.
SIXTH GRADE SING-OUT
All sixth graders and the Greenlee chorus held a sing-out on December 9th. Patriotic songs were sung and those students who gave readings were Diane Lucero, Manuel Grge, Rose' Tafoya, Becky Padilla, Cindy Rampa and Yen Yen Yin. The purpose of the sing-out was to give the students an opportunity to express their feelings of citizenship, patriotism and human" relationships. The program was under the direction of Mr. Mike Connors and Mrs. Joyce Davis. The guitar was played by Miss Margaret Casey.
LIBRARY PLAY
The fifth grade students in Mrs. Mary Sharpe's room will present a play "Christmas in Ozland." 1 The play will be given in the. library under the direction of Miss Eleanor Anderson. Those pupils who have leading parts are Debbie. Jaramillo, David Nadeau, Mdrgie Lim^lin, Benjie Trujillo, Debra Lehman, Joseph Francosa. The program will be presented for the primary grades.
LARASA Workshop
LARAS A sponsored an allday Workshop at Baker Junior High School1 on Dec. 10. The workshop was about the problems of Spanish-speaking people housing, unemployment, dirj. -imination, etc. It was at-ten :':ed by representatives from about 30 Spanish-American organizations.
Guest speakers were Dr. Campa of the University of Denver and Dr. Daniel Valdes from Metropolitan State College.
Mrs. Thomas P Sepulveda, teacher at Greenlee led a panel discussion on "Problems and Solutions in Elementary Education."
The parents of youngsters who attend the Elati Head Start Center at 228 Elati Ja&eet. are planning a Christmas Open House., The Open House will be held on Wednesday evening, December 21, frpiri 7:30-8:30 p. m.
The parents and teachers at the Center hope that interested neighbors will come to visit the Center and get acquainted with the activities of the Center. Refreshments will be served. The Head Start Project at 228 Elati is sponsored by Auraria Community Center.
St. Cajetan's
The children of Saint Cajetan's School presented a Christmas Program for parents and friends on December '15ih at 7:30 p. m. in the school cafeteria.
The P.T.A. will sponsor a Christmas Party for the children on December 22nd. Classes will be dismissed 1 for the holidays on Dec. 22nd.
CHRISTMAS IS NEAR By Ricky Medina, grade 7 -1,
The snow is now- falling and Christmas is near
The children are happy and smiling with cheer
The children are planning in what they will get
A toy car, a pretty doll, or even a pet.
CHRISTMAS AND THE GIFT By Chris Trujillo, grade 8 Christmas is a time .of happiness Happiness; in our home and in our faith .
Faith in God's Promise. God formed a new family on Christmas night He gave us the Gift A special gift from heaven
THE RECORDER yT Y v
Page Three 'l
Lincoln Park Resident Council
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes had its annual election of officers on Thursday, Dec. 1, 1966. We wish to welcome three of our VISTA volunteers to our Board of Directors. We would like also to welcome all of the VISTA volunteers in our area.
We will have the Children's Christmas Party on Dec. 19 at 1438 Navajo. We will have two parties, one for younger children at 1:00 p.. m. and the other for older children' at 3:45 p. m.
Women's Job Corps
Colorado is very proud of tne number of girls who have taken advantage of the Women's Job Corps Training opportunities. WTCS (Women in Community Service) the volunteer group of women recruit- j ing girls between the age of 16 and 21 years have Sent more than 350 girls to Job Corps Training Centers, according to Mrs. Lucille Qan-riin, Project Director.
WTCS are now engaged in a campaign to recruit girls desiring to take advantage of the educational and job training opportunities offered by the Job Corps. Interested girls may contact the WICS office, Suite .507, University Building, 910 16th Street. Phone 623-4349.
Colorado graduates have been successful in obtaining employment, Mrs. Clannin said. Among the graduates now working are: Virginia Perez, 1325 Lipan Street, Mary E. Quintana, 1223 Lipan Street, Sharon Romero, 917 Kalamath Street, Mary Ramirez, 1324 Lipan Street.

West High
West High will present its annual Singing Christmas Tree December 16th through 22nd. The theme will be "On the Street of Christmas Dreams." On December 16th performances will be at 10:00 a. m. and 2:00 p. m. On December 19th, 20th, 21st and 22nd there will be performances at 7:30 p. m. The concert on December 20th is for invited guests only.
The Concert Choir, the largest ever with 102 voices, will be under the direction of Mr. James Fluckey. The coveted position ;pf the star at the top1 of the tree will be given to a different person for each performance. The "star" also singe a solo,
Although the Choir presents the actual program many other people and organizations work behind the scenes so that West's Singing Christmas Tree becomes a whole school project.
Over-all chairman is Mr. William Kingsley. Publicity is handled by Mrs. June Nich-olds and Mr. Don Nelson. Other groups and people .who help are: Mr. John Karamigios and his stage ci;ew who set up the tree, mfembers of the art classes who, under the direction of MissMyrtice Patty, Mr. Abel Vigil and Mrs. Lulu Jacobs, idesign program and invitation covers, decorate the collars worn by the Choir members and v spray the boughs; the clothing classes directed by Mrs. Mary Ann
Parthum made the collars; the health department that gives physicals to choir, members and the print shop prints programs and invitations under the guidance of Mr. William Grove. Also participating are the journalism students of Mrs, June Nicholds and the. ROTC which serves I asI ushers.
On December 12th the Varsity Football Team of West High and the coaches were honored guests at a banquet held in El Oro Room at the Tiffin Inn. West's best football season in 26 years was the reason for the banquet. Mr. Earl Paul, principal, was the Master of Ceremonies and Mr. Gilbert Cruter was the guest speaker.
Head coach of the team is Mr. Mike Huddleston and cp-captairis-are Dennis Haas and BemiS Lopez.
A large number of school organizations contributed money to make possible this banquet for their team wh6m they obviously felt deserved this honor fpr their success this year. Organizations helping to provide for the dinner. were the Cheerleaders, the Lariattes,. Pep Club, Pom Poms, Optimist Club, Student Council, the Sophomore, Junior and Senior Classes, the Girls Gymnastics and the W Club.
Congratulations to this West High Football Team and may next year be even better!
Elmwood
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park homes; will have its next meeting on Jam 5, 1967/ at 7:30 p. m. This meeting will consist of installing newly elected officers. We. hope to see you there.
* *
Toys for the Children's Christmas Party at Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes have been provided this year through donation by William Blackburn, a local businessman. Helping to wrap the toys have been Mrs. George Qribari, Mrs. Charles Chavez, Mrs. Mary Chavez, Miss Mary Blackburn and Miss Judy Chavez.
We wish you a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
The sixth grade, class at Elmwood School has just finished taking part in an exciting program. The program was called PACE (Project to Advance Creativity in Education).
We had the opportunity of meeting and working with the sixth grade boys and girls from Lincoln and Wyatt Elementary Schools. Each boy and girl in our room had a buddy from each of the two schools. We received their telephone number so that we cOuld call them and get ac-
quainted arid discuss the trips tfyat we would take.
We went with our buddies on four trips to the Chappel House to view articles and learn how the Hispanic, Negro, Indian, and Asian Americans have all made contributions to our way of life. On each trip we were able to meet three people from each culture. We got to see weaving, pottery making, sculpturing and wood carving demonstrated by each group.
Auraria Community Center
Auraria Community Center ana the Denver Housing Authority will dedicate their new building, at 1200 Mariposa Street, on Friday, December 16th at 7:30 p m. The dedication of the new building' will be conducted by the; Denver Housing. Authority, in conjunction with Auraxia's Christmas Family Night.
Entertainment will be pro-i vided by the elementary age club groups-, who will present a Christmas Program, and tlie Greenlee School Chorus, under the direction of Mrs. Davis.
Conducted tours of the building and refreshments will follow- the program.
Auraria Community Center cordially invites West Side residents to visit the new center arid to attend the Christmas Program.
The Auraria-.. Neighborhood Group had an exciting Christmas Party last Tuesday, December 13th. The group invited 10 gentlemen from the Salvation Army Social Service Center to Auraria. to join in the festivities. All present enjoyed bingo, singing, Christmas cards, dancing and refreshments. The refreshments and decoration committee consisted of Mrs. Rosemary Galindo, Mrs. Pauline Barella, and Mrs. Florence Joe.
The Auraria Neighborhood Group meets each Tuesday evening at 7:30 p. m., at the Auraria Community Center.The group is working at finding ways for low income and ADC
Scout News
GIRL SCOUTS
Girl Scout Troop 726 has had a busy schedule through November and December with a Court of Honor Campout November 5 .and ,6 near Conifer. There was much planning, training ani fun that week and on November 19th our Troop went to Eventide of Longmont to entertain the senior citizens for Thanksgiving with songs, table decorations,, cookies and punch. The girls, also enjoyed personal visits with the ladies and gentlemen.
Dec. 17 the girls are invited to a Christmas party of a Senior Troop in Arvada.
BOY SCOUTS
Troop 200 had their first'; winter campout at Tahosa December 10 and 11. Twelve-boys and three adults made the camp cub scouts'Jimmy Dale and Richard Bruffet, Joey Maj, Brian Morris and Richard Zike, and Boy Scouts Mike Rellum, James Cothran, Randy Mena, Brad Morris, Pete and Benny Mdj and Robert Santi-llanez. Leaders were Jim Bruffet, assistant cub master; Eugene Maestas, assistant scout master; and Richard Mena, temporary scout master. Almost all the boys had to cook at least three meals as well as clean up after, make their beds and be sure to have warm enough clothes4 to wear.
December 6 Troop 200 had a chance to learn about the stars.
families to reestablish credit for]by visiting Chamberlin's Obser-
a charge account at reputable stores; Mrs. Gracie Lofton has been teaching some knitting skills at each meeting.
vatory. The sky was not clear, so they did not get to use the telescope, but were invited to come back at a later date.


THE RECORDER
December, 1966
Page Four
. £ltoJ?p ivtcj lifS ,
"If you owe money on something, you can pay a dollar a month/ and if the creditor refuses to accept it, the debt is paid in full." DON'T YOU BELIEVE IT! This old wive's tale has been kicking around for a long time, but IT'S JUST NOT SO! A creditor has a right to demand payment in full whenever it is due, and he can change his mind at any time and demand full payment even if he has accepted part payment before. If you owe money, the law says those you owe it to can collect.
PLEATS TO GROW ON, When. you shop for children's clothes this winter, shop for clothes that will grow with the child, say clothing specialists at the U. S. Department of Agriculture. For little girls, buy dresses that are gathered, pleated or circular, dresses without belts or definite waistlines and with big hems and seams, roomy armholes and short sleeves without cuffs or bands.
HALF A HAM. To get the most for your money when buying a ham, buy it either whole or by the half. That way you know you'll get those meaty center slices. According. to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, a "ham half" must be exactly that. A piece of ham labeled butt or shank "end" or "portion" means the butcher has removed the center slices' (and probably sold them separately, for more mon ey).
Merchants Revitalize Spruce Lane
In September, 1965, the mer-.owners and the landlords was chants on Broadway, between enlisted, many of whom spent
First and Bayaud, held a series of meetings and decided ;o form an association of the businessmen to solve a growing problem in the area. This problem was one of vacant buildings, filthy streets/falling sales, and in general, a drab, dreary business area. The solution was to make the area an attractive, safe, well-lighted and convenient place to shop. They did not want the area to become another lower downtown Denver.
The first step was to start a comprehensive beautification program in the area. At the expense of each merchant, the association bought individual spruce trees to border the area. A conscientious "clean-up" and "light-up" program was initiated and the merchants responded by leaving more window lights on longer and trying to keep the sidewalks, curbs, and gutters cleaner.
The Christmas light program was expanded cmd this year the merchants are purchasing the most beautiful decorations ever installed in the area.
The help of the building
a great deal of money refacing, repainting, remodeling,. or tearing down old property.
An advertising campaign was also started to advertise the individual businesses and to promote the area. Seasonal promotions included a Thanksgiving turkey drawing and a Christmas drawing.
The association has many aggressive plans for the future that include street lighting that will be four times brighter than the present lighting, additional parking facilities, more trees and additional items for beautification, more and better advertising, filling of vacant offices, rooms, and buildings and
Safety First At Christmas Time
A little forethought and planning for Christmas toys and decorations can prevent accidental injury or poisoning,' advises Dr. John Connell, Director of. Denver General Hospital's Pediatric Service and Poison Control Center.
"Toys should be appropriate for the child they're given to," says Dr. Connell. "For instance, a chemistry set is a good present for a 12 year old boy who is reliable about reading instructions and following them. A seven year old could not be depended on to use the set safely, and he might burn or poison himself with the same set."
The same precaution goes for all electrical toys such as
m I_________HR trams and woodbummg sets,
more seasonal promotion pro- . 5 ,
tut vw rockets, gasoline-powered mod-
els, guns of all sorts, knives, dart sets and bows and ar-
grams. All of this is not pos sible without the full support of all the merchants in the area. The member-merchants are at present paying a $1.00 per month per. front foot for beautification, advertising, and promotion and an additional $1.00 per front foot per year for Christmas lighting. This is the expense they gladly pay when they examine the results that have been achieved so far.
CHRISTMAS HINTS
TURKEY TIP. Here's a helpful hint that will put the homemaker in the living room a little sooner on Christmas Day.
U. S. Department of Agriculture food specialists suggest cooking the stuffing separately, then roasting it the last hour that the turkey cooks. For a moist stuffing, baste occasionally with pan drippings from the roasting turkey. A turkey roasted without stuffing tastes
just as good as a stuffed tur- well-watered, urges the U. key, USD A research shows.
TREE TEST. Bounce it, whack it, sniff it. If the Christmas tree you select can pass these testsbuy it. Choose a tree for its shape and size. But check before you buy to be sure it's fresh, say USD A tree specialists. A quick bounce on the frozen ground can give
you the answer. The needles will fly if it's dry. Or take a whack at the branches and see how well the needles hold. Then smell the tree. A newly-cut tree will have that fresh-from-the-f orest smell. However, please remember to reserve the rougher tests for the tree you think you will buy.
FOR MORE FRAGRANCE.
For a healthy, fire-resistant Christmas tree, keep your tree
mm
Department of Agriculture. A 6-foot tree may take up as much as a quart of water a day when first brought indoors. This water is needed to replace the moisture given off by. the needles in the warm atmosphere qf your home. And did you know? The more moisture the needles give off, the more fragrant your tree.
rows. Young children often swallow small pieces of toys or choke on them, so such toys should be given only to children old enough to know better. Even then, parents should be -careful not to let the baby in the family get an older borther's or sister's small toys;. Eyes ,of stuffed toys should be firmly attached, and if they are not, mother should take them off and sew on. buttons with strong twine.
Tree- lights should be inspected for frayed wires and broken sockets before they are used, broken tree balls should be discarded, and Christmas trees should be where a small child can see and enjoy them, but not touch them. Many careful parents put the tree on a table or even inside the play pen when there's a toddler in the house.
BUYING MEN'S SHIRTS
Labels and handtags list the quality of a shirt. The
exact fiber identifications and explicit laundering instructions. These are your clues to fabric performance. A shirt labeled "100% cotton" will be long-wearing, comfortable, absorbent and inexpensive. However, it will rumple easily and require careful ironing. M shirts are to be sent to a commercial laundry, a 100% cotton shirt without special finishes is an excellent choice.
A "100% polyester" (dacron, fortrel, kodel, or vycron) shirt will be less absorbent and
best workmanship is found on the more expensive shirts, but look for high standards of workmanship on any shirt you buy. Even the best fabric is no good if the shirt itself falls apart.
Before you buy, ask the clerk to let you examine the shirt. Look for:
^Closely woven fabrics. Symmetrical lines throughout th shirtfabric cut on the grain, collar points the same length, plaids' and stripes carefully matched.'
more expensive than cotton, Even, short stitches, espec-
but it will be wrinkle-free, dry in a few hours, and require no ironing. "65% polyster35% cotton" fabrics combine the best qualities of cotton and synthetics strong, absorbent, and wrinkle-free. Because of their superior strength, these are the fabrics most often treated with "wash-and-wear" and "permanent press" chemical processes.
"EASY-CARE" FINISHES
ially on collars.1 Longest stitches on "wash-and-wear" and "permanent press" fabrics to prevent seem puckering.
Sleeves inserted at an angle to allow freedom of movement. Sleeves cut in One piece rather than pieced on the underside. Fullness of the sleeve inserted at an angle to allow freedom of movement. Sleeves cut in one piece rather than I gathered. Sleeve placket with
, I mm at feast a 6-inch opening. Con-W ash-and-wear and per- ^nUous
WHAT'S PLENTIFUL? There's lots of good eating ahead for the family who follows the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Plentiful Foods List for Decern-1 ber. Food shops will be full of broiler-fryers, canned sal-:mon> grapes, raisins, pork and -winter pears. And here's what you can look forward to in Januaryoranges (they're the featured item on the list), more pears and broiler-fryers, grapefruit, dry beans and green split peas.
MISLEADING LABELS. The label that deceives rather than describes is nothing new. The 1928 Yearbook of Agriculture points a critical finger at manufacturers who. use containers designed to "blind the eye" and "labels so ornate and so designed to appeal to our sense family.
of the aesthetic rather than our \ common sense." It shows a large false-sided bottle of vanilla extract beside a smaller, straight-sided bottle that contains twice as much. The author urges consumers to "read" the label. "Sharp eyes, she said, "will prove a distinct advantage to the buyer.". How true. Even todayalmost 40 years later.
PENNIES DO COUNT. A few cents, saved here and there at the grocery store, can cut your weekly food bill anywhere from 10 to 15 percent, USD A food economists find. Try it and see. Take breads and cereais as a starter. As you. shop, remember: Bread is, less expensive than rolls. Day-old bread, if available, is even cheaper. Hot cereals cost less than ready-to-eat varieties; Unsweetened cereals less than sugared. Whole grain enriched or fortified cereal products usually are less expensive (and more wholesome) than fancy crackers and spe cial breads. Figure the cost and then decide which is for your
FREE LEGAL SERVICES FOR THE WEST SIDE
Free legal services will be available Monday evenings at 1438 Navajo Street in Lincoln Park. The office will be staffed by VISTA Volunteers living in Lincoln Park, three of whom have degrees in law, along with Denver lawyers from the Neighborhood Law Center at 333 23rd Street. On Monday evenings from 7 to 9 the office will be staffed by the VISTA Volunteers who will interview clients and arrange meetings with lawyers who will be at the office on Monday evenings. Appointments with the lawyers can be made only on Monday nights. The VISTAs are not members of the Colorado Bar and therefore cannot give legal advice or represent clients in court. However, the legal training they have had in other states will enable them to assist the Denver lawyers in providing legal services to the people of the Lincoln Park area. The services are not limited to the residents of Lincoln and South Lincoln Housing Project but rather are available to all people in the neighborhood.
manent press finishes add $2 to the cost of a shirt, but the easy-care qualities (savings on laundry bills or ironing time), comfort, and day-long, wrinkle-free appearance make them desirable.
Unfortunately, these qualities often come at the expense lof fabric durability. The- necessary chemicals and high heat in curing ovens weakens fabrics, especially cotton. Collars and cuffs tend to fray along the edge and at points of abrasion. Ofl stains are hard, if not impossible to remove. Fabrics may feel "stiff" to the touch. Seams may pucker, and require touch-up ironing. (If there is to be seam puckering on a "permanent press" shirt, you can see it before you buy. On "wash-and-wear" shirts, it shows up only after laundering.)
As for advertising claims of "no ironing," it is generally agreed that "wash-and-wear" shirts do require touch-up ironing. "Permanent press" shirts require rio ironing, if tumble dried. The effectiveness and durability of these finishes may vary, depending on the quality of the shirt.
WORKMANSHIP
The workmanshiphow a garment is cut, sown, and finished helps you determine
facing on sleeve placket of -'wash-and-wear" and "permanent press" shirts to reduce seam puckering. Cuff stitching around top of cuff or through center to hold lining in place.
-^Matching buttons,' of uniform thickness, rustproof, and firmly sewn with rid loose threads. Buttonholes firmly stitched and reinforbed at each end.
LONGER-LASTING SHIRTS
Proper laundering can make shirts last longer and look better. Cotton shirts should be washed after each wearing in hot water and heavy-duty detergent for 10 minutes, "Wash-and-wear" and "permanent press" shirts shouldfee washed in cold or warm water (to prevent wrinkling) for 5 minutes. Collars and cuffs should be pre-treated with a liquid detergent. Check hangtags before using chlorine biecHa on synthetic fabrics. A fabric softener helps prevent graying and yellowing. "Wash-and-wear" and "permanent press" shirts should be removed from dryer promptly. The heat of the dryer may set wrinkles permanently.
Condensed from Summer 66 | EVERYBODY'S MONEY, a magazine for credit union members. Copyright 1966 by Everybody's Money.