Citation
West side recorder, February, 1967

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, February, 1967
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3, Number 10

Monthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
February, 1967
Mrs. Cooper New Librarian
At Byers
Byers not only has a new look, it has h new staff. On January 2.7, .Mrs. Ritzma spent her last day in; the library, briefing me bn my pleasant new duties. She joined her husband who is working as a geologist for the state of Utah in Salt Lake City.
I can Martha' Cooper, with a "Mrs." as my title; I grew up on a cattle ranch near Canon City, Colorado, graduated irom Colorado State College in Greeley, taught school in numerous Colorado towns, and now -live in Littleton. I am truly a daughter of this state!
Our twenty-year old' son is in the navy on the aircraft carrier, U.S.S. America, and nineteen-year old Jeannie is attending college in Fort Collins.
> Because I love to read and I really, like people, I feel Byers Library is my;.answer to a wonderful career. I have already met many of the fine people of this area and find them friendly and patient. The children who have come in with school groups or after, school hours cere well behgyed and eager to really use .itheir library.
I § vyyill v. try,^tp continue^. the 'Saril#' pblfey 'arid^gb^^^eivicb you .. have ha:d,; in. the past. Since-iillihg1 %bhr";. requests = for books is a rear pleasure 10 me, I hope you won't;'hesitate to ask for any and everything you'd like to read.
ORDINANCE PASSED ON JUNK CARS
Denver City Council unanimously passed an ordinance ill to help in dealing with the I r junk car problem at their meet-\| ing of January 30, The ordi-|| nance makes it -unlawful to| | have junk cars 'or pieces of tnem on private property and provides that when the owner of a junk car cannot be found the car will be taken to the car pound and stored for 30 days to allow the owner to redeem it. If he does not claim it, it is then sold. The Department of Health and Hospitals is given the responsibility to enforce this ordinance.
The passage of this ordinance is due in part _to .the efforts of the Park Hill Action Committee and the West Side Improvement Association, working jointly in making Citizen concern known to poun-cilmen. Leslie Kalanquin and Julian Kroeger attended several council sessions for the West Side Improvement Association to support the passage of the new ordinance.
Firehouse Finally Razed
PLAY SCHEDULED
"The Revolutionist" an original., 2 act .play by Rudolph [(Corky) Gonzales Is currently playing at the Seventh Avenue United. Churchy bf y Christ, 666 Kfhg.C* ::beihg-.. pres^hted
the 17th, 18th, and1 19th f February at 8:Q0 p. rh. Tickets are $l;Sp)v Reservations Ore
preferred. These may be obtained- by calling 222-0825.
FORTY-FIVE WEST SIDERS ATTEND HEARING ON 3.2 BAR APPLICATION
A hearing was held on February 9 at 9:30 a. m. at 810 14th Street on an application for a 3.2 beer license which is being sought for the old Santa Fe Theatre building at 974 Sdn-
area (and perhaps in general); are hazardous to safety and property. They argued mat the noise that would be generated would interfere with sleep, especially of elderly
a Fe Drive. Approximately 45 j persons living directly across people were present to pro-1 me street. They felt that the .test the application: Aside | tavern would be a bad moral
from the applicants for the li- j influence on young teens and cense, the only testimony in that-.-some older teens attracted favor of the" application came j to the area by the bar would from a young man in the neighborhood who testified that he,
DON'T BE A SUCKER!
Citizens Meet With Police Captain
What kinds of things are soldi Concerned citizens from the by people who might try to Lincoln Park and South Lin-trick the buyer into signing a coin Park Resident Council and contract? Vacuum cleaners, from District 4 of the West freezers, sewing machines, to Side Improvement Association name h few. The man selling met with Capt Stallins of the a sewing machine, for instance, Denver Police Department, to may have d model that is ad- discuss the feeling of some vertised cheap$20, say. He people that the time it took Will come ^0/ the'house and police to respond to a recent show it, telling you everything emergency call was excessive, that is wrong witk it. Then,.I While, those meeting with heu will ielbyou. gbo^t. the., ter-: ...Qqpi.
rifle; machine" he ~ fids; 'in the- [4v satisfied with police figures bar, and he will show you about how long it took for as-that one, costing better than' sistance to arrive, several im-ten times as much but worth! portant points were discussed, only, say, $50. He then stays Capt Stallins stressed the fill he gets the woman to sign i importance of speaking clear-refusing to leave, sometimes: ly when calling police and till midnight or one in the being sure to tell where help morning. He will tell the worn-'is needed. While you do an ANYTHING to, get her,not have to identify your-name on the paper-that, she self, Capt. Stallins urged peo-.can return it if she doesn't j pie to do so, giving a phone like it, etc. But once she number so that police can signs, SHE'S STUCK! Often j check back for more informa-she.signs to mortgage the fur-1 tion if necessary. He com-niture, 1 In that case, the sales- jmented that the police get man has to get the husband's j many calls where the caller signature too. He will try to will say; something-like "There
After nearly two years of requests by members of the West Side Improvement Association, the old Fire Station at Third Avenue arid Cherokee- Street Was demolished early this month. Demolition was arranged by the purchaser of the property, the Pappy Fry Development Corporation. For many years the building was used to store old materials from various City departments; while the structure was gradually deteriorating. At a general meeting of the Improvement Association in February, 1965, residents of the neighborhood asked the City to remove the building which was unattractive and from which stones near the roof were beginning to fall. A housing inspection program was under way in the area, and home owners were cooperating in a clean up campaign, but -the City owned building was detracting from the improvement efforts.
Ift the fall of 1965 the Fire Station was sold, with a provision that the purchaser must remove the building by December of that year. Various relays resulted, but residents of the neighborhood continued to press for action. Vandals entered the building frequently, and windows were broken .' flies ;j vwere : reported- in- side, and bricks were removed to leave a hole in the wall. Police and Fire Departments were called a number of times, n December, 1966, the Chief building Inspector, Jack OFal-lon, ordered an inspection of the building at the request of the Association, and the structure was declared unsafe. George Kelly, of the Mayor's Office, also assisted in efforts to board up the entrances and o reduce the hazards created V the building.
his Wife, and his sister circulate^; a. petition in favor of the gr&hfing of the license. A number of people testified to cir- culgting;' petitions against;
Mr.. Albert Roybal testified' in: opposition -to the granting; of :the license on behalf of the Westside Action Council; of which he Is vice-president. Mrs. Forrest Swanson, vice-president of the West Side Improvement Association, gave testimony against the proposed license on behalf of' the Association. Opposition was also voiced by persons in the area speaking as property owners,- business people, residents, clergymen, and parents of school-aged children. **
Testimony against the license stressed several factors.People
get the., husband ..anyway, if the wife is not working.
Then the salesman sells the paper' to the finance company, He has his money,! and the finance company will get theirs
attempt to purchase hard liqr _OR ELSE! uor frpm outlet^ in the area by
subterfuge. People also com- Sometimes outfits try to catch
plgmed that the location is too close to West High School. They argued that parking problems would be created in the; area by an influx of teenagers into the neighborhood. Most! often, people pointed out that the area is already well supplied- I with alcoholic beverage' dicenses. -of all; kinds;
Applicants for the license, Mr. Glen W. Jerome and Mr. Lawrence Rodriguez, testified +6 their intention to remodel the theater and apply for a cabaret license in order to have dancing. They both expressed +heir intention to conduct a well-run, attractive business which would be a desirable place for young people.
The decision by Safety Manager Hugh McCleam on the
felt that 3.2 taverns in the application is stffl pending.
suckers by puttingi*&ds in the newspapers1 under "Help. Wanted;" offering people the ^chance to make good money at. home;
You. will be selling, something, they tellWyou,arid ypu will heed one to., demonstrate f.tb customers.,: Yoii'- get ;paid for each. customer, they say, and they ask you to;., sigh the : paper "to work for the company."
If a person1 says he can't pay' investigation into file particu-
bas been a terrible accident 'Tt the! comer. Come' quick!'' And the caller then hangs up, without .telling police'; Where to go. y,The kind! dl call is re^ ported! by the police dispatcher in code:.;This means that: when 'riling, -police you should be eleefr to, let.- the dispatcher know how serious the problem is; Is it a robbery?- An accident?1 Ah illness?
A change in ^police procedure! was reported .rby';.<;Capt. Stallins, designed t "cut down ;oh delays caused by possible confusion .at [the. time, of ; evening r roll call.-. This change was initiated as a result of
The West Side Improvement Association appreciates the help given by the City agencies, but much of the credit must also be given to members of Districts' 7 and 9 who continued their interest and their pressures to improve the West Side.
for, the itema sewing machine, vacuum cleaner, or whateverhe is told, "Don't worry, we will take care of it for you.'' ,"But suppose I .can't., sell any,?"., the, pprson answers. .['Don't worry," says the salesman. "We'will take care of the payments one way or another." And they do OUT OF YOUR HIDE!
lar emergency call which was discussed.
Capt; Stallins expressed a willingness to meet with West Si'ders whenever there is any concern about service .in the area He>. stressed the importance of raising, questions as soon after the incident as possible, so that everything would be fresh in people's minds.
Foster Family Needed
Fort Logan Mental Heoillh Center is looking for a special kind of family to provide a foster home, for a young woman in her 20's. She needs a warrft, stable family who would be interested in her and wi&:Jwould treat her as a member pf their own family. An Anglo or Spanish American hoihe would be suitable. If your home is accepted you would become a part of our Family Care program, and would receive help from Fort Logan /Mental Health Center. You would also be paid $130 per month to cover expenses of care for this young woman.
For more information call Caroline Benham, social worker, Ft. Logan Mental Health Center, 761-0220, ext. 371.


Page Two
RECORDER
February, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez. Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgcrd, Mildred I Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, i Mary Chavez.
'JteiyMi&i&Mcl '7'loted,
-Mr. and Mrs. Rex Mayes ot 1300 Kalamath had as their guest their nephew, Mike Dillon of Terre Haute, Indiana. He is being stationed at Lowry Field.
Abel James Espinosa, the son of Eva Espinosa of 1458 Navajo, and the grandson of Abel M. Choury of 1451 Navajo, is'serving with toe navy. He has left for his station at San Diego, California,
Kirs. Alfonzo Martinez of 1348 Mariposa is now .home from St. Luke's Hospital where she had a check up.
Mrs, May Day pf 138 West 1st Avnu§ Entertained Keif pinochle club, January 30th* There were six present and a delicious luncheon wtt§ served. Noble Day of Fillmore, Utah, brother in law of Mrs. May Day, went on a sight seeing trip around Denver. They visited Buffalo Bill's grave. May Day had a birthday January 27th at her son's home. He is Q. E. Merritt of 5340 East 33rd Avenue. They had a ^wonderful time playing games and visiting..
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Sullivan's nephew, Edmond Carpenter of Arvada, was buried last week at Fort Logan National Cemetery.
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kensler and Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Shriv-er of Pueblo spent last Friday and Saturday with Mr. and Mrs. Henry Schonborg of 1348 Lipan Street
Lance Corporal Jimmy Martinez, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Pacheco of 1253 Lipan Street, called them from Washington, D. C., where he is visiting his cousin.
Rest In Peace
NATIVE DENVERITE, EMMA HODAPP. DIES Miss
TRADING UP? WATCH OUT!
This is what happens when I dollars less for what you heed,
you go. into a store to buy xviias Emma T. Hodapp, a -he washer advertised at "$125 |H native of Denver,- died Sun-^-the price goes up to $1-69.95 j§ aay, February 5 in Littleton after this, one-day sale" and Nursing Home after a long ill- you-walk' out of the store with
WEST DENVER GIRL ELECTED AT D. U.
At the annual election of officers for Associated Women Students at the University of Denver, Miss Ruth Ann Un-
ness, at the age of 78. The Rosary was recited for her Wednesday evening in Me-Conarty's Boulevard Mortuary with requiem high mass being -ung Thursday, February 6 at 9 a.m. in St. Elizabeth's Church. Burial was in Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
: Bom October 9, 1888 in Den-|=Si she attended St. Eilzabeth's School. She was a retired su-oervisor at Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Com-
tbe $209 model instead: the salesman has traded you up.
It-may be that the low-price model wasn't as ''automatic" as -the ad led you to believe. So the friendly salesman showed you the "more automatic" One at a higher price. But really he was primed to make you jump through the hoop for the high-dollar model automatic, yes; frills and flashy deluxe features, yes; but better .performance and usabil-
zicker was honored by beifigloony. Miss Hodapp was a,., ,
, 'M , .i i.*, r t r D itv than the miaale-pnce mod
elected treasurer of -the groups member of Our Lady of the Bell |||
A banquet and the election was held, on January 30th.
A second year student; at Denver \ University, H Miss Uri-zicker is a graduate .of West High's 1965 class, She also attended Fairmont and Baker Junior Hidh.- Miss Unzickdr is the daughter of Mr; and Mrs. Harry Unzicker of 144 W. 2nd Avenue.
Auraria
Community Center
Mothers and grandmothers dome to Auraria Community Center Thursday mornings 9:00 to 11:30 for arts and crafts, .slim gym, or fun cooking. Baby sitting will be provided for pre-school children. All women in the neighborhood are invited to come in to the new Auraria Center at 1212 Mariposa and sign up for one of the three interest groups. I The groups will. run for four weeks. starting Thursday, February 23. All supplies will be provided for the groups but a $1 Auraria membership is required. The arts and crafts !group will be. making things I for the home such as mosaic tiles, plaster-of-paris decorations and copper enamel jew-
Telephone Pioneers, Columbine Council, St. Elizabeth's Altai and -Rosary Society, Holy Ghost Altar' and Rosary Society, Third Order of St. Francis, Dominican Sisters of Sick. Poor Auxiliary, St.v Vincent's, St. Clara's and Queen of Heaven Auxiliaries.
A resident of West Denver U her life, Miss Hodapp resided at 1275 Kalamath for many, many years.
Why, we. even. have a' $900 outfit to lay your weetry bones on. V,V'
It's an- old game, trading up. To... resist be' determined to buy only what you. need. Learn about quality and performance arid usefulness. Usu-ally, the best value is in the middle-price line. Luxury lines of merchandise take your dollars for oversold frills while lowest-price lines don't always prove to be bargains.
For you, the buyery~.high performance and pleasure are as important as low price. Do ask questions, shop around, and guard against gaudy extras that tickle your ego while they take your dollars.
Merchants and manufacturers get their highest profits-from the-deluxe model or the. high price line. Then why do
Listen to the salesman talking; Want a sofa-bed for only $199?.' Sure, we've got one.
But look at these with more'
luxurious fabrics. How about] they offer a $199. sofa bed or arm caps for another $10, stain a $125 washer or a stripped-repeilent' for an extra $30, ] down car "nailed" to the; sales-' lefts* foenn rubber cushion at room floor? One company's; $15, plus $40 more for a brand- ] sales executive answered name mattress, (and a bag oi that such low-price models are options. enough to boost your j needed to start selling you She is. paying' price to well over] erway from. It's known as sell-survived by four sisters, Mrs.}$250)? And then there's the ing by non-selling,
Addie Winter^ of Seattle.: and j luxury line that will take you
up to $389 counting all the add-on features. Just like buying a car, expensive "options", arid all. But all you want is
Mrs. Rov ... Balentine, Mrs. Charles Colbercr and Mrs. Tames Coursey, all of Denver.
CHURCH NEWS
First Mennonite
CRUSADE SPEAKER On Sunday evening, February 5th, Emilio Dominguez of the Crusade for Justice spoke to a -. group of members at First Mennonite Church. Mr. Dominguez told some of his life's story leading up to how he became involved in the work of the Crusade for Justice. He outlined the various areas in which the Crusade
Trading, up, anyone?
Reprinted by psrfftissioh from Spring *66 Everybody's Money.
1 HHH t-n i, i Copyright 1966 by EVERYBODY'S a simple sofa-bed? Don t be MONEY| s magazine for credit
silly, why spend a hundred! unioa members.
How To Read
Newspaper
Ads
Newspaper advertising is governed by federal laws. These laws regulate what is said in ads. If an ad says that an item is "Regular $3.98," it means that the store usually sells it at that price. If the ad reads "$3.98 value," it means the item has never been
Tom Lucero, son pf Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hodges of 1114 Mariposa Street, receiving an advancement in rate certificate to the U. S. Navy.
. Miss Helen Martinez is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marcos Martinez, 118 Fox. She has been in Maine with the Women's lob Corps and ;vrill be retunring around toe 21$, of February.
for Justice is working to help
elrv. The slim gym. .group ,the Spanish American people j1 will play shuffle board, bad-1 Qf Denver. They are endeay-!*n ^e. store: s general sotek: minton, exercise and possibly | oring to offer aid in the areas s^ore Bought the item spe-go bowling. The cooking j of civil rights, community ser- /rially dor sale, and there group will use the big new vice, employment, legal aid, *s no way to give a regular kitchen to cook up some new education, political action, la- price to compare with the sales interesting andfun recipes you bor unions and athletics. Mr. Price. Be careful of the word may not have had a .chance Dominguez particularly stressed j vahie
to try at home. You can what the Crusade is doing in Goods advertised as "Manu-come in and sign up any time the areas of community ser- ( . > 11
before the first meeting of the IP W B 111 facturers closeout may or
interest groups.
RESIDENT COUNCIL LINCOLN PARE HOMES
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes would like to thank its maintenance crew and Mr. Leonard Chadwick, manager, for answering our questions. Wo also would like to thank Mr. Austin Robinson, director of management for coming to cur meeting.
We would like to thank Mrs. Jacld Anderson from toe Colorado University Extension for coming and talking to us.
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes would like to welcome all of its new residents.
The next meeting of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes will be held on March 2 at 1438 Navajo; 6:30 p. m. We are going to have a pot luck dinner before toe meeting. So -come one, come all. Hope to see you there!
vice and aid in finding em-
may not be worth your money.
pioyment. ; I
Officers of the Crusade for .This is a clearance of a ware-justice Board are: President, house, the leftovers, the un-Corky Gonzales; First Vice wanted samples; discontinued Resident lesse B. Sauceda; ^emsMhe soiled. fce ex.
Quintana; Secretary, Juanita Penslve H Si toe*pensive' M. Dominguez; Treasurer, Leo veiY careful of closeouts.
Valdez; and Chaplain, Rev.' Hosiery marked "irregular" Thomas Sepulveda. Their of- ^ rfce noted rfect.. fices are located at 1265 Cher- , . , , T,
okee Street, phone; 222-0825. is ften a v00* bu^- indicating
very tiny differences from gov-
GIRLS* CLUB
Girls Club at First Mennonite started on January 12th with an enrollment of 50 girls from toe West Side. Mary Ellen Short is toe director with a staff of about 12 leaders and 7 drivers to pick up toe torls. It was necessary to limit toe number of girls attending this year because of a lack of available staff. However, we do have toe pleasure this, year of having several staff members who are "arad-
eimment
weave.
standards in toe
Check drapery prices carefully. The big, eye-catching price is far toe smallest drapes. I
Be careful of seconds.. This often means there is a weak spot in toe material of toe garment
Condensed from "How to Read the Ads", by Annabelle Mclllnay. Copyright 1966 by EVERYBODY'S
uates" of Girls Club and have .MONEY, a magazine for. credit un-T*etumed to help this program I Ion members. Reprinted by per-continue for other girls. I mission.
Neighborhood
Business
GREEN'S HARDWARE
Green's Hardware, 767 Santa. Fe Drive, has been in operation, at the same location for approximately 50 years. The original owner, Russell A. Green, sold', toe business to Maurice Goldman in November, 1947. Mr. Goldman has operated toe firm since that time. He states that from time to time Mr. Green-comes back to visit his old-friends on the Drive.
The store carries a complete-line of hardware, plumbing supplies, tools and paint. It is the only hardware store in toe Immediate vicinity.
RUMMAGE ROOM
A new Rummage Room was-opened recently at 969 Santa Fe Drive. It is open Tuesdays,. Thursdays and Saturdays from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. Organizations are invited to rent toe Rummage Room for their ways: and means projects. Telephone numbers to call are 935-2768, 936-5446.
ANNE'S BEAUTY SALON
Anne's Beauty Salon, 971 Santa Fe Drive, is celebrating thirty years in business at the same locatiofi. Mrs. Aririe Mo-lien is drid of toe rejnainin^ old timers an toe Santa Fe business ship. .


February, 1967
THE RECORDER
Pag Three
School Youth Activity Recreation
Greenlee
The Greenlee PTA held a candied apple sal'on February 1 Oth. The children placed their orders in advance and purchased the apples for 10c each. This sale was attempted as a new money-raising venture for the PTA fund. The PTA is- also contemplating after school films' as another project.
The sixth grade chorus has been invited to present their "sing-out" program on February 21st at Knight School. The boys and girls sing musical numbers and present readings that pertain to patriotism, hii-J man relations, and' good citizenship... The program will be under the combined' direction of Mrs. Joyce Davis and Mr. Mike Gannor§,
St. Cajatart's
These stories were written in response to the question, "What do you think of when you look at the globe?" The top paper was the first. English story ever written by Jose, who came from Mexico this year. Mrs. Calderwood Remedial Reading,
St. Cajetan THE GLOBE
by Jose Garcia, grade 6 The earth is yellow, green and the water is blue,1 It has states very big and tilers little. And toOj it. has ocean's, the Pacific and Atlantic
Baker Junior High
.Baker Junior High School's Achievement Roll included forty-three boys and girls at the end of the first- semester. Qualifications for this highly prized honor list are:
1. Scholastic achievement (good grades)
2. Good citizenship
3. Signatures of three sponsoring teachers and approval by all the faculty
The students whose names are listed below; in alphabet-
oceans, .. The biggest part of j-lcal order met these- qualifica-I the earth is water. lions:
1 And toq | it has hills and space and. many plants and many cities. It has. sun and night and,, day. The sun is bicrger.. than .the moon. I 1
A girl's drill team has been
Arid it hds animals and snow
organized at Greenlee. under -".cl it has many river^M th direction of Mr. Bennie j OUR GLOBE NuOnes. These girls learn to By Cabrini Gonzales, grade 5 march and perform With good.. The globe is round and full; precision and rhythm as a;of states. The line in the
middle is called the equator. In Africa i $he animals are very wild. On the globe the blue is the seas and the brown is the mountains. The colors of- the glob are very beautiful. Some of the temperatures are warm and cool. Our horn states are green for our rass. And the people of it t very nice and kind.
THE EARTH
by Steve Chavez,. grad 7 The earth is our home. God created it for man. It is made of many different hemispheres. It has an equator that runs through the middle of Africa. And it also has many different continents. It is made very small for a school. The name of it is a globe, the duplicate of the earth. It is round. Christopher Columbus proved 'that to the people of his' time. It's round like a ball and I call it the foot stool of our Lord..
group. It is hoped that uniforms can be ordered for them in order that they may perform fpr different school groups. The girls on the drill team are Nellie Fullwood, Beverly Conict, Mary Williams, Pamela- Norwood, Trudy McClendon, Debbie Jackson, Brenda Thompson and Debbie Lehman.
The Greenlee PTA will meet'bn' February 5th at 3:00 p. m. The program should be of great interest to parents in the West area in that there will be a discussion of Federal Aid monies and how they contribute to th Greenlee school curriculum. Some of the areas in which these funds have contributed are the team teaching program, the Reading Improvement Program, Guidance and Counseling, before and atier school study halls, use of a parent as a general school-aide, increased number of volumes for the library, as well as additional classroom teaching materials1. It is hoped that we will have many parents at this meeting.
Fairmont Recreation
Fairmont Recreation Center at. West Third and Fox provides a variety of activities for school age children. Every evening, Monday through Fri-dav, there is recreation from 3:30 to' 6:00 p. m. for children under 14, Table games, crafts, voll^vball and supervised playground- play are among the things offered.
From 6:00 to 9:00 p. m., five nights a week there is recre ation and crafts for children oyer 14. Some activities offered are basketball, table games, enrm, votievball. sew-ina parties and on Fridav nfehts fr'vrt 7;00 to 9:00 p. m. a Teen Dance!
A complete schedule of -events may be obtained at the Center.
Gary Aguirre bnarriv Alexander Trank Alvarez |
David AnthPhy Rosalie Bleq Alice Borrego Charlyne Brown Barbara Carillo Fred Carillo Christine Cisneros James Cruz .
Robert Cunningham Janell Cutshall Loretta Duran Cheryl Dyes Rosalyn Gaffney Patricia. Garcia Alfonso Gold-,
Linda Gomez Angelina Jctramillo Sharon Joe Hahs Krisch Helen Lopez Donna Maj Albert Marquez -Delores Medina James Mollendar Judy Moore Benrta Olivas Joey Ortiz Jane Padilla Carolyn Ramirez Rose Rivera Kathy Rodriquez Daniel Sailas Modestine Smith Richard Valdez Andy Vigil Ernest Vigil Linda Vigil Max Vigil William Wendelin Gertrude Zajaczkowski
Boys' Club News
The Boys' Club wrestling team lost to the J. C. Owen Club on Saturday, February 4 and also wrestled with the West Side Club on the 11th SAFETY PATROL of February. The 17th and 18th of February are the dates for the All-Boys Tournament
The 25th, the boys will have a Sectional Basketball Tournament here in Denver. The Sectional Billiard) Tournament will be held in Greeley, Colorado some time in March. The annua] Easter Hat Parade will be held in March.
West Side
Church
Directory
ST. CAJETAN 9fh and Lawrence Phone 825-8059 Tatiier Max Santamaria, Pastor
SericesSunday Mass: 7:00* 8:30, 10:30, 12, 7 p. m.
Holy Days6:30/ 8:30, 10:30. 7:00.
CHURCH OF GOD 5th and Fox Street Phone 244-2339 Rev. Leroy Vance Sunday Service, > 11.
7:30. Sunday School. 10.
METROPOLITAN BAPTIST 910 Kalamath Street : Rv.. Salvador Cano Sunday .Service;-. 1L; 6:30.
Sunday School 13;
Denver Inner City Protestant Parish
910. Galapago Si:eet Phone 244-2636
Rev. lyiarilou Taggart, Director Harlan Beach,
. Part-time .minister Janet Brett, "
. Administrative. Secretary Church Services: Thursdays, 7:30 p. m.
Church School and Junior Choir, Saturdays, 1O::0O a. m. No Sunday Services.
Apostolic Church of Jesus 1039 W. 13th Avenue Rev. Toby Rampa Phone 244-2765 Sunday School, 9:30 a. m. Sunday Morning Worship, 10:30 a., m.
Sunday Evening Worship 7:30 p. m.,.
Wednesdays: Prayer Service 7:30 p. m*.
ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN West 3rd Ave. and Acoma Phone 733-3777 Paul G. Hansen and. Roger A. Stiers, Pastors
Services: Sunday 8:30, 11:00 a. m., 7:00 p. m,
Sunday School: 9:45 a. m.
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CATHOLIC CHURCH W. 6th Ave. and Galapago Si Phone 534-4408 Rev. James Nugent, C. Ss. R Pastor
Services-Sunday Mass: t 7, 8:30, 10, 11:30.
Holy Days 6, 7, 3, 9, 12:15 6 p. m.
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST 935 W. 11th Avenue Phone 255-6152 Rev. Thomas Sepulveda Service^Sunday: 9:45, 11.
First Avenue Presbyterian 120 West 1st Avenue Phone 777;5325 Rev. A. J. Blomquist,
: Sunday Service, U a. m.. 6:30. p, in. ?T\ .
Sunday School 9:45. .
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH 1000 Kalamath Street Phone 255-3215 Rev. R. W. Nichols ServiceSunday: 11, 7:00. Sunday School9:30, ;
ST. ELIZABETH 11th and Curtis Streets. Phone 255-9556 Rev. Fabian Flynn, Pastor ServicesSunday Mass: 6. 8, 9:15, 11, 12:15.
Holy Days: 6, 7, 8, 1 12:15.
Elmwood
Fairmont School
grades under the able leader-
The Safety Patrol has been doing another fine job this
Elmwood will hold open house for past presidents, former principals, students and teachers, February 15th from 1:30 p,m. to .3:0.0 p.m. Refresh-~ien+s will be served in the 1st floor gym.
Assisting Mrs. Emily Sanchez, PTA president, in planning the event are: Mrs. Vera Schelling, Mrs. Cathv Goontz, Mrs. Lela Romero, Mrs. Corrlne Borrego* Mrs. Beverly Apodaca.
year. These boys and girls are selected as representatives of the student body as symbols of safety. We have a fine group and we are proud of the work they do. They just received bridges far their safety belts. Their sponsor is Mrs. Beverly Smith.
Srifety Patrol Members Rosetta Martinez Debbie Bruffett Arils Szabo Stanley Strecker John Cordova Barbara Romero Mike Valerio Harry Whalen Ma-io Metia Richard Martinez Diane Valdez G^egorv Montoya STUDENT COUNCIL The .Stuclnt Council is made up ,of student electee} from tfe {purth, fifth arid si&th
ship of Mrs. Beardsworth.
The representatives are:
Fourth-Patricia Valdez, Marty Rodriguez, Victoria Gonzales, Benny Pena, and Linda Clark.
FifthSteVen Bowen, Gina Martinez, Brian Morris, Nancy Griego and Eugene Martinez.
Sixth Richard Martinez, Wilma Corea, Chris Padilla and Terry Rodriquez.
The Student Council has been very busy again -this year. They have been in charge of many programs and activities. (The United Fund Campaign, Halloween, and Christmas). They have presented skits on safety, good conduct and citizenship be-1 havior. They are sponsoring! the Optimist-Police Award pro-1 gram. The officers are: Pres-!
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL 126 West 2nd Avenue Phone 722-8781 Rev. David Minton Holy Communion, 8=00 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a. m. Sunday Service 11:00 a m.
WESLEYAN COVENANT* 525 West First Ave.
Rev. O. L. Crager Phone 722-4888 Sunday services11.
Sunday School, 10:00 amL.
Iglesia Betel De Las Asam-bleas De Dios
West 2nd Ave. and Fox St Rev. Mike A. Salazar, Pastor ServiceSunday, 10:00 and 7:30 p. m.
FIRST BETHANY LUTHERAN 215 West 5th Avenue Phone 825-4862 Rev. Fred A. Bloch. Sunday Service, 11. . ^ >
Sunday School 9 3Q._ J
WEST SIDE CHRISTIAN 668 Inca Street i Phone: 623-3419 William K. Linton, Minister Services: Sunday Worship 10:10 and 7:00 p: m.
Bible School: 9:00 a. m.
WESLEY METHODIST 465 Galapago Street Phone 222-3337 Rev. Joe Kamman Sunday Service, 11. 'Sunday School 9:45.
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH 885 Delaware Street Phone 2442093 Rev. Marcus Bishop Rev. John Ventura Sunday Service9:00; Span-
ldent, Richard Martinez;' Vlce-Ilsh Service 1H15; Sunday President, Nancy Griego: $ec-1 School 10;00; Evening Service retary, Wilma Corea 7^0-


Page Four
THE RECORDER
February, 1967
. ^hoppittq Tibs.
REPORT OF JANUARY MEETING
The Westside Action Council met January 26th tor its regular monthly meeting. Sites foi the Neighborhood Service Center were discussed and given priorities. However, later developments made this unnecessary. Reverend Sepulveda, after approval by his superiors, donated the use of 3000 square feet of space in the First Methodist Church at 935 West 11th Avenue. This would be free except for utilities and upkeep. A telephone survey was nade of the Council members and the majority gave their approval to making this site tiie first choice of the Council our Neighborhood Service Center. The Action Councils ~fi'e hoping that the Service , Centers will be funded very
WHAT'S PLENTIFUL. Still soon> sticking to your New Year's
resolution to shop more care- Some of the other business fully for food? Then watch for tar-en care of at the meeting these items 0*- oranges, grape-1 included the appointment of fruit, pork, eggs, canned sal- lWO new committees. In con-rmon, dry beans and green nection witn this, plans are -split peas. The U. S. Depart-. beinq made to restructure the anent of Agriculture says they'll | committees of the Council to ibe in especially plentiful sup* ^ provide better service and more
WEST SIDE ACTION council \ BANK BEGINS CONSTRUCTION
gply in February. In March eggs, pork, oranges, grapefruit, green split peas and
efficiency. This matter will be taken up at the next meeting. The two new committees are
canned salmon will continue!,:ne Executive and Personnel on the list, with eggs cmd! Committees. On the Executive peanuts and peanut products Committee are Don Gallegos, featured. Rice also appears Council Chairman; Albert Roy-on the March list of plenti- kcd* Vice Chairman; Joyce Ells-Julg j worth, Secretary; and Frank
,1T Clay,Treasurer. Other members
UNDER FOOT. Worn out qj-q Rev_ John Ventura, Ralph shoes may harm feet. Shoes Gaschler, Moses Cisneros and with ripped seams or soles attomeyi Robert Johnson. Serv with holes should be repaired ing on the Personnel Commit-promptly, the U. S. Depart-!tee are Leonard Chadwick as ment of Agriculture says. But chairman with Rev. James Mm S Eg that Mg soles Nugent. Larry Lucero, Sister and resoling may change the Liguori, Sister Martinelle, Betsy size and shape of the shoes Kester< Lupe DeNava and cmd result m a poor fit. With Rach^ Guedea as mernbers. rising shoe repair costs, it mOy!The first job of this committee
i>e less expensive to buy new
will be to review the applica-
shoes for your child's rapidlyI M for DiTector of the Neigh-growing feet. borhood Service Center. There
TO REDUCE WRINKLES. If' are 60 some applications for you don't have a wash-and-1 this job and the committee will wear cycle on your washing need to select five applicants machine or dryeryet want to jrrs their first choices for the wse these machines for clothes! job.
-liiade of synthetic fibers, try
these suggestions from the U. iS. Department of Agriculture.
Tney'U help reduce wrinkling.
'Wash in small loads. Use ood or warm (never hot) water. Wash only long enough to remove soil. Rinse' in cool water. Shorten the water extraction timesboth after wash-i have requested to send us rep-
Also appointed was a temporary committee to select, resident candidates for the Council to fill Before the meeting closed, Mr. Gallegos informed the Council that three agencies
ing- and after rinsing. Set dryer at low or medium... After clothes are dry, tumble them for N|0 minutes more without lieat. Remove immediately and Jiang. r "
Aide Wanted
Mr. Jim Meier, Social Worker at Baker Junior High School, is accepting applications for itthe position of neighborhood 'aide. This position will pay resentatives as. non voting members of the Council. Agencies requesting this are the Department of Health and Hospitals, the.. Department of Welfare dnd.,XARASA. The Council welcomes. ;thi's feeling it will prcivide an excellent opportunity: for communication between :. the area residents and these agencies.
The next meeting of the Action Council is February 23, at 7:30 p. m. at Auraria Community Center. The public is urged to attend. The Council represents the residents of the West Side and needs to know the thoughts and feelings of the- people.
The Education Committee of the Westside Action Council has met with the faculty and administration of various local schools in the last few months. In January they visited Fair-
mont and Greenlee Schools j and were briefed on the various programs in these schools. On February 1st the Committee visited Elmwood School and had an interesting discussion with the principal and some of the teachers. One of he things discussed was the 'Tipact of the Headstart Program on the area and its schools. On February- 21 the Committee will meet at St. Elizabeth's to become acquainted with their program.
The Education Committee is attempting -to become better acquainted with the schools so hat they can serve as a contact between the schools and the community. The Committee welcomes questions about what they are doing and is willing to help with prob-'ems concerning the schools. Mrs. Carmen f Hodges, 1114 Mariposa, phone 623-3950, is chairman of the committee.
HEALTH COMMITTEE MEETS
The health committee of the five Action Councils met February 6, 1967 at 8 p. m. at the Avondale Lutheran Church at West Colfax and. Irving. Ross Investment Company presented a proposal to build a Medical Center to our specifications if we lease from them and providing they get adequate. financing. A possible site for the Health Center No. 2 at 10th and Federal Blvd. was discussed.
COMMITTEE HEARS PROPOSAL BY AFSC
The Inter-Council Committee of the five Action Councils met on Friday, February 10. At this meeting the American Friends Service. Committee, represented by Jean McCorry and Warren Witte, presented their hopes to work with the Action Councils and the Neighborhood Service Centers.
The AFSC is a funded delegate agency of Denver Opportunity which for two years has conducted,, a tutorial program in various Denver Junior High Schools.
Looking to the future the AFSC would like to see the Neighborhood Service Centers become the agencies through /vhich junior high students would be channeled to the AFSC tutorial program. In connection, with this, the AFSC is offering to .provide a paid educational- aide, to each Neighborhood Service Center which would have, a tutorial program in its area. These aides would be paid by private funds cmd could' be counted as in-kind i donations, to this Service Cen-i ters. v"--.-J
In a telephone conversation which this reporter had with Mr. Witte, he expressed the desire that the Neighborhood Service Centers would provide feedback from the communities to the AFSC concerning their tutorial program. He also stated that Mrs. McCorry and he found the meeting with the Action Councils very enlightening and they would hope to continue close contact between the Councils and the AFSC.
Architect's drawing of the National City Bank as it will look on completion of the expansion program now under way.
The National City Bank, which has been closely identified with the west side during the 56 years of its existence, has begun a major expansion and remodeling pro-gram at its location at the corner of South Broadway and Bayaud Avenue. According to President R. K. Hudson the improvements will increase the service capacity of the bank's interior facilities, modernize the exterior and enhance the appearance of the adjoining area.
National City opened for business as the West Side State Bank, January 16, 1911 at the southeast comer of Eighth and Santa Fe. In 1927 the bank nationalized, acquired its present name and moved to the Broadway location:
President Hudson said that the bank will utilize ground adjoining the bank's present structure on the north which was acquired nine months ago for the rebuilding program. This area, with 140 feet fronting on South Broadway, will afford space for extending the north wall of the" building by 40 feet to provide increased lobby space, creation of an arcade, a landscaped court and additional customer parking.
The main lobby will be increased to 4600 square feet
to provide added space for ot-j facers' platform, teller line, cue-| tomer reception areas and oth-l.er departmental functions. The
* safe deposit vault will be I doubled in size and a second 'walk-up tellers area will be
created.
A colonnade of brick piers iwill create the arcade and will be extended to include the building's frontage on South
Broadway. The new main en-I trance will be from the arcade.
A 4600 square feet sunken I garden court will be at the north of the arcade in the cen-jter of which will be a lighted fountain. This area .will- also j be landscaped.
I There will be a driveway j leading from South Broadway at the north extremity of the complex to a parking area west of the court.
Another feature in the general remodeling plan will be creation of a roof deck for employee use.
New furniture, fixtures and carpeting will be installed in the main lobby as well as the instalment loan, data processing and auditing departments on the second floor.
Cost of construction and furnishing in all areas will approximate $250,000, according to President Hudson, who said that completion is. scheduled for mid-summer.
WEST SIDE Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS
Feb. 23 ill Westside > Action Council Meeting at Auraria Community Center, 7; 30 p. m.
EVERY WEEK
MondaysWell-Child Clinic. First Mennonite Church 12:30-4 ,p:: m. (1st & 3rd Mondays orily). y^....
Monday thru Friday-Recreation at Fairmont Recreation Center,: ,
3:30-6:00 p. m, for children under 14.
, 6:00-9:00 p. m. for children, over 14.
TuesdaysGirl Scout Troop 1893:30 p. m. at Greenlee School. _
ThursdaysMama's Morning Out 9:00 to 11:30 a. m., Auraria Community Center (4 weeks)
Thursdays1-4 p.m. Planned Parenthood Clinic, First Mennonite Church.
Ads Now Accepted
This issue the Recorder' starts a new service to its readers. The Recorder will be carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 60c per line/ $1.00 minimum, Box 50%. extra, Boldface fe-,70c a line.
Ads must be brought to the office of the West Side Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Drive, by the I Oth of each month. Payment for the ad must be made at the. scone time, the ad is brought in.
The Recorder is offering this service to the community feeling that/it. will be useful to our readers.,.. >..
CLASSIFIED ADS
Assorted Jazz Records § at reasonable prices, 425 W. 2nd Ave., 733-4968.
For Rent. 4 rooms, bath, 1st floor, remodeled1. Tile floors, heat, drapes, yard. On bus. Working or retired couple $60. 529' Galapago. 244-6775.
Wanted. Combination Heating and Cooking Gas Range. 244-6775.
Anne's Beauty Salon 971 Santa Fe Dr. 244-5604 permanents $10 up; haircuts $2; shampoos & sets $2. Free coffee


Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 3, Number 10

Monthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
February, 1967
Mrs. Cooper New Librarian
At Byers
Byers not only has a new look, it has h new staff. On January 2.7, .Mrs. Ritzma spent her last day in; the library, briefing me bn my pleasant new duties. She joined her husband who is working as a geologist for the state of Utah in Salt Lake City.
I can Martha' Cooper, with a "Mrs." as my title; I grew up on a cattle ranch near Canon City, Colorado, graduated irom Colorado State College in Greeley, taught school in numerous Colorado towns, and now -live in Littleton. I am truly a daughter of this state!
Our twenty-year old' son is in the navy on the aircraft carrier, U.S.S. America, and nineteen-year old Jeannie is attending college in Fort Collins.
> Because I love to read and I really, like people, I feel Byers Library is my;.answer to a wonderful career. I have already met many of the fine people of this area and find them friendly and patient. The children who have come in with school groups or after, school hours cere well behgyed and eager to really use .itheir library.
I § vyyill v. try,^tp continue^. the 'Saril#' pblfey 'arid^gb^^^eivicb you .. have ha:d,; in. the past. Since-iillihg1 %bhr";. requests = for books is a rear pleasure 10 me, I hope you won't;'hesitate to ask for any and everything you'd like to read.
ORDINANCE PASSED ON JUNK CARS
Denver City Council unanimously passed an ordinance ill to help in dealing with the I r junk car problem at their meet-\| ing of January 30, The ordi-|| nance makes it -unlawful to| | have junk cars 'or pieces of tnem on private property and provides that when the owner of a junk car cannot be found the car will be taken to the car pound and stored for 30 days to allow the owner to redeem it. If he does not claim it, it is then sold. The Department of Health and Hospitals is given the responsibility to enforce this ordinance.
The passage of this ordinance is due in part _to .the efforts of the Park Hill Action Committee and the West Side Improvement Association, working jointly in making Citizen concern known to poun-cilmen. Leslie Kalanquin and Julian Kroeger attended several council sessions for the West Side Improvement Association to support the passage of the new ordinance.
Firehouse Finally Razed
PLAY SCHEDULED
"The Revolutionist" an original., 2 act .play by Rudolph [(Corky) Gonzales Is currently playing at the Seventh Avenue United. Churchy bf y Christ, 666 Kfhg.C* ::beihg-.. pres^hted
the 17th, 18th, and1 19th f February at 8:Q0 p. rh. Tickets are $l;Sp)v Reservations Ore
preferred. These may be obtained- by calling 222-0825.
FORTY-FIVE WEST SIDERS ATTEND HEARING ON 3.2 BAR APPLICATION
A hearing was held on February 9 at 9:30 a. m. at 810 14th Street on an application for a 3.2 beer license which is being sought for the old Santa Fe Theatre building at 974 Sdn-
area (and perhaps in general); are hazardous to safety and property. They argued mat the noise that would be generated would interfere with sleep, especially of elderly
a Fe Drive. Approximately 45 j persons living directly across people were present to pro-1 me street. They felt that the .test the application: Aside | tavern would be a bad moral
from the applicants for the li- j influence on young teens and cense, the only testimony in that-.-some older teens attracted favor of the" application came j to the area by the bar would from a young man in the neighborhood who testified that he,
DON'T BE A SUCKER!
Citizens Meet With Police Captain
What kinds of things are soldi Concerned citizens from the by people who might try to Lincoln Park and South Lin-trick the buyer into signing a coin Park Resident Council and contract? Vacuum cleaners, from District 4 of the West freezers, sewing machines, to Side Improvement Association name h few. The man selling met with Capt Stallins of the a sewing machine, for instance, Denver Police Department, to may have d model that is ad- discuss the feeling of some vertised cheap$20, say. He people that the time it took Will come ^0/ the'house and police to respond to a recent show it, telling you everything emergency call was excessive, that is wrong witk it. Then,.I While, those meeting with heu will ielbyou. gbo^t. the., ter-: ...Qqpi.
rifle; machine" he ~ fids; 'in the- [4v satisfied with police figures bar, and he will show you about how long it took for as-that one, costing better than' sistance to arrive, several im-ten times as much but worth! portant points were discussed, only, say, $50. He then stays Capt Stallins stressed the fill he gets the woman to sign i importance of speaking clear-refusing to leave, sometimes: ly when calling police and till midnight or one in the being sure to tell where help morning. He will tell the worn-'is needed. While you do an ANYTHING to, get her,not have to identify your-name on the paper-that, she self, Capt. Stallins urged peo-.can return it if she doesn't j pie to do so, giving a phone like it, etc. But once she number so that police can signs, SHE'S STUCK! Often j check back for more informa-she.signs to mortgage the fur-1 tion if necessary. He com-niture, 1 In that case, the sales- jmented that the police get man has to get the husband's j many calls where the caller signature too. He will try to will say; something-like "There
After nearly two years of requests by members of the West Side Improvement Association, the old Fire Station at Third Avenue arid Cherokee- Street Was demolished early this month. Demolition was arranged by the purchaser of the property, the Pappy Fry Development Corporation. For many years the building was used to store old materials from various City departments; while the structure was gradually deteriorating. At a general meeting of the Improvement Association in February, 1965, residents of the neighborhood asked the City to remove the building which was unattractive and from which stones near the roof were beginning to fall. A housing inspection program was under way in the area, and home owners were cooperating in a clean up campaign, but -the City owned building was detracting from the improvement efforts.
Ift the fall of 1965 the Fire Station was sold, with a provision that the purchaser must remove the building by December of that year. Various relays resulted, but residents of the neighborhood continued to press for action. Vandals entered the building frequently, and windows were broken .' flies ;j vwere : reported- in- side, and bricks were removed to leave a hole in the wall. Police and Fire Departments were called a number of times, n December, 1966, the Chief building Inspector, Jack OFal-lon, ordered an inspection of the building at the request of the Association, and the structure was declared unsafe. George Kelly, of the Mayor's Office, also assisted in efforts to board up the entrances and o reduce the hazards created V the building.
his Wife, and his sister circulate^; a. petition in favor of the gr&hfing of the license. A number of people testified to cir- culgting;' petitions against;
Mr.. Albert Roybal testified' in: opposition -to the granting; of :the license on behalf of the Westside Action Council; of which he Is vice-president. Mrs. Forrest Swanson, vice-president of the West Side Improvement Association, gave testimony against the proposed license on behalf of' the Association. Opposition was also voiced by persons in the area speaking as property owners,- business people, residents, clergymen, and parents of school-aged children. **
Testimony against the license stressed several factors.People
get the., husband ..anyway, if the wife is not working.
Then the salesman sells the paper' to the finance company, He has his money,! and the finance company will get theirs
attempt to purchase hard liqr _OR ELSE! uor frpm outlet^ in the area by
subterfuge. People also com- Sometimes outfits try to catch
plgmed that the location is too close to West High School. They argued that parking problems would be created in the; area by an influx of teenagers into the neighborhood. Most! often, people pointed out that the area is already well supplied- I with alcoholic beverage' dicenses. -of all; kinds;
Applicants for the license, Mr. Glen W. Jerome and Mr. Lawrence Rodriguez, testified +6 their intention to remodel the theater and apply for a cabaret license in order to have dancing. They both expressed +heir intention to conduct a well-run, attractive business which would be a desirable place for young people.
The decision by Safety Manager Hugh McCleam on the
felt that 3.2 taverns in the application is stffl pending.
suckers by puttingi*&ds in the newspapers1 under "Help. Wanted;" offering people the ^chance to make good money at. home;
You. will be selling, something, they tellWyou,arid ypu will heed one to., demonstrate f.tb customers.,: Yoii'- get ;paid for each. customer, they say, and they ask you to;., sigh the : paper "to work for the company."
If a person1 says he can't pay' investigation into file particu-
bas been a terrible accident 'Tt the! comer. Come' quick!'' And the caller then hangs up, without .telling police'; Where to go. y,The kind! dl call is re^ ported! by the police dispatcher in code:.;This means that: when 'riling, -police you should be eleefr to, let.- the dispatcher know how serious the problem is; Is it a robbery?- An accident?1 Ah illness?
A change in ^police procedure! was reported .rby';.<;Capt. Stallins, designed t "cut down ;oh delays caused by possible confusion .at [the. time, of ; evening r roll call.-. This change was initiated as a result of
The West Side Improvement Association appreciates the help given by the City agencies, but much of the credit must also be given to members of Districts' 7 and 9 who continued their interest and their pressures to improve the West Side.
for, the itema sewing machine, vacuum cleaner, or whateverhe is told, "Don't worry, we will take care of it for you.'' ,"But suppose I .can't., sell any,?"., the, pprson answers. .['Don't worry," says the salesman. "We'will take care of the payments one way or another." And they do OUT OF YOUR HIDE!
lar emergency call which was discussed.
Capt; Stallins expressed a willingness to meet with West Si'ders whenever there is any concern about service .in the area He>. stressed the importance of raising, questions as soon after the incident as possible, so that everything would be fresh in people's minds.
Foster Family Needed
Fort Logan Mental Heoillh Center is looking for a special kind of family to provide a foster home, for a young woman in her 20's. She needs a warrft, stable family who would be interested in her and wi&:Jwould treat her as a member pf their own family. An Anglo or Spanish American hoihe would be suitable. If your home is accepted you would become a part of our Family Care program, and would receive help from Fort Logan /Mental Health Center. You would also be paid $130 per month to cover expenses of care for this young woman.
For more information call Caroline Benham, social worker, Ft. Logan Mental Health Center, 761-0220, ext. 371.


Page Two
RECORDER
February, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez. Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgcrd, Mildred I Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, i Mary Chavez.
'JteiyMi&i&Mcl '7'loted,
-Mr. and Mrs. Rex Mayes ot 1300 Kalamath had as their guest their nephew, Mike Dillon of Terre Haute, Indiana. He is being stationed at Lowry Field.
Abel James Espinosa, the son of Eva Espinosa of 1458 Navajo, and the grandson of Abel M. Choury of 1451 Navajo, is'serving with toe navy. He has left for his station at San Diego, California,
Kirs. Alfonzo Martinez of 1348 Mariposa is now .home from St. Luke's Hospital where she had a check up.
Mrs, May Day pf 138 West 1st Avnu§ Entertained Keif pinochle club, January 30th* There were six present and a delicious luncheon wtt§ served. Noble Day of Fillmore, Utah, brother in law of Mrs. May Day, went on a sight seeing trip around Denver. They visited Buffalo Bill's grave. May Day had a birthday January 27th at her son's home. He is Q. E. Merritt of 5340 East 33rd Avenue. They had a ^wonderful time playing games and visiting..
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Sullivan's nephew, Edmond Carpenter of Arvada, was buried last week at Fort Logan National Cemetery.
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Kensler and Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Shriv-er of Pueblo spent last Friday and Saturday with Mr. and Mrs. Henry Schonborg of 1348 Lipan Street
Lance Corporal Jimmy Martinez, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Pacheco of 1253 Lipan Street, called them from Washington, D. C., where he is visiting his cousin.
Rest In Peace
NATIVE DENVERITE, EMMA HODAPP. DIES Miss
TRADING UP? WATCH OUT!
This is what happens when I dollars less for what you heed,
you go. into a store to buy xviias Emma T. Hodapp, a -he washer advertised at "$125 |H native of Denver,- died Sun-^-the price goes up to $1-69.95 j§ aay, February 5 in Littleton after this, one-day sale" and Nursing Home after a long ill- you-walk' out of the store with
WEST DENVER GIRL ELECTED AT D. U.
At the annual election of officers for Associated Women Students at the University of Denver, Miss Ruth Ann Un-
ness, at the age of 78. The Rosary was recited for her Wednesday evening in Me-Conarty's Boulevard Mortuary with requiem high mass being -ung Thursday, February 6 at 9 a.m. in St. Elizabeth's Church. Burial was in Mt. Olivet Cemetery.
: Bom October 9, 1888 in Den-|=Si she attended St. Eilzabeth's School. She was a retired su-oervisor at Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Com-
tbe $209 model instead: the salesman has traded you up.
It-may be that the low-price model wasn't as ''automatic" as -the ad led you to believe. So the friendly salesman showed you the "more automatic" One at a higher price. But really he was primed to make you jump through the hoop for the high-dollar model automatic, yes; frills and flashy deluxe features, yes; but better .performance and usabil-
zicker was honored by beifigloony. Miss Hodapp was a,., ,
, 'M , .i i.*, r t r D itv than the miaale-pnce mod
elected treasurer of -the groups member of Our Lady of the Bell |||
A banquet and the election was held, on January 30th.
A second year student; at Denver \ University, H Miss Uri-zicker is a graduate .of West High's 1965 class, She also attended Fairmont and Baker Junior Hidh.- Miss Unzickdr is the daughter of Mr; and Mrs. Harry Unzicker of 144 W. 2nd Avenue.
Auraria
Community Center
Mothers and grandmothers dome to Auraria Community Center Thursday mornings 9:00 to 11:30 for arts and crafts, .slim gym, or fun cooking. Baby sitting will be provided for pre-school children. All women in the neighborhood are invited to come in to the new Auraria Center at 1212 Mariposa and sign up for one of the three interest groups. I The groups will. run for four weeks. starting Thursday, February 23. All supplies will be provided for the groups but a $1 Auraria membership is required. The arts and crafts !group will be. making things I for the home such as mosaic tiles, plaster-of-paris decorations and copper enamel jew-
Telephone Pioneers, Columbine Council, St. Elizabeth's Altai and -Rosary Society, Holy Ghost Altar' and Rosary Society, Third Order of St. Francis, Dominican Sisters of Sick. Poor Auxiliary, St.v Vincent's, St. Clara's and Queen of Heaven Auxiliaries.
A resident of West Denver U her life, Miss Hodapp resided at 1275 Kalamath for many, many years.
Why, we. even. have a' $900 outfit to lay your weetry bones on. V,V'
It's an- old game, trading up. To... resist be' determined to buy only what you. need. Learn about quality and performance arid usefulness. Usu-ally, the best value is in the middle-price line. Luxury lines of merchandise take your dollars for oversold frills while lowest-price lines don't always prove to be bargains.
For you, the buyery~.high performance and pleasure are as important as low price. Do ask questions, shop around, and guard against gaudy extras that tickle your ego while they take your dollars.
Merchants and manufacturers get their highest profits-from the-deluxe model or the. high price line. Then why do
Listen to the salesman talking; Want a sofa-bed for only $199?.' Sure, we've got one.
But look at these with more'
luxurious fabrics. How about] they offer a $199. sofa bed or arm caps for another $10, stain a $125 washer or a stripped-repeilent' for an extra $30, ] down car "nailed" to the; sales-' lefts* foenn rubber cushion at room floor? One company's; $15, plus $40 more for a brand- ] sales executive answered name mattress, (and a bag oi that such low-price models are options. enough to boost your j needed to start selling you She is. paying' price to well over] erway from. It's known as sell-survived by four sisters, Mrs.}$250)? And then there's the ing by non-selling,
Addie Winter^ of Seattle.: and j luxury line that will take you
up to $389 counting all the add-on features. Just like buying a car, expensive "options", arid all. But all you want is
Mrs. Rov ... Balentine, Mrs. Charles Colbercr and Mrs. Tames Coursey, all of Denver.
CHURCH NEWS
First Mennonite
CRUSADE SPEAKER On Sunday evening, February 5th, Emilio Dominguez of the Crusade for Justice spoke to a -. group of members at First Mennonite Church. Mr. Dominguez told some of his life's story leading up to how he became involved in the work of the Crusade for Justice. He outlined the various areas in which the Crusade
Trading, up, anyone?
Reprinted by psrfftissioh from Spring *66 Everybody's Money.
1 HHH t-n i, i Copyright 1966 by EVERYBODY'S a simple sofa-bed? Don t be MONEY| s magazine for credit
silly, why spend a hundred! unioa members.
How To Read
Newspaper
Ads
Newspaper advertising is governed by federal laws. These laws regulate what is said in ads. If an ad says that an item is "Regular $3.98," it means that the store usually sells it at that price. If the ad reads "$3.98 value," it means the item has never been
Tom Lucero, son pf Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hodges of 1114 Mariposa Street, receiving an advancement in rate certificate to the U. S. Navy.
. Miss Helen Martinez is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Marcos Martinez, 118 Fox. She has been in Maine with the Women's lob Corps and ;vrill be retunring around toe 21$, of February.
for Justice is working to help
elrv. The slim gym. .group ,the Spanish American people j1 will play shuffle board, bad-1 Qf Denver. They are endeay-!*n ^e. store: s general sotek: minton, exercise and possibly | oring to offer aid in the areas s^ore Bought the item spe-go bowling. The cooking j of civil rights, community ser- /rially dor sale, and there group will use the big new vice, employment, legal aid, *s no way to give a regular kitchen to cook up some new education, political action, la- price to compare with the sales interesting andfun recipes you bor unions and athletics. Mr. Price. Be careful of the word may not have had a .chance Dominguez particularly stressed j vahie
to try at home. You can what the Crusade is doing in Goods advertised as "Manu-come in and sign up any time the areas of community ser- ( . > 11
before the first meeting of the IP W B 111 facturers closeout may or
interest groups.
RESIDENT COUNCIL LINCOLN PARE HOMES
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes would like to thank its maintenance crew and Mr. Leonard Chadwick, manager, for answering our questions. Wo also would like to thank Mr. Austin Robinson, director of management for coming to cur meeting.
We would like to thank Mrs. Jacld Anderson from toe Colorado University Extension for coming and talking to us.
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes would like to welcome all of its new residents.
The next meeting of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes will be held on March 2 at 1438 Navajo; 6:30 p. m. We are going to have a pot luck dinner before toe meeting. So -come one, come all. Hope to see you there!
vice and aid in finding em-
may not be worth your money.
pioyment. ; I
Officers of the Crusade for .This is a clearance of a ware-justice Board are: President, house, the leftovers, the un-Corky Gonzales; First Vice wanted samples; discontinued Resident lesse B. Sauceda; ^emsMhe soiled. fce ex.
Quintana; Secretary, Juanita Penslve H Si toe*pensive' M. Dominguez; Treasurer, Leo veiY careful of closeouts.
Valdez; and Chaplain, Rev.' Hosiery marked "irregular" Thomas Sepulveda. Their of- ^ rfce noted rfect.. fices are located at 1265 Cher- , . , , T,
okee Street, phone; 222-0825. is ften a v00* bu^- indicating
very tiny differences from gov-
GIRLS* CLUB
Girls Club at First Mennonite started on January 12th with an enrollment of 50 girls from toe West Side. Mary Ellen Short is toe director with a staff of about 12 leaders and 7 drivers to pick up toe torls. It was necessary to limit toe number of girls attending this year because of a lack of available staff. However, we do have toe pleasure this, year of having several staff members who are "arad-
eimment
weave.
standards in toe
Check drapery prices carefully. The big, eye-catching price is far toe smallest drapes. I
Be careful of seconds.. This often means there is a weak spot in toe material of toe garment
Condensed from "How to Read the Ads", by Annabelle Mclllnay. Copyright 1966 by EVERYBODY'S
uates" of Girls Club and have .MONEY, a magazine for. credit un-T*etumed to help this program I Ion members. Reprinted by per-continue for other girls. I mission.
Neighborhood
Business
GREEN'S HARDWARE
Green's Hardware, 767 Santa. Fe Drive, has been in operation, at the same location for approximately 50 years. The original owner, Russell A. Green, sold', toe business to Maurice Goldman in November, 1947. Mr. Goldman has operated toe firm since that time. He states that from time to time Mr. Green-comes back to visit his old-friends on the Drive.
The store carries a complete-line of hardware, plumbing supplies, tools and paint. It is the only hardware store in toe Immediate vicinity.
RUMMAGE ROOM
A new Rummage Room was-opened recently at 969 Santa Fe Drive. It is open Tuesdays,. Thursdays and Saturdays from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. Organizations are invited to rent toe Rummage Room for their ways: and means projects. Telephone numbers to call are 935-2768, 936-5446.
ANNE'S BEAUTY SALON
Anne's Beauty Salon, 971 Santa Fe Drive, is celebrating thirty years in business at the same locatiofi. Mrs. Aririe Mo-lien is drid of toe rejnainin^ old timers an toe Santa Fe business ship. .


February, 1967
THE RECORDER
Pag Three
School Youth Activity Recreation
Greenlee
The Greenlee PTA held a candied apple sal'on February 1 Oth. The children placed their orders in advance and purchased the apples for 10c each. This sale was attempted as a new money-raising venture for the PTA fund. The PTA is- also contemplating after school films' as another project.
The sixth grade chorus has been invited to present their "sing-out" program on February 21st at Knight School. The boys and girls sing musical numbers and present readings that pertain to patriotism, hii-J man relations, and' good citizenship... The program will be under the combined' direction of Mrs. Joyce Davis and Mr. Mike Gannor§,
St. Cajatart's
These stories were written in response to the question, "What do you think of when you look at the globe?" The top paper was the first. English story ever written by Jose, who came from Mexico this year. Mrs. Calderwood Remedial Reading,
St. Cajetan THE GLOBE
by Jose Garcia, grade 6 The earth is yellow, green and the water is blue,1 It has states very big and tilers little. And toOj it. has ocean's, the Pacific and Atlantic
Baker Junior High
.Baker Junior High School's Achievement Roll included forty-three boys and girls at the end of the first- semester. Qualifications for this highly prized honor list are:
1. Scholastic achievement (good grades)
2. Good citizenship
3. Signatures of three sponsoring teachers and approval by all the faculty
The students whose names are listed below; in alphabet-
oceans, .. The biggest part of j-lcal order met these- qualifica-I the earth is water. lions:
1 And toq | it has hills and space and. many plants and many cities. It has. sun and night and,, day. The sun is bicrger.. than .the moon. I 1
A girl's drill team has been
Arid it hds animals and snow
organized at Greenlee. under -".cl it has many river^M th direction of Mr. Bennie j OUR GLOBE NuOnes. These girls learn to By Cabrini Gonzales, grade 5 march and perform With good.. The globe is round and full; precision and rhythm as a;of states. The line in the
middle is called the equator. In Africa i $he animals are very wild. On the globe the blue is the seas and the brown is the mountains. The colors of- the glob are very beautiful. Some of the temperatures are warm and cool. Our horn states are green for our rass. And the people of it t very nice and kind.
THE EARTH
by Steve Chavez,. grad 7 The earth is our home. God created it for man. It is made of many different hemispheres. It has an equator that runs through the middle of Africa. And it also has many different continents. It is made very small for a school. The name of it is a globe, the duplicate of the earth. It is round. Christopher Columbus proved 'that to the people of his' time. It's round like a ball and I call it the foot stool of our Lord..
group. It is hoped that uniforms can be ordered for them in order that they may perform fpr different school groups. The girls on the drill team are Nellie Fullwood, Beverly Conict, Mary Williams, Pamela- Norwood, Trudy McClendon, Debbie Jackson, Brenda Thompson and Debbie Lehman.
The Greenlee PTA will meet'bn' February 5th at 3:00 p. m. The program should be of great interest to parents in the West area in that there will be a discussion of Federal Aid monies and how they contribute to th Greenlee school curriculum. Some of the areas in which these funds have contributed are the team teaching program, the Reading Improvement Program, Guidance and Counseling, before and atier school study halls, use of a parent as a general school-aide, increased number of volumes for the library, as well as additional classroom teaching materials1. It is hoped that we will have many parents at this meeting.
Fairmont Recreation
Fairmont Recreation Center at. West Third and Fox provides a variety of activities for school age children. Every evening, Monday through Fri-dav, there is recreation from 3:30 to' 6:00 p. m. for children under 14, Table games, crafts, voll^vball and supervised playground- play are among the things offered.
From 6:00 to 9:00 p. m., five nights a week there is recre ation and crafts for children oyer 14. Some activities offered are basketball, table games, enrm, votievball. sew-ina parties and on Fridav nfehts fr'vrt 7;00 to 9:00 p. m. a Teen Dance!
A complete schedule of -events may be obtained at the Center.
Gary Aguirre bnarriv Alexander Trank Alvarez |
David AnthPhy Rosalie Bleq Alice Borrego Charlyne Brown Barbara Carillo Fred Carillo Christine Cisneros James Cruz .
Robert Cunningham Janell Cutshall Loretta Duran Cheryl Dyes Rosalyn Gaffney Patricia. Garcia Alfonso Gold-,
Linda Gomez Angelina Jctramillo Sharon Joe Hahs Krisch Helen Lopez Donna Maj Albert Marquez -Delores Medina James Mollendar Judy Moore Benrta Olivas Joey Ortiz Jane Padilla Carolyn Ramirez Rose Rivera Kathy Rodriquez Daniel Sailas Modestine Smith Richard Valdez Andy Vigil Ernest Vigil Linda Vigil Max Vigil William Wendelin Gertrude Zajaczkowski
Boys' Club News
The Boys' Club wrestling team lost to the J. C. Owen Club on Saturday, February 4 and also wrestled with the West Side Club on the 11th SAFETY PATROL of February. The 17th and 18th of February are the dates for the All-Boys Tournament
The 25th, the boys will have a Sectional Basketball Tournament here in Denver. The Sectional Billiard) Tournament will be held in Greeley, Colorado some time in March. The annua] Easter Hat Parade will be held in March.
West Side
Church
Directory
ST. CAJETAN 9fh and Lawrence Phone 825-8059 Tatiier Max Santamaria, Pastor
SericesSunday Mass: 7:00* 8:30, 10:30, 12, 7 p. m.
Holy Days6:30/ 8:30, 10:30. 7:00.
CHURCH OF GOD 5th and Fox Street Phone 244-2339 Rev. Leroy Vance Sunday Service, > 11.
7:30. Sunday School. 10.
METROPOLITAN BAPTIST 910 Kalamath Street : Rv.. Salvador Cano Sunday .Service;-. 1L; 6:30.
Sunday School 13;
Denver Inner City Protestant Parish
910. Galapago Si:eet Phone 244-2636
Rev. lyiarilou Taggart, Director Harlan Beach,
. Part-time .minister Janet Brett, "
. Administrative. Secretary Church Services: Thursdays, 7:30 p. m.
Church School and Junior Choir, Saturdays, 1O::0O a. m. No Sunday Services.
Apostolic Church of Jesus 1039 W. 13th Avenue Rev. Toby Rampa Phone 244-2765 Sunday School, 9:30 a. m. Sunday Morning Worship, 10:30 a., m.
Sunday Evening Worship 7:30 p. m.,.
Wednesdays: Prayer Service 7:30 p. m*.
ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN West 3rd Ave. and Acoma Phone 733-3777 Paul G. Hansen and. Roger A. Stiers, Pastors
Services: Sunday 8:30, 11:00 a. m., 7:00 p. m,
Sunday School: 9:45 a. m.
ST. JOSEPH'S REDEMPTORIST CATHOLIC CHURCH W. 6th Ave. and Galapago Si Phone 534-4408 Rev. James Nugent, C. Ss. R Pastor
Services-Sunday Mass: t 7, 8:30, 10, 11:30.
Holy Days 6, 7, 3, 9, 12:15 6 p. m.
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST 935 W. 11th Avenue Phone 255-6152 Rev. Thomas Sepulveda Service^Sunday: 9:45, 11.
First Avenue Presbyterian 120 West 1st Avenue Phone 777;5325 Rev. A. J. Blomquist,
: Sunday Service, U a. m.. 6:30. p, in. ?T\ .
Sunday School 9:45. .
APOSTOLIC FAITH CHURCH 1000 Kalamath Street Phone 255-3215 Rev. R. W. Nichols ServiceSunday: 11, 7:00. Sunday School9:30, ;
ST. ELIZABETH 11th and Curtis Streets. Phone 255-9556 Rev. Fabian Flynn, Pastor ServicesSunday Mass: 6. 8, 9:15, 11, 12:15.
Holy Days: 6, 7, 8, 1 12:15.
Elmwood
Fairmont School
grades under the able leader-
The Safety Patrol has been doing another fine job this
Elmwood will hold open house for past presidents, former principals, students and teachers, February 15th from 1:30 p,m. to .3:0.0 p.m. Refresh-~ien+s will be served in the 1st floor gym.
Assisting Mrs. Emily Sanchez, PTA president, in planning the event are: Mrs. Vera Schelling, Mrs. Cathv Goontz, Mrs. Lela Romero, Mrs. Corrlne Borrego* Mrs. Beverly Apodaca.
year. These boys and girls are selected as representatives of the student body as symbols of safety. We have a fine group and we are proud of the work they do. They just received bridges far their safety belts. Their sponsor is Mrs. Beverly Smith.
Srifety Patrol Members Rosetta Martinez Debbie Bruffett Arils Szabo Stanley Strecker John Cordova Barbara Romero Mike Valerio Harry Whalen Ma-io Metia Richard Martinez Diane Valdez G^egorv Montoya STUDENT COUNCIL The .Stuclnt Council is made up ,of student electee} from tfe {purth, fifth arid si&th
ship of Mrs. Beardsworth.
The representatives are:
Fourth-Patricia Valdez, Marty Rodriguez, Victoria Gonzales, Benny Pena, and Linda Clark.
FifthSteVen Bowen, Gina Martinez, Brian Morris, Nancy Griego and Eugene Martinez.
Sixth Richard Martinez, Wilma Corea, Chris Padilla and Terry Rodriquez.
The Student Council has been very busy again -this year. They have been in charge of many programs and activities. (The United Fund Campaign, Halloween, and Christmas). They have presented skits on safety, good conduct and citizenship be-1 havior. They are sponsoring! the Optimist-Police Award pro-1 gram. The officers are: Pres-!
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL 126 West 2nd Avenue Phone 722-8781 Rev. David Minton Holy Communion, 8=00 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a. m. Sunday Service 11:00 a m.
WESLEYAN COVENANT* 525 West First Ave.
Rev. O. L. Crager Phone 722-4888 Sunday services11.
Sunday School, 10:00 amL.
Iglesia Betel De Las Asam-bleas De Dios
West 2nd Ave. and Fox St Rev. Mike A. Salazar, Pastor ServiceSunday, 10:00 and 7:30 p. m.
FIRST BETHANY LUTHERAN 215 West 5th Avenue Phone 825-4862 Rev. Fred A. Bloch. Sunday Service, 11. . ^ >
Sunday School 9 3Q._ J
WEST SIDE CHRISTIAN 668 Inca Street i Phone: 623-3419 William K. Linton, Minister Services: Sunday Worship 10:10 and 7:00 p: m.
Bible School: 9:00 a. m.
WESLEY METHODIST 465 Galapago Street Phone 222-3337 Rev. Joe Kamman Sunday Service, 11. 'Sunday School 9:45.
FIRST MENNONITE CHURCH 885 Delaware Street Phone 2442093 Rev. Marcus Bishop Rev. John Ventura Sunday Service9:00; Span-
ldent, Richard Martinez;' Vlce-Ilsh Service 1H15; Sunday President, Nancy Griego: $ec-1 School 10;00; Evening Service retary, Wilma Corea 7^0-


Page Four
THE RECORDER
February, 1967
. ^hoppittq Tibs.
REPORT OF JANUARY MEETING
The Westside Action Council met January 26th tor its regular monthly meeting. Sites foi the Neighborhood Service Center were discussed and given priorities. However, later developments made this unnecessary. Reverend Sepulveda, after approval by his superiors, donated the use of 3000 square feet of space in the First Methodist Church at 935 West 11th Avenue. This would be free except for utilities and upkeep. A telephone survey was nade of the Council members and the majority gave their approval to making this site tiie first choice of the Council our Neighborhood Service Center. The Action Councils ~fi'e hoping that the Service , Centers will be funded very
WHAT'S PLENTIFUL. Still soon> sticking to your New Year's
resolution to shop more care- Some of the other business fully for food? Then watch for tar-en care of at the meeting these items 0*- oranges, grape-1 included the appointment of fruit, pork, eggs, canned sal- lWO new committees. In con-rmon, dry beans and green nection witn this, plans are -split peas. The U. S. Depart-. beinq made to restructure the anent of Agriculture says they'll | committees of the Council to ibe in especially plentiful sup* ^ provide better service and more
WEST SIDE ACTION council \ BANK BEGINS CONSTRUCTION
gply in February. In March eggs, pork, oranges, grapefruit, green split peas and
efficiency. This matter will be taken up at the next meeting. The two new committees are
canned salmon will continue!,:ne Executive and Personnel on the list, with eggs cmd! Committees. On the Executive peanuts and peanut products Committee are Don Gallegos, featured. Rice also appears Council Chairman; Albert Roy-on the March list of plenti- kcd* Vice Chairman; Joyce Ells-Julg j worth, Secretary; and Frank
,1T Clay,Treasurer. Other members
UNDER FOOT. Worn out qj-q Rev_ John Ventura, Ralph shoes may harm feet. Shoes Gaschler, Moses Cisneros and with ripped seams or soles attomeyi Robert Johnson. Serv with holes should be repaired ing on the Personnel Commit-promptly, the U. S. Depart-!tee are Leonard Chadwick as ment of Agriculture says. But chairman with Rev. James Mm S Eg that Mg soles Nugent. Larry Lucero, Sister and resoling may change the Liguori, Sister Martinelle, Betsy size and shape of the shoes Kester< Lupe DeNava and cmd result m a poor fit. With Rach^ Guedea as mernbers. rising shoe repair costs, it mOy!The first job of this committee
i>e less expensive to buy new
will be to review the applica-
shoes for your child's rapidlyI M for DiTector of the Neigh-growing feet. borhood Service Center. There
TO REDUCE WRINKLES. If' are 60 some applications for you don't have a wash-and-1 this job and the committee will wear cycle on your washing need to select five applicants machine or dryeryet want to jrrs their first choices for the wse these machines for clothes! job.
-liiade of synthetic fibers, try
these suggestions from the U. iS. Department of Agriculture.
Tney'U help reduce wrinkling.
'Wash in small loads. Use ood or warm (never hot) water. Wash only long enough to remove soil. Rinse' in cool water. Shorten the water extraction timesboth after wash-i have requested to send us rep-
Also appointed was a temporary committee to select, resident candidates for the Council to fill Before the meeting closed, Mr. Gallegos informed the Council that three agencies
ing- and after rinsing. Set dryer at low or medium... After clothes are dry, tumble them for N|0 minutes more without lieat. Remove immediately and Jiang. r "
Aide Wanted
Mr. Jim Meier, Social Worker at Baker Junior High School, is accepting applications for itthe position of neighborhood 'aide. This position will pay resentatives as. non voting members of the Council. Agencies requesting this are the Department of Health and Hospitals, the.. Department of Welfare dnd.,XARASA. The Council welcomes. ;thi's feeling it will prcivide an excellent opportunity: for communication between :. the area residents and these agencies.
The next meeting of the Action Council is February 23, at 7:30 p. m. at Auraria Community Center. The public is urged to attend. The Council represents the residents of the West Side and needs to know the thoughts and feelings of the- people.
The Education Committee of the Westside Action Council has met with the faculty and administration of various local schools in the last few months. In January they visited Fair-
mont and Greenlee Schools j and were briefed on the various programs in these schools. On February 1st the Committee visited Elmwood School and had an interesting discussion with the principal and some of the teachers. One of he things discussed was the 'Tipact of the Headstart Program on the area and its schools. On February- 21 the Committee will meet at St. Elizabeth's to become acquainted with their program.
The Education Committee is attempting -to become better acquainted with the schools so hat they can serve as a contact between the schools and the community. The Committee welcomes questions about what they are doing and is willing to help with prob-'ems concerning the schools. Mrs. Carmen f Hodges, 1114 Mariposa, phone 623-3950, is chairman of the committee.
HEALTH COMMITTEE MEETS
The health committee of the five Action Councils met February 6, 1967 at 8 p. m. at the Avondale Lutheran Church at West Colfax and. Irving. Ross Investment Company presented a proposal to build a Medical Center to our specifications if we lease from them and providing they get adequate. financing. A possible site for the Health Center No. 2 at 10th and Federal Blvd. was discussed.
COMMITTEE HEARS PROPOSAL BY AFSC
The Inter-Council Committee of the five Action Councils met on Friday, February 10. At this meeting the American Friends Service. Committee, represented by Jean McCorry and Warren Witte, presented their hopes to work with the Action Councils and the Neighborhood Service Centers.
The AFSC is a funded delegate agency of Denver Opportunity which for two years has conducted,, a tutorial program in various Denver Junior High Schools.
Looking to the future the AFSC would like to see the Neighborhood Service Centers become the agencies through /vhich junior high students would be channeled to the AFSC tutorial program. In connection, with this, the AFSC is offering to .provide a paid educational- aide, to each Neighborhood Service Center which would have, a tutorial program in its area. These aides would be paid by private funds cmd could' be counted as in-kind i donations, to this Service Cen-i ters. v"--.-J
In a telephone conversation which this reporter had with Mr. Witte, he expressed the desire that the Neighborhood Service Centers would provide feedback from the communities to the AFSC concerning their tutorial program. He also stated that Mrs. McCorry and he found the meeting with the Action Councils very enlightening and they would hope to continue close contact between the Councils and the AFSC.
Architect's drawing of the National City Bank as it will look on completion of the expansion program now under way.
The National City Bank, which has been closely identified with the west side during the 56 years of its existence, has begun a major expansion and remodeling pro-gram at its location at the corner of South Broadway and Bayaud Avenue. According to President R. K. Hudson the improvements will increase the service capacity of the bank's interior facilities, modernize the exterior and enhance the appearance of the adjoining area.
National City opened for business as the West Side State Bank, January 16, 1911 at the southeast comer of Eighth and Santa Fe. In 1927 the bank nationalized, acquired its present name and moved to the Broadway location:
President Hudson said that the bank will utilize ground adjoining the bank's present structure on the north which was acquired nine months ago for the rebuilding program. This area, with 140 feet fronting on South Broadway, will afford space for extending the north wall of the" building by 40 feet to provide increased lobby space, creation of an arcade, a landscaped court and additional customer parking.
The main lobby will be increased to 4600 square feet
to provide added space for ot-j facers' platform, teller line, cue-| tomer reception areas and oth-l.er departmental functions. The
* safe deposit vault will be I doubled in size and a second 'walk-up tellers area will be
created.
A colonnade of brick piers iwill create the arcade and will be extended to include the building's frontage on South
Broadway. The new main en-I trance will be from the arcade.
A 4600 square feet sunken I garden court will be at the north of the arcade in the cen-jter of which will be a lighted fountain. This area .will- also j be landscaped.
I There will be a driveway j leading from South Broadway at the north extremity of the complex to a parking area west of the court.
Another feature in the general remodeling plan will be creation of a roof deck for employee use.
New furniture, fixtures and carpeting will be installed in the main lobby as well as the instalment loan, data processing and auditing departments on the second floor.
Cost of construction and furnishing in all areas will approximate $250,000, according to President Hudson, who said that completion is. scheduled for mid-summer.
WEST SIDE Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS
Feb. 23 ill Westside > Action Council Meeting at Auraria Community Center, 7; 30 p. m.
EVERY WEEK
MondaysWell-Child Clinic. First Mennonite Church 12:30-4 ,p:: m. (1st & 3rd Mondays orily). y^....
Monday thru Friday-Recreation at Fairmont Recreation Center,: ,
3:30-6:00 p. m, for children under 14.
, 6:00-9:00 p. m. for children, over 14.
TuesdaysGirl Scout Troop 1893:30 p. m. at Greenlee School. _
ThursdaysMama's Morning Out 9:00 to 11:30 a. m., Auraria Community Center (4 weeks)
Thursdays1-4 p.m. Planned Parenthood Clinic, First Mennonite Church.
Ads Now Accepted
This issue the Recorder' starts a new service to its readers. The Recorder will be carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 60c per line/ $1.00 minimum, Box 50%. extra, Boldface fe-,70c a line.
Ads must be brought to the office of the West Side Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Drive, by the I Oth of each month. Payment for the ad must be made at the. scone time, the ad is brought in.
The Recorder is offering this service to the community feeling that/it. will be useful to our readers.,.. >..
CLASSIFIED ADS
Assorted Jazz Records § at reasonable prices, 425 W. 2nd Ave., 733-4968.
For Rent. 4 rooms, bath, 1st floor, remodeled1. Tile floors, heat, drapes, yard. On bus. Working or retired couple $60. 529' Galapago. 244-6775.
Wanted. Combination Heating and Cooking Gas Range. 244-6775.
Anne's Beauty Salon 971 Santa Fe Dr. 244-5604 permanents $10 up; haircuts $2; shampoos & sets $2. Free coffee