Citation
West side recorder, June, 1967

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, June, 1967
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 4, Number 2
Monthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
June, 1967
Police Captain Urges Cooperation
Captain Donald Stallins, of the Police Department told West Siders at a meeting June 6, that the' main,weapon that shopkeepers have against window breakage is the reporting ,,of incidents. While people Have been complaining lately about window breakage, only 22 broken windows have been reported to police from the West Side in the past three months. Of these, police have made arrests in over half the cases.
The amount of "malicious mischief" the term includes breaking windowsis about the same this year as last. It seems that there is an increase in this crime toward the end of school, if the weather is nice. The new problem is that apparently window breaking vandals .are now firing from cars some kind of air gun which shoots an aluminum pellet (larger than a B-B). Police have not yet caught these people.
Capt. Stallins says that many merchants ask why they should bother to report window breakage. He stated1 that the police can apprehend offenders in on' of these waysluCk^(being. a witness to the crime),. finding the pattern pf behavior,, and citizen support. In window breakage, reports from citizens
pattern of breakage (time/ type
of missle, etc.). An officer can see, g. smashed window readily, but it is difficult ,to tell Whether1 pellet holes ;in a-window are new or old.
There are also -complaints about windshield breakage. Boys ride bikes down the' street with a ball pean hammer, smashing windows on the way.
In both the case ;pf/hammers and pellet guns, patents should keep an eye on the behavior of their children. Yours too rauld end up in Juvenile Hall.
West High Buildings Temporary?*
James P. Whalen Ordained
i CLEAN STREETS BEFORE AND AFTER Last summet the streets around here were not kept in the best of clean condition. In fact they were dirty. It seemed to us a few weeks prior to the mayoralty election the sweepers were extremely busy and the streets were clean, noticeably so. Now a few weeks after the election we do not see such energy put forth in the interest of clean streets. Congratulations Mayor Tom Curri-gOn on your re-election. Now we wish to ask a question. Will you prod someone along just a bit so we may have the~clean streets again? Thank you. We also wish to take this opportunity to tell you that the garbage cbllection in our area is excellent Some of our citizens hay written ln tp express their thanks and.,, more of our members7, have /declared their sat-tsfdchdh' anct thdnke ja^p%' meetings. I
SENIOR CITIZENS HIGH RISE
A B. Hirschfeld Tower
Located at West Ellsworth and Cherokee is a high-rise apartment eixpected to be completed arid ready for occupancy in October. This-reporter took a preview look (uninvited I might add) and, confesses to many Oh's, and Ah's over the bright sunny arid spacious apartments.' Even the halls are well lighted;: The architect, Miles Lantz, gave full consideration to; every need, comfort and convenience..for our. elderly. Thpre <$£e $50 apartments with 209 buffet/- 34 oh bScfc room and 7 two bedrooms; The building is constructed of red brick, with., green brick used in front and back to add to the overall esthetic' effect.
The spaciousness of each apartment was noted and especially the sunny bright rooms dtie to window expanse. The walls done in pastel and restful colors along with ceramic tile baths and' colored fixtures in kitchen and bath were beautiful. A joy to any woman was the well planned amount of storage space with folding doors on the wardrobe closets. There is perimeter heating and
an , extra generator to be iris-ailed for standby emergency equipment. There are two elevators and three sets of stairs. Each stair landing is enclosed by- windows.
The grounds surrounding the building are extremely spacious and in addition .the location is directly across from Dailey Park. The minimum age for tenancy is 62.
Applications are being taken j atjih^.;'$>ffice.)of Denver Housing1 Authority, '1449j Naygjo, phone 534-0821. 1 W are reminded daily by our local paperj1 business men, Chamber of Commerce, private citizens and many others of the progress, development and future planning of the great city of Denver. All-this is true and it's a credit to pur city officials that they have not neglected our Senior Citizens who in years past have contributed so much to make the present progress possible. Another high-rise for Senior Citizens will be built at 20th and Clarkson with 100 apartments, which is expected to be completed in 1969.
On June 21, at Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, in the Redemplor-ist Fathers' Seminary, fifteen young men will be ordained to the Roman Catholic Priesthood. Archbishop William E. Cousins of Milwaukee will be the Ordaining' Prelate. Frater James Patrick Whalen is among those! to be ordained. Frater Whalen attended St. Joseph Elementary School through the eighth grade when' he entered the Redem-P: torist-. -Min^ ,.S^minarv^..in :Kirk-wood, Missouri, Whefe he grad:, ua'ted' from high school..
The newly built Minor Seminary at EdgertOn, Wisconsin, opened that year and the class was transferred' for- two years of studies preparatory to entering the novitiate. On August 1, 1961, James Whalen was vested in the religious habit of the Redemptorist Fathers and after a year of contemplative study mad his profession Of vows arid then, returned to .Oconomowoc for five more, years of study, majoring, in philosophy and theology.
After his Ordination Father Whalen will return to Denver to celebrate his first Solemn High Mass on July 2, at St. Joseph's Church at 12:30 p. mv followed by a reception in the Church, hall irntil 3:30.
Father Whalen is the son of Howard Whalen and the late Mrs. Whalen of 645 Fox Street.
He is the rgrandson. of the late James and Catherine Whalen1 whd were married in St. Joseph Church in 1897.
Howard. Whalen and his late wife Julia were, also married in St. Joseph Church. Mr. Whalen retired with the rank of Captain after twenty-five years with the Denver-Fire Department. The name Whalen has been associated with the growth of the West Side for many years.
The West Siders extend their congratulations and best wishes to Father Whalen for a long and fruitful life in his chosen vocation.
In the past several years, neighborhood organizations have been concerned about the needs for improved facilities at West High School. The Lay Advisory Committee, under the chairmanship of Dale Hawkins, has called the attention of the Board' of Educaion to the inadequate and out-dated shops and equipment. At least 70 per cent of the boys at West are enrolled in Industrial Arts classes, but in cramped quarters not comparable to real work situations.
Recently two metal buildings were set on the parking lot to provide space for one home economics classroom and one basic metal shop. A spokes man for the school administra tion has said "the buildings are viewed as temporary to help implement at least a part of the recommendations of both Equality Committees in regard to provision of additional vocational education programs." Similar buildings have been erected at East, Manual and North High Schools.
While the intent may be
rooms do not come close :to meeting the needs for more "arid better shops at West. The Lay Advisory Committee, and organizations cooperating with it, are not satisfied with the limited additions provided. *Mr. Hawkins pointed out that parking has been shifted to the already inadequate grounds near the practice fields, restricting even more the physical education space. There is also a concern that the two new sheds, although termed "temporary," may be in use for many years and may become substitutes for an adequate permanent wing on the school. As plans are made on the proposed bond issue for schools, tentatively scheduled for next fall, neighborhood attention will center on what is specifically included for West and Elmwood schools. We are assured that the detached metal buildings at West are temporary.
Continued community interest will help to get them moved and replaced' by the permanent adequate and attractive shops which are needed for a good equal educa-
good, the two additional class- tion.
AREA WEST HIGH SCHOLARSHIPS
NAME': ' TYPE TO
Suzie Pacheco Academic' Colorado State University
Elizabeth Kerr Academic Colorado State University
Robert Caton Athletic Colorado State University
Ingeborg Jeike Regents University of Colorado
Joseph Thompson Grant University of Colorado
Patricia Chavez Academic Metro. State College
Mary-. Lou Gomez Academic Metro. State College
Anna Knierim Denver Assn, of Educational Secretaries
Albert Baldivia ' Hispanic Education and Leadership Program
Seferino Hurtado Hispanic Education and Leadership Program
Pauline Quintana : Dollars for Scholars
EDITORIAL
Albert Moore and Ed Burke are the two candidates in a runoff election for District 7 on June 20th.
This paper is non-partisan. However we have a few suggestions for whoever may be elected. It would be a refreshing change if the newly elected Councilman would acquaint hims^f with pur particular area.
He will always be welcome as a guest at any of the West Side Improvement Association meetings. We trust he will visit our office to meet the staff and elected officers and feel free to avail himself of any information we may have pertaining to our area.
It would also seem a matter of courtesy if he would return telephone calls at his convenience. (at least within a reasonable time) of any of his constituents;
We will be happy to have
our. membership meet their Councilman but we sincerely trust he wishes to meet them.
In other words; Sir, after election may we see and hear from you for we always see and hear from candidates prior to election.
Each of ypu- has set forth your campaign platform.1 Your 'aims are worthy and we hope you will carry them out with vigor and determination. We urge our members to vote as you choose but see' that you vote on June 20.Your. Councilman should ] be as important to your .. district as the Mayor is to the city and the Governor to / the state. In our democratic system, take pride in your privilege of voting your choice and exercise that orHe at the polls. Congratulations and our best wishes to the newly elected Councilman, whoever wins the election.


Page Two
* H !! RECORDER
June, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored By WestSide Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Acting Editor: Mary E. Larkin
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
'JZetyjt&a'iAocd Tic te&
H
Lincoln Park Senior Citizens
As a .-special observance oij May 16, the group met in the Senior Citizens'. Month, pro-1 library roam of Auraria Com-11 claimed by Governor Love, the munity Center with seventeen Lincoln Park Senior Citizens members present. Mrs. Faye I Club dispensed with their reg-1 and Mrs. Ruby Fdrra were hos-| uar business meeting, May 2, | tesses.
in order to prepare-for a tea
from 2 to 4. All those who
Following lunch and, a short business meeting Mrs. Pat
attended enjoyed an afternoon .D , , .... .
1 x *. u ~Ms j Bnsley oi the visitmg Nurse As
i of conversation with homemade . , .,
I cup cakes," coffee and punch served.
On May 11th more than fifty persons .. attended an- open Sandra Winterhalter (1.) and Marsha White; West-High j house given by Mrs, Lucia graduates, will attend Sterling : College, Sterling, Kansas.
Mrs. Thomas
I I 1 ^pulv|d' ' Weddbg Bells
teacher at Greenlee bchool, ^
The Robert Spotswoods, 1038
West 13th Ave., report that Mrs.; .
Spotswood caught a three\ wil1 Le one of six on the sum- ChcSV@Z-Joh BlSOn pound rainbow at their "Spec-1mer ^hool faculty at Regis j
Gorman, treasurer of the Sr. I Citizens Club, where Mayor j.Currigan was the guest of honor. The mayor addressed the citizens outlining the improve-I ments made and the many developments underway and in
ial" place on the Platte River.
Alphonzo Martinez, 1378
College in a program on lan guage cuts teaching for
disadvantaged. The program is jy Chavez, the accountant at I Andrew Armatas and Mr. financed under funds provided | Auraria Community Center,! George Cronin also addressed | cessful.
j Sacred Heart Church was the the planning stage for Denver, to setting for the wedding of Lar-j
I sociation described the work of the Medical Clinic now located in the old Auraria Community Building, 1178 Mariposa, which is open five days a week. This is a hew health service for ..all residents of the Lincoln Park area. Denver doctors donating their services for examinations and diagnosis and some medications are free, ft is hoped that the clinic in the near future may be expanded to become as large as the clinic at Welton and 29th St. which has been outstandingly suc-
Mariposa, enjoyed three week- §11 tomentary anc* Second- j and Dorothy Johnson on Satur-' the group. Assisted by her
ary Education Act.
day, June 3, The bride wore daughter, Mrs. Gorman served:
relaxation i There will be 36 teachers j a floor-length lace gown with homemade cake and coffee.
{{rom to Denver Public Schools detachable train and a short __________________________________
and 7'from Parochial Schools, j veil. She carried a bouquet of ...
., T ^ . M I II Mrs. Sepulveda is the wife of white carnations. The brides- IVICIrille Home
Mrs. ha Davis Mrs lone Rev. Thomas Sepulveda, pas-jmaids ^nd matron of honor]
Schroeder and Mrs. Mayme tor of the First Spanish Meth 1 1
Douglas recently enjoyed the odist Church, hospitality of their friend Mrs. j May Day, 138 West 1st Ave. |
They motored to Colorado I Springs.
wore aqua' and carried pink On Furlouqn .carnations. The groom and. ^
escorts wore^ black A recep- Co^mi Gilbert J. Perea is Thomas Sepulveda Jr., ar-.*lon, _.was ^eld following the home enjoying a 20 day fur-
for a wading at Guadeliipe Hall. Mr. and Mrs. Chavez are hon-
lough after serving 13 months
Mrs. Esther Sullivan rived home June 12,
entertained on Mother's Day week's visit with his parents. |AVU* SI AVU.S* iMpI ux^ $px| in Chui Lau, Vietnam. He re for Mrs. Day and Mrs. Lulu Mr. Sepulveda, a member of eYmooning irf Sutom Califor- ceived his training in the U.
Young.
To celebrate their 15th anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Kalanquin spent the Memorial holiday in Carthage, Missouri.
Mr. and Mrs. M. M, Churchill, 1209 Lipan, attended Commencement exercises in Greeley when their granddaughter Judy Stack graduated. A reception was held in Ft. Collins for over a hundred guests.
Mrs. Adolph Pacheco left June 4 for a ten day visit with her sister in Oakland.
The Arthur Schonborgs sold their home at 1248 Lipan to Mrs. Velva Farrow. She and "Tiger" are busy getting settled in their new home.
The Arthur K. S&rumgards, 1247 Lipan, entertained at dinner for her sister Mrs. Rose Bastien and Mrs. May Day.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Recek, formerly of 132 Galdpago, recently, purchased. a new home at 10360 East-,13th Ave. in Aurora.
At their annual spring banquet held Sunday; June 4th at the Shirley Scriroy Hotel, the Alpha j Lambda Delta Sorority voted Miss Ruth. Ann Unzicker their most outstanding sophomore member for 1967, She was also on the honor roll for the second quarter at the University of Denver. A graduate of West High. School, she is now majoring in mathematics and1 economics at D. U. Ruth Ann is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry A.. Unzicker of 144 W. 2nd Avenue.
the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra is preparing for a concert tour of Europe.
Mrs. Edith Davis, of 1215 West 13th is in Denver General Hospital with a borken hip suffered from a fall. Mrs. Davis expects to return to her home soon.
nia and Mexico.
S. Marines at Camp Pendleton, California, before leaving for Vietnam. He will report for further assignment at El Toro Base, Santa Ana, California,
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Trujillo and children Mike and Laura of 1239 Kalamath drove to Billings, Montana where
WEST SIDE BROTHERS IN SERVICE
Former West High graduate, when he leaves Denver.
P.F.C. William B, Gallegos, was_ ~ ~ , ,
wounded recently while on du- 'Corporal Perea attended ty in Viet Nam. Pvt. Gallegos West Denver schools Green-was awarded the Purple Heart, lee, Baker Junior, and West He is recuperating in the hos- High School before entering pital ship Repose and will re- service in September 1964. He
turn to duty in Viet Nam with the Marine Corps.
A brother Walter Gallegos,
is the son of Mrs. Bernice Perea of 263 Chreokee, arid also en-
also a graduate of West High, 3Yin him celebrate his 14th birthday. May 27th. Richard is at Yellowstone Boys Ranch located near Billings.
tioned in Germany with the 7th Qene Torres. He was enter-Army. The boys enlisted at tained a faniily dinner in the same time, February, lyob. I
Their mother, Mrs. Ellen Gal- Walsenburg, Colorado, by an legos, resides at 863 Fox St. aunt arid uncle while home.
Seven women represented the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club at the annual luncheon of the Federation of Organizations of OHer People of Metropolitan Denver. More than 350 people representing 30 organizations attended the May 24th luncheon at Leyden-Chiles-Wickersham American Legion Building.
FOSTER PARENTS HONORED
Mr. and Mrs. Luther Cecil, i 814 West 11th Avenue, were
pleasantly surprised when their _ , . , ...
son Bill flew in from Alexan-I Mr- and Mrs. Fredrick Kes- The Kesslers had two chih drier, Virginia, to spend the sler of 621 West Fifth Avenue j dren of their own, a girl and Memorial week-end with them.,were among the 28 Denver a boy, both now grown and He was just in time to see his,couPles and two women who brother Ed and family, whojwere recently honored by the were leaving for Nebraska, and|Denver Department of Welfare,
Division of Services to Children and Youth, for service as foster parents.
to contact his brother Jack and family.
married and themselves parents.
Mrs. Faye Brott, 1426 Osage, left' May 25th for a month's stay in Nebraska where she attended the high school graduation of he^: granddaughter arid will viMB rOlati!ye& and friends;
Mrs. Martha Olsqn, 1406 NaV-ajo, is now at ; home froth Colorado General Hospital aftei eye surgery.
Mrs. Sue Wonner, 1319 W. 13th Ave., drove to Canon' City to spend the Memorial vacation.
The honorees were feted at
Being foster parents can be very rewarding work, but this also requires some special talents. Foster parents must be interested and willing to pro-
thfe annual Foster Parents Rec- vide consistently good care, to ognition Party in St John's Ga-J treat and love the children as thedral. More than 200 persons if they were their very own,
attended. Together, the, Denver area foster parents have cared for an average of 520 children each month' during the past year.
Mr. and Mrs. Kessler were honored for giving outstanding service to 28 foster children in their 10 years of being foster parents. They have been willing to take children with a variety of problems and of any race or creed. They have helped Child Welfare out several
and theri help them tO come on- to new life experiences ana soriibthiibs retdm to their o^rii homes; I This' is particularly difficult when the child hqs come to the. foster home as a result of abuse or neglect. Deliver Departrheht of'Welfare
Improvement Association Dues Set
The May issue of the West Side Recorder carried the announcement that the Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Association had voted to request a dollar per year from each family, business firm, clergymen and others working on the; West Side. The campaign fpr membership started June 1.
The Federal grant given to the Association through the Auraria Community Center expires in February, 1968, only a few months off. There seems to be no possibility of having the grant renewed or obtaining funds from other sources. Having come this far and accomplished some noteworthy projects the organization must continue. No club or organization can run without funds. There is always the matter of operation, postage, mimeographing, and sundry other expenses even with volunteer workers. Send your dollar in or call at the office, 768Santa Fe. Getf yotir. membership card.
As a neighborhood united through an area org&hization we can voice t ouf needs, our hopes and our, approval with far more strength than an individual1 Cooperation of ev-
is constantly in need of additional homes to meet the needs' ery resident within the West
Mrs. Clara Vanciel, 1426, . . . , ,
Osage, spent some time in|when workers urgently needed General Rose Hospital for tests placement for a child with
and a check-up.
special problems.
of the children of Denver. If you or your friends are interested, you might like to inquire times I about providing a home for one or more youngsters. You may call the intake unit of Child Welfare at 292-4100.
Side Improvement boundaries is urged as the orily means of keeping the organization running. The dollar paid will be used only in the interest of the community, which means in your interest.


THE RECORDER
Page Three
June', 1967
AREA STUDENTS HONORED AT WEST HIGH
WEST SIDE HONOR AWARDS NAME TYPE OF AWARD
Shirley Salaz American Management Society
AREA STUDENTS ELECTED AT WEST HIGH Linda Maes, 538 Galapago, was elected Head Girl for 1967-68 at West High School. Among the cheerleaders from :,this area for next school term are Norma1 Lofton-,. 1051 Mariposa, and Donna Winterhdlder, 226 West 3rd Avenue. Selected as Pom Pom girls are Donna Cross, 325 West Irvington Place, Trace Korns, 245 Bannock, and Marilyn Close 533 Kalamath.
Proficiency CertificateMathematics Sharon Gleason American Management Society-^.
Proficiency CertificateSpelling Carol Salazar Carter. Memorial Art ContestHonorable
WSIA STAFF MEMBER LEAVES
During the past year; I have had the privilege of working with agencies and residents of the West Side, through my association as part of the staff in the office of the West Side Improvement Association. Con-
Mention (scheduled to graduate in August) tacts with peoples District 10.
directors of the West Side lm-
Auraria Center
Auraria Commuity Center will have day camp this sum- Vernon McKim mer. The camp will be held at' a ranch near Morrison where the children will be taken by bus each day for outdoor activities.
Kindergarten and 1st grade camp will be from June 26j ANNUAL MEETING through July 7, 9 a. m. to 4 p.1 AT AURARIA m. 4th, 5th and > 6th grade i A ~ m ^
camp will be from July 101 * The Aurora Community Cen
Pauline Quintana Dollars or Scholars
Ira Bear Second Place State Art Award
Colo. Women's Club
Ingeborg Jeike Denyer Area Panhellenic Rita DeNava -Home EconomicsOutstanding Girl Bernard Lopez Home EconomicsOutstanding Boy Joseph Thompson Professional Engineers of. Colorado Robert Caton Mike Stath Memorial Award-Basketball Alumni Athletic AwardTrack (scheduled to graduate in August)
Ralph Candelaria Alumni Athletic AwardCross Country Bernard Lopez Alumni Academic Achievement and Service War Memorial (Citizenship)
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. Isabel Martinez, 1429 Mariposa, a resident, of 16 years at Lincoln Park Homes,
fgiHM T,,i oio.on 7.on ter's Annual Meeting was held,
through July 2lst 12 30 7 30 on May 25(h_ The new Idled at Mercy Hospital,follow-
" mi tnlv 94 thmnciti mi>ers were introduced at hig a short illness. Mrs. Mar-
that time. They are: Mr. Leon-' toez had thirteen children, sev-T^ugust 4, 9 am. through 4 p.m. ^ Chadwicki ^ Florence en of whom survive her. From
Joe, Dr. William Van Orman,!Denver there are two dough-will be held at the center on ^ yenturCfj ters, Mrs. Max G. Valdez and
ijf M^Charles Vigil. Also,' elec- i^s- M>? Ramirez- Mrs Mar Thursday 10 to 12 A. M. for .jj 6f officers £or ^ board tine2 also leaves twenty-seven
provement Association, school and community leaders> as well as Denyer Opportunity leaders and- participants have been fruitful and rewarding. It is indeed heartening to see a community become concerned enough about its own problems to do something about them.
However, the accomplishments to this date have been I brought about by the concerted efforts of relatively f*w people. It will be important fori the future ; of the West Side Improvement Association to have the support of all the| people. Only as the people of the community unite ,their efforts in ceaseless and tireless work can the community become the kind of place in | Watch for these, which we. all want to live and work.
David ]. Witt
kindergarden, 1st and 2nd graders, and for 3rd, 4th arid
was held. They
! grandchildren and thirty-four
w Bruce Ducker, Presideiit; Dr. grecrt-gTcmdchildren. The fcan-
day rftemc^ns from 3 SSI Tra*s Baylor, 1st Vice Presi-|i>Y of Mrs. Martinez wish to
children will have games, arts and crafts, music, dramatics,
dent; Mr. John Mason, 2nd Vice thank a11 their £riends for B
President; Mrs. Marilyn Mead-
and wood'shop activities, The ff: S * 8 9tcretarY- H Mr- Ben game room will begin on June nm' treasurer.
26 and is open to any child ^4r. Michael Moore, Execu-1 who is a member of the cen- hve Director of Denver Oppor- j teri tunity, gave a very interesting!
. .Teen :lounge, will continue speech. ;
Thursday evenings through The meeting was highlighted July with special events plan- by the presentation of a cita-ned for every other week.. June tion to Mr. Leon Selig in rec-1h
29 there will be bowling, July ognition oi dll the work and tlnlWOvQ 13 a swim party and July 29 interest he has put forth for a picnic in the mountains. On Auraria.
alternate weeks teen lounge Refreshments were served will be at the center as usual, following the meeting.
many flowers and expressions of sympathy extended to them at the time of Mrs. Martinez' death.
Cereals and Baked Goods
Some stores offer specials I on day-old bakery products.
Buy the big package of cereal and save.
^BHot cereals cost less than ready-to-eat varieties.
Sugared cereals cost mors than unsweetened. Sugar them yourself and save.
Advisory Committee Requests New
CITY TOLERATES BLIGHTED BUILDINGS
The question is directed to invitation for worse than van-the city, the owners and the dalism.
citizehs/ Have you taken a' T w , ,
Ml p , , . ,v m :1s there a need to go into
look tone look is enough) at i . , ,
.1 i ^ j . , details ot the tragedies which
the property located at 1016 to, inii
moo o a j could occur? We did not see a
1022 on Manposa? A used-to- , , .
u r .. rrvi , ' condemned sign on any of the
be four unit. The windows , T, Al ,/ ,
buildings. If the city rules
smashed, doors off, steps caving in.
governing condition of build-_ . .. __ ings prevail, then why. are
A two story building at 942-they permitted to remain in Lipan with a danger sign on their present state? The con-the porch post. (meaning, unfit dition did npt happen
over-
for human habitation). | night, yet some of them have
Observe 1069 to 1079 Kala-, been like this for months. Do math with a For Rent sign in the owners who-are hot deriv-
two'windows. Then try 927 Kalamath; this- tops the others for'state of complete wreck in-
ing any revenue from these places think they will just let them sit? If so, the proper
eluding a huge pile of old city officials should inform
brick-iri the bdek yard. This writer did not venture into the i interior of' these" buildings, not-' wishing to trespass," and from the .exterior condition1 we suspect the interior matched.
So everyone yells' vandalism;, true, we 'khow that'- Incidentally it 'would seem the rseponsibility; of the citizehs to call the police when they see or hear this going bn. Among those mentioned someone must have the responsibility to see that these places are repaired, boarded up or tom down.
They are breeding places for rats, roaches arid filth.. They invite further vandalism if such is possible. They are an open
them otherwise.
I Remember that bld' &entimbh1 tal favorite, "JuSf- cr shOn'ty in old shantytown"? The West Siders have too much pride to, see this type of building- -allowed to remain in their, area. The answer is simple:. Repair, board up or tear down.
But whoever has the authority (city) should do something immediately. It's a blot, a blight and a disgrace to a community. On four different occasions, West Siders voted i to invite inspection of property by Health and Hospitals to upgrade neighborhood conditions.
West Siders, do care.
The following letter was sent to the Superintendent of Denver Public Schools as the annual report of the Elmwood School Advisory Committee.
Dear Dr. Oberholtzer:
Our current recommendation is that Elmwood School' be demolished and replaced. Y/e feel that older neighborhoods such as this have been neglected in provision of quality facilities, and we expect that there will be a need for an elementary ..school at this site foi some time.
We. suggest that the new building be built with an eye to flexibility, ,so that, should the time, .evei' conie.. that there would not be sufficient need to justify a regular elementary schobi !at ,!that Ration,;, the use cotjM be' converted^. We would i see the. n$w ElmWopd'-' and' nearby1 j Wed{ arid Bdkei*;as an edi^crtidndVrib^pliic. A1 flexible new Elmwdod ''couldv
be used fori pxiiposes of adult'r
MOST VALUABLE PLAYER AWARD
A former West Side boy,
Larry Zaragoza, capped a phenomenal year of high school track by receiving the Most |
Valuable Player award of the I year from Lafayette High products . .
School.
Zaragoza never turned out for competitive sports until last spring when he joined the Bobcats, track team. The reward was well deserved and well earned, Coach Neil Crown remarked, for Zaragoza worked out two miles before practice and two miles after practice every day.
Prior to this year the only sports activities for Zaragoza consisted of being manager for the Lafayette football team.
Larry lived on the West Side until recently.
In Denver he attended Green-.lee. and Baker Jr. High. He is the. son of Mrs. Julie Rendon.
For cooking try nonfat dry milk and canned evaporated milk.
Use nonfat dry milk to make skim milk for family drinking. It costs half the price.
Buy milk in quantity and save. For example, if a halfgallon of milk costs 55 cents at the grocery store; a quart would be about 30 cents. Home delivered-this same half-gallon of milk might cost 62 cents; a quart, 34 cents.
Sundays:
Mondays:
Tuesdays:
Wednesdays:
education, vocational education,, ai^pr^SR^cd^^iqq^Q, Spedial eahcatioh sHOma be an expanding fiq!d, with clasps for. thqj perceptucdly hqn.diccrp-ped tq begiji, soon anci j pthOrs for. the. emotionally disturbed inV the. talking^ stq^e. For ah such puippses Elmwood has the advantage, of a relatively central location.
Yours- truly,;
Salvador,, Delgado Qi&inngrv..
Eltnwoed School Advisory Committee
Fridciy:
Saturdays!:
INNER CITY PARISH SUMMER PROGRAM W. 9th Ave. and GalapagO St. closed
9-4 Headstart. 9:30 a. m.Playschool (3 and 4 year olds)
9-4$eqdstdrt n, -:.u ., *1
9:30 a.v m.: Clothing Sales .
8- 9 p. m.Sr. high boys (basketball)
9- 4 J^eadstart - * 1
9:30-; a. m.: -.Comniupity; Meeting (worship
and discussion don^viW v >
(special recreation and work projects ixx adults)'
7;9 p.ym- Sr.;and/Jr.- high jprosp^xm (10-14 yrsj gVhi:# and other aclhritefl)'
9:30-a. m.: Playschool (3 and 4 year olds)
2:00 p. m.: Primary children (6-9 yrs.) crafts, music, drama, trips
8- 9 pi;in.: Sr. high program (boys and/or girls)
9- 4' Headstart , j
9:30 a. m.: Volunteer Nurses an duty ]
2:00 p. m.: Jr. high program (dialogue, service projects)
7-9 p. m.: adult program: recreation, movies, dances, suppers, etc.
10 a m. to noon: Church School (children 6-i 1 years) singing, films, stories, games, worship, recreation, trips, eats


THE RECORDER
June,, 1967
Page Four
Vacation Reading Begins At Byers
Would you believe it is time for the Vacation Reading Program to begin? On June 1, we began giving out "VRP" tallies to school-aged children so they could keep their own records of books they read this summer. Byers Neighborhood Library lias many new children's books and the well-stocked shelves are ready for every age child.
Moon Man' is one of the new picture books. It will chartn the space-paced beginning reader. Tomi Ungerer has written about the man in the moon and his visit to earth. Moon Man's lunar powers fascinate everyone who hears or reads this story.
An old friend of the children's has returned in a new book, Lyle's Birthday Party, by* Bernard Waber. Lyle is a very worldly crocodile and be is funnier, if possible, than the-first time readers met him.
Older children will enjoy the new mysteries, fiction and nonfiction books at Byers. Josephine Poole's Moon Eyes *has an intriguing cover, indicating its mysterious contents. Boys will wonder, "Was it true that Captain Kidd's treasure was buried on Treasure Island, cts some people believed?" after reading. Topsail Island Treasure, by Stephen W. Mea-der.
Minutemen of the Air, ~>y Glines and Gurney, a non-fiction book, tells of the valiant exploits of the Civil Air Patrol in peace and war.
Thrilling action, high spirited horses, and a boy's courage j are combined in the fascinating | new book, Bom to Trot, by | Marguerite Henry. And, her! book, Misty of Chincotague. j is a favorite with boys and girls.
For young adults, there are books especially interesting for girls and books just for boys,; Three Cheers for Polly, by j Carol Morse, and Second Year Nurse, by Carli Laklan, are exciting stories about teen-agers. A moving and compassionate novel is Zoa Sherburne's Too! 3Bad About the Haines Girl.
Teen-age boys will thoroughly enjoy Allan McLean's Souni of Trumpets. It is a historic novel of compelling suspense. An unusual sport story for boys is Fear Rides Nigh/ by Jay Heavillin. There also are a number of new science fiction books waiting to be read by the reader who! jprefers "way-out" tales.
.It's COOL (to coin a teenage phrase) to read in the summer. You'll find Byers library -is a cool place to visit and -.read..
£
St. Joseph's IBB|
BIG BENEFIT DANCE At St. Joe's gym, Sixth Ave. and Galapago
On Saturday night, starting at 8:30 p. m., June 24th FEATURING DANNY SELVA AND HIS JAY TONES! Sponsored by the St.Alphonsus Guard
(Men's organization of St.
Joseph's Parish.) ADMISSION: $3.00 per couple FREE REFRESHMENTS!
West Side Action Council Election Set
3.2 LICENSE TRANSFER REQUESTED
Wesley Methodist Church Celebrates Homecoming
JULY 31
Machinery is rapidly being set up for the holding of the Neighborhood Action Council elections July 31, with the hope and expectation that the voter turnout this year will be much larger than last. Petitions to be used by candidates1-to get on the ballot are now available at the five Action Centers and at the Denver Opportunity offices, 810 14th Street. The West Side Center is located at 1042 Santa Fe Drive, Petitions will also be distributed by the present Action Council members, by the Action Center Staffs, by the various agencies in the five areas. and by the more than 200 persons who are making a survey for the Head Start program.
The Denver Opportunity Board of Directors has set up guidelines for the elections and thesp must be rigidly adhered to.
Eligible voters shall be 18 years of age or older and shall be residents of the tract in which they vote. Drivers' licenses shall establish proof of residence and age. If the voter does not possess adequate identification or if challenged by an election judge, the voter may raise his hand and subscribe the following oath:
"I do solemnly swear or affirm that I am at least 18 years of age and reside in this census tract."
The taking of this oath will satisfy the challenge.
Resident candidates shall have the following qualifications:
,1. They must be 18 years of age or older by July 7, 1967. (The deadline for. filing petitions.)
Morey Sharp who operates the Adman, 220 Broadway, has | requested a transfer of license to 1023 West 8th Ave. He has a Cabaret License (class E) for live entertainment and dancing.
Directors of the West Side Improvement Association on June 13 voted to oppose this request. The Pastors in the area, those working with the youth in tills neighborhood and other interested persons, we are sure, will take, a dim view of a 3.2 license. Jt is not the intent of anyone to deprive a person of his means of livelihood.
Does this area need a 3.2 license or another outlet? Past experience with this type of license has resulted in nuisance and trouble for the residents and the youth of the neighborhood. The public hearing for the transfer will be held on July 10 at 9:30 A. M. at 810 14th Street. Anyone wishing to circulate petitions in opposition to this request may obtain them at the office of the West Side Improvement Association, 768 Santa Fe.
On June 4, Wesley Methodist Church, 5th and Galapago, cel-1 ebrated the beginning of a new church year, the remodel-1 ing 6f the Sanctuary with a Homecoming. New paneling, new carpeting and a new altar table were installed.
The Rev. Joe Kamman and the Men's Group were responsible for the project. The newly elected officers and teacher were installed at this time.
After the dedication and installation services, dinner was served to 76 people.
2. They jnust be residents of the census tract from which they are running.
3. They may not hold pul> lie office or an office in a political party higher than precinct committeeman or commit-teewoman.
4. They must file, before midnight July 7, 1967, a petition signed by thirty-five (35) eligibly voters residing in the same census tract.
Volunteer For Work On
Rachel Guedea who did such a splendid job as Editor of The West Side Recorder resigned her office in May. In case- the stork arrives ahead of our July issue, congratulations Rachel. The paper needs an Editor and several staff members. It does not take much of your time and as Mrs. Arthur Serumgard, who has been a reporter since the first issue of (he paper, remarked. "I love the Job; it gives me
Your Newspaper
an opportunity to talk to so many people whom I would not have met and a much better idea of what's going on in my community."
It is your newspaper; it belongs to every resident within the boundaries of the Association and it needs your help to keep it running. Please volunteer your services. Either call the office, 244-3301, or drop up to see us at 768 Santa Fe Drive. We do need you.
yThe Recorder is now carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 60c per line, $1.00 minimum. Box50% extra. Bold face 70c a line.
Ads must be brought to the office of the West Side' Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Drive, by the 10th of each month. Payment for the ad m&si be made., at. the- same time the ad is brought in.
The Recorder is offering this service to the, community feeling that it! will be useful to our readers.
CLASSIFIED ADS
567 Inca, Brick, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, family room, excellent buy. Owner can carry loan. Call Gary Dean Realty, at 534-5737.
Advertise With Your Community Paper
Do you realize that five thousand copies of the West Side Recorder are distributed each month? To individual families, business men, property owners.
If only two people (and there are more) read the papery that makes ten thousand. Among that many people there may be someone who may I want what you have to sell. So why not patrenize your community paper? Bring your Ad to the office. From past advertisements our subscribers have told us they had results thorugh their, ads in the Recorder.
Repeated Protests Made On Run-Down Terraces vj
Officers in Districts 3 and 4 of the West Side Improvement Association delivered the following communication to the office of Mr. Douglas Wigle, Jr., Chief of the Housing Section, Department of Health and Hospitals.
Dear Mr. Wigle:
Many people in the neighborhood continue to be concerned about the run-down condition of the terraces from 912 to 920 West 11th Avenue. The back yard is again full of trash. Many screens and windows are broken. The interiors are in- poor condition, with paint peeling off,. filthy walls, damp and musty. Heaters are inadequate. Trash has been thrown into the crawl space under the terraces, constituting a. fire hazard. In one unit, flooring in. the. bacb§ .is worn, to the pQint of. being defective, | The units are badly infested .with, cockroaches. .
People have been concerned because of the fact that the miserable conditions in these units have continued for years in spite of orders from the Housing Section of the Department of Health and Hospitals. West Siders have asked for neighborhood inspection by the Housing Section, but what good is it to have inspection if the city refuses to enforce its orders vigorously when met by continuous delaying tactics? These units are not fit for humans to live in.


Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 4, Number 2
Monthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
June, 1967
Police Captain Urges Cooperation
Captain Donald Stallins, of the Police Department told West Siders at a meeting June 6, that the' main,weapon that shopkeepers have against window breakage is the reporting ,,of incidents. While people Have been complaining lately about window breakage, only 22 broken windows have been reported to police from the West Side in the past three months. Of these, police have made arrests in over half the cases.
The amount of "malicious mischief" the term includes breaking windowsis about the same this year as last. It seems that there is an increase in this crime toward the end of school, if the weather is nice. The new problem is that apparently window breaking vandals .are now firing from cars some kind of air gun which shoots an aluminum pellet (larger than a B-B). Police have not yet caught these people.
Capt. Stallins says that many merchants ask why they should bother to report window breakage. He stated1 that the police can apprehend offenders in on' of these waysluCk^(being. a witness to the crime),. finding the pattern pf behavior,, and citizen support. In window breakage, reports from citizens
pattern of breakage (time/ type
of missle, etc.). An officer can see, g. smashed window readily, but it is difficult ,to tell Whether1 pellet holes ;in a-window are new or old.
There are also -complaints about windshield breakage. Boys ride bikes down the' street with a ball pean hammer, smashing windows on the way.
In both the case ;pf/hammers and pellet guns, patents should keep an eye on the behavior of their children. Yours too rauld end up in Juvenile Hall.
West High Buildings Temporary?*
James P. Whalen Ordained
i CLEAN STREETS BEFORE AND AFTER Last summet the streets around here were not kept in the best of clean condition. In fact they were dirty. It seemed to us a few weeks prior to the mayoralty election the sweepers were extremely busy and the streets were clean, noticeably so. Now a few weeks after the election we do not see such energy put forth in the interest of clean streets. Congratulations Mayor Tom Curri-gOn on your re-election. Now we wish to ask a question. Will you prod someone along just a bit so we may have the~clean streets again? Thank you. We also wish to take this opportunity to tell you that the garbage cbllection in our area is excellent Some of our citizens hay written ln tp express their thanks and.,, more of our members7, have /declared their sat-tsfdchdh' anct thdnke ja^p%' meetings. I
SENIOR CITIZENS HIGH RISE
A B. Hirschfeld Tower
Located at West Ellsworth and Cherokee is a high-rise apartment eixpected to be completed arid ready for occupancy in October. This-reporter took a preview look (uninvited I might add) and, confesses to many Oh's, and Ah's over the bright sunny arid spacious apartments.' Even the halls are well lighted;: The architect, Miles Lantz, gave full consideration to; every need, comfort and convenience..for our. elderly. Thpre <$£e $50 apartments with 209 buffet/- 34 oh bScfc room and 7 two bedrooms; The building is constructed of red brick, with., green brick used in front and back to add to the overall esthetic' effect.
The spaciousness of each apartment was noted and especially the sunny bright rooms dtie to window expanse. The walls done in pastel and restful colors along with ceramic tile baths and' colored fixtures in kitchen and bath were beautiful. A joy to any woman was the well planned amount of storage space with folding doors on the wardrobe closets. There is perimeter heating and
an extra generator to be iris-ailed for standby emergency equipment. There are two elevators and three sets of stairs. Each stair landing is enclosed by- windows.
The grounds surrounding the building are extremely spacious and in addition .the location is directly across from Dailey Park. The minimum age for tenancy is 62.
Applications are being taken j atjih^.;'$>ffice.)of Denver Housing1 Authority, '1449j Naygjo, phone 534-0821. 1 W are reminded daily by our local paperj1 business men, Chamber of Commerce, private citizens and many others of the progress, development and future planning of the great city of Denver. All-this is true and it's a credit to pur city officials that they have not neglected our Senior Citizens who in years past have contributed so much to make the present progress possible. Another high-rise for Senior Citizens will be built at 20th and Clarkson with 100 apartments, which is expected to be completed in 1969.
On June 21, at Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, in the Redemplor-ist Fathers' Seminary, fifteen young men will be ordained to the Roman Catholic Priesthood. Archbishop William E. Cousins of Milwaukee will be the Ordaining' Prelate. Frater James Patrick Whalen is among those! to be ordained. Frater Whalen attended St. Joseph Elementary School through the eighth grade when' he entered the Redem-P: torist-. -Min^ ,.S^minarv^..in :Kirk-wood, Missouri, Whefe he grad:, ua'ted' from high school..
The newly built Minor Seminary at EdgertOn, Wisconsin, opened that year and the class was transferred' for- two years of studies preparatory to entering the novitiate. On August 1, 1961, James Whalen was vested in the religious habit of the Redemptorist Fathers and after a year of contemplative study mad his profession Of vows arid then, returned to .Oconomowoc for five more, years of study, majoring, in philosophy and theology.
After his Ordination Father Whalen will return to Denver to celebrate his first Solemn High Mass on July 2, at St. Joseph's Church at 12:30 p. mv followed by a reception in the Church, hall irntil 3:30.
Father Whalen is the son of Howard Whalen and the late Mrs. Whalen of 645 Fox Street.
He is the rgrandson. of the late James and Catherine Whalen1 whd were married in St. Joseph Church in 1897.
Howard. Whalen and his late wife Julia were, also married in St. Joseph Church. Mr. Whalen retired with the rank of Captain after twenty-five years with the Denver-Fire Department. The name Whalen has been associated with the growth of the West Side for many years.
The West Siders extend their congratulations and best wishes to Father Whalen for a long and fruitful life in his chosen vocation.
In the past several years, neighborhood organizations have been concerned about the needs for improved facilities at West High School. The Lay Advisory Committee, under the chairmanship of Dale Hawkins, has called the attention of the Board' of Educaion to the inadequate and out-dated shops and equipment. At least 70 per cent of the boys at West are enrolled in Industrial Arts classes, but in cramped quarters not comparable to real work situations.
Recently two metal buildings were set on the parking lot to provide space for one home economics classroom and one basic metal shop. A spokes man for the school administra tion has said "the buildings are viewed as temporary to help implement at least a part of the recommendations of both Equality Committees in regard to provision of additional vocational education programs." Similar buildings have been erected at East, Manual and North High Schools.
While the intent may be
rooms do not come close :to meeting the needs for more "arid better shops at West. The Lay Advisory Committee, and organizations cooperating with it, are not satisfied with the limited additions provided. *Mr. Hawkins pointed out that parking has been shifted to the already inadequate grounds near the practice fields, restricting even more the physical education space. There is also a concern that the two new sheds, although termed "temporary," may be in use for many years and may become substitutes for an adequate permanent wing on the school. As plans are made on the proposed bond issue for schools, tentatively scheduled for next fall, neighborhood attention will center on what is specifically included for West and Elmwood schools. We are assured that the detached metal buildings at West are temporary.
Continued community interest will help to get them moved and replaced' by the permanent adequate and attractive shops which are needed for a good equal educa-
good, the two additional class- tion.
AREA WEST HIGH SCHOLARSHIPS
NAME': ' TYPE TO
Suzie Pacheco Academic' Colorado State University
Elizabeth Kerr Academic Colorado State University
Robert Caton Athletic Colorado State University
Ingeborg Jeike Regents University of Colorado
Joseph Thompson Grant University of Colorado
Patricia Chavez Academic Metro. State College
Mary-. Lou Gomez Academic Metro. State College
Anna Knierim Denver Assn, of Educational Secretaries
Albert Baldivia ' Hispanic Education and Leadership Program
Seferino Hurtado Hispanic Education and Leadership Program
Pauline Quintana : Dollars for Scholars
EDITORIAL
Albert Moore and Ed Burke are the two candidates in a runoff election for District 7 on June 20th.
This paper is non-partisan. However we have a few suggestions for whoever may be elected. It would be a refreshing change if the newly elected Councilman would acquaint hims^f with pur particular area.
He will always be welcome as a guest at any of the West Side Improvement Association meetings. We trust he will visit our office to meet the staff and elected officers and feel free to avail himself of any information we may have pertaining to our area.
It would also seem a matter of courtesy if he would return telephone calls at his convenience. (at least within a reasonable time) of any of his constituents;
We will be happy to have
our. membership meet their Councilman but we sincerely trust he wishes to meet them.
In other words; Sir, after election may we see and hear from you for we always see and hear from candidates prior to election.
Each of ypu- has set forth your campaign platform.1 Your 'aims are worthy and we hope you will carry them out with vigor and determination. We urge our members to vote as you choose but see' that you vote on June 20.Your. Councilman should ] be as important to your .. district as the Mayor is to the city and the Governor to / the state. In our democratic system, take pride in your privilege of voting your choice and exercise that orHe at the polls. Congratulations and our best wishes to the newly elected Councilman, whoever wins the election.


Page Two
* H !! RECORDER
June, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored By WestSide Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Acting Editor: Mary E. Larkin
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder, Mary Chavez.
'JZetyjt&a'iAocd Tic te&
H
Lincoln Park Senior Citizens
As a .-special observance oij May 16, the group met in the Senior Citizens'. Month, pro-1 library roam of Auraria Com-11 claimed by Governor Love, the munity Center with seventeen Lincoln Park Senior Citizens members present. Mrs. Faye I Club dispensed with their reg-1 and Mrs. Ruby Fdrra were hos-| uar business meeting, May 2, | tesses.
in order to prepare-for a tea
from 2 to 4. All those who
Following lunch and, a short business meeting Mrs. Pat
attended enjoyed an afternoon .D , , .... .
1 x *. u ~Ms j Bnsley oi the visitmg Nurse As
i of conversation with homemade . , .,
I cup cakes," coffee and punch served.
On May 11th more than fifty persons .. attended an- open Sandra Winterhalter (1.) and Marsha White; West-High j house given by Mrs, Lucia graduates, will attend Sterling : College, Sterling, Kansas.
Mrs. Thomas
I I 1 ^pulv|d' Weddbg Bells
teacher at Greenlee bchool, ^
The Robert Spotswoods, 1038
West 13th Ave., report that Mrs.; .
Spotswood caught a three\ wil1 Le one of six on the sum- ChcSV@Z-Joh BlSOn pound rainbow at their "Spec-1mer ^hool faculty at Regis j
Gorman, treasurer of the Sr. I Citizens Club, where Mayor j.Currigan was the guest of honor. The mayor addressed the citizens outlining the improve-I ments made and the many developments underway and in
ial" place on the Platte River.
Alphonzo Martinez, 1378
College in a program on lan guage cuts teaching for
disadvantaged. The program is jy Chavez, the accountant at I Andrew Armatas and Mr. financed under funds provided | Auraria Community Center,! George Cronin also addressed | cessful.
j Sacred Heart Church was the the planning stage for Denver, to setting for the wedding of Lar-j
I sociation described the work of the Medical Clinic now located in the old Auraria Community Building, 1178 Mariposa, which is open five days a week. This is a hew health service for ..all residents of the Lincoln Park area. Denver doctors donating their services for examinations and diagnosis and some medications are free, ft is hoped that the clinic in the near future may be expanded to become as large as the clinic at Welton and 29th St. which has been outstandingly suc-
Mariposa, enjoyed three week- §11 tomentary anc* Second- j and Dorothy Johnson on Satur-' the group. Assisted by her
ary Education Act.
day, June 3, The bride wore daughter, Mrs. Gorman served:
relaxation i There will be 36 teachers j a floor-length lace gown with homemade cake and coffee.
{{rom to Denver Public Schools detachable train and a short __________________________________
and 7'from Parochial Schools, j veil. She carried a bouquet of ...
., T ^ . M I II Mrs. Sepulveda is the wife of white carnations. The brides- IVICIrille Home
Mrs. ha Davis Mrs lone Rev. Thomas Sepulveda, pas-jmaids ^nd matron of honor]
Schroeder and Mrs. Mayme tor of the First Spanish Meth 1 1
Douglas recently enjoyed the odist Church, hospitality of their friend Mrs. j May Day, 138 West 1st Ave. |
They motored to Colorado I Springs.
wore aqua' and carried pink On Furlouqn .carnations. The groom and. ^
escorts wore^ black A recep- Co^mi Gilbert J. Perea is Thomas Sepulveda Jr., ar-.*lon, _.was ^eld following the home enjoying a 20 day fur-
for a wading at Guadeliipe Hall. Mr. and Mrs. Chavez are hon-
lough after serving 13 months
Mrs. Esther Sullivan rived home June 12,
entertained on Mother's Day week's visit with his parents. |AVU* SI AVU.S* iMpI ux^ $px| in Chui Lau, Vietnam. He re for Mrs. Day and Mrs. Lulu Mr. Sepulveda, a member of eYmooning irf Sutom Califor- ceived his training in the U.
Young.
To celebrate their 15th anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Kalanquin spent the Memorial holiday in Carthage, Missouri.
Mr. and Mrs. M. M, Churchill, 1209 Lipan, attended Commencement exercises in Greeley when their granddaughter Judy Stack graduated. A reception was held in Ft. Collins for over a hundred guests.
Mrs. Adolph Pacheco left June 4 for a ten day visit with her sister in Oakland.
The Arthur Schonborgs sold their home at 1248 Lipan to Mrs. Velva Farrow. She and "Tiger" are busy getting settled in their new home.
The Arthur K. S&rumgards, 1247 Lipan, entertained at dinner for her sister Mrs. Rose Bastien and Mrs. May Day.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Recek, formerly of 132 Galdpago, recently, purchased. a new home at 10360 East-,13th Ave. in Aurora.
At their annual spring banquet held Sunday; June 4th at the Shirley Scriroy Hotel, the Alpha j Lambda Delta Sorority voted Miss Ruth. Ann Unzicker their most outstanding sophomore member for 1967, She was also on the honor roll for the second quarter at the University of Denver. A graduate of West High. School, she is now majoring in mathematics and1 economics at D. U. Ruth Ann is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry A.. Unzicker of 144 W. 2nd Avenue.
the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra is preparing for a concert tour of Europe.
Mrs. Edith Davis, of 1215 West 13th is in Denver General Hospital with a borken hip suffered from a fall. Mrs. Davis expects to return to her home soon.
nia and Mexico.
S. Marines at Camp Pendleton, California, before leaving for Vietnam. He will report for further assignment at El Toro Base, Santa Ana, California,
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Trujillo and children Mike and Laura of 1239 Kalamath drove to Billings, Montana where
WEST SIDE BROTHERS IN SERVICE
Former West High graduate, when he leaves Denver.
P.F.C. William B, Gallegos, was_ ~ ~ , ,
wounded recently while on du- 'Corporal Perea attended ty in Viet Nam. Pvt. Gallegos West Denver schools Green-was awarded the Purple Heart, lee, Baker Junior, and West He is recuperating in the hos- High School before entering pital ship Repose and will re- service in September 1964. He
turn to duty in Viet Nam with the Marine Corps.
A brother Walter Gallegos,
is the son of Mrs. Bernice Perea of 263 Chreokee, arid also en-
also a graduate of West High, 3Yin him celebrate his 14th birthday. May 27th. Richard is at Yellowstone Boys Ranch located near Billings.
tioned in Germany with the 7th Qene Torres. He was enter-Army. The boys enlisted at tained a faniily dinner in the same time, February, lyob. I
Their mother, Mrs. Ellen Gal- Walsenburg, Colorado, by an legos, resides at 863 Fox St. aunt arid uncle while home.
Seven women represented the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club at the annual luncheon of the Federation of Organizations of OHer People of Metropolitan Denver. More than 350 people representing 30 organizations attended the May 24th luncheon at Leyden-Chiles-Wickersham American Legion Building.
FOSTER PARENTS HONORED
Mr. and Mrs. Luther Cecil, i 814 West 11th Avenue, were
pleasantly surprised when their _ , . , ...
son Bill flew in from Alexan-I Mr- and Mrs. Fredrick Kes- The Kesslers had two chih drier, Virginia, to spend the sler of 621 West Fifth Avenue j dren of their own, a girl and Memorial week-end with them.,were among the 28 Denver a boy, both now grown and He was just in time to see his,couPles and two women who brother Ed and family, whojwere recently honored by the were leaving for Nebraska, and|Denver Department of Welfare,
Division of Services to Children and Youth, for service as foster parents.
to contact his brother Jack and family.
married and themselves parents.
Mrs. Faye Brott, 1426 Osage, left' May 25th for a month's stay in Nebraska where she attended the high school graduation of he^: granddaughter arid will viMB rOlati!ye& and friends;
Mrs. Martha Olsqn, 1406 NaV-ajo, is now at ; home froth Colorado General Hospital aftei eye surgery.
Mrs. Sue Wonner, 1319 W. 13th Ave., drove to Canon' City to spend the Memorial vacation.
The honorees were feted at
Being foster parents can be very rewarding work, but this also requires some special talents. Foster parents must be interested and willing to pro-
thfe annual Foster Parents Rec- vide consistently good care, to ognition Party in St John's Ga-J treat and love the children as thedral. More than 200 persons if they were their very own,
attended. Together, the, Denver area foster parents have cared for an average of 520 children each month' during the past year.
Mr. and Mrs. Kessler were honored for giving outstanding service to 28 foster children in their 10 years of being foster parents. They have been willing to take children with a variety of problems and of any race or creed. They have helped Child Welfare out several
and theri help them tO come on- to new life experiences ana soriibthiibs retdm to their o^rii homes; I This' is particularly difficult when the child hqs come to the. foster home as a result of abuse or neglect. Deliver Departrheht of'Welfare
Improvement Association Dues Set
The May issue of the West Side Recorder carried the announcement that the Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Association had voted to request a dollar per year from each family, business firm, clergymen and others working on the; West Side. The campaign fpr membership started June 1.
The Federal grant given to the Association through the Auraria Community Center expires in February, 1968, only a few months off. There seems to be no possibility of having the grant renewed or obtaining funds from other sources. Having come this far and accomplished some noteworthy projects the organization must continue. No club or organization can run without funds. There is always the matter of operation, postage, mimeographing, and sundry other expenses even with volunteer workers. Send your dollar in or call at the office, 768Santa Fe. Getf yotir. membership card.
As a neighborhood united through an area org&hization we can voice t ouf needs, our hopes and our, approval with far more strength than an individual1 Cooperation of ev-
is constantly in need of additional homes to meet the needs' ery resident within the West
Mrs. Clara Vanciel, 1426, . . . , ,
Osage, spent some time in|when workers urgently needed General Rose Hospital for tests placement for a child with
and a check-up.
special problems.
of the children of Denver. If you or your friends are interested, you might like to inquire times I about providing a home for one or more youngsters. You may call the intake unit of Child Welfare at 292-4100.
Side Improvement boundaries is urged as the orily means of keeping the organization running. The dollar paid will be used only in the interest of the community, which means in your interest.


THE RECORDER
Page Three
June', 1967
AREA STUDENTS HONORED AT WEST HIGH
WEST SIDE HONOR AWARDS NAME TYPE OF AWARD
Shirley Salaz American Management Society
AREA STUDENTS ELECTED AT WEST HIGH Linda Maes, 538 Galapago, was elected Head Girl for 1967-68 at West High School. Among the cheerleaders from :,this area for next school term are Norma1 Lofton-,. 1051 Mariposa, and Donna Winterhdlder, 226 West 3rd Avenue. Selected as Pom Pom girls are Donna Cross, 325 West Irvington Place, Trace Korns, 245 Bannock, and Marilyn Close 533 Kalamath.
Proficiency CertificateMathematics Sharon Gleason American Management Society-^.
Proficiency CertificateSpelling Carol Salazar Carter. Memorial Art ContestHonorable
WSIA STAFF MEMBER LEAVES
During the past year; I have had the privilege of working with agencies and residents of the West Side, through my association as part of the staff in the office of the West Side Improvement Association. Con-
Mention (scheduled to graduate in August) tacts with peoples District 10.
directors of the West Side lm-
Auraria Center
Auraria Commuity Center will have day camp this sum- Vernon McKim mer. The camp will be held at' a ranch near Morrison where the children will be taken by bus each day for outdoor activities.
Kindergarten and 1st grade camp will be from June 26j ANNUAL MEETING through July 7, 9 a. m. to 4 p.1 AT AURARIA m. 4th, 5th and > 6th grade i A ~ m ^
camp will be from July 101 The Aurora Community Cen
Pauline Quintana Dollars or Scholars
Ira Bear Second Place State Art Award
Colo. Women's Club
Ingeborg Jeike Denyer Area Panhellenic Rita DeNava -Home EconomicsOutstanding Girl Bernard Lopez Home EconomicsOutstanding Boy Joseph Thompson Professional Engineers of. Colorado Robert Caton Mike Stath Memorial Award-Basketball Alumni Athletic AwardTrack (scheduled to graduate in August)
Ralph Candelaria Alumni Athletic AwardCross Country Bernard Lopez Alumni Academic Achievement and Service War Memorial (Citizenship)
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. Isabel Martinez, 1429 Mariposa, a resident, of 16 years at Lincoln Park Homes,
fgiHM T,,i oio.on 7.on ter's Annual Meeting was held,
through July 2lst 12 30 7 30 on May 25(h_ The new Idled at Mercy Hospital,follow-
" mi tnlv 94 thmnciti mi>ers were introduced at hig a short illness. Mrs. Mar-
that time. They are: Mr. Leon-' toez had thirteen children, sev-T^ugust 4, 9 am. through 4 p.m. ^ Chadwicki ^ Florence en of whom survive her. From
Joe, Dr. William Van Orman,!Denver there are two dough-will be held at the center on ^ yenturCfj ters, Mrs. Max G. Valdez and
ijf M^Charles Vigil. Also,' elec- i^s- M>? Ramirez- Mrs Mar Thursday 10 to 12 A. M. for .jj 6f officers £or ^ board tine2 also leaves twenty-seven
provement Association, school and community leaders> as well as Denyer Opportunity leaders and- participants have been fruitful and rewarding. It is indeed heartening to see a community become concerned enough about its own problems to do something about them.
However, the accomplishments to this date have been I brought about by the concerted efforts of relatively f*w people. It will be important fori the future ; of the West Side Improvement Association to have the support of all the| people. Only as the people of the community unite ,their efforts in ceaseless and tireless work can the community become the kind of place in | Watch for these, which we. all want to live and work.
David ]. Witt
kindergarden, 1st and 2nd graders, and for 3rd, 4th arid
was held. They
! grandchildren and thirty-four
w Bruce Ducker, Presideiit; Dr. grecrt-gTcmdchildren. The fcan-
day rftemc^ns from 3 SSI Tra*s Baylor, 1st Vice Presi-|i>Y of Mrs. Martinez wish to
children will have games, arts and crafts, music, dramatics,
dent; Mr. John Mason, 2nd Vice thank a11 their £riends for B
President; Mrs. Marilyn Mead-
and wood'shop activities, The ff: S 8 9tcretarY- H Mr- Ben game room will begin on June nm' treasurer.
26 and is open to any child ^4r. Michael Moore, Execu-1 who is a member of the cen- hve Director of Denver Oppor- j teri tunity, gave a very interesting!
. .Teen :lounge, will continue speech. ;
Thursday evenings through The meeting was highlighted July with special events plan- by the presentation of a cita-ned for every other week.. June tion to Mr. Leon Selig in rec-1h
29 there will be bowling, July ognition oi dll the work and tlnlWOvQ 13 a swim party and July 29 interest he has put forth for a picnic in the mountains. On Auraria.
alternate weeks teen lounge Refreshments were served will be at the center as usual, following the meeting.
many flowers and expressions of sympathy extended to them at the time of Mrs. Martinez' death.
Cereals and Baked Goods
Some stores offer specials I on day-old bakery products.
Buy the big package of cereal and save.
^BHot cereals cost less than ready-to-eat varieties.
Sugared cereals cost mors than unsweetened. Sugar them yourself and save.
Advisory Committee Requests New
CITY TOLERATES BLIGHTED BUILDINGS
The question is directed to invitation for worse than van-the city, the owners and the dalism.
citizehs/ Have you taken a' T w , ,
Ml p , , . ,v m :1s there a need to go into
look tone look is enough) at i . , ,
.1 i ^ j . , details ot the tragedies which
the property located at 1016 to, inii
moo o a j could occur? We did not see a
1022 on Manposa? A used-to- , , .
u r .. rrvi , ' condemned sign on any of the
be four unit. The windows , T, Al ,/ ,
buildings. If the city rules
smashed, doors off, steps caving in.
governing condition of build-_ . .. __ ings prevail, then why. are
A two story building at 942-they permitted to remain in Lipan with a danger sign on their present state? The con-the porch post. (meaning, unfit dition did npt happen
over-
for human habitation). | night, yet some of them have
Observe 1069 to 1079 Kala-, been like this for months. Do math with a For Rent sign in the owners who-are hot deriv-
two'windows. Then try 927 Kalamath; this- tops the others for'state of complete wreck in-
ing any revenue from these places think they will just let them sit? If so, the proper
eluding a huge pile of old city officials should inform
brick-iri the bdek yard. This writer did not venture into the i interior of' these" buildings, not-' wishing to trespass," and from the .exterior condition1 we suspect the interior matched.
So everyone yells' vandalism;, true, we 'khow that'- Incidentally it 'would seem the rseponsibility; of the citizehs to call the police when they see or hear this going bn. Among those mentioned someone must have the responsibility to see that these places are repaired, boarded up or tom down.
They are breeding places for rats, roaches arid filth.. They invite further vandalism if such is possible. They are an open
them otherwise.
I Remember that bld' &entimbh1 tal favorite, "JuSf- cr shOn'ty in old shantytown"? The West Siders have too much pride to, see this type of building- -allowed to remain in their, area. The answer is simple:. Repair, board up or tear down.
But whoever has the authority (city) should do something immediately. It's a blot, a blight and a disgrace to a community. On four different occasions, West Siders voted i to invite inspection of property by Health and Hospitals to upgrade neighborhood conditions.
West Siders, do care.
The following letter was sent to the Superintendent of Denver Public Schools as the annual report of the Elmwood School Advisory Committee.
Dear Dr. Oberholtzer:
Our current recommendation is that Elmwood School' be demolished and replaced. Y/e feel that older neighborhoods such as this have been neglected in provision of quality facilities, and we expect that there will be a need for an elementary ..school at this site foi some time.
We. suggest that the new building be built with an eye to flexibility, ,so that, should the time, .evei' conie.. that there would not be sufficient need to justify a regular elementary schobi !at ,!that Ration,;, the use cotjM be' converted^. We would i see the. n$w ElmWopd'-' and' nearby1 j Wed{ arid Bdkei*;as an edi^crtidndVrib^pliic. A1 flexible new Elmwdod ''couldv
be used fori pxiiposes of adult'r
MOST VALUABLE PLAYER AWARD
A former West Side boy,
Larry Zaragoza, capped a phenomenal year of high school track by receiving the Most |
Valuable Player award of the I year from Lafayette High products .
School.
Zaragoza never turned out for competitive sports until last spring when he joined the Bobcats, track team. The reward was well deserved and well earned, Coach Neil Crown remarked, for Zaragoza worked out two miles before practice and two miles after practice every day.
Prior to this year the only sports activities for Zaragoza consisted of being manager for the Lafayette football team.
Larry lived on the West Side until recently.
In Denver he attended Green-.lee. and Baker Jr. High. He is the. son of Mrs. Julie Rendon.
For cooking try nonfat dry milk and canned evaporated milk.
Use nonfat dry milk to make skim milk for family drinking. It costs half the price.
Buy milk in quantity and save. For example, if a halfgallon of milk costs 55 cents at the grocery store; a quart would be about 30 cents. Home delivered-this same half-gallon of milk might cost 62 cents; a quart, 34 cents.
Sundays:
Mondays:
Tuesdays:
Wednesdays:
education, vocational education,, ai^pr^SR^cd^^iqq^Q, Spedial eahcatioh sHOma be an expanding fiq!d, with clasps for. thqj perceptucdly hqn.diccrp-ped tq begiji, soon anci j pthOrs for. the. emotionally disturbed inV the. talking^ stq^e. For ah such puippses Elmwood has the advantage, of a relatively central location.
Yours- truly,;
Salvador,, Delgado Qi&inngrv..
Eltnwoed School Advisory Committee
Fridciy:
Saturdays!:
INNER CITY PARISH SUMMER PROGRAM W. 9th Ave. and GalapagO St. closed
9-4 Headstart. 9:30 a. m.Playschool (3 and 4 year olds)
9-4$eqdstdrt n, -:.u ., *1
9:30 a.v m.: Clothing Sales .
8- 9 p. m.Sr. high boys (basketball)
9- 4 J^eadstart - 1
9:30-; a. m.: -.Comniupity; Meeting (worship
and discussion don^viW v >
(special recreation and work projects ixx adults)'
7;9 p.ym- Sr.;and/Jr.- high jprosp^xm (10-14 yrsj gVhi:# and other aclhritefl)'
9:30-a. m.: Playschool (3 and 4 year olds)
2:00 p. m.: Primary children (6-9 yrs.) crafts, music, drama, trips
8- 9 pi;in.: Sr. high program (boys and/or girls)
9- 4' Headstart , j
9:30 a. m.: Volunteer Nurses an duty ]
2:00 p. m.: Jr. high program (dialogue, service projects)
7-9 p. m.: adult program: recreation, movies, dances, suppers, etc.
10 a m. to noon: Church School (children 6-i 1 years) singing, films, stories, games, worship, recreation, trips, eats


THE RECORDER
June,, 1967
Page Four
Vacation Reading Begins At Byers
Would you believe it is time for the Vacation Reading Program to begin? On June 1, we began giving out "VRP" tallies to school-aged children so they could keep their own records of books they read this summer. Byers Neighborhood Library lias many new children's books and the well-stocked shelves are ready for every age child.
Moon Man' is one of the new picture books. It will chartn the space-paced beginning reader. Tomi Ungerer has written about the man in the moon and his visit to earth. Moon Man's lunar powers fascinate everyone who hears or reads this story.
An old friend of the children's has returned in a new book, Lyle's Birthday Party, by* Bernard Waber. Lyle is a very worldly crocodile and be is funnier, if possible, than the-first time readers met him.
Older children will enjoy the new mysteries, fiction and nonfiction books at Byers. Josephine Poole's Moon Eyes *has an intriguing cover, indicating its mysterious contents. Boys will wonder, "Was it true that Captain Kidd's treasure was buried on Treasure Island, cts some people believed?" after reading. Topsail Island Treasure, by Stephen W. Mea-der.
Minutemen of the Air, ~>y Glines and Gurney, a non-fiction book, tells of the valiant exploits of the Civil Air Patrol in peace and war.
Thrilling action, high spirited horses, and a boy's courage j are combined in the fascinating | new book, Bom to Trot, by | Marguerite Henry. And, her! book, Misty of Chincotague. j is a favorite with boys and girls.
For young adults, there are books especially interesting for girls and books just for boys,; Three Cheers for Polly, by j Carol Morse, and Second Year Nurse, by Carli Laklan, are exciting stories about teen-agers. A moving and compassionate novel is Zoa Sherburne's Too! 3Bad About the Haines Girl.
Teen-age boys will thoroughly enjoy Allan McLean's Souni of Trumpets. It is a historic novel of compelling suspense. An unusual sport story for boys is Fear Rides Nigh/ by Jay Heavillin. There also are a number of new science fiction books waiting to be read by the reader who! jprefers "way-out" tales.
.It's COOL (to coin a teenage phrase) to read in the summer. You'll find Byers library -is a cool place to visit and -.read..
£
St. Joseph's IBB|
BIG BENEFIT DANCE At St. Joe's gym, Sixth Ave. and Galapago
On Saturday night, starting at 8:30 p. m., June 24th FEATURING DANNY SELVA AND HIS JAY TONES! Sponsored by the St.Alphonsus Guard
(Men's organization of St.
Joseph's Parish.) ADMISSION: $3.00 per couple FREE REFRESHMENTS!
West Side Action Council Election Set
3.2 LICENSE TRANSFER REQUESTED
Wesley Methodist Church Celebrates Homecoming
JULY 31
Machinery is rapidly being set up for the holding of the Neighborhood Action Council elections July 31, with the hope and expectation that the voter turnout this year will be much larger than last. Petitions to be used by candidates1-to get on the ballot are now available at the five Action Centers and at the Denver Opportunity offices, 810 14th Street. The West Side Center is located at 1042 Santa Fe Drive, Petitions will also be distributed by the present Action Council members, by the Action Center Staffs, by the various agencies in the five areas. and by the more than 200 persons who are making a survey for the Head Start program.
The Denver Opportunity Board of Directors has set up guidelines for the elections and thesp must be rigidly adhered to.
Eligible voters shall be 18 years of age or older and shall be residents of the tract in which they vote. Drivers' licenses shall establish proof of residence and age. If the voter does not possess adequate identification or if challenged by an election judge, the voter may raise his hand and subscribe the following oath:
"I do solemnly swear or affirm that I am at least 18 years of age and reside in this census tract."
The taking of this oath will satisfy the challenge.
Resident candidates shall have the following qualifications:
,1. They must be 18 years of age or older by July 7, 1967. (The deadline for. filing petitions.)
Morey Sharp who operates the Adman, 220 Broadway, has | requested a transfer of license to 1023 West 8th Ave. He has a Cabaret License (class E) for live entertainment and dancing.
Directors of the West Side Improvement Association on June 13 voted to oppose this request. The Pastors in the area, those working with the youth in tills neighborhood and other interested persons, we are sure, will take, a dim view of a 3.2 license. Jt is not the intent of anyone to deprive a person of his means of livelihood.
Does this area need a 3.2 license or another outlet? Past experience with this type of license has resulted in nuisance and trouble for the residents and the youth of the neighborhood. The public hearing for the transfer will be held on July 10 at 9:30 A. M. at 810 14th Street. Anyone wishing to circulate petitions in opposition to this request may obtain them at the office of the West Side Improvement Association, 768 Santa Fe.
On June 4, Wesley Methodist Church, 5th and Galapago, cel-1 ebrated the beginning of a new church year, the remodel-1 ing 6f the Sanctuary with a Homecoming. New paneling, new carpeting and a new altar table were installed.
The Rev. Joe Kamman and the Men's Group were responsible for the project. The newly elected officers and teacher were installed at this time.
After the dedication and installation services, dinner was served to 76 people.
2. They jnust be residents of the census tract from which they are running.
3. They may not hold pul> lie office or an office in a political party higher than precinct committeeman or commit-teewoman.
4. They must file, before midnight July 7, 1967, a petition signed by thirty-five (35) eligibly voters residing in the same census tract.
Volunteer For Work On
Rachel Guedea who did such a splendid job as Editor of The West Side Recorder resigned her office in May. In case- the stork arrives ahead of our July issue, congratulations Rachel. The paper needs an Editor and several staff members. It does not take much of your time and as Mrs. Arthur Serumgard, who has been a reporter since the first issue of (he paper, remarked. "I love the Job; it gives me
Your Newspaper
an opportunity to talk to so many people whom I would not have met and a much better idea of what's going on in my community."
It is your newspaper; it belongs to every resident within the boundaries of the Association and it needs your help to keep it running. Please volunteer your services. Either call the office, 244-3301, or drop up to see us at 768 Santa Fe Drive. We do need you.
yThe Recorder is now carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 60c per line, $1.00 minimum. Box50% extra. Bold face 70c a line.
Ads must be brought to the office of the West Side' Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Drive, by the 10th of each month. Payment for the ad m&si be made., at. the- same time the ad is brought in.
The Recorder is offering this service to the, community feeling that it! will be useful to our readers.
CLASSIFIED ADS
567 Inca, Brick, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, family room, excellent buy. Owner can carry loan. Call Gary Dean Realty, at 534-5737.
Advertise With Your Community Paper
Do you realize that five thousand copies of the West Side Recorder are distributed each month? To individual families, business men, property owners.
If only two people (and there are more) read the papery that makes ten thousand. Among that many people there may be someone who may I want what you have to sell. So why not patrenize your community paper? Bring your Ad to the office. From past advertisements our subscribers have told us they had results thorugh their, ads in the Recorder.
Repeated Protests Made On Run-Down Terraces vj
Officers in Districts 3 and 4 of the West Side Improvement Association delivered the following communication to the office of Mr. Douglas Wigle, Jr., Chief of the Housing Section, Department of Health and Hospitals.
Dear Mr. Wigle:
Many people in the neighborhood continue to be concerned about the run-down condition of the terraces from 912 to 920 West 11th Avenue. The back yard is again full of trash. Many screens and windows are broken. The interiors are in- poor condition, with paint peeling off,. filthy walls, damp and musty. Heaters are inadequate. Trash has been thrown into the crawl space under the terraces, constituting a. fire hazard. In one unit, flooring in. the. bacb§ .is worn, to the pQint of. being defective, | The units are badly infested .with, cockroaches. .
People have been concerned because of the fact that the miserable conditions in these units have continued for years in spite of orders from the Housing Section of the Department of Health and Hospitals. West Siders have asked for neighborhood inspection by the Housing Section, but what good is it to have inspection if the city refuses to enforce its orders vigorously when met by continuous delaying tactics? These units are not fit for humans to live in.