Citation
West side recorder, July, 1967

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, July, 1967
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
Volume 4, Number 3
Monthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
July, 1967
Action Council Candidates And Statements
Census Tract 12 One to be elected
occupy our youngsters in the summer."
VOTE In Westside Election!
Lupe Arguello 833 Curtis Street
Phillip j. Torres 1033 9'th Street
Census Tract 18
Two to;-be elected
Ralph Gaschler 1168 Kalamath Street
Henry G. Maestas 1070 Inca Street 'T believe that oUr neighborhood deserves much more attention than it is getting. I will do all I can to promote public service and neighborhood improvements for West Denver."
Louie Sanchez 731 Galapago Street
Census Tract 19 Three to be elected
Henry Archuleta 1226 Upon Street Mary Benevidez 1463 Navajo Street
Christine DeLeon 1129 W. 13th Avenue "I will make no promises but v will do the very best I can for my community."
Judy Gallardo
WHERE TO VOTE JULY 31
Census Tract Location
12Fire House, 9th & Golfax
18Elmwood School, 720 Galapago Street
18 West High School, 951 Elati
19 Greenlee ^School, 1150 Lipan Street
19 Lincoln Park Homes, 1438 Navajo Street
20 Evans School, 1115 A-coma Street
21 Fairmont School,. 520 West 3rd Avenue
21Alameda School, 208 West Byers Place
21Baker Junior High School, 574 West 6th Avenue
Census Tract 20 One to be elected Gene. Ortega 134 W.vilth Avenue Silfred L. Ramos 1333 Cherokee Street "Interested in neighborhood problems, education needs, job training."
Census Tract 21 Four to be elected
Rachel Guedea 425 W. 2nd Avenue
Mark Jaramillo 239 Bannock Street
Roy L. Leyba 540 Lipan Street "As a candidate for Action Council, my main goal is the improvement of the standards of the community. We need a community where achievement is accepted, not rejected."
Vera Lucero 526 Kalamath Street "My main interest in being a candidate of the Westside Action Council is because T love to work with people and my belief that all should be treated equal and given every opportunity regardless of color, race., or religion."
Sdi' Kalamath Street "I wanted to be a candidate because they helped us keep slum .conditions from other areas from moving in here."
C. G. Naney 217 W. 2nd Avenue "I love Denver's West Side and its people. I therefore wish to do all that I possibly can to help in the improvement of all conditions of the West Side."
Charles Ramon :1T5 : Galapago Street
Phil Sanchez .
538 Galapago Street
Leo J. Sullivan 282 frica Street
WHEN WILL CITY ACT?
Last month the West Side Recorder reported' on the terrible condition of the terraces located at 912 to 920 W. 11th Avenue. A letter had been delivered to the office of Mr. Douglas Wi-gle, Jr., of the Housing Section, Department of Health and Hospitals. There has been no answer. The conditions of the property are much worse than they werer in September, 1963, when there were numerous violations of the housing code agaihst this property. Can the Housing Section of the Department of Health and Hospitals continue to ignore requests from the West Siders to enforce orders on 912-920 West 11th Avenue? Are these places being rented by tenants receiving public funds? Is the Welfare Department subsidizing slum conditions? The city has the responsibility to see that improvements are made or that Oils property is cleared.
14554- -Kalamath Street
Donald M. Gallegos 1237 W. 10th Avenue "F have lived. within Census Tract 19 for the past 10 years, so I am not a stranger to our problems. I feel that I am qualified to serve you as a good Neighborhood Action Council spokesman because of my previous experience of being an elected Westside Action Council member for the past year."
Jose Grijalva 922 Navajo Street
Antoinette Maes 1063 Navajo Street
Albert Martinez 1115 W. 10 th Avenue "I- intend to represent more of the wants of the people in the West Side. One of the main, things is to get some better dental facilities for our neighborhood'. We also need more and better facilities to
Harold A; Munson
. Why is it that the neighborhood center for the local War on Poverty program is primarily ldenified--^dfh,-J^^i^f .-Qppgr?. ttinity, noi the neighborhood ? The telephone response is "Denver Opportunity, Westside Action Center." Is the Center only a branch of the Denver Opportunity office or is it truly a local center, to meet local needs, with the Westside Action Couhcil directly involved in planning and operation?
Agency Candidates To Be Elected July 31
In addition to resident candidates from their census tracts, voters also vote fpr six out of 16 candidates from churches, schools, agencies and businesses in the area. The candidates and their organizations are?
Alex Vigil, Auraria Community Center
Rev. Thomas Sepulveda, First Spanish. Methodist Church Rev. James Nugent, St. Joseph's Church
Rev. John Ventura, First Mermonite Church Mr. Moses Cisneros, Fairmont Recreation Center Sister Rose, St. Elizabeth's Church
Fred Estrada, Lincoln Park Homes
John Doyle, Baker Junior High Marion Garcia, LARASA Rev. A. J. Blomquist, First Avenue Presbyterian Church Robert Leland Johnson, Bar Association
Miss Mary Waterhouse, Elmwood' Elementary School George Chavez, Safeway Ben Trujillo, Zale Jewelers Richcrrd Tallbull, Whit Buffalo Council
Edith Hugley, Tiny Tot Nursery
West Siders 18 years old and I over go to the polls Monday, j July 3,1, to elect candidates for the Westside Action Council. The Council serves the area including Census Tracts 12, 18, j 19, 20 and 21. Voters will choose among candidates living in their census tracts and will also elect candidates from agencies, schools, and churches in the Action Council area.
The Action Council will work for physical community improvement and for new or better programs for education, health, job training for area residents. The Action Councils are best described as an attempt to bring grass roots democracy and citizen participation in the decisions that really effect the individual and his immediate neighborhood.
The Action Council is the of-| ficial spokesman for target area residents in determining what
WRECK OR REPAIR ORDERS ISSUED
programs receive War on Poverty funds through Deliver Opportunity.
Denver Opportunity is the name of the city-wade agency that makes the policy decisions for War on Poverty projects. One of the largest and most successful of these programs is i.Head Start. Other programs i you may know about include the Neighborhood Health Center, the Optometric Center, St. Elizabeth's and St. Patrick's Adult Tutorial. Programs just starting include the Neighborhood Action Centers, Legal ( Services, a Summer Youth and j Employment program.
' As the elected neighborhood : leadership, the Councils can also press city and private agencies for the services and programs the target areas i need.
New low rates are now in effect for Recorder want ads! You pay only 30c per line, 50c minimum. Bring your ad in to the office at 768 Santa Fe Drive.
The Denver Community Development Agency has inves-
Westside
tigated the vandalized buildings reported. in last month's
Action Center
Reorder. Wreck bf^repair orders had been issued against all four, between April 26, 1966, and June 8, 1967. The owner or administratrix- of two properties cannot be found, and the Building Department, which demolishes hazardous structures on an emergency basis, has no more funds for the purpose this year. We hope that Councilman Burke calls this problem to the immediate attention of the City Council, which can and should grant extra money for this purpose.
Grand Opening Set
* On July 17, 1967, the West Side Action Center, located at i 1042 Santa Fe Drive, opened
its doors to the community, making services available to the residents lof the West Side. This is one of five such centers located in areas designated by Denver Opportunity, the Office of Economic Opportunity, and other agencies. The offic-
ial ^opening is set for July 29. All are invited.
One property listed has been boarded up by a mortgage company and is being redeemed by the Veteran's Administration.
Activities of the center, since beginning operation, have included the perpetuation of food-clothing-and-fumiture bank established1 by the West Side Inter-Agency Council.
The Community Development Agency also reported on the problem of street sweeping. Sanitary Services reports this area is in a restricted area, calling for the use of signs to | clear parked vehicles from the path of the sweepers. As is. custom in restricted areas in. other parts of the city, the schedule calls for sweeping to occur every four to five weeks as different from non-restricted, non-signed areas which are swept every six to seven weeks. During wet weather the schedule is often delayed and this has occurred frequently since April.
Improvement Assn. Meeting Set
Mr. Leslie J. Kalanquin, President of the West Side Improvement Association, welcomes all West Siders to the next meeting of the Board of Directors, at 7:30 p. m., August 8, 1967, at Auraria Community Center.
A concentrated effort has been conducted in cooperation with the Westside Action Council to recruit interested residents and agencies to run in the July 31 Elections as representatives on the Council.
Most of the work has been concentrated in the area of informing the people in the community of the existence of the center and encouraging them to Bring their problems and questions to the ceriter through one of the four neighborhood representatives.
Over two hundred families have come Or been brought to the center. They have received services of various types, such as food; transportation; help with legal problems; housing; economic and health problems and clothing.
The center is open 8;00 to 5:00 daity, Monday through Friday. The phone number is 534-5141.


Pncre Two
jpg recobder
July, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West'Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Sqnjd Fe Drive Phone 24&3301 Editor: Erma Jean Harris .Assistant Editor:
v Jaye Martinez
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Iordan, Juanita Winterhalder
JtetyMw A,$act Ttotet
Thomas Sepulveda, Jr., aftei visiting with his parents last week has gone back to Cleveland, Ohio.
Robert Leland Johnson of the Colorado Bar and Wesrtside Action Council recently had a book published: Trial Handbook for Colorado Tort Lawyers,
Mrs. Daisy Hamlet is in Presbyterian Hospital for observation and treatment.
Gloria Lara, 118 Galapago, 0 Neighborhood Youth Corps worker, is doing office work at the Mennonite Youth Center. She will Be a senior at West High School this fall.
Riedel, the daughter of Mrs. Mary Grant, 722 Elati, is home from the hospital after being struck by a pickup at W. 8th Avenue and Elati. At the time of the accident, she was coming home from her Headstart class.
J. W. Blanscet of 1046 West 5th Avenue, is in St. Joseph's Hospital for eye surgery.
Mr. E. Ray Crabb, 471 Kala-math, after cutting down all weeds around his business property, is in the process of installing a container wall around it.
Mrs. Barbara Maxie, Executive Director of Auraria -Community Center, was recently hospitalized. She is now at home and doing fine. We wi^h her a speedy recovery as the entire staff misses her.
Martin Casorla of 129 Gala-pago who attends 7th grade at St. Joseph's Ggtholic School is spending the summer in Wisconsin attending the seminary to study about priesthood- He is the son of Pete Casorla, Jr., and brother of lisa, who'Is also a student at St. Joseph's.
' Mr. and Mrs. Ghrisey iKoch of 534 West 4th Avenue had a vacation with their daughter and family in California. ;En route home Mr. % Kooh was injured in a cgr accident,. He is now at home -and recuperating cuite well.
Mrs. Viola Smith, 1351 Mariposa St., visited her son in Seattle, Washington.
Mrs. Leola Polk of 1135 Inca* has visited relatives in Nebras- ka and Kansas.
We rejoice with Mr. and Mrs. A. John Blomguist upon the birth of their new daughter, Karen Ruth, on June 8 in Farmington, New Mexico. This child is the^graridsoh,. of Rev. and Mrs. A. j. Blomquist of the First Avenue Presbyterian Church.
Mr. and Mrs. Linkous and, family of 1464 Navajo Street are having a very nice visit with Mrs. Margery Glover, Mrs. Linkous' mother, from Marietta, Ohio. Mrs. Linkhous returned home from St Joseph's Hospital after surgery and is recuperating quite well. She wishes to thank friends who called and visited her and she appreciated he lovely card' from the Lincoln Park-South Lincoln Park. Resident Council. ' 1
Mrs. Alfonzo Martinez spent four days near Brighton with her two granddaughters while her daughter and son-in-law went to New Mexico.
Mrs. Juanita Picchione is visiting from Brockton,, Mass.,, with her folks, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin M. Churchill, at 1209 Lipan St.
Mrs. A. Broom of 121 Chero-ikee has just returned from a visit with her daughter and family, the Harry Gunruds of, Fergus Falls, Minn.
A. S. Mermans from Hartford, Conn. Mrs. Day and Mrs. Merman have enjoyed long years of standing friendship since high school.
Mr. William Schroeder has returned from a six-weeks visit with his brother and family in Iowa.
Mrs. Elinore Marshall and her daughter Lori spent 4th of July with Mr. and Mrs. G. Glynn of 1253 Kalamath Street.
Vickie Espinoza, daughter of Mrs. Gracia Espinoza of 1470 Navajo St., is home for a month from the Job Corps in West Virginia.
WEDDING BELLS
Dippel-Gonzales
Mrs. Charlotte Gonzales of 1022 West 9th Ave., announces the engagement of her daughter Eleanor to Mr. Mike Dip-pel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Victor Dippel, of Jasper, Indiana. Miss Gonzales is a graduate of West High School and Trinidad State Junior College. Her fiance is presently a senior at Southern Colorado State College. The .couple plan to get married on September 16, 1967 at St. Joseph's Catholic Church.
Morris-Holden
Ida Jane Holden, daughter of Mrs. Mary Alice Holden, 825 Delaware, was married to Mr. Virgil Morris at St. Paul's Methodist Church, July 9.
Local Boy Home on Leave
Glenn Close Jr., 533 Kalamath, is home on furlough from Fitzsimons. He has been at the hospital after being wounded in Viet Nam.
New Teen Center
The Young Adult Center ai 912 Galapago Is open for all neighborhood teenagers. The Center is open week days from 9 a. m. until 11 p. m. and on Saturdays; when there is a dance at Inner City Protestant Parish. The Center has-volley ball, badminton, checkers, darts, baseball games, music, as well as dances and some job placement. There will be a dance this Saturday, July 22, at 7 until 11:30 p. m.
Campus Capers
SER HELPS FIND JOBS
S
Chavez to Law School
Larry Chavez, Aurora's bookkeeper, wa^Lawarded cr- 'scholarship to attend Denver University School of Law for the summer. He is a semi-finalist! and is one of 20 persons to be awarded the scholarship. In September, 12 out of the 20 will be awarded full scholarships vo attend Law School. We wish him good luck toward the full scholarship.
Since Larry is back in school Auraria now has a new bookkeeper. She is Mrs. Jeannie Dewald. Auraria welcomes its new staff member.
Garcia Appointed
Southern Colorado State College has appointed Gilbert Garcia, son of Mr. and Mrs. Max E. Garcia of 264 Inca Street, to the faculty. During his 10 years in Loveland schools, Mr. Garcia served as a teacher in elementary, junior high and assisted in senior high in instrumental music. He has directed the summer band for six years. He will begin his doctoral program at the University of Oregon in Eugene this summer. His wife Susan has been recog-
Training opportunities With the., airlines are now open to> young adults, Teports Joe Herrera, Slate Director of Operation SER. Classes to train girls j for stewardess positions are being formed. Girls must be high school graduates and must be at least 20 years of age by the completion of the training.
Airlines are also looking for young men for jet mechanics-training. They must be 18 yeqrs of age, high school graduates and preferably single^ For more information about: jthese and other training programs, contact the office of Operation SER, 1065 Federal. Office hours are 8 a. m. to 5> p. m., Monday through Friday..
Operation SER is a project: funded by the Department of: Labor and the Office of Economic Opportunity to help in. finding jobs and job training opportunities especially for low income and minority persons-who have had difficulties in. finding jobs.
American Leaion Meetings
John P. hfqrtinez American Legion Post 204, 8D5 Santa Fe Drive, welcome as members any veterans of armed forces.. Meetings are the first Friday of each monthr-7:30 p.m. The Commander is Lee Madrid.
CRUSADE FOR JUSTICE
The first i^sue of El Gallo, a: newspaper published by the-Crusade for Justice, has been distributed: Present plans are for a monthly paper, but the-interest and demand may require .more frequent publica-jjibn. The subscription rate is1 $3.00 for twelve issues. Subscriptions may be sent to the Crusade office, 1365 Cherokee..
nized. in Loveland as a trumpet soloist and has done substitute teaching in the schools. Mr. Garcia, a native of Denver, said it has been 10 won-
A membership meeting of the -Crusade for Justice will be held on Sunday, July 29, at 2:00 p. m., at the Inner City Protestant Parish, 9th Avenue-
derful years of teaching won-, rind Galapago.
derful kids.
Mrs. Betty Yagi of 1244 Mariposa, spent a week vacationing with her son and family dt Yellowstone and Teton National Parks.
' Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Pacheco rif 1253 Lipan St., spent July m attending a -family reunion Ond, picnic at Lyons, Colorado. Fi% rfel'atives were present.
. ^yhoftituj lift.
Pick the Plentifuls. Thanksgiving isn't hereyet, but the turkeys areand in great supply. So the U. S. Department of Agriculture suggests that turkeys be included in your July menus Also plentiful this month are dry edible beans, fish fillets and steaks, lemons, j limes and seasonal vegetables. -
Lincoln Park Senior Citizens
An attractive dessert luncheon was served to sixteen members of thebiricojn Park Senior Citizens Club on Tuesday, Juner6th. Mds. .Dagmar Christ tiansen, ISiSiVW. ;i.3tli Ay^., and Miss Corine Gibson, 1351 iposa, acted as hostesses. At; the business meeting which Jbl>; lowed, upcoming' -summer ad-; tivities were- disciissbd.(A 'round bf1 'applause was ^given 'iMiv Leonard Chadwick, Manager ol Mribblri Park' and'-1&>uth'bineolri Park Homes, on his recent Blectibri to the board* of A urar-ia .Community Center.
On June >?0th, the = Lincoln Park Seniors entertained the Twilighters j Club qf. dhe.. Quigg Newton Housing,Project.at the Lincoln Park Community Hall/ 1438 ^Navajo St. Fifteen Lim coin Park Senior Citizen members were on hand to greet twelve members of the Twilighters. The tables were beautifully decorated with clusters of!
large decorator type flowers in vivid colors, hand made from crepe paper and plastics by Mrs. Elsie lijienthal, decorations chairman for the Lincoln Park Club.
Sunday, June 25th, twelve methb^reof-4hd Lincoln Park Senior1 GitiXens left by special bus' r for Oh ; Overnight, stay at YMCA -camp at Estes^Park, f'gothg5,by^Wdy-'bfi'the North St. |Vr&in v0emybn and returning .through' the^Big'lfoempson. -?Aljl arrangements 1 were made ifev1\ the'club's'1 very -aMe (Coordinator, Mis. ^Lynn 'Bradley, ftloj hiking was attempted, but two long drives arotind .'Estes; Park gave the; group ion opportunity to ; fully enjoy the beauty of the drea.
Ho regular meetings of the Lincoln Park Seniors will be held in July and August, but plans are being made -for a picnic in July.
El Teatro Campesino (The* Farm Workers Theatre) will present their dramatic program at. the-Santa Fe Theatre on August'.^. The play ,?The Ravolu-ibnist' will also^be shown. Curtain time is 8:00 p. m.
El ^atro C^jnpesino is a ,grqup of fafm wp-rfe6?3 from California who have developed, a series of skits into a program which has bright jiafional/ attention. ;
. A rummgge sale will, be conducted^ by ffyV! Cruspde for Justice defess 'from ,' me 'Santa Fe Theatre (l0th Ave. and Santa Fe' Dri^e on August 7 and 8.
The Crusade for Justice, will present a bazaar on August 12 in !the 1900 block of South Tejon St. Major events are a combo competition for teenagers, qnd a queen contest for girls age 5 to 10 years.


196?
THE RECORDER
Page Three
Auraria Community Center
Shall we: go' on a visit with the group called Mamma's Morning Out?
June was a busy month for us, especially with school letting out But we mothers still have time to play? Each Thursday morning seven or .eight mothers and their children gather at Auraria Community Center about 9. We leave our little ones with the baby 'sitter and larger' ones at arts, arid craft classes. We climb iiito a go-mO-bile and take off for all the fun, Our first stop 3-n June was -the Botanical. Gardens. We found many large, beautiful, irses of all colors and combinations of colors. We also saw the famous banana trees and lots of other tropical plants and trees.
Now, the second trip is a .twofold visit to the State Capitol and the State Historical Museum. These two places'of interest are across the street from one another. We had a guided tour of the Capital. Here we saw several large rooms used by our governing body.
Auraria Headstart, under the direction of Martha Ann Owen and Lois Pierre with ; their as-' sistants Eleanor Lucero and Jaye Martinez, have been having many wonderful experiences with the children on educational trips. We have visited Botanical Gardens, Aero Space Park in Littleton, Colorado and we also took a trip to day camp in which many of the parents participated. We also took the children to Surif; ken Gardens on a picnic which wa.s enjoyed by all.
We have; also had. several visitors from the Institute For Disadvantaged Children from Del Hart, Texas, who are taking training at Denver University and students who wifi be working with the migrants in: different parts of Colorado.' They felt that the experience of observing will be helpul in their I work with migrants and disadvantaged children. We have also had our last inservice training for the summer session and it was helpful in understanding and communi-
The third trip was to the Art. . , t 8 ,
Museum where we saw Euro-1catmg BS teacher?- asslst
Scout News
The families of Pack 200 had j a .picnic June 18 at Cherry: Creek Dam. The families were | the Majs, Menas, Grubys, Ley-bas and Sanchezes. Fishing, eating, swimming, horseshoe playing and good fun rounded out the day. pack $00 softball team has had a fine summer so far. Mri Leyba has Brought fheJ'teairF up to 3 wins 1 loss.
June 26 pock 200 had an Olympics at' Sunken Gardens. The events yrere high jumping, broad jump, 'SO and 100 yard dash, sdhbdll .throw, sack race and relay racel Randy Garcia won first place with Richard Leyba one point behind.
* * *
Twelve lucky girls and four leaders from Troop 726 went .tent carnping from July 1 to July 4. Mr. and Mrs. Field and Mr. and Mrs. Mena were in
pean and Oriental art exhibits. July started with a visit to
ants and children.
NEW GEORGIE BOY'S The Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Association, at a meeting held' on July 11, 1967, voted to send a letter to Georgie Boy's Meats, 1042 W. 8th Avenue, expressing appreciation for the addi-
, ,, , r . , rj. | Lincoln Park has also agreed tionto the appearance of the
the .Museum of Natural History to use of their pool for Head-|neighborhood represented by at aty Park. The ammas here start to use for one hour per ,he new Georgie Boys building, look alive m every detail. Welrweek. *..*.*.****-*..
also saw a model of a new space ship. We hated to leave this building because it was so fascinating but it was lunchtime and the little ones were waiting for us.
Loretha Williams
charge. They arrived at Gla-cer Basin in Rocky Mountain Park, on Saturday. Sunday they attended church and visited Estes Park. Monday they enjoyed a 7 mile hike from Wild Basin camp to Falls. Tuesday was
Inner City
Inner City Parish Summer Program at 9th and Galapago Street invites residents of the West Side community to participate in its special summer program this year. Any groups wishing to use our hew recre-Ousel1 ^on center may contact Rev. spent Beach at the parisli-i-244-2636.
breaking camp in the rain but The Parish is here to serve you a good time was had by all. -and your children. Come and
get acquainted !
June 19, three patrols led by j ^1----------
Brad Morris, Randy Mena and CULTURAL ARTS PROGRAM
Everett Bear made anighthike I
There are four areas of the
Mental Health Day Camp
Drop-in Game Room , HB I TT !, .
1 The Mental Health Clinic at After two weeks of getting Denver General Hospital is cur-acquainted, playing in the |||||p- running a summer day park and working with arts and camp in the neighborhood for crafts, the Drop-In Fun Time emotionally disturbed.boys. The here at the cpnter_ is in full sixteen boya; age ^ght f ,fe siying. Activities in the. pro- tWG}ve yGors, began day camp
up Lookout Mountain from £inb dfts rbpreibh'ted in the Pub-golden. On the. hike they ob- lie Schools cultural arts program served a few garden snakes, at Gilpin School-music, art, two wrecks cars, a few birds |g| iMMMBBlBa chU-rmd an applej -free Everyone ^ are enoourd&ed to choose learned. how -to help each o h- fe0mAese40ur .fields the one in
BH finleded, I HI which they are the most in-started at 8:30 and the boys which they
arrived home at midnight. lhey would to leam
* * * and sfody in some depth. AL
though the children' Spend the lune ,18, three boy scouts majority of tlifeir time at the went on a hike to Qncrry Cenfer -working in the area in Creek Dam. While there, they which they are most interested, enjoyed fishing, swimming and ^ OTe exposed to artists and a picnic. Troop 200's softball j teclchers in all fields_ ^ a team has made its first round-new ^ vital interest may in with flying colors, winning j ^ waybegin. There are 20 games from Troop 22812 to Adepts enrolled in the pro-7, Troop 364 :12 to 1, iTrcop j qram from. Greenlee SchooL 666 14 to 0. With great lead-. The program has two basic
ership and the pitching power purposes; one, to provide the of David Madnl they should | pupils with cm opportunity to make one of the top spots in extend their learning and ap-the league. On lime 24, 11 premdtion of the fine arts; and boy scouts and their leader Mr. | two, to provide the vehicle for Mena played putt putt golf cultural. understanding, human
rifations, and realistic integration.
"For We Are Riding To Majiroda . "
..The above.dsitheJoyous;theme .. .. . .. , , - -
thatcam be heard tju;pqgh 'the |Tf5ks have. i u su^h until August 25th. The ...
3or^' tendance has been high, due oufoJtiieeity towards.theydMe.l fo the varied activities,' which
open ^jjaqes..jriplude arts and crafts, recrea-.nqme of tjhp qainp,t;^q^ bppn; Attendance for the Drop^In- tpriV and weekly ,.cr^ecf;,<0t pfjfbe com^ellpr's program has been fairly good. Biid JidJd names. TJieySenior counsellors Any children who have not for : this, summer are Margaret been attending are welcome to
gram during the past few on July 5 ^ continue
swimming
at 2100 Federal.
JOBS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE?
Did I read recently where the writer and a neighbor were
Fettjnan; aj-id Jim Figge, ,;ypiy [cqm.e rand join the fun. -.Same, ably assisted by Rosie: Chavez. of' o,ur. plans -for the, rest pf the and Da# Vigil as junior coun--summer include working' with sellors. paper mache, clay, copper;.
As the summer progresses,1 enameling, making our own the children enjoy siich activi- .PuPPets, putting on puppet ties as hikes, water-sports and shows*, and of course more fun 'numerous1 Bature gamds. Last and games.
'fhe' campprS'Wdnt out to
see the haying ldrid were .thrilled when Mr. Stanley Harwood, owner pi the ranch, gave them dll a riae on the various haying machines. Our deepest gratitude* goes'out to. Mr. Harwood for1 his generosity in alr lowing our camp to ^use his land.
West Side Teens, Injured, Killed in Accident
One teenager was killed and .five others injured by a hit The staff believes. ihat.fhese and run driver on. fhe sidewalk
The staff consists of two vol--unte'ers; three VISTAs and one leader, who is a graduate social Work student Two of the VISTAS, Enid.Meyer and Mickey Stewart, acre liying at 1331 Mariposa: Street.
City would clear a vacant lot of weeds at no expense to the owner?
Didn't it used to be by a given date if the property own-
s&ck of looking at a vacant I6t" overrun"with weeds so we storied the job ourselves, soon fcllcWea by little youngsters offering to help. It took two dtrys and without being mod-
er had not cleared the weeds about it we did1 a bang-up
the Otty worfd- Mll the owner? 5^. jlncidentcdly, we found
Ti , ,. . .. . .. two wrist Wdfehes, a ring, sev-
It doesnt seem to this writer .,, ,__' .__,, .^
|s inMjmjjg l^ralvdoHars m change and hun-
B Bmi of 1pop bottles which the
lions would produce very re- ^ for cash_ We
mar a e resu s- can't guarantee gold in "them
BYERS LIBRARY
Due to the increase in rain thar vacant lots but we can the 'weeds have thrived this guarantee a neater looking spring. ; in many cases they cirea, d job for kids and a bring personal discomfort 'to greater pride and satisfaction to some of our citizens who suffer everyone. Please will you help from hay fever''or^miis^'trouble, make Denver a cleaner, neerter W. 7th Aye, 6t ^Santa Fe Drive Some .lots provide a dumping city? I sincerely bplieve it is
Hours* ground'#'for -train. In offd' m- not the bbliqdtion of the city
TVinre Pri 9 c.Qn' stance we thought it constitut- to clear private owned lots of
Mon.^Tues., Thurs^ Fn. 2-5.30,ed SQm^wh^ of cm obstruction, weeds but rfirmly believe they
?f;nSat 0 n?n,a d,for clear vision of an intersec- should be cleared before they
children are dreatly benefitting from this outdoor experience and .children .and staff .aMke
are having a 1 lot; ,of dun.
*..*:'*.
Auraria ,Community Gfentef announces :^tfi'e beginfiing.bf q new J head-start I jpreschciol o Jor children with special emo.tioriqj and sOcial'prdblems.- ,The class is being referred to as;. the therapeutic preschool ,or nursery. This fecial class is de-f: med for early identification, diagnosis, and educatiohal therapy for emotionally disturbed. tures, and oveir a hundred children in .order to prepare Pitches beneath her chin; and these clii'idrpn for a more sue- Eugene Cavaldon, Benny Lti-cessful adjustment in regular Sammy Duran and Diane school. Aurari,a Community, Koyama, who were badly Center is working in conj.unc- ^ruised, and released from the tton with Denver General Hos- !f,hospital. Mary Elizabeth Tru-pital in order to promote and -iiho .will be in a cast for at sponsor this program. 'least seven months.
bn jl2h and Santa Fe Drive on July 2 wBU ,on %tlipir wery to a pa$y.
'The driver is being held ori hit and ruf> charges andvfurthef charges arei now pending.
' The 'six Wpst Side iePnagers,. all' 17 {bldf/1 who( 'dff^idr
'ed *St. josCpfr's,. Higji Scbool,' aheV Yvoiine, Medran the most 4eriouely' ihjured who died on Sunday, July 16th; Mary Elizabeth Trujillo ^who received a broken left leg, compound frac-
tion.
become dry and constitute a
1-5:30 p.m. dosed Wednesdays.
Thomas H. Raddall creates unusual excitement in .his historical novel, Hangman's Beach.
Here is a skillfui blend* of romance .and foct about Halifax, , _ r.-.ru
Nova Scotia, the lone British, ^-ity? From^^pident Jphnson p^- Jn vfhe .knowledge that you
Onii Tt.'.on < J H ) 11 v' I tnrrSiVrrn ftTrrte rnrv rniin- _LL j_______:_______ .
fire hazard. For the time being Just a suggestion and per- you property owners may call haps one of the city agencies 244-3301. Ladies and gentle-would care to 'deyelpp the Pro_ j mehf step to your phone and I gram. Or the Westside Ac-|£eei sure you will have your tion Council? Denver Qppor- vacant lots cleared and be hap-
dovm through state, (city, couri-ha\re done sorhefhing to help ty arid own pride ini
talks pf jpbs {or youth. Why i your city;
MBmmm Sdb : start this
fortress ,cnid nerval base m North i Arnica,, 0 >the .time of the r.N Janice Holt Giles writes abdut lithe dountty in whidh' she liVed for fourteen' yedrls 'in 40 Acres cmd No Mule. The1 author 1 is'"a city Woman who caihe to know arid love the people in one comer of Appalachia. Heir story makes most! dlj looking for w;crys and meari9
Progfani? Cerdirily wb; Ore dl-? talking1' abdut' the v pirtdel we have in JP.. S. A -bit of irony. The lot wo eleedfed several years ago? .: itfe owner came by to see>f haw we were doing (sweet of him). He found us with
fer !h(J?e Youngsters' v/hom We fhe Jewelry and change: notch see roaming around are nat,.he vrished to claim them. No,
interesting reading.
of getting intd1; trouble. ..Most
The Time Is Noon, by IJIIBBBM earn-
mg a few bucks, n a job. were
S. Buck; fs a rich portrait of a woman as daughter, sister, wife and mother. It is the story of Joan Richards as she grows into womanhood in an American town between the two world wars.
available.
Pulling, raking and piling weeds isn't' done in an office and it is tedious but at least lit would bed job. Personally attested. Some years ago this
he didn't get them but after a call -from the city he was made to pay for hauling the piles o! weeds away. Let's not be made to have civic pride, let's volunteer to help keep Denver beautiful and at the same time provide a few jobs for youths.
A Concerned Weed-Picker
/


Page Four
July, 1967
THE RECOR DER
RECORDER HAS NEW EDITOR
Mrs. Emma Harris was selected by the Newspaper Committee of the West Side Im-j provement Association as the new editor of the West Side Recorder. Mrs. Harris has been interested in her community and its development as evidenced by her activities. She is current secretary of St. Elizabeth's PTA and has volunteered her services to further the growth and progress of community affairs. While every newspaper must have an editor, in a community paper, such as ours, it is also important that all of us participate to some degree. Please assist Mrs. Harris by sending in news items, articles or editorials.
West
Side
NATIONAL BRANDS STORE HAVING GRAND OPENING
SANTA FE CLEANERS CLOSES OUT BUSINESS
After 31 years in the same! location, the Santa Fe Cleaners, 618 Santa Fe, is "closing its! doors." The closing was announced this week by owners! Mrs. Kay Perkins Leclerc and Charles Quesnoy.
Mr. and Mrs. N. S. Perkins opened the cleaning shop in1 1936 and operated the business until poor health forced the selling of the establishment. After, Mr. Perking' death a year later. Mrs. Leclerc took back the Santa Fe Cleaners, and she and her son, Charles Ques-1 noy, have operated it since. Mrs. Leclerc will retire from the business'now, and Quesnoy is pursuing other business ven- tures.
According to the owners, living and working in West Den-
ver has been a "memorable experience." "We want to
thank- the community for its support throughout the years," they said.
Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS ..
July 29Crusade for Justice : Membership Meeting,; 2 p. m.,
; Inner City Protestant Parish, W. 9th Ave. and Galapago
July 31Elections for West-side Action. Council
July 31 to Aug. 9First Men-noriite Church Vacation Bible School, 430 W. 9th Ave., 6:45 to 8:45 p. m. Open for all children from first to eighth grade
August 3 and 4Rummage Sale, St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 126 W. 2nd Ave., 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
August 4John P. Martinez Post 204, American Legion, 805 Santa Fe Drive, 7:30 p. m.
August 7El Teatro Campe-sino (The Farm Workers Theatre) and "The Revolutionist," at Santa Fe Theatre, 8 p. m.
August 7 and 8Rummage Sale for Crusade for Justice, across from the Santa Fe Theatre
August 8West Side Improvement Association Board Meeting, 7:30 p. m., at Auraria /Community Center, 1212 Mariposa Street
I August 12Crusade for Justice bazaar, 1900 block on S. Tejon
EVERY WEEK
Young Adult Center, 912 Galapago. Monday through Friday, 9 a. m, to II p. m, Saturday dances 7 p. m. to 11:30 p. m.
The Recorder is -now carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 30c per line, $.50 minimum. Box 50% extra.- Bold face35c a line.
Ads must be brought to t^e office of the West Side Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Drive, by the 10th of each month. Payment for the ad must be made at the; same time the ad is brought in.
The Recorder is offering this service ,,to the community feeling that *it will be useful to our readers. |
The grand opening celebra-|" Neighbors are invited to portion of Charlie's National Brands ticipate in the celebration and store, 727 Santa Fe Drive, is register for the many prizes underway. The store is wel- being given away this week coming community residents to! including 160 color cameras, visit, and see the expansion, 1100 baskets of groceries, 30,000 remodeling and redecorating Mor-Valu Stamps, barbecue innovations with easy and grill, toaster and table radio, pleasant shopping and parking Owner and operator of the for 100 cars in back. ! store is Charlie Scarafiotti. Mr.
Included in the expansion Scarafiotti started in the gro-of over 7,000 square feet of eery business 20 years ago on floor space is the enlargement Sana Fe Drive with only one of the meat department, the in-1 employee. The store now em-stallation of a large section of ploys 12 persons, freezer food cases, fresh fruit | According to "Charlie," the and vegetable bins, dairy cas-j enlargement and remodeling of es and delicatessen, a new the store was to serve the West bakery department featuring Denver community better. "I "freshly-baked" goods, and new check-out stands.
FOR SALE567 ,jlnca. Brick, 3 bdrms., 2 baths,^family rm., separate dining, family kitchen, part basement, garage, 3 lots (80'xl05) fenced. Excellent buy. No down payment GI total monthly $101. Call Gary Dean Realty 534-5737.
Harold's Shamrock Service "You Haul Trailers"
501 Kalamath, phone 623-9845
IdentificationPlease In the daily papers we have noticed the same signature in connection with informaion and more recently a question, always pertaining to the West Side. The first item was signed "Florence Carlson, a fourth generation West Sider." More re-51 have faith in West" Denver," he centlY "The West Side Improve-
I said.
Clean Up, Pappy!
The Pappy Fry Development Corporation is again using the property at West -3rd Avenue .and Cherokee Street for storr 'age. Cars are parked there and children are playing oh them. This is dangerous. October 9, 1966, in the Daily Journal it was noted that the Pappy Fry Development Corporation intended to buy this property. At that time there were stipulations that all building structures and improvements were to be removed. Shortly thereafter the old fire station at West 3rd Ave. and Cherokee Street instead of being tom down was being used for storing cars and furniture. On January 14, 1966, an action was filed against Pappy Fry Development Corporation to compel them to improve this property
according to the terms of the contract. June, 1966, the old fire station was still standing and being used as a warehouse. July,( 1966, in .an interview with a Denver Post reporter, Mr. Fry admitted buying the building (fire station) at West 3rd Avenue and Cherokee Street but said he had no further use for it. The weeds were cut and cars removed at that time. February, 1967, the old .warehouse was finally torn down and the lot was clear of weeds, cars and furniture. Now, July 1967, after 2 V2 years of hard work by the West Siders on impovements to 'the area, this property is being used for storage again.
Are the zoning laws written for someone else, Mr. Fry?
3.2 HEARING HELD
Thirty-five West Siders attended a hearing at 9:30 a. m., July 10, at 810 14th Strqet' to protest the proposed transfer of a 3.2 license from 220 Broadway to',1023 W: 8th Avenue. A number of West Siders spoke at the hearing and presented petitions with signatures- against the transfer. Only Mr. Morey Sharp, the holder of the 3.2 license, spoke in favor. He also presented a petition in favor. Mr. Sharp was not represented by an attorney.
Among those testifying were Mrs. Forrest. Swanson, vice-president of the West Side Improvement Association, and a neighborhood worker from the Westside Action Center. Concerns expressed by those from the neighborhood were that the transfer might increase drunkenness and disorderly behavior in the neighborhood, that the proposed location is too close to the Boys' Club, and that the increased availability might lead to a lowering of the moral fibre of young people in' the area. Mr. Sharp argued that he had a reputation for fairness and honesty and that he has never had any trouble in his establishments with either 3.2 licenses or regular tavern licenses. He felt that, if his place of business were opened at 1023 W. 8th Avenue; problems with, young people. would be, less because his cabaret would provide healthy entertainment which would keep them off the streets.
Mr. George Canjar, Deputy Manager of Safety and Excise, conducted the hearing. A decision on the application will be made at a later date by
EDITORIAL
ment Association, Florence Carlson."
We cannot locate Florence Carlson. She is not in our membership files and other sources have failed. Does Florence Carlson really exist? If so, we would like to meet her. Florence, dear girl, we
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park is set up to serve public housing residents in the area. There are 21 members on the Board1
of the Council. They, live in | cannot qfford Perry Mason and Lincoln or South Lincoln Park his private eye Paul Drake to
Homes. We are going to need the support and help of the residents of both projects in order to make the Christmas party for the children a success. Money from rummage or bake sales or bazaars goes toward expenses of the Council, including, the Christmas program. With the help of all the residents we can have a program for the children again this year.
Rumors Are Flying!
.Recently, there has been a rash of rumors in the area about Stokely Carmichael. About six weeks ago, a rumor began that he would be in town within a couple weeks. This rumor has proven to be false. More recently, someone started the rumor that Mr. Carmichael met Rodolfo "Corky" Gonzales when Mr. Gonzales was in New Mexico recently in connection with the .-upcoming trial of, Reyes Tijerina and others. When asked about this story, Mr. Gonzales: denied it,, point- blank. The- same people) apparently, are now saying that Carmichael1 will have a mass rally in Lincoln Park, followed by riots.
Of course Mr. Carmichael or anyone else may decide at some point to come to town, but it is clear that the people dreaming up his arrival at a definite" time were wrong. And the story about him and Mr. Gonzales is simply false. It is plain enough what those
spreading such rumors are up to. Right-thinking people will Mr. Hugh McCleam, Manager know better than to believe of Safety and Excise. such foolishness.
find you. Will you please contact us? It could be to our mutual interest. The office is located at 768 Santa Fe or call 244-330. L ,
CHURCH NEWS
ST. PETER'S
St. Peter's Episcopal Church will sponsor a rummage sale to be held August 3 and 4 at the Parish hall, 126 W. 2nd Ave. This sale will include many household items and children's school clothing. The sale will be at 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. The snack bar^will be In operation during the sale.
IGLESIA BETEL Rev. Mike Salazar, minister of Iglesia Betel de las Asam-bleas de Dios, West 2nd Avenue and Fox, announced the following summer schedule: Sunday'
10 a.m., ^Sunday School 2:30 p. mj Services in the southwest comer of Lincoln Park
7:30 p. m., Evangelistic Service
Tuesday
7:30 p. rn., Ladies' CM.F. Thursday-^- 'f-7:30 p. m., Young People's Meeting
FIRST MENNONITE The First Mennonite Church, 430 West 9th Avenue, will have their Vacation Bible School from July 31 to August 9, weekday evenings from 6:45 to 8:45 p. m. The Bibie School is open to all children from first to eighth grade. The Bible School project this year is the collection of Bibles for foreign missions.


Full Text
Volume 4, Number 3
Monthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
July, 1967
Action Council Candidates And Statements
Census Tract 12 One to be elected
occupy our youngsters in the summer."
VOTE In Westside Election!
Lupe Arguello 833 Curtis Street
Phillip j. Torres 1033 9'th Street
Census Tract 18
Two to;-be elected
Ralph Gaschler 1168 Kalamath Street
Henry G. Maestas 1070 Inca Street 'T believe that oUr neighborhood deserves much more attention than it is getting. I will do all I can to promote public service and neighborhood improvements for West Denver."
Louie Sanchez 731 Galapago Street
Census Tract 19 Three to be elected
Henry Archuleta 1226 Upon Street Mary Benevidez 1463 Navajo Street
Christine DeLeon 1129 W. 13th Avenue "I will make no promises but v will do the very best I can for my community."
Judy Gallardo
WHERE TO VOTE JULY 31
Census Tract Location
12Fire House, 9th & Golfax
18Elmwood School, 720 Galapago Street
18 West High School, 951 Elati
19 Greenlee ^School, 1150 Lipan Street
19 Lincoln Park Homes, 1438 Navajo Street
20 Evans School, 1115 A-coma Street
21 Fairmont School,. 520 West 3rd Avenue
21Alameda School, 208 West Byers Place
21Baker Junior High School, 574 West 6th Avenue
Census Tract 20 One to be elected Gene. Ortega 134 W.vilth Avenue Silfred L. Ramos 1333 Cherokee Street "Interested in neighborhood problems, education needs, job training."
Census Tract 21 Four to be elected
Rachel Guedea 425 W. 2nd Avenue
Mark Jaramillo 239 Bannock Street
Roy L. Leyba 540 Lipan Street "As a candidate for Action Council, my main goal is the improvement of the standards of the community. We need a community where achievement is accepted, not rejected."
Vera Lucero 526 Kalamath Street "My main interest in being a candidate of the Westside Action Council is because T love to work with people and my belief that all should be treated equal and given every opportunity regardless of color, race., or religion."
Sdi' Kalamath Street "I wanted to be a candidate because they helped us keep slum .conditions from other areas from moving in here."
C. G. Naney 217 W. 2nd Avenue "I love Denver's West Side and its people. I therefore wish to do all that I possibly can to help in the improvement of all conditions of the West Side."
Charles Ramon :1T5 : Galapago Street
Phil Sanchez .
538 Galapago Street
Leo J. Sullivan 282 frica Street
WHEN WILL CITY ACT?
Last month the West Side Recorder reported' on the terrible condition of the terraces located at 912 to 920 W. 11th Avenue. A letter had been delivered to the office of Mr. Douglas Wi-gle, Jr., of the Housing Section, Department of Health and Hospitals. There has been no answer. The conditions of the property are much worse than they werer in September, 1963, when there were numerous violations of the housing code agaihst this property. Can the Housing Section of the Department of Health and Hospitals continue to ignore requests from the West Siders to enforce orders on 912-920 West 11th Avenue? Are these places being rented by tenants receiving public funds? Is the Welfare Department subsidizing slum conditions? The city has the responsibility to see that improvements are made or that Oils property is cleared.
14554- -Kalamath Street
Donald M. Gallegos 1237 W. 10th Avenue "F have lived. within Census Tract 19 for the past 10 years, so I am not a stranger to our problems. I feel that I am qualified to serve you as a good Neighborhood Action Council spokesman because of my previous experience of being an elected Westside Action Council member for the past year."
Jose Grijalva 922 Navajo Street
Antoinette Maes 1063 Navajo Street
Albert Martinez 1115 W. 10 th Avenue "I- intend to represent more of the wants of the people in the West Side. One of the main, things is to get some better dental facilities for our neighborhood'. We also need more and better facilities to
Harold A; Munson
. Why is it that the neighborhood center for the local War on Poverty program is primarily ldenified--^dfh,-J^^i^f .-Qppgr?. ttinity, noi the neighborhood ? The telephone response is "Denver Opportunity, Westside Action Center." Is the Center only a branch of the Denver Opportunity office or is it truly a local center, to meet local needs, with the Westside Action Couhcil directly involved in planning and operation?
Agency Candidates To Be Elected July 31
In addition to resident candidates from their census tracts, voters also vote fpr six out of 16 candidates from churches, schools, agencies and businesses in the area. The candidates and their organizations are?
Alex Vigil, Auraria Community Center
Rev. Thomas Sepulveda, First Spanish. Methodist Church Rev. James Nugent, St. Joseph's Church
Rev. John Ventura, First Mermonite Church Mr. Moses Cisneros, Fairmont Recreation Center Sister Rose, St. Elizabeth's Church
Fred Estrada, Lincoln Park Homes
John Doyle, Baker Junior High Marion Garcia, LARASA Rev. A. J. Blomquist, First Avenue Presbyterian Church Robert Leland Johnson, Bar Association
Miss Mary Waterhouse, Elmwood' Elementary School George Chavez, Safeway Ben Trujillo, Zale Jewelers Richcrrd Tallbull, Whit Buffalo Council
Edith Hugley, Tiny Tot Nursery
West Siders 18 years old and I over go to the polls Monday, j July 3,1, to elect candidates for the Westside Action Council. The Council serves the area including Census Tracts 12, 18, j 19, 20 and 21. Voters will choose among candidates living in their census tracts and will also elect candidates from agencies, schools, and churches in the Action Council area.
The Action Council will work for physical community improvement and for new or better programs for education, health, job training for area residents. The Action Councils are best described as an attempt to bring grass roots democracy and citizen participation in the decisions that really effect the individual and his immediate neighborhood.
The Action Council is the of-| ficial spokesman for target area residents in determining what
WRECK OR REPAIR ORDERS ISSUED
programs receive War on Poverty funds through Deliver Opportunity.
Denver Opportunity is the name of the city-wade agency that makes the policy decisions for War on Poverty projects. One of the largest and most successful of these programs is i.Head Start. Other programs i you may know about include the Neighborhood Health Center, the Optometric Center, St. Elizabeth's and St. Patrick's Adult Tutorial. Programs just starting include the Neighborhood Action Centers, Legal ( Services, a Summer Youth and j Employment program.
' As the elected neighborhood : leadership, the Councils can also press city and private agencies for the services and programs the target areas i need.
New low rates are now in effect for Recorder want ads! You pay only 30c per line, 50c minimum. Bring your ad in to the office at 768 Santa Fe Drive.
The Denver Community Development Agency has inves-
Westside
tigated the vandalized buildings reported. in last month's
Action Center
Reorder. Wreck bf^repair orders had been issued against all four, between April 26, 1966, and June 8, 1967. The owner or administratrix- of two properties cannot be found, and the Building Department, which demolishes hazardous structures on an emergency basis, has no more funds for the purpose this year. We hope that Councilman Burke calls this problem to the immediate attention of the City Council, which can and should grant extra money for this purpose.
Grand Opening Set
* On July 17, 1967, the West Side Action Center, located at i 1042 Santa Fe Drive, opened
its doors to the community, making services available to the residents lof the West Side. This is one of five such centers located in areas designated by Denver Opportunity, the Office of Economic Opportunity, and other agencies. The offic-
ial ^opening is set for July 29. All are invited.
One property listed has been boarded up by a mortgage company and is being redeemed by the Veteran's Administration.
Activities of the center, since beginning operation, have included the perpetuation of food-clothing-and-fumiture bank established1 by the West Side Inter-Agency Council.
The Community Development Agency also reported on the problem of street sweeping. Sanitary Services reports this area is in a restricted area, calling for the use of signs to | clear parked vehicles from the path of the sweepers. As is. custom in restricted areas in. other parts of the city, the schedule calls for sweeping to occur every four to five weeks as different from non-restricted, non-signed areas which are swept every six to seven weeks. During wet weather the schedule is often delayed and this has occurred frequently since April.
Improvement Assn. Meeting Set
Mr. Leslie J. Kalanquin, President of the West Side Improvement Association, welcomes all West Siders to the next meeting of the Board of Directors, at 7:30 p. m., August 8, 1967, at Auraria Community Center.
A concentrated effort has been conducted in cooperation with the Westside Action Council to recruit interested residents and agencies to run in the July 31 Elections as representatives on the Council.
Most of the work has been concentrated in the area of informing the people in the community of the existence of the center and encouraging them to Bring their problems and questions to the ceriter through one of the four neighborhood representatives.
Over two hundred families have come Or been brought to the center. They have received services of various types, such as food; transportation; help with legal problems; housing; economic and health problems and clothing.
The center is open 8;00 to 5:00 daity, Monday through Friday. The phone number is 534-5141.


Pncre Two
jpg recobder
July, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West'Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Sqnjd Fe Drive Phone 24&3301 Editor: Erma Jean Harris .Assistant Editor:
v Jaye Martinez
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings, Margot Serumgard, Mildred Iordan, Juanita Winterhalder
JtetyMw A,$act Ttotet
Thomas Sepulveda, Jr., aftei visiting with his parents last week has gone back to Cleveland, Ohio.
Robert Leland Johnson of the Colorado Bar and Wesrtside Action Council recently had a book published: Trial Handbook for Colorado Tort Lawyers,
Mrs. Daisy Hamlet is in Presbyterian Hospital for observation and treatment.
Gloria Lara, 118 Galapago, 0 Neighborhood Youth Corps worker, is doing office work at the Mennonite Youth Center. She will Be a senior at West High School this fall.
Riedel, the daughter of Mrs. Mary Grant, 722 Elati, is home from the hospital after being struck by a pickup at W. 8th Avenue and Elati. At the time of the accident, she was coming home from her Headstart class.
J. W. Blanscet of 1046 West 5th Avenue, is in St. Joseph's Hospital for eye surgery.
Mr. E. Ray Crabb, 471 Kala-math, after cutting down all weeds around his business property, is in the process of installing a container wall around it.
Mrs. Barbara Maxie, Executive Director of Auraria -Community Center, was recently hospitalized. She is now at home and doing fine. We wi^h her a speedy recovery as the entire staff misses her.
Martin Casorla of 129 Gala-pago who attends 7th grade at St. Joseph's Ggtholic School is spending the summer in Wisconsin attending the seminary to study about priesthood- He is the son of Pete Casorla, Jr., and brother of lisa, who'Is also a student at St. Joseph's.
' Mr. and Mrs. Ghrisey iKoch of 534 West 4th Avenue had a vacation with their daughter and family in California. ;En route home Mr. % Kooh was injured in a cgr accident,. He is now at home -and recuperating cuite well.
Mrs. Viola Smith, 1351 Mariposa St., visited her son in Seattle, Washington.
Mrs. Leola Polk of 1135 Inca* has visited relatives in Nebras- ka and Kansas.
We rejoice with Mr. and Mrs. A. John Blomguist upon the birth of their new daughter, Karen Ruth, on June 8 in Farmington, New Mexico. This child is the^graridsoh,. of Rev. and Mrs. A. j. Blomquist of the First Avenue Presbyterian Church.
Mr. and Mrs. Linkous and, family of 1464 Navajo Street are having a very nice visit with Mrs. Margery Glover, Mrs. Linkous' mother, from Marietta, Ohio. Mrs. Linkhous returned home from St Joseph's Hospital after surgery and is recuperating quite well. She wishes to thank friends who called and visited her and she appreciated he lovely card' from the Lincoln Park-South Lincoln Park. Resident Council. ' 1
Mrs. Alfonzo Martinez spent four days near Brighton with her two granddaughters while her daughter and son-in-law went to New Mexico.
Mrs. Juanita Picchione is visiting from Brockton,, Mass.,, with her folks, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin M. Churchill, at 1209 Lipan St.
Mrs. A. Broom of 121 Chero-ikee has just returned from a visit with her daughter and family, the Harry Gunruds of, Fergus Falls, Minn.
A. S. Mermans from Hartford, Conn. Mrs. Day and Mrs. Merman have enjoyed long years of standing friendship since high school.
Mr. William Schroeder has returned from a six-weeks visit with his brother and family in Iowa.
Mrs. Elinore Marshall and her daughter Lori spent 4th of July with Mr. and Mrs. G. Glynn of 1253 Kalamath Street.
Vickie Espinoza, daughter of Mrs. Gracia Espinoza of 1470 Navajo St., is home for a month from the Job Corps in West Virginia.
WEDDING BELLS
Dippel-Gonzales
Mrs. Charlotte Gonzales of 1022 West 9th Ave., announces the engagement of her daughter Eleanor to Mr. Mike Dip-pel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Victor Dippel, of Jasper, Indiana. Miss Gonzales is a graduate of West High School and Trinidad State Junior College. Her fiance is presently a senior at Southern Colorado State College. The .couple plan to get married on September 16, 1967 at St. Joseph's Catholic Church.
Morris-Holden
Ida Jane Holden, daughter of Mrs. Mary Alice Holden, 825 Delaware, was married to Mr. Virgil Morris at St. Paul's Methodist Church, July 9.
Local Boy Home on Leave
Glenn Close Jr., 533 Kalamath, is home on furlough from Fitzsimons. He has been at the hospital after being wounded in Viet Nam.
New Teen Center
The Young Adult Center ai 912 Galapago Is open for all neighborhood teenagers. The Center is open week days from 9 a. m. until 11 p. m. and on Saturdays; when there is a dance at Inner City Protestant Parish. The Center has-volley ball, badminton, checkers, darts, baseball games, music, as well as dances and some job placement. There will be a dance this Saturday, July 22, at 7 until 11:30 p. m.
Campus Capers
SER HELPS FIND JOBS
S
Chavez to Law School
Larry Chavez, Aurora's bookkeeper, wa^Lawarded cr- 'scholarship to attend Denver University School of Law for the summer. He is a semi-finalist! and is one of 20 persons to be awarded the scholarship. In September, 12 out of the 20 will be awarded full scholarships vo attend Law School. We wish him good luck toward the full scholarship.
Since Larry is back in school Auraria now has a new bookkeeper. She is Mrs. Jeannie Dewald. Auraria welcomes its new staff member.
Garcia Appointed
Southern Colorado State College has appointed Gilbert Garcia, son of Mr. and Mrs. Max E. Garcia of 264 Inca Street, to the faculty. During his 10 years in Loveland schools, Mr. Garcia served as a teacher in elementary, junior high and assisted in senior high in instrumental music. He has directed the summer band for six years. He will begin his doctoral program at the University of Oregon in Eugene this summer. His wife Susan has been recog-
Training opportunities With the., airlines are now open to> young adults, Teports Joe Herrera, Slate Director of Operation SER. Classes to train girls j for stewardess positions are being formed. Girls must be high school graduates and must be at least 20 years of age by the completion of the training.
Airlines are also looking for young men for jet mechanics-training. They must be 18 yeqrs of age, high school graduates and preferably single^ For more information about: jthese and other training programs, contact the office of Operation SER, 1065 Federal. Office hours are 8 a. m. to 5> p. m., Monday through Friday..
Operation SER is a project: funded by the Department of: Labor and the Office of Economic Opportunity to help in. finding jobs and job training opportunities especially for low income and minority persons-who have had difficulties in. finding jobs.
American Leaion Meetings
John P. hfqrtinez American Legion Post 204, 8D5 Santa Fe Drive, welcome as members any veterans of armed forces.. Meetings are the first Friday of each monthr-7:30 p.m. The Commander is Lee Madrid.
CRUSADE FOR JUSTICE
The first i^sue of El Gallo, a: newspaper published by the-Crusade for Justice, has been distributed: Present plans are for a monthly paper, but the-interest and demand may require .more frequent publica-jjibn. The subscription rate is1 $3.00 for twelve issues. Subscriptions may be sent to the Crusade office, 1365 Cherokee..
nized. in Loveland as a trumpet soloist and has done substitute teaching in the schools. Mr. Garcia, a native of Denver, said it has been 10 won-
A membership meeting of the -Crusade for Justice will be held on Sunday, July 29, at 2:00 p. m., at the Inner City Protestant Parish, 9th Avenue-
derful years of teaching won-, rind Galapago.
derful kids.
Mrs. Betty Yagi of 1244 Mariposa, spent a week vacationing with her son and family dt Yellowstone and Teton National Parks.
' Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Pacheco rif 1253 Lipan St., spent July m attending a -family reunion Ond, picnic at Lyons, Colorado. Fi% rfel'atives were present.
. ^yhoftituj lift.
Pick the Plentifuls. Thanksgiving isn't hereyet, but the turkeys areand in great supply. So the U. S. Department of Agriculture suggests that turkeys be included in your July menus Also plentiful this month are dry edible beans, fish fillets and steaks, lemons, j limes and seasonal vegetables. -
Lincoln Park Senior Citizens
An attractive dessert luncheon was served to sixteen members of thebiricojn Park Senior Citizens Club on Tuesday, Juner6th. Mds. .Dagmar Christ tiansen, ISiSiVW. ;i.3tli Ay^., and Miss Corine Gibson, 1351 iposa, acted as hostesses. At; the business meeting which Jbl>; lowed, upcoming' -summer ad-; tivities were- disciissbd.(A 'round bf1 'applause was ^given 'iMiv Leonard Chadwick, Manager ol Mribblri Park' and'-1&>uth'bineolri Park Homes, on his recent Blectibri to the board* of A urar-ia .Community Center.
On June >?0th, the = Lincoln Park Seniors entertained the Twilighters j Club qf. dhe.. Quigg Newton Housing,Project.at the Lincoln Park Community Hall/ 1438 ^Navajo St. Fifteen Lim coin Park Senior Citizen members were on hand to greet twelve members of the Twilighters. The tables were beautifully decorated with clusters of!
large decorator type flowers in vivid colors, hand made from crepe paper and plastics by Mrs. Elsie lijienthal, decorations chairman for the Lincoln Park Club.
Sunday, June 25th, twelve methb^reof-4hd Lincoln Park Senior1 GitiXens left by special bus' r for Oh ; Overnight, stay at YMCA -camp at Estes^Park, f'gothg5,by^Wdy-'bfi'the North St. |Vr&in v0emybn and returning .through' the^Big'lfoempson. -?Aljl arrangements 1 were made ifev1\ the'club's'1 very -aMe (Coordinator, Mis. ^Lynn 'Bradley, ftloj hiking was attempted, but two long drives arotind .'Estes; Park gave the; group ion opportunity to ; fully enjoy the beauty of the drea.
Ho regular meetings of the Lincoln Park Seniors will be held in July and August, but plans are being made -for a picnic in July.
El Teatro Campesino (The* Farm Workers Theatre) will present their dramatic program at. the-Santa Fe Theatre on August'.^. The play ,?The Ravolu-ibnist' will also^be shown. Curtain time is 8:00 p. m.
El ^atro C^jnpesino is a ,grqup of fafm wp-rfe6?3 from California who have developed, a series of skits into a program which has bright jiafional/ attention. ;
. A rummgge sale will, be conducted^ by ffyV! Cruspde for Justice defess 'from ,' me 'Santa Fe Theatre (l0th Ave. and Santa Fe' Dri^e on August 7 and 8.
The Crusade for Justice, will present a bazaar on August 12 in !the 1900 block of South Tejon St. Major events are a combo competition for teenagers, qnd a queen contest for girls age 5 to 10 years.


196?
THE RECORDER
Page Three
Auraria Community Center
Shall we: go' on a visit with the group called Mamma's Morning Out?
June was a busy month for us, especially with school letting out But we mothers still have time to play? Each Thursday morning seven or .eight mothers and their children gather at Auraria Community Center about 9. We leave our little ones with the baby 'sitter and larger' ones at arts, arid craft classes. We climb iiito a go-mO-bile and take off for all the fun, Our first stop 3-n June was -the Botanical. Gardens. We found many large, beautiful, irses of all colors and combinations of colors. We also saw the famous banana trees and lots of other tropical plants and trees.
Now, the second trip is a .twofold visit to the State Capitol and the State Historical Museum. These two places'of interest are across the street from one another. We had a guided tour of the Capital. Here we saw several large rooms used by our governing body.
Auraria Headstart, under the direction of Martha Ann Owen and Lois Pierre with ; their as-' sistants Eleanor Lucero and Jaye Martinez, have been having many wonderful experiences with the children on educational trips. We have visited Botanical Gardens, Aero Space Park in Littleton, Colorado and we also took a trip to day camp in which many of the parents participated. We also took the children to Surif; ken Gardens on a picnic which wa.s enjoyed by all.
We have; also had. several visitors from the Institute For Disadvantaged Children from Del Hart, Texas, who are taking training at Denver University and students who wifi be working with the migrants in: different parts of Colorado.' They felt that the experience of observing will be helpul in their I work with migrants and disadvantaged children. We have also had our last inservice training for the summer session and it was helpful in understanding and communi-
The third trip was to the Art. . , t 8 ,
Museum where we saw Euro-1catmg BS teacher?- asslst
Scout News
The families of Pack 200 had j a .picnic June 18 at Cherry: Creek Dam. The families were | the Majs, Menas, Grubys, Ley-bas and Sanchezes. Fishing, eating, swimming, horseshoe playing and good fun rounded out the day. pack $00 softball team has had a fine summer so far. Mri Leyba has Brought fheJ'teairF up to 3 wins 1 loss.
June 26 pock 200 had an Olympics at' Sunken Gardens. The events yrere high jumping, broad jump, 'SO and 100 yard dash, sdhbdll .throw, sack race and relay racel Randy Garcia won first place with Richard Leyba one point behind.
* *
Twelve lucky girls and four leaders from Troop 726 went .tent carnping from July 1 to July 4. Mr. and Mrs. Field and Mr. and Mrs. Mena were in
pean and Oriental art exhibits. July started with a visit to
ants and children.
NEW GEORGIE BOY'S The Board of Directors of the West Side Improvement Association, at a meeting held' on July 11, 1967, voted to send a letter to Georgie Boy's Meats, 1042 W. 8th Avenue, expressing appreciation for the addi-
, ,, , r . , rj. | Lincoln Park has also agreed tionto the appearance of the
the .Museum of Natural History to use of their pool for Head-|neighborhood represented by at aty Park. The ammas here start to use for one hour per ,he new Georgie Boys building, look alive m every detail. Welrweek. *..*.*.****-*..
also saw a model of a new space ship. We hated to leave this building because it was so fascinating but it was lunchtime and the little ones were waiting for us.
Loretha Williams
charge. They arrived at Gla-cer Basin in Rocky Mountain Park, on Saturday. Sunday they attended church and visited Estes Park. Monday they enjoyed a 7 mile hike from Wild Basin camp to Falls. Tuesday was
Inner City
Inner City Parish Summer Program at 9th and Galapago Street invites residents of the West Side community to participate in its special summer program this year. Any groups wishing to use our hew recre-Ousel1 ^on center may contact Rev. spent Beach at the parisli-i-244-2636.
breaking camp in the rain but The Parish is here to serve you a good time was had by all. -and your children. Come and
get acquainted !
June 19, three patrols led by j ^1----------
Brad Morris, Randy Mena and CULTURAL ARTS PROGRAM
Everett Bear made anighthike I
There are four areas of the
Mental Health Day Camp
Drop-in Game Room , HB I TT !, .
1 The Mental Health Clinic at After two weeks of getting Denver General Hospital is cur-acquainted, playing in the |||||p- running a summer day park and working with arts and camp in the neighborhood for crafts, the Drop-In Fun Time emotionally disturbed.boys. The here at the cpnter_ is in full sixteen boya; age ^ght f ,fe siying. Activities in the. pro- tWG}ve yGors, began day camp
up Lookout Mountain from £inb dfts rbpreibh'ted in the Pub-golden. On the. hike they ob- lie Schools cultural arts program served a few garden snakes, at Gilpin School-music, art, two wrecks cars, a few birds |g| iMMMBBlBa chU-rmd an applej -free Everyone ^ are enoourd&ed to choose learned. how -to help each o h- fe0mAese40ur .fields the one in
BH finleded, I HI which they are the most in-started at 8:30 and the boys which they
arrived home at midnight. lhey would to leam
* * * and sfody in some depth. AL
though the children' Spend the lune ,18, three boy scouts majority of tlifeir time at the went on a hike to Qncrry Cenfer -working in the area in Creek Dam. While there, they which they are most interested, enjoyed fishing, swimming and ^ OTe exposed to artists and a picnic. Troop 200's softball j teclchers in all fields_ ^ a team has made its first round-new ^ vital interest may in with flying colors, winning j ^ waybegin. There are 20 games from Troop 22812 to Adepts enrolled in the pro-7, Troop 364 :12 to 1, iTrcop j qram from. Greenlee SchooL 666 14 to 0. With great lead-. The program has two basic
ership and the pitching power purposes; one, to provide the of David Madnl they should | pupils with cm opportunity to make one of the top spots in extend their learning and ap-the league. On lime 24, 11 premdtion of the fine arts; and boy scouts and their leader Mr. | two, to provide the vehicle for Mena played putt putt golf cultural. understanding, human
rifations, and realistic integration.
"For We Are Riding To Majiroda "
..The above.dsitheJoyous;theme .. .. . .. , , - -
thatcam be heard tju;pqgh 'the |Tf5ks have. i u su^h until August 25th. The ...
3or^' tendance has been high, due oufoJtiieeity towards.theydMe.l fo the varied activities,' which
open ^jjaqes..jriplude arts and crafts, recrea-.nqme of tjhp qainp,t;^q^ bppn; Attendance for the Drop^In- tpriV and weekly ,.cr^ecf;,<0t pfjfbe com^ellpr's program has been fairly good. Biid JidJd names. TJieySenior counsellors Any children who have not for : this, summer are Margaret been attending are welcome to
gram during the past few on July 5 ^ continue
swimming
at 2100 Federal.
JOBS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE?
Did I read recently where the writer and a neighbor were
Fettjnan; aj-id Jim Figge, ,;ypiy [cqm.e rand join the fun. -.Same, ably assisted by Rosie: Chavez. of' o,ur. plans -for the, rest pf the and Da# Vigil as junior coun--summer include working' with sellors. paper mache, clay, copper;.
As the summer progresses,1 enameling, making our own the children enjoy siich activi- .PuPPets, putting on puppet ties as hikes, water-sports and shows*, and of course more fun 'numerous1 Bature gamds. Last and games.
'fhe' campprS'Wdnt out to
see the haying ldrid were .thrilled when Mr. Stanley Harwood, owner pi the ranch, gave them dll a riae on the various haying machines. Our deepest gratitude* goes'out to. Mr. Harwood for1 his generosity in alr lowing our camp to ^use his land.
West Side Teens, Injured, Killed in Accident
One teenager was killed and .five others injured by a hit The staff believes. ihat.fhese and run driver on. fhe sidewalk
The staff consists of two vol--unte'ers; three VISTAs and one leader, who is a graduate social Work student Two of the VISTAS, Enid.Meyer and Mickey Stewart, acre liying at 1331 Mariposa: Street.
City would clear a vacant lot of weeds at no expense to the owner?
Didn't it used to be by a given date if the property own-
s&ck of looking at a vacant I6t" overrun"with weeds so we storied the job ourselves, soon fcllcWea by little youngsters offering to help. It took two dtrys and without being mod-
er had not cleared the weeds about it we did1 a bang-up
the Otty worfd- Mll the owner? 5^. jlncidentcdly, we found
Ti , ,. . .. . .. two wrist Wdfehes, a ring, sev-
It doesnt seem to this writer .,, ,__' .__,, .^
|s inMjmjjg l^ralvdoHars m change and hun-
B Bmi of 1pop bottles which the
lions would produce very re- ^ for cash_ We
mar a e resu s- can't guarantee gold in "them
BYERS LIBRARY
Due to the increase in rain thar vacant lots but we can the 'weeds have thrived this guarantee a neater looking spring. ; in many cases they cirea, d job for kids and a bring personal discomfort 'to greater pride and satisfaction to some of our citizens who suffer everyone. Please will you help from hay fever''or^miis^'trouble, make Denver a cleaner, neerter W. 7th Aye, 6t ^Santa Fe Drive Some .lots provide a dumping city? I sincerely bplieve it is
Hours* ground'#'for -train. In offd' m- not the bbliqdtion of the city
TVinre Pri 9 c.Qn' stance we thought it constitut- to clear private owned lots of
Mon.^Tues., Thurs^ Fn. 2-5.30,ed SQm^wh^ of cm obstruction, weeds but rfirmly believe they
?f;nSat 0 n?n,a d,for clear vision of an intersec- should be cleared before they
children are dreatly benefitting from this outdoor experience and .children .and staff .aMke
are having a 1 lot; ,of dun.
*..*:'*.
Auraria ,Community Gfentef announces :^tfi'e beginfiing.bf q new J head-start I jpreschciol o Jor children with special emo.tioriqj and sOcial'prdblems.- ,The class is being referred to as;. the therapeutic preschool ,or nursery. This fecial class is de-f: med for early identification, diagnosis, and educatiohal therapy for emotionally disturbed. tures, and oveir a hundred children in .order to prepare Pitches beneath her chin; and these clii'idrpn for a more sue- Eugene Cavaldon, Benny Lti-cessful adjustment in regular Sammy Duran and Diane school. Aurari,a Community, Koyama, who were badly Center is working in conj.unc- ^ruised, and released from the tton with Denver General Hos- !f,hospital. Mary Elizabeth Tru-pital in order to promote and -iiho .will be in a cast for at sponsor this program. 'least seven months.
bn jl2h and Santa Fe Drive on July 2 wBU ,on %tlipir wery to a pa$y.
'The driver is being held ori hit and ruf> charges andvfurthef charges arei now pending.
' The 'six Wpst Side iePnagers,. all' 17 {bldf/1 who( 'dff^idr
'ed *St. josCpfr's,. Higji Scbool,' aheV Yvoiine, Medran the most 4eriouely' ihjured who died on Sunday, July 16th; Mary Elizabeth Trujillo ^who received a broken left leg, compound frac-
tion.
become dry and constitute a
1-5:30 p.m. dosed Wednesdays.
Thomas H. Raddall creates unusual excitement in .his historical novel, Hangman's Beach.
Here is a skillfui blend* of romance .and foct about Halifax, , _ r.-.ru
Nova Scotia, the lone British, ^-ity? From^^pident Jphnson p^- Jn vfhe .knowledge that you
Onii Tt.'.on < J H ) 11 v' I tnrrSiVrrn ftTrrte rnrv rniin- _LL j_______:_______ .
fire hazard. For the time being Just a suggestion and per- you property owners may call haps one of the city agencies 244-3301. Ladies and gentle-would care to 'deyelpp the Pro_ j mehf step to your phone and I gram. Or the Westside Ac-|£eei sure you will have your tion Council? Denver Qppor- vacant lots cleared and be hap-
dovm through state, (city, couri-ha\re done sorhefhing to help ty arid own pride ini
talks pf jpbs {or youth. Why i your city;
MBmmm Sdb : start this
fortress ,cnid nerval base m North i Arnica,, 0 >the .time of the r.N Janice Holt Giles writes abdut lithe dountty in whidh' she liVed for fourteen' yedrls 'in 40 Acres cmd No Mule. The1 author 1 is'"a city Woman who caihe to know arid love the people in one comer of Appalachia. Heir story makes most! dlj looking for w;crys and meari9
Progfani? Cerdirily wb; Ore dl-? talking1' abdut' the v pirtdel we have in JP.. S. A -bit of irony. The lot wo eleedfed several years ago? .: itfe owner came by to see>f haw we were doing (sweet of him). He found us with
fer !h(J?e Youngsters' v/hom We fhe Jewelry and change: notch see roaming around are nat,.he vrished to claim them. No,
interesting reading.
of getting intd1; trouble. ..Most
The Time Is Noon, by IJIIBBBM earn-
mg a few bucks, n a job. were
S. Buck; fs a rich portrait of a woman as daughter, sister, wife and mother. It is the story of Joan Richards as she grows into womanhood in an American town between the two world wars.
available.
Pulling, raking and piling weeds isn't' done in an office and it is tedious but at least lit would bed job. Personally attested. Some years ago this
he didn't get them but after a call -from the city he was made to pay for hauling the piles o! weeds away. Let's not be made to have civic pride, let's volunteer to help keep Denver beautiful and at the same time provide a few jobs for youths.
A Concerned Weed-Picker
/


Page Four
July, 1967
THE RECOR DER
RECORDER HAS NEW EDITOR
Mrs. Emma Harris was selected by the Newspaper Committee of the West Side Im-j provement Association as the new editor of the West Side Recorder. Mrs. Harris has been interested in her community and its development as evidenced by her activities. She is current secretary of St. Elizabeth's PTA and has volunteered her services to further the growth and progress of community affairs. While every newspaper must have an editor, in a community paper, such as ours, it is also important that all of us participate to some degree. Please assist Mrs. Harris by sending in news items, articles or editorials.
West
Side
NATIONAL BRANDS STORE HAVING GRAND OPENING
SANTA FE CLEANERS CLOSES OUT BUSINESS
After 31 years in the same! location, the Santa Fe Cleaners, 618 Santa Fe, is "closing its! doors." The closing was announced this week by owners! Mrs. Kay Perkins Leclerc and Charles Quesnoy.
Mr. and Mrs. N. S. Perkins opened the cleaning shop in1 1936 and operated the business until poor health forced the selling of the establishment. After, Mr. Perking' death a year later. Mrs. Leclerc took back the Santa Fe Cleaners, and she and her son, Charles Ques-1 noy, have operated it since. Mrs. Leclerc will retire from the business'now, and Quesnoy is pursuing other business ven- tures.
According to the owners, living and working in West Den-
ver has been a "memorable experience." "We want to
thank- the community for its support throughout the years," they said.
Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS ..
July 29Crusade for Justice : Membership Meeting,; 2 p. m.,
; Inner City Protestant Parish, W. 9th Ave. and Galapago
July 31Elections for West-side Action. Council
July 31 to Aug. 9First Men-noriite Church Vacation Bible School, 430 W. 9th Ave., 6:45 to 8:45 p. m. Open for all children from first to eighth grade
August 3 and 4Rummage Sale, St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 126 W. 2nd Ave., 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.
August 4John P. Martinez Post 204, American Legion, 805 Santa Fe Drive, 7:30 p. m.
August 7El Teatro Campe-sino (The Farm Workers Theatre) and "The Revolutionist," at Santa Fe Theatre, 8 p. m.
August 7 and 8Rummage Sale for Crusade for Justice, across from the Santa Fe Theatre
August 8West Side Improvement Association Board Meeting, 7:30 p. m., at Auraria /Community Center, 1212 Mariposa Street
I August 12Crusade for Justice bazaar, 1900 block on S. Tejon
EVERY WEEK
Young Adult Center, 912 Galapago. Monday through Friday, 9 a. m, to II p. m, Saturday dances 7 p. m. to 11:30 p. m.
The Recorder is -now carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 30c per line, $.50 minimum. Box 50% extra.- Bold face35c a line.
Ads must be brought to t^e office of the West Side Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Drive, by the 10th of each month. Payment for the ad must be made at the; same time the ad is brought in.
The Recorder is offering this service ,,to the community feeling that *it will be useful to our readers. |
The grand opening celebra-|" Neighbors are invited to portion of Charlie's National Brands ticipate in the celebration and store, 727 Santa Fe Drive, is register for the many prizes underway. The store is wel- being given away this week coming community residents to! including 160 color cameras, visit, and see the expansion, 1100 baskets of groceries, 30,000 remodeling and redecorating Mor-Valu Stamps, barbecue innovations with easy and grill, toaster and table radio, pleasant shopping and parking Owner and operator of the for 100 cars in back. ! store is Charlie Scarafiotti. Mr.
Included in the expansion Scarafiotti started in the gro-of over 7,000 square feet of eery business 20 years ago on floor space is the enlargement Sana Fe Drive with only one of the meat department, the in-1 employee. The store now em-stallation of a large section of ploys 12 persons, freezer food cases, fresh fruit | According to "Charlie," the and vegetable bins, dairy cas-j enlargement and remodeling of es and delicatessen, a new the store was to serve the West bakery department featuring Denver community better. "I "freshly-baked" goods, and new check-out stands.
FOR SALE567 ,jlnca. Brick, 3 bdrms., 2 baths,^family rm., separate dining, family kitchen, part basement, garage, 3 lots (80'xl05) fenced. Excellent buy. No down payment GI total monthly $101. Call Gary Dean Realty 534-5737.
Harold's Shamrock Service "You Haul Trailers"
501 Kalamath, phone 623-9845
IdentificationPlease In the daily papers we have noticed the same signature in connection with informaion and more recently a question, always pertaining to the West Side. The first item was signed "Florence Carlson, a fourth generation West Sider." More re-51 have faith in West" Denver," he centlY "The West Side Improve-
I said.
Clean Up, Pappy!
The Pappy Fry Development Corporation is again using the property at West -3rd Avenue .and Cherokee Street for storr 'age. Cars are parked there and children are playing oh them. This is dangerous. October 9, 1966, in the Daily Journal it was noted that the Pappy Fry Development Corporation intended to buy this property. At that time there were stipulations that all building structures and improvements were to be removed. Shortly thereafter the old fire station at West 3rd Ave. and Cherokee Street instead of being tom down was being used for storing cars and furniture. On January 14, 1966, an action was filed against Pappy Fry Development Corporation to compel them to improve this property
according to the terms of the contract. June, 1966, the old fire station was still standing and being used as a warehouse. July,( 1966, in .an interview with a Denver Post reporter, Mr. Fry admitted buying the building (fire station) at West 3rd Avenue and Cherokee Street but said he had no further use for it. The weeds were cut and cars removed at that time. February, 1967, the old .warehouse was finally torn down and the lot was clear of weeds, cars and furniture. Now, July 1967, after 2 V2 years of hard work by the West Siders on impovements to 'the area, this property is being used for storage again.
Are the zoning laws written for someone else, Mr. Fry?
3.2 HEARING HELD
Thirty-five West Siders attended a hearing at 9:30 a. m., July 10, at 810 14th Strqet' to protest the proposed transfer of a 3.2 license from 220 Broadway to',1023 W: 8th Avenue. A number of West Siders spoke at the hearing and presented petitions with signatures- against the transfer. Only Mr. Morey Sharp, the holder of the 3.2 license, spoke in favor. He also presented a petition in favor. Mr. Sharp was not represented by an attorney.
Among those testifying were Mrs. Forrest. Swanson, vice-president of the West Side Improvement Association, and a neighborhood worker from the Westside Action Center. Concerns expressed by those from the neighborhood were that the transfer might increase drunkenness and disorderly behavior in the neighborhood, that the proposed location is too close to the Boys' Club, and that the increased availability might lead to a lowering of the moral fibre of young people in' the area. Mr. Sharp argued that he had a reputation for fairness and honesty and that he has never had any trouble in his establishments with either 3.2 licenses or regular tavern licenses. He felt that, if his place of business were opened at 1023 W. 8th Avenue; problems with, young people. would be, less because his cabaret would provide healthy entertainment which would keep them off the streets.
Mr. George Canjar, Deputy Manager of Safety and Excise, conducted the hearing. A decision on the application will be made at a later date by
EDITORIAL
ment Association, Florence Carlson."
We cannot locate Florence Carlson. She is not in our membership files and other sources have failed. Does Florence Carlson really exist? If so, we would like to meet her. Florence, dear girl, we
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park is set up to serve public housing residents in the area. There are 21 members on the Board1
of the Council. They, live in | cannot qfford Perry Mason and Lincoln or South Lincoln Park his private eye Paul Drake to
Homes. We are going to need the support and help of the residents of both projects in order to make the Christmas party for the children a success. Money from rummage or bake sales or bazaars goes toward expenses of the Council, including, the Christmas program. With the help of all the residents we can have a program for the children again this year.
Rumors Are Flying!
.Recently, there has been a rash of rumors in the area about Stokely Carmichael. About six weeks ago, a rumor began that he would be in town within a couple weeks. This rumor has proven to be false. More recently, someone started the rumor that Mr. Carmichael met Rodolfo "Corky" Gonzales when Mr. Gonzales was in New Mexico recently in connection with the .-upcoming trial of, Reyes Tijerina and others. When asked about this story, Mr. Gonzales: denied it,, point- blank. The- same people) apparently, are now saying that Carmichael1 will have a mass rally in Lincoln Park, followed by riots.
Of course Mr. Carmichael or anyone else may decide at some point to come to town, but it is clear that the people dreaming up his arrival at a definite" time were wrong. And the story about him and Mr. Gonzales is simply false. It is plain enough what those
spreading such rumors are up to. Right-thinking people will Mr. Hugh McCleam, Manager know better than to believe of Safety and Excise. such foolishness.
find you. Will you please contact us? It could be to our mutual interest. The office is located at 768 Santa Fe or call 244-330. L ,
CHURCH NEWS
ST. PETER'S
St. Peter's Episcopal Church will sponsor a rummage sale to be held August 3 and 4 at the Parish hall, 126 W. 2nd Ave. This sale will include many household items and children's school clothing. The sale will be at 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. The snack bar^will be In operation during the sale.
IGLESIA BETEL Rev. Mike Salazar, minister of Iglesia Betel de las Asam-bleas de Dios, West 2nd Avenue and Fox, announced the following summer schedule: Sunday'
10 a.m., ^Sunday School 2:30 p. mj Services in the southwest comer of Lincoln Park
7:30 p. m., Evangelistic Service
Tuesday
7:30 p. rn., Ladies' CM.F. Thursday-^- 'f-7:30 p. m., Young People's Meeting
FIRST MENNONITE The First Mennonite Church, 430 West 9th Avenue, will have their Vacation Bible School from July 31 to August 9, weekday evenings from 6:45 to 8:45 p. m. The Bibie School is open to all children from first to eighth grade. The Bible School project this year is the collection of Bibles for foreign missions.