Citation
West side recorder, May, 1967

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, May, 1967
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 4, Number 1
West Side Welcomes Action Center Coordinator
Donald A. Garcia, thenew-ly f,hired'', coordmdfor for the ,. Neighborhood Action Center, :told tHe.:Wst Side Riec^eW; '"I'm very excited about j ftn& idea of Neighborhood j Action Centers. The neighborhood; approach is very practical-making services available in the neighborhood. But it will take the efforts ;and interests of the entire neighborhood to make these centers a success."
Mr. Garcia was born in San Luis, Colorado, in 1936. His family moved to Alamosa when he was 9f years old, and he went to school there, graduating froip... Alamosa High School in 1954. ^ lie spent 3 years in the Navy, returning afterwards to Alamosa to attend Adams State College. Mr. Garcia first moved to Denver in 1961 but then returned to Alamosa to complete work at Adams State College, where he earned a degree of Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Sociology in 1964.
Mr. Garcia and his wife Yvonne, married in 1958, have three childrenMichaellene, 7, Donald Jeffrey, 6, and Yvonne Francine, 18 months.
Donald Garcia has had a variety of employment experience, He worked as a mail Oarnerrm*'1958 to 1961 and then woflced for about a year in the mint here in Denver. He returned to Alamosa in 1962, where, he worked full time as a mail clerk while going to school .full time.. After earning his degree at Adams State, Mr. Garcia took a job with Job Opportunity Center, where he worked until the center's close in December, 1966. He held several different positions with IOC, including psychological testing specialist, vocational counsellor, vocational training director, job development supervisor, and administrative assistant fiscal officer.
According to Mr. Garcia all the coordinators and develop
Monthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
May, 1967
Job Corps Has Openings For Young People
Juvenile Court Judge Philip Gilliam is swearing a group of young men into the Job Corps. Third from the left in the front row is West Sider Chris Nelson of 1376 Osage.
West Side Improvement Association Sets Annual Membership Drive
The Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Asso-: classes may be pbtaine 1 by ciation voted at their meeting'calling his office, 292-5190.
Metro State Summer Session Set
Eighty-four courses will be offered by Metropolitan State College this summer. Dr. Harold W. Benn, Dean of the summer quarter, has announced.A copy of the bulletin and schedule of
of May 10 to open a dollar a year fajnily membership cam-
Recently the Colorado General Assembly authorized ad-
paign. The campaign, ia begin junior .courses --in- the fall on June 1, is -to-. fchnrfbf 1967 and senior courses in
ilies. living 'in the area, businessmen arid1 property owners, clergymen, and others working in the West Side. The mem-horships will be valid through! Persons who ~ We"'"not September 30, 1968.
Board members will arrange to have their districts canvassed for memberships. Memberships will also be available at the office of the Association,
768 Santa Fe Drive.
the fall of 1968.
Registration is June 12, classes-start June 13 and the summer quarter ends August 18.
previously attended the college should submit an application for admission as soon as pos-
Money raised through the membership drive will not be used for current staff or office space but will be the property of the Association itself to ers for each of 1he five target be used as the Board sees fit.
areas have been given a one-week training course which may become a model for training throughout the country. It was the first time the training program, developed' by the University of Missouri Multi-Purpose Training 'Center, whs given before the start of neighborhood work by paid staff.
| All West Sidets wish Wm Garcia all the success in the world in this undertaking.
to meet operating expenses of the Association itself.
West Siders are proud to be a part of the progress in our area. Much of this progress ?s due to the efforts of citizens working together in the West Side Improvement Association. This is your. opportunity to become a card-holder in the Association.
Manager of Safely Turns Down License
sible and not end of May.
later than the
7j5*he Job Corps is looking fbr young people between 16 and 21 years old; unemployed and out of' school. Young people) who join Receive training in Job Corps*!'deters and get paid while they learn. It is also possible for Job Corps members to send some money home money which the government will match up to $25 per month.
Responsibility for recruiting boys 16 through 21 years old for the Job Corps is the respon-sibility of the Colorado Department of Employment. Girls 16 through 21 are recruited by Women in Community Service I (WISC), a' volunteer organization. Since the program was initiated in mid-January 1965, more than 1,115 young men have been sent to Job Corps camps by the Department.
Fellows interested in Job Corps should check with the Youth Opportunity Center, 1115 Broadway, phone 292-4150. Girls should call or visit Women in Community Service
^07, phone 623-4349.
Arts and Sciences offerings (WICS) g10 16th Street, Room will include art, biology, chemistry, economics, education,
English, history, mathematics, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, speech, and health, physical education and recreation.
-There will* be courses this summer in business; accounting, data processing, management, marketing, typing and shorthand. Other Applied Sci-nces vocational-technical of
Local Performance Set For #/The Revolutionist"
"The Revolutionist," the play by Rodolfo "Gorky'' Gonzales* will be performed at the Santa Fe Theater, 974 Santa Fe Drive, at 8 p. m., June 6. Those under 18 and persons who have a Crusade, for Justice membership ferings will include culinary card will be admitted free. The arts, police science, technical- admission charge for other drawing and aerospace tech- adults is $1.00.
nology.
Mr. Hugh McCleam, Denver Manager of Safety arid Excise, issued a decision on- May 1 denying the application by Schad's Grocery, 1100 Santa Fe Drive, for a 3.2 beer license. Mr. McCleam cited the opposition of the West Side Improvement Association and the Lincoln Park-South Lincoln Park Resident Council, based on fear that a new owner of the business might turn the location into a 3.2 bar.
The State Legislature recently passed and signed a new law
which becomes effective July 1 and which requires an applicant for a 3.2 license to specify whether he wants a license for on- or for off-premises consumption. The West Side Improvement Association supported this bill while it was in the Senate.
Mr. McCleam stated in his decision, "An application for an off sale license after July 1, 1967, would not, of course, be vulnerable to the objections which cause me to deny this application."
Local Grocery Does Extensive Remodeling
Work on enlarging and extensive remodeling is progressing at the National Brands Store at 727 Santa Fe Drive.
With the new addition there will be approximately 7,000 square feet of floor space, which will make easier and more pleasant shopping.
The AG store, owned and managed by Charlie Scarafiotti, has been located at 727 Santa Fe Drive since 1948.
Included in the remodeling is an increase in size of the frozen food department, more fruit and vegetable bins, dairy cases and delicatessen, a new bakery department to be installed soon to supply freshly baked items including special orders for birthday cakes, etc.
Besides the new ceiling and more fluorescent lights, new display cases will be installed. Charlie has also provided parking space for over 100 cars in the rear of the store.
A grand opening to celebrate the .completion of the new store will be held early in June.
Charlie's investment in the West Side proves his faith in the economic growth of the area and his confidence in its people.
West
Sid
Ok
The Revolutionist has received favorable reviews in the daily press. The play pictures the way in which the pressures of -life in the city sometimes destroy the rural Latin American family unit and deprive proud men of their dignity as they are driven to despair by a system that they do not understand.
Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS
May 21Open House and Dedication of new recreation facilities at Inner City Protestant Parish, 7:00. p. m.
May 21.Auraria Community Center Family Picnic, 10:00 to 4:00 p. m.
May 22 Fairmont- School Mother-Daughter Tea for Kindergarten, -1st, 2nd and 3rd grades, 2 p. m.
May 23 Elmwood School Area Piano Concert at Bradley School) 7:3d p. m.
May 24St.Elizabeth's School PTA, 8:00 p. m.
May 24 Greenlee School Area Band and Orchestra Concert, 7:30 p.. m.
May 25Auraria Community Center Annual Meeting, 7:30-9:30 p. m.
May 25West High Spring Choral Concert, West High
Auditorium, 7:30 p. m.
May 26St. Joseph's Talent Show, 7:30 p.' m;
. May 29 g- Fairmont School Mother Daughter Tea for 4th, 5th, and 6th grades, 2 p. m.
June 1 Resident Council Meeting at Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7:30 p. m.
* June 2 --Auraria Community Center Annual Carnival, 7:00-9:30 p. m.'
June 6"The Revolutionist," play by Rodolfo "Corky" Gonzales at Santa Fe Theater, 8 p. m.
June 12 to June 23Vacation Bible School, First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 9:00 a.m.
EACH WEEK
Rev. Sepulveda, minister of First Spanish Methodist Church, wee1'1 / radio broadcast on KFSC Radio, Saturday 4:45
1 p.tn,1 -v


f
Page Two
THE RECORDER
May, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings. Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
j Abel G. Espinosa, son of Mrs. Eva Espinosa and the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Abel | Chavez of 1451 Navajo, visited his family for two weeks. He, is on furlough front the U.S. | Navy at San Diego. He will! leave home on the 22nd and' will return to San Diego.
Mrs. Elizabeth Heald, 250 Cherokee, left Friday morning for Douglas,. Wyoming, to visit her sister.'
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Anderson, 225 West 2nd Avenue, left Wednesday for an extended visit with relatives in Denmark.
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Land (the former Patsy Cain), 267 Cherokee, were injured badly recently in a head-on collision. Patsy is very seriously ill in Denver General Hospital and Leo had plastic surgery on his face Thursday at St. Anthony's Hospital. He also has a broken arm.
Our sympathy is with Mrs. Ruby Chavez and family of 238 Cherokee St., whose mother passed away after a long illness.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilford Young from What Cheer, Iowa, were guests at the Henry Schonborg home, 1247 Lipan Street.
, Mr. and Mrs. Lee Biesecker of Kenosha, Wisconsin, the daughter and' son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Kalanquin of 1423 Lipan Street, were the guests of' their folks for four days.
Margot Serumgard of 1247 Lipan Street was elected Sergeant-at-arms for the year 1967-68 by the Ted Leyden Unit No. 1 of the American Legion Auxiliary of Denver. .She will be installed May 21st at the Legion at 2:00 p. m.
Miss Debra Winterhalder, 226 W. 3rd Avenue, celebrated her 6th birthday with a pqrty. Guests were Margo and Nancy Garcia, Diana Haro, Sally Ley-ba, Sandy and Joan Rios, Andrea Boelter and Pam Man-tooth.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Maberry, 308 Inca St., had guests from El Paso, Texas, Mr. and Mrs Bob Gaskin and children who are on their way to New Jersey to be relocated with the U. S. Army.
Mrs. Lorraine Wilsoh of 243 West 2nd Avenue celebrated her birthday on April 27. Friends and relatives came to call.
Mrs. Lena Richards, 244 West 3rd Ave., was pleasantly surprised when her son Fred and family from Delta, Colorado, arrived to help her celebrate her birthday April 16. Her daughter, Mrs. Bette Kosel of Prescott, Arizona, also came to help celebrate the occasion.
We are happy to report Mr. Louis Betz, 240 Cherokee, is doing nicely after eye surgery in St. Luke's Hospital.
Mr. Ben Martinez, 244 Cherokee, is home from the hospital and getting itchy fingered to work .in his yard.
Mr. and Mr^. W. Koc^ "ame Sunday, the 17th of April to1 help Mrs. Rubv Allison of 259 Cherokee celebrate her birthday and their 25th anniversary.
I H I
Donald Grover, graduate of i West High School, who has been with Frontier, Air Lines since November 1/ 1963, has just been promoted to manager1 of sales and advertising with Frontier Air Lines.
Tom Sepulveda, Jr., son of Rev. and Mrs. Thomas Sepul-j veda, may be in Denver, on vacation in June.
Mr. Sepulveda, who is a graduate of West High School, Colorado State College, and the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York, is a member of the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra and is in the process of preparing for a tour through Europe with the Symphony Orchestra. He hopes, though, to be able to be in Denver in June to spend some time with his parents.
EDITORIAL
As this wity be the lgst 4seue I will 'Serve as editor of the West Side Recorder, I would like to take this opportunity to say a few words of appreciation.
When I started as editor 2V2 years ago I was a fairly recent resident of the West Side. I am sure that one big reason I have come to feel that this is my home and community has been due to. the many contacts I have had through the paper.
I would also like to thank those people who have faithfully given us news month after month. With this newspaper the editor and staff are dependent upon those people and agencies who are interested enough to give us their support in the form of news. My thanks also to the staff members who have been faithful in their reporting jobs and to those "unsung heroes" who voluntarily help with- the distribution each month. '
It is my hope that the neighborhood will continue to support the newspaper and the new editor so that it be an asset to the West Side.
Thank you,
Mrs. Rachel Guedea
Note Of Thanks
I would like to express appreciation to the Family Health Center for the fine service they are providing to our neighborhood. I feel that the clinic has been a worthwhile addition to; the West Side area.
Mrs. Donald Gallegos
Resident Council
. The Resident Cptmcil.of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes would like to thank Mrs. Loretta Rhym for the tine program presented at the last Resident Council meeting. A group of girls from Baker Junior High School performed a dance routine, and we saw "The High Wall," a movie about prejudice.
Residents of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes wish their president, Mrs. Martha Olsen; a speedy; recovery from her recent operation. Mrs. Ruth Santos is also recovering from an operation.
The next Resident Council meeting will be held June 1, 1967, at 7:30 p.m. at Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa. We hope to see you there. New residents to Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes are welcomed and urged to get into the swing of things by coming to Resident Council doings.
Lincoln Park Senior Citizens
The Lincoln Park Senior Citizens met in the Lincoln Park Community Hall, 1438 Navajo, on April 4. Twenty-three members were present, and two guests: Mrs. Amanda Harvey, the house guest of Mrs. Sue Wonner, .1319 W. 13th Ave., and Mrs. Carmilla Boudreaux, 1429 Mariposa. The tables were decorated with bouquets of bright flowers, and Miss Corine Gibson, acting hostess for the month, served a refreshing fruit salad with wafers, mints, and salted' nuts on the side.
After the dishes were cleared away. Miss Helen Keaveny, of the U. S. Food and Drug Administration, spoke explaining the purpose of the West Side Fair to be held at the Auraria Community Center, April 14 and 15. Plans for participating in, the Fair were discussed. An hour of bingo for prizes completed the afternoon.
On April 6, tbe Lincoln Park Senior Citizens were entertained by the Senior Citizens of the Ouigg Newton-Housing Project, 4407 Mariposa Way. Twelve of our members were able to attend and enjoyed a dessert luncheon, a short program, and a lively bingo game where prizes were passed from one winner to another.
The business session of the April 18 meeting of the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens was tak- i munist Hungary
eh up with plans for a tea, to be given the afternoon of May 2, and to which all older residents of both Lincoln Park and South Lincoln Park Homes were invited. The name of Mrs. Carmilla Boudreaux was added to the club roster. Three others added this year are: Miss Corine Gibson, 1351 Mariposa, Mrs. Elsa Giuen and Mrs. Rose Adams, both of 1429 Mariposa.
The last two weeks of April were busy ones for the Lincoln Park Senior Citizen's Club. On j April 11, nine members made | a tour of the State Capitol, had .a glimpse of our legislators at work, and were greatly impressed by the beauty and history of the building. A group of eight of our ladies served as volunteers at the West Side Fair held in Auraria Community Center Apr. 14, 15. Miss Anita Miirhs, 1428 Osage St, was tile lucky winner of one of the valuable door prizes given out On tile last afternoon. A beautiful display of needlework-was arranged by the ladies of -the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens for the open house at Auraria Community Center, April 28. i Two outstanding pieces were the crocheted bedspread made : by Mrs. Martha Olsen, 1406 Navajo, and a lovely embroid-I ered cloth which Mrs. Ludee Vajda, 1438 Osage St., brought with her when she escaped from her former home in Coin-
G. I. Forum Selects Queen
The Mile High Chapter of the GI Forum held its coronation and coronation ball on the 22nd of April. There were 8 young girls competing for ;the title of Miss Mile Hi Queen.
It was won by Miss Helen Chaves and she will represent the Mile Hi Chapter at the State Convention which will be | held in Walsenberg in June.
I The Ball was held: at the- Albany Hotel Ball Room and there Were about 500 in attend-icmce. We want to thank all that attended for their great I support.
Miss Chaves will compete | with other queens for the honor of being the national queen, in (August at the national convention of the GI Forum in Denver.
The Mile High Chapter also attended- the coronation of the queen at Fort Lupton on the 29th of April.
Alfonza Martinez, Chaplain Mile Hi Chapter
West Siders Attend Ordination
Mrs. Ben Hodges and family. Mr. and Mrs. Luz Sanchez and family, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Cordova and family, and Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Sanchez attended the ordination of their nephew and cousin George Salazar to the priesthood at las Vegas, N. Mex. Father George Salazar was ordained in a beautiful ceremony at Our Lady of Sorrows Church in Las Vegas on May 13, 1967. He was the first person in over 30 years fe be braairfed ffem tiie town of 'Las Vegas.
His fif&' mdss 'wcfe celebrated bn 'Mother's Day, :May 14, at 5:00 p.m. at Immaculate Cbn-deption Church in Las Vegas.
Relatives from Denver, Texas, and throughout New Mexico attended.
Father Salazar will be visiting relatives in Denver on Sunday, May 21, and will say a Mass at St. Joseph's Church on Monday, May 22, at 7 a.m.
Auraria
Community
Center
Fcnnily Picnic
Auraria Community Center will hold a "Family Picnic" on Sunday, May 21 at Q'Fallon Park. The Cfenter will provide buses for transportation which will leave from the Center at 10:00, a.m. and return at 4:00 p.m.
Each family should bring, enough food for their own family, warm clothes, their own silverware and a blanket or Something that can be used as a picnic cloth.
The Center will provide I drinks, a dessert, dishes and I cups, and many exciting games such as: baseball, three legged.
I races, relay races, sack races,, j volley ball, scavenger hunt.
' and horse shoes.
Anyone who is interested in the picnicshould call1. Auraria Community Center at 534-7614 to make reservations.. No children will be allowed on-buses unless their parents are-present
Annual Carnival
j The Center's Annual Carni-I val will be held on Friday ,, i June 2nd from 7:00-9:30 p.m.. Various groups at the Center I are planning the carnival and Will also be in charge of the-. different booths. Tickets will be available at 5c per event I Everyone is invited to attend, and as in past years, can be-I expected to enjoy themselves I and have lots of fun. Profits, from the carnival will go toward Day Camp expenses.
Day Camp
Day Camp at Auraria wilL begin on June 26th. We wilL again be using the ranch in the foothills. The cost will be $2.00 per session per child and the Center will furnish milk.. Each child must bring his own sack lunch.
Dates and times for the sessions for youngsters who have completed the following grades-are:
Kindergarten and First Grade* K-June 26Huly 79:00-4:00 p. m.
4th, 5th and 6th Grade: July 10-Iuly 2112:30-7:30 p.m.
2nd and 3rd GradesJuly 24-August 4-9:00-4:00 p.m.
Registration dates are: Monday, June 12 from 9:00 to 5:00 p. m. and Monday evening-from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; Tuesday and Wednesday, June 13 and' 14 from *9:00 to 5:00 p.m. We will register 25 youngsters for each session, so if you are interested, please come in early on the above registration dates.
Annual Meeting
. Auraria Community Center's Annual Meeting will be held on May 25th from 7:30 to 9:30 p. m. The Annual Meeting is held each year for election cf new Board members, honoring Volunteers, etc. Mr. Mike Moore, Director of Denver Opportunity, will be the main speaker.
Club groups will have different displays throughout the Center. Everyone is cordially invited to attend!.


May, 1967
THE RECORDER
Pag Three
St. Joseph's Grade School
Safety Assembly Raul Ponce
On April 20 our school had a safety assembly where deserving patrol members received a merit pin. Officer Martin, guest speaker, spoke on safety, and gave out the awards.
Ben Duran, a sixih grader, won a "Safety Dollar" for making a winning poster in the AAA Poster Contest. His motto was: "A Safe Knight Wears White at Night."
Th e Baseball Team John Von Tilius
The Saint Joseph baseball team has had a pretty good year with two wins and three! losses. We have a good pitch- j ing staff consisting of Jeff Lopez, Mike Santistevan and Jerry Matson. Our infield is made up of David Hastings, Chris Garcia, Gilbert Duran and Jerry Matson. Our outfield includes Steve Gallegos, John Von Tilius arid Andrew Renden. Our catcher is Richard Yribia.
Elections
The eighth grade civics class spent the week before city elections delving into facts about candidates, platforms and elections in general. Mrs. Edythe Clark spoke to the class on her duties as precinct chairwoman. She also demonstrated the use of the voting 'machine at Baker Junior High School.' After members of the class gave campaign speeches for various candidates, a mock election was held in the classroom.
Talent Show Patricia Lovatto
Singing, dancing and guitar playing for entertainment; all | this and more will be at the1 talent show to be held at Saint Joseph's church hall at 6th and Galapago oh May 26, 1967, at 7:30 p.m. There will be a small admission. The money will be-'for a charitable cause. Many of the students in the grade school will put on. their own little act Anyone can come 1 for the entertainment. Hope to see you there.
"Hdv Toledo Batman"
Martha Santistevan
ROBIN: Boy, Batman, it's time for the eighth graders at Saint Joseph's to continuate.
BATMAN: It sure is going to be a big day for them as well as their parents who will attend an all school Mass on June first at 8:00 in Saint Joseph's Church.
Head Start Mothers Help At Fair
Mothers of Head Start children at Auraiid .Community Center took part. in the West Sh Fair which was held April 14-1V Miss Dillingham and Mr Barela from the Department of Health worked with the group comparing less expensive foods with the same value in protein. We appreciate the help given by Head Start mothers who were able to assist with the Fair: Betty Fay, Ella Roybal, Maxine Tyson, Irene Huerta, Mary Armento, Esther Henry and Elaine Sandoval.
Irene Huerta
ROBIN: Let's say a little prayer foh all those .who hope to graduate tfris*year and wish all of them happiness in high schopl.
Seminary Richard Yribia This summer the Redemptor-ist Seminary in Edgerton, Wisconsin's sponsoring a program for 7th and 8th grade boys named "The Basic Six." This program is not really to turn these boys into priests but to find a good vocation, a vocation which they will enjoy. This | program will last from July 9 to July 16. The boys will have certain duties to do while at I the seminary. The trip includes an over- night stay in j Chicago.
Camp Saint Maria Kenneth Portuese Forms for camp were given out to boys from ages 9 to 14 to go and enjoy themselves during the summer. The camp is very beautiful. It has swimming pools, boating, horseback riding, hiking and fishing. The days to go to camp are from June 20 to August 20. This only costs four dollars for two weeks. This is sponsored by Catholic Charities and is for all boys in Catholic Schools.
June First Ronald De Herrera June First is the day that everyone waits for, even the teachers. It is the day we get our report cards. Most everyone is anxious to see if they were demoted or promoted. The expressions on everyone's faces' ~ are 'exciting to*' watch. Every expression is different because of final grades.
June first is also a day of departing with your peers until next year. Although June first is a day of departing it ,is a happy day to me. I go back and see all the crazy things I did and all the exciting moments I had throughout the year. I believe that that is the happiest day of the year.
Closing of School Cam Vuksinich The good-byes are said, the school doors are shut and the last bell rings. From the first day of school you look forward to summer vacation but when the time really comes you find yourself wishing you were back at your desk with Reading, History and (geography books by your side. But those days are gone forever You will have to look ahead to your future, life. You can never relive the time that was lost so just do good with every minute of the day.
Area Elementary Concerts
May 23 at 7:30 p.m. students from Elmwood School will be participating in the Elementary School area piano concert at Bradley School.
On May 24 Greenlee School will be host to one of the elementary school area Band and Orchestra Concerts. Schools participating will be Elmwood, Fairmont, Greenlee, and Cheltenham. The program will be at 7:30 p. m.
NEW PRINCIPAL AT GREENLEE
Boys' Club
Jhe Greenlee faculty gave a retirement tea for Mr. Ben Krim, the principal, on the afternoon of May 7. Many people were on hand to wish him well.
Mr. Kenneth Gorsline is to be the new principal at Greenlee this fall. He is a native Denverite and lives in Denver. Mr. Gorsline attended Boulevard and Ashland schools and graduated from North High. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees at the University of Denver.
Mr. Gorsline began his teach, ing career in 1931 at East High School, where he remained till 1953. At that time, he was appointed assistant principal at Merrill. From 1958 to 1961, Mr. Gorsline served as principal of Wyman, and since then he has been principal at Cowell. He also served as principal of the summer session at East High School two years.
School Transfer Forms Available
Request forms for Limited Open Enrollment are now available in- all Denver public schools. The applications, which must be obtained and submitted by the parent or legal guardian, are for the
The Lincoln Park Boys' Club came in 2nd place in the "All Club Game Room Tournament" Friday and Saturday, April 21 and 22. The boys lost to the Westside Club by only 2 points.
A Track Sectional Touma-ment Meet is going to be held' at Colorado Springs May 27. There will be boys going from he Lincoln Park Club.
Anv boy that wants to join the, club come .in and pick up and ,,sign an application.
Tb "Boy of the Month" is Joe Marline?, son of Mr. and Mrs. |||j|j Martnez of 735 Kala-math, Denver, Colorado. He is 16 and goes to West High School.
The Boxing wall have a meet at the JC Owen Building this month. The date has not yet been set.
Girl Scout News
April 27th was circus month for pack 200. The meeting started with girl scout' color guard'. Beverly Gruby, Dianne Mena, Evelyn Dixon, Melody Dabrowski, and Shelly Urtado rounded out the color guard. Ribbons were given to cubs for best costume. Arthur Martinez, Darrell Morris and Jimmy Dale received first place ribbons. Richard Bruffett and Orlando Jiron received second place ribbons. James Sanchez and Fred Sanchez received' third place ribbons. All other boys received an extra ticket to play on the midway.
The boy scouts also put on the award ceremony. Mr. Sanchez was chosen to be the gredt Akela and wore the large Indian head dress.
Pack 200 also is practicing soft ball and hopes to field a "B" team. Mr. Leyba, Mr. Sanchez and Mr. Rael are working with the boys.
May 22 will be the last skating party until September. So we hope many of you will be there. Tickets can be bought at 427 Fox.
May 25 will be Pack Night ; at Baker. Slides of scouting
St. Elizabeth's
- Three St. Elizabeth's students won Safety Dollar Awards in the AAA's National Safety Poster Contest. The awards were presented at a school assembly to Greg Baca, Kenneth Pap-rocki, and Carolyn Durham.
The April PTA meeting featured a display of the best of this year's art work. Parents voted to determine the winners in. each case. Winners were:
1st grade::;Joann Montoya, John Hinojosa >
2nd grad: Maurene Hebdon, David Heimosillo, Alcorita Gar-
3rd grade: Arthur Ramirez, William Harris, Elizabeth Whiting
4th grade: Valerie Gallegos, Theresa Hernandez, Stacy Mumford, Theresa Pfeifer
5th grade: Francine Alire, Louise Montoya, Stephen Sties-meyer, Brenda Delgado
6th grade: Michael Sena, Kenneth Paprocki
7th grade: Renee Kennedy, Kenneth Pfeifer, Denise Alire*
At the same meeting, the PTA officers for the 1967-1968 school year were anna meed as follows: President, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Lucero; Vice-President, Mr. and Mrs. Jesus Vargas; Secretary, Mrs. Irma Harris; Treasurer, Mrs. Sam Ramirez; Health Chairman, Mrs. Margaret King; Ways and Means, Mr. and Mis. Mike Hernandez.
The final PTA meeting of the year will be highlighted by the all-school presentation of an o-riginal operetta, Don Pedro. The performance will take place in the Bingo hall at 8:00 p. m., Wednesday, May 24th. The public is cordially invited.
school year 1967-1968.
Under the Limited Open En- ^ be shown as well as Skits', rqilment plan any Denver pu- singing and lots of £un. prl may apply to attend any,
Denver school designated asj The summer program will be: having available space. Trans-1 1. Scout day at Elitch's, June
portation, if necessary, must 17.
be provided by the parents. In the event that more applications are received for a particular school than places are available
a drawing will be
2. Pack meeting, June 24, at Sunken Gardens (Olympics),all pack meetings 6 p. m.
3. Scout day at Bears Stad-
18 . , . , . .jum July 14, 8 p. m.
held to determine the pnontvl . ,.T . _
- ------------ This will take , ^ Peac^
r ful Valley Ranch for boys 10 following l to n yeyOT3 oli c^tVoo
July 24 (Piney Wood Derby)
5. .Scout train trip. Leave at
of each request, place, if necessary closing date for filing applications.
Request forms, after being g completed by parents or legal j
guardian, are to. be brought or Pack meeting August 14 mailed to the office of the As- (ccrmival). sistant. Superintendent for Pep- j Troop 200 is still looking for sonriel Services, Room 106, 414 a coach. Please contact Mr. Fourteenth Street, Denver, Colo-[Morris, 244-1629. The troop had rado 80202, ItfOT LATER THAN a booth at the ,Scout Exposition. August Id, 1967. They used knots and wood
Fairmont
West High School
Latin American Student Club officers for 1967-68 were elected at the regular bi-monthly meeting April 26, in the social room.
Those elected are Joyce Lujan, president; Tom Delgado, vice president; Rosie Rodriguez, secretary; Gloria Bobian, treasurer; and Barbara Lujan, historian.
The spring choral concert of West High School will be presented in the school auditorium on Thursday evening May 25th, at 7:30. The program will feature the Concert Choir, under the direction of Mr. James Fluckey, the Girls' Ensemble, directed by Miss Blod-wen Roberts, and the Advanced Choir, Mrs. Anne Carey,, conductor,
A program of rich variety has been prepared,1 and music to please every taste is included. Featured works will include not only the older mastersBach, Beethoven, and Brahms but
out with the second place ribbon. The boys are preparing for the Scout softball season The annual Mother-Daughter and many hikes and campouts. Tea will be held for mothers Their summer campout will be and daughters of kindergarten,! from July 16 to July 22 at Ta-1st and 2nd and 3rd grades onjhosa.
May 22, at 2:00 p.m. For 4th, I May 23rd the troop will have 5th, and 6th grades, the Tea1, a pine wood derby. We hope will be held May 29 at 2:001 many of the parents will be p. rti. there.
crafts as their part and came also such modem composers
as Hindemith and ZaninellL
A festival chorus of two hundred and fifty voices will climax the evening's music with a performance of Jacobson's "Blessed Be God" for chorus, piano, and organ.
The public is cordially invited to :attend, and there is no charge for admission.


Page Four
THE RECORDER
May, 1967
. MmB "Tips.
HELPFUL BOOKS FOR EVERYDAY LIVING AT BYERS LIBRARY
FREEZER FACTS
Beef Buys. You'll find many supermarkets offering good buys in beef this month and next. It's a good time to stock up on select cuts. But before you buy, be sure to check your freezer. Is there room enough to store the meat? According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, you should figure 1 cubic foot of space for each 30 to 35 pounds of meat.
FOOD FACTS
Pick the Plentifuls. Put eggs on your grocery list often in May. There are lots of them, and they're an especially good j sages.
buy. Also appearing on the _________________
May Plentiful Foods List of ^ie!pinrr Aim U.S. Department of Agriculture I FLIES AND are: orange juice, beef and potatoes. In June there'll still be good supplies of eggs, orange juice, beef and potatoes plus dry beans, milk and dairy products.
Put Eggs In Your Basket.
When you shop for eggs, look
Spring is here! Everything looks fresh and new. It is a good time of year to clean house, make clothes, start a garden, waterproof the basement, or take new directions in your way of life. Byers Neighborhood' Library has many books with fresh and useable information on all of these subjects, Here is; a sampling:
J. K. Lassers new book, Your Social Security and Medicare Guide, gives complete, up-to-the-minute information on how to get maximum benefits from the new Social Security and Medicare programs. Regardless of your present age or income, you need to know the steps for obtaining these benefits, and this book covers almost every aspect of the Social Security Law.
Herbs for Every Garden, by Gertrude B. Foster, is a book of surprises. There are excel-J lent descriptive lists of herbs which can be grown easily by the average gardener at very low cost. Cooking hints and recipes are included with taste variations for everyday meals which use herbs. There is e-ven special material on how to make everything from herb jellies and vinegars to herb cor-
The Arco Publishing Company's Preliminary Practice for die High School Equivalency Diploma is widely recognized by Civil Service, business, industry, armed services, and many colleges as equal to a four-year high school diplo-j me*.
So You Want To Be A Working Mother by Lois Ben-; jeemin gives many valuable suggestions on how working mothers can juggle their hours and energies to be a good parent and a wage-earner too. The book is remarkably funny
Girl Scout News
Cadette Troop 726 has had a busy spring. March 23rd, 24th and 25th they went camping at Beaver Ranch Camp by Conifer. The girls enjoyed hiking, games, campfire program, dances, skits, Easter egg dyeing and hunt and lots of good food. April ,15th found many of our troop at the Senior Swirl. We have had many parties including a Valentine party of Senior Troop 347 and a party for 34 little children from Bayaud Head Start program in Washington Park on
for all its sound advice and April 29'. The Cadettes had easy reading. I games, songs, toys, balloons
A simplified guide for begin. ^ refreshments for the chil-ing sewers is The Dress-J dren. We served ice cream, making Book. Basic items of cupcakes and punch. May 13 clothing can be easy to make was a dciy spent at Eventide if you read and follow the o{ Longmon, Nursing ff§| methods given by Adele r.
Margolis. jThe Gadettes sang songs,
! danced'and served the elder-We have many more books i 1 ilili , , HMH
, , , . . , . , ly people cupcakes and root
oi homemaking and gardening i *
waiting on our shelves. So do j ^>eer ^oats* Our troop has come in and choose your sub-i adopted six grandmothers and ject. And, remember to pick up one grandfather. They received
your latest copy of "Clues."
COCKROACHES
Death on Schedule. Out to kill. cockroaches and houseflies? All right, synchronize your watches and at 4 p. m., spray. Repeated tests made
I MMHBI IHR over a two-year period by for the USDA grademark. This u. § Department of Agricul-mdicates quality. Within, each ture_ specialists show that
grade, there are also sizes. In most recipes an egg is an egg.
more roaches: and flies are killed by an insecticide spray-
of
But for your information, it ed at this titne takes 7 small eggs to make a at other time, cupiul; o mediums; 5 large; 4 extra large. " 1
day than Evidently,
the insects' vulnerability fluctuates with their daily activi-THE SHOE DEPARTMENT | ties. Flies appear to be most A good fit. Don't ask for active and roaches to be start-shoes by size. Ask the clerk in feet. The foot alters slightly in1 Buy fresh in seasonbut
length and width when it takes ^ not at the first. Prices usually the body's weight. go down as supply increases.
Of
Check The Cost Convenience ... Chances are the
Look for lower priced fruits and vegetables. For instance, partially t apples that are smaller and not prepared items will cost youso red. You could save 8 to more than the fresh. But not j 12 cents on a 5-pound bag. always. Some convenience
foods, like- frozen concentrated! orange juice, frozen green peas, canned orange juice and fruit ' tMier convenience foods, like frozen com on the cob, stuffed baked potatoes, cheese in a spray can and frozen dinners, usually cost you more.
BUT if time is short, you may be willing to pay the cost of convenience. Just remember the choice you are making. Fruits and Vegetables . .
Be willing to switch one vegetable for another, one fruit for anotherif the price is right and your family likes it
Watch for canned and
VACATION TIPS
While You're Away. Vacation bound? Don't forget to get someone to water plants in your indoor planter. Or-if a water boy isn't availabletrain the plants to get along on their own. Before you are ready to leave, gradually reduce the amount at each watering and water less often. Plants usually etth get along satisfactorily by themselves for about two weeks. If you plan to be gone longerexpect some of them to die, especially those in flower.
FILMS FOR
SENIOR CITIZENS
Two films on the American way of life will be shown for senior citizens at 2:30 p.m., May 29 at the Coordinated Services for the Aging Community Center, 1620 Meade St.
Admission | is free.
Baker, West Teachers Honored
Among the nine Denver Pub-, f lie School teachers who have
frozen; specials as new supplies been named to receive the an cornel to market. fnual honors from the Teachers
[Award foundation are two West Side teachers: Richard P,
Save money by selecting fruits.; packed in light rather them;heavy syrups.
Whole fruits and vegetables in a can are usually higher priced than slices, chunks or halves. Small or "mixed" pieces cost even less.
Special frozen vegetable combinations and butter added, boil-in-the-bag vegetables add to your food bill. If you have the time, prepare them yourself.
Big poly bags of frozen
Hotton, social studies teacher,
a- gift from our troop.
We will have a party for the Junior girls entering our Cadette Troop on June 3, a Court of Awards on June 17 and a tent camping trip in Rocky Mountain National Park from July 1 to July 4.
\The Recorder is now carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 60c per line, $1.00 minimum. Box50% extra. Bold fac6 r70c a line.
Ads must be brought to the office of the West, Side Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Drive, by the 10th of each month. Payment for the ad must be made at the qpane time the- ad is .brought jn.
%The i1 Recorder is offering this service to the community feeling that it will be useful favour readers.
CLASSIFIED ADS Sewing done in my home. 801 W. 10th Ave., 623-2432.
Ironing" done in my home.
49 S. Federal Blvd. 934-7104] WantedBoy Jb mow lawn and do general yard work. 14 to 17 yrs. old. Apply 471 Kala-math. Ask to see Doug Crabb.
High Altitude Cooking
High Pressured. Don't forget to adjust your recipesand remember, altitude also makes a difference in pressure cooking. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it takes 10 pounds of pressure for a pressure cooker at sea level to reach 240 degrees F., the temperature required for processing meats and most vegetables. But one additional pound of pressure is needed, for each 2,000 feet above sea level. This means at Denver altitude you need just over 12 pounds.
Church News
Mennonite Church i cation. Bible School in First
Avenue Presbyterian Church is On May 1st at-7:30 p.m. the set for the first two weeks af-Christian Education Department, ter the public school's recess teachers and superintendents; i for the summerMonday, June Bible School director and teach-j \2 to Friday, June 23, with ers; and the Social Service Cabinet met with the Sisters of St.
Elizabeth's Parochial School; at 11th St. and Curtis. The sisters gave a presentation of their religious materials and told how they are communicating the faith and their concerns for the person in the West Side Community.
First Spanish Church
Methodist
daily sessions from 9:00 to 11:30 a. m. A closing program is planned for Thursday night, June 22, in the Church Sanctuary. Mrs. Elizabeth Fisher is serving as Superintendent ef the school.
Inner City Protestant Parish
The public is cordially invited to attend an open house and dedication of new recre-
A new activity at the church is the weekly meeting of the
Mental Health Clinic / Social! ation facilities at the Inner City Hour, which is held each j Protestant Parish, 9th and Gal-Monday morning from 8 to 12.1 apago, on Sunday, May 21, Out-patients of Denver General at 7 p. m. There will be a Hospital, Psychiatric Services1 program of entertainment fea-Department, who live in the turing performances by the West Side area each week choir, selections of classical meet with a team of four staff and Flamenco guitar by Mr. personnel, from Denver Gener- Vaughan Aandahl and folk al Hospital. singing. People are invited to
| . - r r I inspect the new gymnasium
Each month graduates of the recreation area built by
counselor and former coach at j AlllsoI1'MPnal: $j%fn volunteer labor in i wh&t was
HQHj ^rtnerly the sanctuary. Present-Mexico, meet at the First Span- ly equipped, ;for basketball,;it
Play one form of fruits and fruits and vegetables are monvegetables against another; is ey-savers. You can pour out it fresh, only as much as you need.
it cheaper to serve canned, or frozen?
save the rest.
West High School, and Mrs. Kathryn N. Thomas, science teacher at Baker Junior High. Each teacher receives a $300 award, a medallion, and a certificate at the awards dinner on May 25th.
Mr. Hotton has been a teacher since 1933 and has taught at West for 27 years. From 1940-1947 he was coach of Varsity Baseball, Sophomore Football, Basketball and other sports. He is now teaching in the social science department
isH Methodist Church. ! is hoped ..that equipment for vol-
Rev. Sepulveda, minister of leY: tumbling and' other sports the First Spanish
Methodist B§ be available in the future.
Church, invites everyone to listen to his weekly broadcast on KFSC radio, Saturdays at 4:45 p. m. His program includes Spanish History and Culture, and Religion.
First Avenue Presbyterian
Under -the j direction and sponsorship of the Sunday School Council the annual Va- gram.
The new room has already been used for two dances for Junior High youth, and there will be another Junior High dance following the program on Sunday. Refreshments will be served' and tamales sold. Margaret Casteneda, Catherine Casteneda, Mary Castro, and Stella Garcia are committee members planning the pro-


Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 4, Number 1
West Side Welcomes Action Center Coordinator
Donald A. Garcia, thenew-ly f,hired'', coordmdfor for the ,. Neighborhood Action Center, :told tHe.:Wst Side Riec^eW; '"I'm very excited about j ftn& idea of Neighborhood j Action Centers. The neighborhood; approach is very practical-making services available in the neighborhood. But it will take the efforts ;and interests of the entire neighborhood to make these centers a success."
Mr. Garcia was born in San Luis, Colorado, in 1936. His family moved to Alamosa when he was 9f years old, and he went to school there, graduating froip... Alamosa High School in 1954. ^ lie spent 3 years in the Navy, returning afterwards to Alamosa to attend Adams State College. Mr. Garcia first moved to Denver in 1961 but then returned to Alamosa to complete work at Adams State College, where he earned a degree of Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Sociology in 1964.
Mr. Garcia and his wife Yvonne, married in 1958, have three childrenMichaellene, 7, Donald Jeffrey, 6, and Yvonne Francine, 18 months.
Donald Garcia has had a variety of employment experience, He worked as a mail Oarnerrm*'1958 to 1961 and then woflced for about a year in the mint here in Denver. He returned to Alamosa in 1962, where, he worked full time as a mail clerk while going to school .full time.. After earning his degree at Adams State, Mr. Garcia took a job with Job Opportunity Center, where he worked until the center's close in December, 1966. He held several different positions with IOC, including psychological testing specialist, vocational counsellor, vocational training director, job development supervisor, and administrative assistant fiscal officer.
According to Mr. Garcia all the coordinators and develop
Monthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
May, 1967
Job Corps Has Openings For Young People
Juvenile Court Judge Philip Gilliam is swearing a group of young men into the Job Corps. Third from the left in the front row is West Sider Chris Nelson of 1376 Osage.
West Side Improvement Association Sets Annual Membership Drive
The Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Asso-: classes may be pbtaine 1 by ciation voted at their meeting'calling his office, 292-5190.
Metro State Summer Session Set
Eighty-four courses will be offered by Metropolitan State College this summer. Dr. Harold W. Benn, Dean of the summer quarter, has announced.A copy of the bulletin and schedule of
of May 10 to open a dollar a year fajnily membership cam-
Recently the Colorado General Assembly authorized ad-
paign. The campaign, ia begin junior .courses --in- the fall on June 1, is -to-. fchnrfbf 1967 and senior courses in
ilies. living 'in the area, businessmen arid1 property owners, clergymen, and others working in the West Side. The mem-horships will be valid through! Persons who ~ We"'"not September 30, 1968.
Board members will arrange to have their districts canvassed for memberships. Memberships will also be available at the office of the Association,
768 Santa Fe Drive.
the fall of 1968.
Registration is June 12, classes-start June 13 and the summer quarter ends August 18.
previously attended the college should submit an application for admission as soon as pos-
Money raised through the membership drive will not be used for current staff or office space but will be the property of the Association itself to ers for each of 1he five target be used as the Board sees fit.
areas have been given a one-week training course which may become a model for training throughout the country. It was the first time the training program, developed' by the University of Missouri Multi-Purpose Training 'Center, whs given before the start of neighborhood work by paid staff.
| All West Sidets wish Wm Garcia all the success in the world in this undertaking.
to meet operating expenses of the Association itself.
West Siders are proud to be a part of the progress in our area. Much of this progress ?s due to the efforts of citizens working together in the West Side Improvement Association. This is your. opportunity to become a card-holder in the Association.
Manager of Safely Turns Down License
sible and not end of May.
later than the
7j5*he Job Corps is looking fbr young people between 16 and 21 years old; unemployed and out of' school. Young people) who join Receive training in Job Corps*!'deters and get paid while they learn. It is also possible for Job Corps members to send some money home money which the government will match up to $25 per month.
Responsibility for recruiting boys 16 through 21 years old for the Job Corps is the respon-sibility of the Colorado Department of Employment. Girls 16 through 21 are recruited by Women in Community Service I (WISC), a' volunteer organization. Since the program was initiated in mid-January 1965, more than 1,115 young men have been sent to Job Corps camps by the Department.
Fellows interested in Job Corps should check with the Youth Opportunity Center, 1115 Broadway, phone 292-4150. Girls should call or visit Women in Community Service
^07, phone 623-4349.
Arts and Sciences offerings (WICS) g10 16th Street, Room will include art, biology, chemistry, economics, education,
English, history, mathematics, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, speech, and health, physical education and recreation.
-There will* be courses this summer in business; accounting, data processing, management, marketing, typing and shorthand. Other Applied Sci-nces vocational-technical of
Local Performance Set For #/The Revolutionist"
"The Revolutionist," the play by Rodolfo "Gorky'' Gonzales* will be performed at the Santa Fe Theater, 974 Santa Fe Drive, at 8 p. m., June 6. Those under 18 and persons who have a Crusade, for Justice membership ferings will include culinary card will be admitted free. The arts, police science, technical- admission charge for other drawing and aerospace tech- adults is $1.00.
nology.
Mr. Hugh McCleam, Denver Manager of Safety arid Excise, issued a decision on- May 1 denying the application by Schad's Grocery, 1100 Santa Fe Drive, for a 3.2 beer license. Mr. McCleam cited the opposition of the West Side Improvement Association and the Lincoln Park-South Lincoln Park Resident Council, based on fear that a new owner of the business might turn the location into a 3.2 bar.
The State Legislature recently passed and signed a new law
which becomes effective July 1 and which requires an applicant for a 3.2 license to specify whether he wants a license for on- or for off-premises consumption. The West Side Improvement Association supported this bill while it was in the Senate.
Mr. McCleam stated in his decision, "An application for an off sale license after July 1, 1967, would not, of course, be vulnerable to the objections which cause me to deny this application."
Local Grocery Does Extensive Remodeling
Work on enlarging and extensive remodeling is progressing at the National Brands Store at 727 Santa Fe Drive.
With the new addition there will be approximately 7,000 square feet of floor space, which will make easier and more pleasant shopping.
The AG store, owned and managed by Charlie Scarafiotti, has been located at 727 Santa Fe Drive since 1948.
Included in the remodeling is an increase in size of the frozen food department, more fruit and vegetable bins, dairy cases and delicatessen, a new bakery department to be installed soon to supply freshly baked items including special orders for birthday cakes, etc.
Besides the new ceiling and more fluorescent lights, new display cases will be installed. Charlie has also provided parking space for over 100 cars in the rear of the store.
A grand opening to celebrate the .completion of the new store will be held early in June.
Charlie's investment in the West Side proves his faith in the economic growth of the area and his confidence in its people.
West
Sid
Ok
The Revolutionist has received favorable reviews in the daily press. The play pictures the way in which the pressures of -life in the city sometimes destroy the rural Latin American family unit and deprive proud men of their dignity as they are driven to despair by a system that they do not understand.
Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS
May 21Open House and Dedication of new recreation facilities at Inner City Protestant Parish, 7:00. p. m.
May 21.Auraria Community Center Family Picnic, 10:00 to 4:00 p. m.
May 22 Fairmont- School Mother-Daughter Tea for Kindergarten, -1st, 2nd and 3rd grades, 2 p. m.
May 23 Elmwood School Area Piano Concert at Bradley School) 7:3d p. m.
May 24St.Elizabeth's School PTA, 8:00 p. m.
May 24 Greenlee School Area Band and Orchestra Concert, 7:30 p.. m.
May 25Auraria Community Center Annual Meeting, 7:30-9:30 p. m.
May 25West High Spring Choral Concert, West High
Auditorium, 7:30 p. m.
May 26St. Joseph's Talent Show, 7:30 p.' m;
. May 29 g- Fairmont School Mother Daughter Tea for 4th, 5th, and 6th grades, 2 p. m.
June 1 Resident Council Meeting at Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7:30 p. m.
* June 2 --Auraria Community Center Annual Carnival, 7:00-9:30 p. m.'
June 6"The Revolutionist," play by Rodolfo "Corky" Gonzales at Santa Fe Theater, 8 p. m.
June 12 to June 23Vacation Bible School, First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 9:00 a.m.
EACH WEEK
Rev. Sepulveda, minister of First Spanish Methodist Church, wee1'1 / radio broadcast on KFSC Radio, Saturday 4:45
1 p.tn,1 -v


f
Page Two
THE RECORDER
May, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Rachel Guedea
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings. Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
j Abel G. Espinosa, son of Mrs. Eva Espinosa and the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Abel | Chavez of 1451 Navajo, visited his family for two weeks. He, is on furlough front the U.S. | Navy at San Diego. He will! leave home on the 22nd and' will return to San Diego.
Mrs. Elizabeth Heald, 250 Cherokee, left Friday morning for Douglas,. Wyoming, to visit her sister.'
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Anderson, 225 West 2nd Avenue, left Wednesday for an extended visit with relatives in Denmark.
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Land (the former Patsy Cain), 267 Cherokee, were injured badly recently in a head-on collision. Patsy is very seriously ill in Denver General Hospital and Leo had plastic surgery on his face Thursday at St. Anthony's Hospital. He also has a broken arm.
Our sympathy is with Mrs. Ruby Chavez and family of 238 Cherokee St., whose mother passed away after a long illness.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilford Young from What Cheer, Iowa, were guests at the Henry Schonborg home, 1247 Lipan Street.
, Mr. and Mrs. Lee Biesecker of Kenosha, Wisconsin, the daughter and' son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Kalanquin of 1423 Lipan Street, were the guests of' their folks for four days.
Margot Serumgard of 1247 Lipan Street was elected Sergeant-at-arms for the year 1967-68 by the Ted Leyden Unit No. 1 of the American Legion Auxiliary of Denver. .She will be installed May 21st at the Legion at 2:00 p. m.
Miss Debra Winterhalder, 226 W. 3rd Avenue, celebrated her 6th birthday with a pqrty. Guests were Margo and Nancy Garcia, Diana Haro, Sally Ley-ba, Sandy and Joan Rios, Andrea Boelter and Pam Man-tooth.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Maberry, 308 Inca St., had guests from El Paso, Texas, Mr. and Mrs Bob Gaskin and children who are on their way to New Jersey to be relocated with the U. S. Army.
Mrs. Lorraine Wilsoh of 243 West 2nd Avenue celebrated her birthday on April 27. Friends and relatives came to call.
Mrs. Lena Richards, 244 West 3rd Ave., was pleasantly surprised when her son Fred and family from Delta, Colorado, arrived to help her celebrate her birthday April 16. Her daughter, Mrs. Bette Kosel of Prescott, Arizona, also came to help celebrate the occasion.
We are happy to report Mr. Louis Betz, 240 Cherokee, is doing nicely after eye surgery in St. Luke's Hospital.
Mr. Ben Martinez, 244 Cherokee, is home from the hospital and getting itchy fingered to work .in his yard.
Mr. and Mr^. W. Koc^ "ame Sunday, the 17th of April to1 help Mrs. Rubv Allison of 259 Cherokee celebrate her birthday and their 25th anniversary.
I H I
Donald Grover, graduate of i West High School, who has been with Frontier, Air Lines since November 1/ 1963, has just been promoted to manager1 of sales and advertising with Frontier Air Lines.
Tom Sepulveda, Jr., son of Rev. and Mrs. Thomas Sepul-j veda, may be in Denver, on vacation in June.
Mr. Sepulveda, who is a graduate of West High School, Colorado State College, and the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York, is a member of the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra and is in the process of preparing for a tour through Europe with the Symphony Orchestra. He hopes, though, to be able to be in Denver in June to spend some time with his parents.
EDITORIAL
As this wity be the lgst 4seue I will 'Serve as editor of the West Side Recorder, I would like to take this opportunity to say a few words of appreciation.
When I started as editor 2V2 years ago I was a fairly recent resident of the West Side. I am sure that one big reason I have come to feel that this is my home and community has been due to. the many contacts I have had through the paper.
I would also like to thank those people who have faithfully given us news month after month. With this newspaper the editor and staff are dependent upon those people and agencies who are interested enough to give us their support in the form of news. My thanks also to the staff members who have been faithful in their reporting jobs and to those "unsung heroes" who voluntarily help with- the distribution each month. '
It is my hope that the neighborhood will continue to support the newspaper and the new editor so that it be an asset to the West Side.
Thank you,
Mrs. Rachel Guedea
Note Of Thanks
I would like to express appreciation to the Family Health Center for the fine service they are providing to our neighborhood. I feel that the clinic has been a worthwhile addition to; the West Side area.
Mrs. Donald Gallegos
Resident Council
. The Resident Cptmcil.of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes would like to thank Mrs. Loretta Rhym for the tine program presented at the last Resident Council meeting. A group of girls from Baker Junior High School performed a dance routine, and we saw "The High Wall," a movie about prejudice.
Residents of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes wish their president, Mrs. Martha Olsen; a speedy; recovery from her recent operation. Mrs. Ruth Santos is also recovering from an operation.
The next Resident Council meeting will be held June 1, 1967, at 7:30 p.m. at Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa. We hope to see you there. New residents to Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes are welcomed and urged to get into the swing of things by coming to Resident Council doings.
Lincoln Park Senior Citizens
The Lincoln Park Senior Citizens met in the Lincoln Park Community Hall, 1438 Navajo, on April 4. Twenty-three members were present, and two guests: Mrs. Amanda Harvey, the house guest of Mrs. Sue Wonner, .1319 W. 13th Ave., and Mrs. Carmilla Boudreaux, 1429 Mariposa. The tables were decorated with bouquets of bright flowers, and Miss Corine Gibson, acting hostess for the month, served a refreshing fruit salad with wafers, mints, and salted' nuts on the side.
After the dishes were cleared away. Miss Helen Keaveny, of the U. S. Food and Drug Administration, spoke explaining the purpose of the West Side Fair to be held at the Auraria Community Center, April 14 and 15. Plans for participating in, the Fair were discussed. An hour of bingo for prizes completed the afternoon.
On April 6, tbe Lincoln Park Senior Citizens were entertained by the Senior Citizens of the Ouigg Newton-Housing Project, 4407 Mariposa Way. Twelve of our members were able to attend and enjoyed a dessert luncheon, a short program, and a lively bingo game where prizes were passed from one winner to another.
The business session of the April 18 meeting of the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens was tak- i munist Hungary
eh up with plans for a tea, to be given the afternoon of May 2, and to which all older residents of both Lincoln Park and South Lincoln Park Homes were invited. The name of Mrs. Carmilla Boudreaux was added to the club roster. Three others added this year are: Miss Corine Gibson, 1351 Mariposa, Mrs. Elsa Giuen and Mrs. Rose Adams, both of 1429 Mariposa.
The last two weeks of April were busy ones for the Lincoln Park Senior Citizen's Club. On j April 11, nine members made | a tour of the State Capitol, had .a glimpse of our legislators at work, and were greatly impressed by the beauty and history of the building. A group of eight of our ladies served as volunteers at the West Side Fair held in Auraria Community Center Apr. 14, 15. Miss Anita Miirhs, 1428 Osage St, was tile lucky winner of one of the valuable door prizes given out On tile last afternoon. A beautiful display of needlework-was arranged by the ladies of -the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens for the open house at Auraria Community Center, April 28. i Two outstanding pieces were the crocheted bedspread made : by Mrs. Martha Olsen, 1406 Navajo, and a lovely embroid-I ered cloth which Mrs. Ludee Vajda, 1438 Osage St., brought with her when she escaped from her former home in Coin-
G. I. Forum Selects Queen
The Mile High Chapter of the GI Forum held its coronation and coronation ball on the 22nd of April. There were 8 young girls competing for ;the title of Miss Mile Hi Queen.
It was won by Miss Helen Chaves and she will represent the Mile Hi Chapter at the State Convention which will be | held in Walsenberg in June.
I The Ball was held: at the- Albany Hotel Ball Room and there Were about 500 in attend-icmce. We want to thank all that attended for their great I support.
Miss Chaves will compete | with other queens for the honor of being the national queen, in (August at the national convention of the GI Forum in Denver.
The Mile High Chapter also attended- the coronation of the queen at Fort Lupton on the 29th of April.
Alfonza Martinez, Chaplain Mile Hi Chapter
West Siders Attend Ordination
Mrs. Ben Hodges and family. Mr. and Mrs. Luz Sanchez and family, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Cordova and family, and Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Sanchez attended the ordination of their nephew and cousin George Salazar to the priesthood at las Vegas, N. Mex. Father George Salazar was ordained in a beautiful ceremony at Our Lady of Sorrows Church in Las Vegas on May 13, 1967. He was the first person in over 30 years fe be braairfed ffem tiie town of 'Las Vegas.
His fif&' mdss 'wcfe celebrated bn 'Mother's Day, :May 14, at 5:00 p.m. at Immaculate Cbn-deption Church in Las Vegas.
Relatives from Denver, Texas, and throughout New Mexico attended.
Father Salazar will be visiting relatives in Denver on Sunday, May 21, and will say a Mass at St. Joseph's Church on Monday, May 22, at 7 a.m.
Auraria
Community
Center
Fcnnily Picnic
Auraria Community Center will hold a "Family Picnic" on Sunday, May 21 at Q'Fallon Park. The Cfenter will provide buses for transportation which will leave from the Center at 10:00, a.m. and return at 4:00 p.m.
Each family should bring, enough food for their own family, warm clothes, their own silverware and a blanket or Something that can be used as a picnic cloth.
The Center will provide I drinks, a dessert, dishes and I cups, and many exciting games such as: baseball, three legged.
I races, relay races, sack races,, j volley ball, scavenger hunt.
' and horse shoes.
Anyone who is interested in the picnicshould call1. Auraria Community Center at 534-7614 to make reservations.. No children will be allowed on-buses unless their parents are-present
Annual Carnival
j The Center's Annual Carni-I val will be held on Friday ,, i June 2nd from 7:00-9:30 p.m.. Various groups at the Center I are planning the carnival and Will also be in charge of the-. different booths. Tickets will be available at 5c per event I Everyone is invited to attend, and as in past years, can be-I expected to enjoy themselves I and have lots of fun. Profits, from the carnival will go toward Day Camp expenses.
Day Camp
Day Camp at Auraria wilL begin on June 26th. We wilL again be using the ranch in the foothills. The cost will be $2.00 per session per child and the Center will furnish milk.. Each child must bring his own sack lunch.
Dates and times for the sessions for youngsters who have completed the following grades-are:
Kindergarten and First Grade* K-June 26Huly 79:00-4:00 p. m.
4th, 5th and 6th Grade: July 10-Iuly 2112:30-7:30 p.m.
2nd and 3rd GradesJuly 24-August 4-9:00-4:00 p.m.
Registration dates are: Monday, June 12 from 9:00 to 5:00 p. m. and Monday evening-from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; Tuesday and Wednesday, June 13 and' 14 from *9:00 to 5:00 p.m. We will register 25 youngsters for each session, so if you are interested, please come in early on the above registration dates.
Annual Meeting
. Auraria Community Center's Annual Meeting will be held on May 25th from 7:30 to 9:30 p. m. The Annual Meeting is held each year for election cf new Board members, honoring Volunteers, etc. Mr. Mike Moore, Director of Denver Opportunity, will be the main speaker.
Club groups will have different displays throughout the Center. Everyone is cordially invited to attend!.


May, 1967
THE RECORDER
Pag Three
St. Joseph's Grade School
Safety Assembly Raul Ponce
On April 20 our school had a safety assembly where deserving patrol members received a merit pin. Officer Martin, guest speaker, spoke on safety, and gave out the awards.
Ben Duran, a sixih grader, won a "Safety Dollar" for making a winning poster in the AAA Poster Contest. His motto was: "A Safe Knight Wears White at Night."
Th e Baseball Team John Von Tilius
The Saint Joseph baseball team has had a pretty good year with two wins and three! losses. We have a good pitch- j ing staff consisting of Jeff Lopez, Mike Santistevan and Jerry Matson. Our infield is made up of David Hastings, Chris Garcia, Gilbert Duran and Jerry Matson. Our outfield includes Steve Gallegos, John Von Tilius arid Andrew Renden. Our catcher is Richard Yribia.
Elections
The eighth grade civics class spent the week before city elections delving into facts about candidates, platforms and elections in general. Mrs. Edythe Clark spoke to the class on her duties as precinct chairwoman. She also demonstrated the use of the voting 'machine at Baker Junior High School.' After members of the class gave campaign speeches for various candidates, a mock election was held in the classroom.
Talent Show Patricia Lovatto
Singing, dancing and guitar playing for entertainment; all | this and more will be at the1 talent show to be held at Saint Joseph's church hall at 6th and Galapago oh May 26, 1967, at 7:30 p.m. There will be a small admission. The money will be-'for a charitable cause. Many of the students in the grade school will put on. their own little act Anyone can come 1 for the entertainment. Hope to see you there.
"Hdv Toledo Batman"
Martha Santistevan
ROBIN: Boy, Batman, it's time for the eighth graders at Saint Joseph's to continuate.
BATMAN: It sure is going to be a big day for them as well as their parents who will attend an all school Mass on June first at 8:00 in Saint Joseph's Church.
Head Start Mothers Help At Fair
Mothers of Head Start children at Auraiid .Community Center took part. in the West Sh Fair which was held April 14-1V Miss Dillingham and Mr Barela from the Department of Health worked with the group comparing less expensive foods with the same value in protein. We appreciate the help given by Head Start mothers who were able to assist with the Fair: Betty Fay, Ella Roybal, Maxine Tyson, Irene Huerta, Mary Armento, Esther Henry and Elaine Sandoval.
Irene Huerta
ROBIN: Let's say a little prayer foh all those .who hope to graduate tfris*year and wish all of them happiness in high schopl.
Seminary Richard Yribia This summer the Redemptor-ist Seminary in Edgerton, Wisconsin's sponsoring a program for 7th and 8th grade boys named "The Basic Six." This program is not really to turn these boys into priests but to find a good vocation, a vocation which they will enjoy. This | program will last from July 9 to July 16. The boys will have certain duties to do while at I the seminary. The trip includes an over- night stay in j Chicago.
Camp Saint Maria Kenneth Portuese Forms for camp were given out to boys from ages 9 to 14 to go and enjoy themselves during the summer. The camp is very beautiful. It has swimming pools, boating, horseback riding, hiking and fishing. The days to go to camp are from June 20 to August 20. This only costs four dollars for two weeks. This is sponsored by Catholic Charities and is for all boys in Catholic Schools.
June First Ronald De Herrera June First is the day that everyone waits for, even the teachers. It is the day we get our report cards. Most everyone is anxious to see if they were demoted or promoted. The expressions on everyone's faces' ~ are 'exciting to*' watch. Every expression is different because of final grades.
June first is also a day of departing with your peers until next year. Although June first is a day of departing it ,is a happy day to me. I go back and see all the crazy things I did and all the exciting moments I had throughout the year. I believe that that is the happiest day of the year.
Closing of School Cam Vuksinich The good-byes are said, the school doors are shut and the last bell rings. From the first day of school you look forward to summer vacation but when the time really comes you find yourself wishing you were back at your desk with Reading, History and (geography books by your side. But those days are gone forever You will have to look ahead to your future, life. You can never relive the time that was lost so just do good with every minute of the day.
Area Elementary Concerts
May 23 at 7:30 p.m. students from Elmwood School will be participating in the Elementary School area piano concert at Bradley School.
On May 24 Greenlee School will be host to one of the elementary school area Band and Orchestra Concerts. Schools participating will be Elmwood, Fairmont, Greenlee, and Cheltenham. The program will be at 7:30 p. m.
NEW PRINCIPAL AT GREENLEE
Boys' Club
Jhe Greenlee faculty gave a retirement tea for Mr. Ben Krim, the principal, on the afternoon of May 7. Many people were on hand to wish him well.
Mr. Kenneth Gorsline is to be the new principal at Greenlee this fall. He is a native Denverite and lives in Denver. Mr. Gorsline attended Boulevard and Ashland schools and graduated from North High. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees at the University of Denver.
Mr. Gorsline began his teach, ing career in 1931 at East High School, where he remained till 1953. At that time, he was appointed assistant principal at Merrill. From 1958 to 1961, Mr. Gorsline served as principal of Wyman, and since then he has been principal at Cowell. He also served as principal of the summer session at East High School two years.
School Transfer Forms Available
Request forms for Limited Open Enrollment are now available in- all Denver public schools. The applications, which must be obtained and submitted by the parent or legal guardian, are for the
The Lincoln Park Boys' Club came in 2nd place in the "All Club Game Room Tournament" Friday and Saturday, April 21 and 22. The boys lost to the Westside Club by only 2 points.
A Track Sectional Touma-ment Meet is going to be held' at Colorado Springs May 27. There will be boys going from he Lincoln Park Club.
Anv boy that wants to join the, club come .in and pick up and ,,sign an application.
Tb "Boy of the Month" is Joe Marline?, son of Mr. and Mrs. |||j|j Martnez of 735 Kala-math, Denver, Colorado. He is 16 and goes to West High School.
The Boxing wall have a meet at the JC Owen Building this month. The date has not yet been set.
Girl Scout News
April 27th was circus month for pack 200. The meeting started with girl scout' color guard'. Beverly Gruby, Dianne Mena, Evelyn Dixon, Melody Dabrowski, and Shelly Urtado rounded out the color guard. Ribbons were given to cubs for best costume. Arthur Martinez, Darrell Morris and Jimmy Dale received first place ribbons. Richard Bruffett and Orlando Jiron received second place ribbons. James Sanchez and Fred Sanchez received' third place ribbons. All other boys received an extra ticket to play on the midway.
The boy scouts also put on the award ceremony. Mr. Sanchez was chosen to be the gredt Akela and wore the large Indian head dress.
Pack 200 also is practicing soft ball and hopes to field a "B" team. Mr. Leyba, Mr. Sanchez and Mr. Rael are working with the boys.
May 22 will be the last skating party until September. So we hope many of you will be there. Tickets can be bought at 427 Fox.
May 25 will be Pack Night ; at Baker. Slides of scouting
St. Elizabeth's
- Three St. Elizabeth's students won Safety Dollar Awards in the AAA's National Safety Poster Contest. The awards were presented at a school assembly to Greg Baca, Kenneth Pap-rocki, and Carolyn Durham.
The April PTA meeting featured a display of the best of this year's art work. Parents voted to determine the winners in. each case. Winners were:
1st grade::;Joann Montoya, John Hinojosa >
2nd grad: Maurene Hebdon, David Heimosillo, Alcorita Gar-
3rd grade: Arthur Ramirez, William Harris, Elizabeth Whiting
4th grade: Valerie Gallegos, Theresa Hernandez, Stacy Mumford, Theresa Pfeifer
5th grade: Francine Alire, Louise Montoya, Stephen Sties-meyer, Brenda Delgado
6th grade: Michael Sena, Kenneth Paprocki
7th grade: Renee Kennedy, Kenneth Pfeifer, Denise Alire*
At the same meeting, the PTA officers for the 1967-1968 school year were anna meed as follows: President, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Lucero; Vice-President, Mr. and Mrs. Jesus Vargas; Secretary, Mrs. Irma Harris; Treasurer, Mrs. Sam Ramirez; Health Chairman, Mrs. Margaret King; Ways and Means, Mr. and Mis. Mike Hernandez.
The final PTA meeting of the year will be highlighted by the all-school presentation of an o-riginal operetta, Don Pedro. The performance will take place in the Bingo hall at 8:00 p. m., Wednesday, May 24th. The public is cordially invited.
school year 1967-1968.
Under the Limited Open En- ^ be shown as well as Skits', rqilment plan any Denver pu- singing and lots of £un. prl may apply to attend any,
Denver school designated asj The summer program will be: having available space. Trans-1 1. Scout day at Elitch's, June
portation, if necessary, must 17.
be provided by the parents. In the event that more applications are received for a particular school than places are available
a drawing will be
2. Pack meeting, June 24, at Sunken Gardens (Olympics),all pack meetings 6 p. m.
3. Scout day at Bears Stad-
18 . . , . .jum July 14, 8 p. m.
held to determine the pnontvl . ,.T . _
- ------------ This will take , ^ Peac^
r ful Valley Ranch for boys 10 following l to n yeyOT3 oli c^tVoo
July 24 (Piney Wood Derby)
5. .Scout train trip. Leave at
of each request, place, if necessary closing date for filing applications.
Request forms, after being g completed by parents or legal j
guardian, are to. be brought or Pack meeting August 14 mailed to the office of the As- (ccrmival). sistant. Superintendent for Pep- j Troop 200 is still looking for sonriel Services, Room 106, 414 a coach. Please contact Mr. Fourteenth Street, Denver, Colo-[Morris, 244-1629. The troop had rado 80202, ItfOT LATER THAN a booth at the ,Scout Exposition. August Id, 1967. They used knots and wood
Fairmont
West High School
Latin American Student Club officers for 1967-68 were elected at the regular bi-monthly meeting April 26, in the social room.
Those elected are Joyce Lujan, president; Tom Delgado, vice president; Rosie Rodriguez, secretary; Gloria Bobian, treasurer; and Barbara Lujan, historian.
The spring choral concert of West High School will be presented in the school auditorium on Thursday evening May 25th, at 7:30. The program will feature the Concert Choir, under the direction of Mr. James Fluckey, the Girls' Ensemble, directed by Miss Blod-wen Roberts, and the Advanced Choir, Mrs. Anne Carey,, conductor,
A program of rich variety has been prepared,1 and music to please every taste is included. Featured works will include not only the older mastersBach, Beethoven, and Brahms but
out with the second place ribbon. The boys are preparing for the Scout softball season The annual Mother-Daughter and many hikes and campouts. Tea will be held for mothers Their summer campout will be and daughters of kindergarten,! from July 16 to July 22 at Ta-1st and 2nd and 3rd grades onjhosa.
May 22, at 2:00 p.m. For 4th, I May 23rd the troop will have 5th, and 6th grades, the Tea1, a pine wood derby. We hope will be held May 29 at 2:001 many of the parents will be p. rti. there.
crafts as their part and came also such modem composers
as Hindemith and ZaninellL
A festival chorus of two hundred and fifty voices will climax the evening's music with a performance of Jacobson's "Blessed Be God" for chorus, piano, and organ.
The public is cordially invited to :attend, and there is no charge for admission.


Page Four
THE RECORDER
May, 1967
. MmB "Tips.
HELPFUL BOOKS FOR EVERYDAY LIVING AT BYERS LIBRARY
FREEZER FACTS
Beef Buys. You'll find many supermarkets offering good buys in beef this month and next. It's a good time to stock up on select cuts. But before you buy, be sure to check your freezer. Is there room enough to store the meat? According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, you should figure 1 cubic foot of space for each 30 to 35 pounds of meat.
FOOD FACTS
Pick the Plentifuls. Put eggs on your grocery list often in May. There are lots of them, and they're an especially good j sages.
buy. Also appearing on the _________________
May Plentiful Foods List of ^ie!pinrr Aim U.S. Department of Agriculture I FLIES AND are: orange juice, beef and potatoes. In June there'll still be good supplies of eggs, orange juice, beef and potatoes plus dry beans, milk and dairy products.
Put Eggs In Your Basket.
When you shop for eggs, look
Spring is here! Everything looks fresh and new. It is a good time of year to clean house, make clothes, start a garden, waterproof the basement, or take new directions in your way of life. Byers Neighborhood' Library has many books with fresh and useable information on all of these subjects, Here is; a sampling:
J. K. Lassers new book, Your Social Security and Medicare Guide, gives complete, up-to-the-minute information on how to get maximum benefits from the new Social Security and Medicare programs. Regardless of your present age or income, you need to know the steps for obtaining these benefits, and this book covers almost every aspect of the Social Security Law.
Herbs for Every Garden, by Gertrude B. Foster, is a book of surprises. There are excel-J lent descriptive lists of herbs which can be grown easily by the average gardener at very low cost. Cooking hints and recipes are included with taste variations for everyday meals which use herbs. There is e-ven special material on how to make everything from herb jellies and vinegars to herb cor-
The Arco Publishing Company's Preliminary Practice for die High School Equivalency Diploma is widely recognized by Civil Service, business, industry, armed services, and many colleges as equal to a four-year high school diplo-j me*.
So You Want To Be A Working Mother by Lois Ben-; jeemin gives many valuable suggestions on how working mothers can juggle their hours and energies to be a good parent and a wage-earner too. The book is remarkably funny
Girl Scout News
Cadette Troop 726 has had a busy spring. March 23rd, 24th and 25th they went camping at Beaver Ranch Camp by Conifer. The girls enjoyed hiking, games, campfire program, dances, skits, Easter egg dyeing and hunt and lots of good food. April ,15th found many of our troop at the Senior Swirl. We have had many parties including a Valentine party of Senior Troop 347 and a party for 34 little children from Bayaud Head Start program in Washington Park on
for all its sound advice and April 29'. The Cadettes had easy reading. I games, songs, toys, balloons
A simplified guide for begin. ^ refreshments for the chil-ing sewers is The Dress-J dren. We served ice cream, making Book. Basic items of cupcakes and punch. May 13 clothing can be easy to make was a dciy spent at Eventide if you read and follow the o{ Longmon, Nursing ff§| methods given by Adele r.
Margolis. jThe Gadettes sang songs,
! danced'and served the elder-We have many more books i 1 ilili , , HMH
, , , . . , . , ly people cupcakes and root
oi homemaking and gardening i *
waiting on our shelves. So do j ^>eer ^oats* Our troop has come in and choose your sub-i adopted six grandmothers and ject. And, remember to pick up one grandfather. They received
your latest copy of "Clues."
COCKROACHES
Death on Schedule. Out to kill. cockroaches and houseflies? All right, synchronize your watches and at 4 p. m., spray. Repeated tests made
I MMHBI IHR over a two-year period by for the USDA grademark. This u. § Department of Agricul-mdicates quality. Within, each ture_ specialists show that
grade, there are also sizes. In most recipes an egg is an egg.
more roaches: and flies are killed by an insecticide spray-
of
But for your information, it ed at this titne takes 7 small eggs to make a at other time, cupiul; o mediums; 5 large; 4 extra large. " 1
day than Evidently,
the insects' vulnerability fluctuates with their daily activi-THE SHOE DEPARTMENT | ties. Flies appear to be most A good fit. Don't ask for active and roaches to be start-shoes by size. Ask the clerk in feet. The foot alters slightly in1 Buy fresh in seasonbut
length and width when it takes ^ not at the first. Prices usually the body's weight. go down as supply increases.
Of
Check The Cost Convenience ... Chances are the
Look for lower priced fruits and vegetables. For instance, partially t apples that are smaller and not prepared items will cost youso red. You could save 8 to more than the fresh. But not j 12 cents on a 5-pound bag. always. Some convenience
foods, like- frozen concentrated! orange juice, frozen green peas, canned orange juice and fruit ' tMier convenience foods, like frozen com on the cob, stuffed baked potatoes, cheese in a spray can and frozen dinners, usually cost you more.
BUT if time is short, you may be willing to pay the cost of convenience. Just remember the choice you are making. Fruits and Vegetables .
Be willing to switch one vegetable for another, one fruit for anotherif the price is right and your family likes it
Watch for canned and
VACATION TIPS
While You're Away. Vacation bound? Don't forget to get someone to water plants in your indoor planter. Or-if a water boy isn't availabletrain the plants to get along on their own. Before you are ready to leave, gradually reduce the amount at each watering and water less often. Plants usually etth get along satisfactorily by themselves for about two weeks. If you plan to be gone longerexpect some of them to die, especially those in flower.
FILMS FOR
SENIOR CITIZENS
Two films on the American way of life will be shown for senior citizens at 2:30 p.m., May 29 at the Coordinated Services for the Aging Community Center, 1620 Meade St.
Admission | is free.
Baker, West Teachers Honored
Among the nine Denver Pub-, f lie School teachers who have
frozen; specials as new supplies been named to receive the an cornel to market. fnual honors from the Teachers
[Award foundation are two West Side teachers: Richard P,
Save money by selecting fruits.; packed in light rather them;heavy syrups.
Whole fruits and vegetables in a can are usually higher priced than slices, chunks or halves. Small or "mixed" pieces cost even less.
Special frozen vegetable combinations and butter added, boil-in-the-bag vegetables add to your food bill. If you have the time, prepare them yourself.
Big poly bags of frozen
Hotton, social studies teacher,
a- gift from our troop.
We will have a party for the Junior girls entering our Cadette Troop on June 3, a Court of Awards on June 17 and a tent camping trip in Rocky Mountain National Park from July 1 to July 4.
\The Recorder is now carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 60c per line, $1.00 minimum. Box50% extra. Bold fac6 r70c a line.
Ads must be brought to the office of the West, Side Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Drive, by the 10th of each month. Payment for the ad must be made at the qpane time the- ad is .brought jn.
%The i1 Recorder is offering this service to the community feeling that it will be useful favour readers.
CLASSIFIED ADS Sewing done in my home. 801 W. 10th Ave., 623-2432.
Ironing" done in my home.
49 S. Federal Blvd. 934-7104] WantedBoy Jb mow lawn and do general yard work. 14 to 17 yrs. old. Apply 471 Kala-math. Ask to see Doug Crabb.
High Altitude Cooking
High Pressured. Don't forget to adjust your recipesand remember, altitude also makes a difference in pressure cooking. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it takes 10 pounds of pressure for a pressure cooker at sea level to reach 240 degrees F., the temperature required for processing meats and most vegetables. But one additional pound of pressure is needed, for each 2,000 feet above sea level. This means at Denver altitude you need just over 12 pounds.
Church News
Mennonite Church i cation. Bible School in First
Avenue Presbyterian Church is On May 1st at-7:30 p.m. the set for the first two weeks af-Christian Education Department, ter the public school's recess teachers and superintendents; i for the summerMonday, June Bible School director and teach-j \2 to Friday, June 23, with ers; and the Social Service Cabinet met with the Sisters of St.
Elizabeth's Parochial School; at 11th St. and Curtis. The sisters gave a presentation of their religious materials and told how they are communicating the faith and their concerns for the person in the West Side Community.
First Spanish Church
Methodist
daily sessions from 9:00 to 11:30 a. m. A closing program is planned for Thursday night, June 22, in the Church Sanctuary. Mrs. Elizabeth Fisher is serving as Superintendent ef the school.
Inner City Protestant Parish
The public is cordially invited to attend an open house and dedication of new recre-
A new activity at the church is the weekly meeting of the
Mental Health Clinic / Social! ation facilities at the Inner City Hour, which is held each j Protestant Parish, 9th and Gal-Monday morning from 8 to 12.1 apago, on Sunday, May 21, Out-patients of Denver General at 7 p. m. There will be a Hospital, Psychiatric Services1 program of entertainment fea-Department, who live in the turing performances by the West Side area each week choir, selections of classical meet with a team of four staff and Flamenco guitar by Mr. personnel, from Denver Gener- Vaughan Aandahl and folk al Hospital. singing. People are invited to
| . - r r I inspect the new gymnasium
Each month graduates of the recreation area built by
counselor and former coach at j AlllsoI1'MPnal: $j%fn volunteer labor in i wh&t was
HQHj ^rtnerly the sanctuary. Present-Mexico, meet at the First Span- ly equipped, ;for basketball,;it
Play one form of fruits and fruits and vegetables are monvegetables against another; is ey-savers. You can pour out it fresh, only as much as you need.
it cheaper to serve canned, or frozen?
save the rest.
West High School, and Mrs. Kathryn N. Thomas, science teacher at Baker Junior High. Each teacher receives a $300 award, a medallion, and a certificate at the awards dinner on May 25th.
Mr. Hotton has been a teacher since 1933 and has taught at West for 27 years. From 1940-1947 he was coach of Varsity Baseball, Sophomore Football, Basketball and other sports. He is now teaching in the social science department
isH Methodist Church. ! is hoped ..that equipment for vol-
Rev. Sepulveda, minister of leY: tumbling and' other sports the First Spanish
Methodist B§ be available in the future.
Church, invites everyone to listen to his weekly broadcast on KFSC radio, Saturdays at 4:45 p. m. His program includes Spanish History and Culture, and Religion.
First Avenue Presbyterian
Under -the j direction and sponsorship of the Sunday School Council the annual Va- gram.
The new room has already been used for two dances for Junior High youth, and there will be another Junior High dance following the program on Sunday. Refreshments will be served' and tamales sold. Margaret Casteneda, Catherine Casteneda, Mary Castro, and Stella Garcia are committee members planning the pro-