Citation
West side recorder, August, 1967

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, August, 1967
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
August, 1967
THE RECORDER
Page Three
AURARIA COMMUNITY CENTER
Three families from Auraria attended Camp. Insmont sponsored by Denver Opportunity for Head Start families. .They were: Mr. and Mrs. Ralph
Gaschler, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lucero, Jr, and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Castellano and' their families.
At the camp, they were divided into groups according to age. The pre-schoolers were named Chipmunks, the elementary aged groups were called Badgers' and the older kids were named Eagles. The older boys and girls camped in tents, while the parents and babies slept in cabins. There were many interesting activities to enjoy for each age group, the children enjoyed crafts, games, etc., while the parents played games, went on hikes, and had evening activities. Babysitting was provided so that the parents could relax and enjoy themselves.
All the families ate together. The adults also discussed the Head Start program.
*
Members of "Mothers Morning Out" at Auraria Community Center announce their plans for fall. Every Thursday morning beginning September 28 the mothers will meet at 9:00 until 11:30. Half of the time will be spent doing pottery making, woodshop, first aid or cooking, and the other half the four groups will meet for coffee and discussions of topics of interest to-all of them such as home decorating and child behavior. Babysitting for preschool children will be provided. All west side mothers and grandmothers are invited to come.
f* ------------------
HEAD START NEWS
Mrs. Omega Van Velkin-burgh, parent program aide at Auraria Community Center wishes to thank all the Head Start parents from Auraria Community Center, for their cooperation and attendance in parent meetings and excursions throughout the past year. This has been a wonderful experience for me and I shall remember it always.
Auraria Head Start has ended their summer session with some very interesting trips. They visited Karl's Dairy, and went on a hayride and horseback riding in Castle Rock at the ranch of Robin Wellborn, a Head Start volunteer.
On August 10th they had graduation ceremonies at which the children received a scrapbook with their silhouette and a certificate for completing Head Stdrt lot 1967.
On Friday, August 11th they took their last trip which was a train trip to Winter Park where they enjpyed a picnic with parents and staff. They rettimed back to the Center by train at 3:30 p. m. and a good time
was had by all.
*
The staff at Auraria wishes to congratulate Alex Vigil on being elected to the West Side Action Council.
After a brief stay in the hospital, Barbara Maxie is back to work at Auraria. Welcome back Barbara, from the Auraria staff.
The dance sponsored by the Star Dusters of Auraria Com-munty Center was given as a benefit for the children's Christmas party at Lincoln Park Homes. The Question Marks played for the event. Members of the Star Dusters are Vivian Armstrong, Jewell* Ragland, Sharon Jones, Delores Arellano, Betty Headen, Ann Ragland, Given Elliston, Wanda Murray arid Connie Futtrell. Dorothy Clark has been assisting the group this summer.
The Auraria Neighborhood Group has recently been able to get credit accounts at Montgomery Wards. This group had tried getting credit at many other stores before being accepted at Wards. At present, six of the women in this group have a working credit account. They are having a ball getting their children ready for school. They have also been able to get a few nice things for themselves and homes. The Auraria Neighborhood Group has a lot to "offer women in the area. Meeting in the evening is convenient and some are learning to knit, also there is a workshop. During the Consumer Fair, they work ed with the Law Center arid the women put ori a skit on "How to Get Gyped in Buying Household Items." Also they went in a group to see the movie "The Bible" and had a Christmas party. This is a group. that is going forward. The Credit Bureau has been a big help. They checked the credit of the women. Some felt they might have a lot oi debts and not be able to get credit because of this. The Credit Bureau checked and helped these women by encouraging them.
Boys' Club Camp
Boys Club Camp started August 8th and will finish September 1st. Plenty of time to go to camp. So sign up at the Boys' Camp today. Free to all boys club members. Fun and good food, hiking, pool, basketball, boating and outside games. Fun for all boys. One week; leave Monday at 7:30 a. m. and come home Friday at 6:00 p: m.
The outstanding boy of the month for July was Louis Martinez. He lived at 766 Gala-pago and is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Martinez.
HEAD START ENDS SEWING CLASS WITH STYLE SHOW
Elati Head Start
The last day of the summer Head Start program at the Elati Center, 228 Elati St., was one of much excitement for the children as they started the day with a tour through the new low cost housing for the elderly located at Ellsworth and Cherokee, now near completion. For many of the children, the tour provided | many exciting "firsts" in their young lives. They rode an^elevator, saw the city from windows high above the- trees, examined new garbage disposals, showers, and different color schemes of the apartments, and watched an electrician at work. When they returned to the Center with their teacher Mrs. Leah Keller and teachor f aide Josephine Norman, they had, a party which they themselves had helped plan, making their own party hats and frosting their own cupcakes. The afternoon class with teacher Karen Ogata and teacher aide Genevieve Martinez also enjoyed the tour with party aifeiwards. "
bhhHI
Mrs. Jaramillo, Mrs. Ortega (teacher), Mrs. Maes, (parent representative), Mrs. Ruiz, Mrs. Ebell, and Mrs. Williams with their children.
Greenlee PTA
Greenlee PTA has lost two officers over the summer, and so far, no one has been found to fill these vacancies. With a new principal, Mr. Gorsline. coming to Greenlee, the PTA should be there to welcome him in full force. Many new and interesting ideas for PTA's are beginning to take form. This community will not be able to benefit unless volunteers offer their assistance in helping promote these ideas, as well as your own ideas.; The PTA is made up of parents, teachers and others in the; community. Jt can be success-, ful only when there is wide-parent participation and interest in improving your school and community. There will always be someone to help you carry out your duties so please don't use lack of knowledge about PTA's as an excuse for hot offering your services. There is a job for each of Us in the PTA. If you are interested in filling an office or giving general assistance, please leave your name, address and telephone number at the office of Greenlee School or call Mrs. Phyllis Bieber ,255-0137.
Earlier in August the parents and children of the Elati Street Head Start Center took a train trip to Pine Cliff near Boulder where they enjoyed a picnic and hike. The 22 adults ana 26 children returned to Denver by bus, stopping first at Central City.
This trip was just cne of the many activities enjoyed by parents and children of Head Start programs. A weekly discussion meeting is also held to give parents and teachers a chance to get acquainted, discuss problems, and plan family outings.
' Registration for the fall Head Start program at the Elati Center will be conducted the week of September 5. Children, age 4, can be enrolled by contacting Rose Lopez, program parent aide, at the Elati Head Start Center, 228 Elati, phone 722-4878. Classes will begin September 11.
ii
§i
Head Start children 1 model clothing made by their mothers in:class. _ ' If $
.. .. _. . ~ Our sewing class of Head
Baker Junior Hiah I Start mothers under the pat-^ ient direction of Mrs. Ortega
Eighth and ninth grade stu- has had a very successful year, dents' at Baker Jr'. High School I. -
wilt, conduct an' Orieniation for The last class which was on incoming : seventh graders in Tuesday, August 8, ended with advance of the opening of style show and a picnic school. Planning began, with "which was attended by 6 moth-student leaders, during the last rs an^ their children, school year. The purpose of ( Several ladies who were be-th orientation program is to ginners in sewing were very familiarize the new students; excited over their finished ar-with- the school building and I ficles. programs at Baker and to help!
students feel welcome and aj These pictures show only a part of the school. I part of our class. The follow*
Dates for the special orientation are set for August 30 and 31, with about 150 new students expected each day. Student leaders, who are being paid for their work, will meet on August 28 and 29 to complete the plans, rehearse their responsibilities and telephone the new seventh graders to remind them of the program. On the* orientation days, each of the student leaders will guide groups of about six new students in tours of the building and discussion of the school program, costs, lunchroom procedures and other topics. Lunch will be provided for all students who attend and after lunch a skit on school life will be presented by the student leaders.
ing names are parents who be long to this class: Mrs. Antoinette Maes, parent representative; Lupi Medina, Lula Adams, Marcella DeLeon, Loretta Williams, Mary Williams, Frances Ebell, Beverly Billingslee, Amelia Zamora, Patricia Boots, Josephine Ruiz, Olive jaramil--lo, Pauline Ruiz, Mrs. Kirby,, .'ranees Martinez and Delores Salazar. There are other names not available at this time.
Loretha Williams
St Cajetan Bazaar Successful
Rev. Max Santamaria, pastor of StCajetan's Catholic Church, and the Bazaar Committee, wish to express their sincerest theimks to everyone's cooperation toward helping make their bazaar such a big success.
Winner of the 1967 Chevelle Sports Coupe was Rosendo Medinq, 357 Inca Street.
BAKER JUNIOR HIGH COMMUNITY AIDES
Community aid.es &pip. Bak-. er Junior High School are continuing 'their work in helping with school problems in the area. John Doyle, Community Organizer, can be contacted through the school, phone 222-9718. Aides can be reached through the school or at home to discuss school related problems. Mrs. Rodriguez, 953 Clay Way (phone 255-0119) works in the Fairview School area. Mrs. Garcia, 418 Santa Fe Drive (phone 255-1259) represents the Fairmont and Elmwood districts. Mr. Soliz, 940 11th St. (phone 255-8474) works in the;from
Greenlee and Baker areas.
HOUSEHOLD
TIPS
Removing Summer's Green*
Picnic time usually means grass stains on clothes'. How to remove them? For washable fabrics, the U. S. Department of Agriculture recommends working a detergent into the stain and rinse. If stain remains, use a chlorine or so* dium perborate bleach or hydrogen peroxide. But don't use a chlorine bleach on silks, woofs, or special finishes. Read the labels on wash-and-wear fabrics to see if a chlorine bleach is safe to use. Treat grass stains on non-washable fabrics the samebut try alcohol first, if it's safe for the dye. Use one part alcohol to two parts water for stains on an acetate fabric. For all stain removal rememberit's best to work the wrong side of the
fabric.


Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 4, Number 4
Monthly Newspaper of the Wesf Side Improvement Association
August, 1967
RESULTS OF ACTION COUNCIL ELECTIONS
Election of members of the Westside Action Council took place on Monday, July 31. Eleven residents and six agency representatives were elected:
Tract 12Phillip Torres, 1033 9th St.
Tract 18 -^r; Henry Maestas, 1070 Inca St.; Louis Sanchez, .731 Galapago St.
Tract 19Donald Gallegos, 1237 West 10th Ave.; Albert Martinez, 1115 W. 10th Ave.; Christine DeLeon, 1129 W. 13th Ave.
Tract 20Silfred Ramos, 1333 Cherokee St.
Tract 21 Mark Jararmillo, 239 Bannock St.; Phil Sanchez, 538 Galapago St.; Leo Sullivan, 282 Tnca St.; Charles Ramon, 115 Galapago St.
Agency Representatives:
Alex Vigil, Auraria Community Center; Rev. James Nugent, St. Joseph's Church; Rev. John Ventura, The First Mennonite Church; Moses Cisneros, Fairmont Recreation Center; Sister Rose, St. Elizabeth's Catholic Church; George Chavez, Safeway Stores.
Only 74*8 voters went to the polls in Target Area E this year, compared with 1,236 voters last year.
Action Center Grand Opening
The West Side Action Coun- j cil had their grand opening' Saturday, July 29th. Participating in the ribbon cutting ceremonies were Donald. Gallegos, Westside Action Council Chairman, and Anthony Augustine. Also attending: Representative MiHlred Cresswell of Denver County, Bernard Valdez, Manager of Welfare, Don Waddell, Welfare Department, Bill Miller of the Mayor's Office, Michael C. Moore of Den* ver Opportunity and other various board members of D. O,
Refreshments were served punch, cookies, and cold-cuts to
West Side Schools Included In Bond Issue
PUBLIC SCHOOL REGISTRATION
Registration of pupils NEW to the Denver Public Schools is scheduled for_ the two-week per-, iod, August 2-1 through September L ALL NEW pupils should register at the school they are to attend; this includes kindergarten pupils who must be five (5) years old on or before October 15. All new pupils should bring proof of age with them, either a birth certificate or other record.
Dropouts who are returning to school#;pupils under limited open enrollment, and transfers
j A bond issue proposal, including improvements at West High School and1 replacement of Elmwood Elementary School, has been presented to the Board of Education. The five-year plan includes the following recommendations in the West Side:
West High Schooladd industrial arts and physical education facilities.
Expand the site, ming pool.
Add swim-
Kenneih Braxton
Continuing Education
Kenneth Braxton, son. of Mrs.
Geneva Braxton of 1329 Navajo Street, will be entering Rangely. Junior College in Rangely, Colorado, September 18, 1967. His goal is to become,
a. teacher. He is a 1967 grad-tin centers, veteran's benefits, uaie -of West High School. emergency services.
the over 200 people who visit-] from onfe Denver public school ed the Center. . j to another also are urged to
j register -during this two-week period1.
West Side Action Center is funded through Denver Opportunity to serve as a liaison between .the poor and the agencies. Out of the 500 families we have served; we have found out that they do not know the resources in the community so, therefore, we have been a great service to them in cutting the red tape and sending them ta_the...right agency. Information' and help are available related to civil rights, welfare, eelucqtion, employment, health, HeadStart, housing, legal service s,'mental health, personal recognizance bonds, public de* fender,! social security, recrea-
West Side Letter Carrier Retires
T. "Toddy" Tautfest (center) with Retirement Committee members George Lowe, Jr (left) and Julian Kreoger
New high school registrants are urged to register as soon as possible to allow time for evaluation of their previous credits and possible testing.
Persons new to Denver can find out the name and location of the school they are to attend' by calling the School Administration Building, 266-2255, or ariy Denver public school.
c^FlRSCJ^^^JWEE^IESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6-All Sehver Public (School pupils report to school at 8:45 a. md far class assignments. School buses will .follow regular routes EXCEPT buses for special education pupils which will begin on September 11. Pupils will be dismissed by noon on this day to return at the regular time on Monday, September 11.
REGULAR SESSIONS, SEPTEMBER .11All students begin regular sessions at their assigned schools on Monday, September 11, at 8:45 a. m.
Opportunity School, day division will conduct- registration for classes on Wednesday, September 6, from 8:45 a. m. to 3:00 p. m. -The evening division of Opportunity School will conduct its registration on Thursday^ September 7, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.J in.
3.2 Beer License Denied
In the Matter of the application of Morey Sharp for transfer of his fermented malt beverage (3.2% beer) license from 220 Broadway to 1023 W. 8th Avenue, and for issuance of a Glass "E" Cabaret license at 1023 West 8th Avenue, Denver, Colorado: The neighborhood does not need this outlet and the residents of this area do not desire it ... In addition to the fact that the testimony in this case and the decisions indicate that approval of this application would aggravate a public safety problem, we have,a clear indication that the residents of this area ate opposed' to the approval of 'this; application The opposition of the residents of the neigh* borhood was bolstered by the opposition of neighborhood organizations which apparently have as their aim the overall betterment of this portion of town. Both the West Side Action Center and the West Side Improvement Association had representatives testify in opposition to this application.
The application to transfer location is, therefore, denied.
from the decision of HUGH MaCLEARN Manager of Safety and Excise
ElmwoodReplace building. Site location to be determined.
The total school construction cost for the next five years is suggested as $41,482,500. For the West Side area, $4,679,500 is recommended. In addition to improvements at the high school, three elementary ;sGhopls are to be replaced (Elmwood, Eagieton and Sherman); additions are planned ior two elementary schools (Alameda and Cowell); and one' elementary school is to be eliminated (Evans).
To pay for the building projects, a bond issue of $30,000-000 has been recommended, involving a ,mill levy increase of less than one mill on property taxes. The present capital Reserve Fund in the school budget would be continued to provide the remaining $11,500-000 over the five-year period.
L. T. "Toddy" Tautfest, a Letter Carrier in the Denver Post Office for 32. years retired July
1, 1967. Toddy carried mail in West Denver, for qyer 28 years. He carried mail -for this area from the Main Office,. then in 1946 when the carriers were first assigned at the old Santa Fe Station at 901 Santa Fe Drive. He remained at Santa Fe Station when the Station was moved to 815 Santa Fe Drive, and retired from the new station at 1350 Santa Fe Drive. His route always remained in approximately the same territory, around Denver General
Hospital. Also from June 1943 to December 1945 he served in the Navy as a Mail Man and was stationed in the South Pacific.
On July 15, 1967, the employees at Santa Fe Station and former employees honored Toddy with a retirement dinner. The Retirement Committee was composed of George Lowe, Jr. and Julian Kreoger, both long time carriers on the West Side. Toddy was presented with a plaque from the employees of the Station by Mr. Robert Cocke, Assistant Postmaster of the Denver Post Office.
Cars Removed From Fire'Station Lot
Latest Chapter in the continued story of the old fire station
August 9* 1 old ecus were cleared off the lot at 3rd Avenue and Cherokee St., following the issuance of an injunction against the Pappy Fry Development Co., requested1 by the Zoning Administration. Appearance of the area is much improved except for high weeds on the lots. Continued vigil-lance will be required. Thanks to Tony Jansen, Zoning Administrator.
Inner City Parish Dinner
A benefit Dinner and Dance to raise funds for the Community Food Bank will be held at the Inner City Parish, 9th and Galapago on Friday, August 25 at 6 p. m. There will be a chicken dinner and enchiladas1 with entertainment and dancing following1 the dinner. Cost is $1.00 for adults and 50c for children under 12. Tickets can be purchased from the Parish office, or staff members. Tickets will also be available at the door.
The summer program of the Parish will come to a close on Friday, August 18th and will reopen after Labor Day. The Wednesday morning community meetings and the Tuesday morning Rummage Sales will continue as usual.
For several years the New Elmwood Committee of the West Side Improvement Asso-ciaiion has urged the Board of Education to provide adequate lacriities at Elmwood School, ihe Improvement Association has gone on record in support of a bond issue which will in- elude a appropriate I improvements The Board of Education must still decide on a date for the bond election, probably in October. School improvements are needed throughout the city. This time, the West Side must be, included, and with enough attention to merit our support.
Mr. and Mrs. Martinez Attended G. I. Forum Convention
Mr. and Mrs. Alfonso Martinez and family attended the G. I. Forum National Convention which was held the 3rd, 4th and, 5th of August. | It was held at the Albany Hotel and the Queen Ball was held at the Hliton Hotel. About 1,550 were in attendance at this year's convention. Miss California won the title of Miss G. I. Forum. Guest speakers were* Lt. Gov. Mark Hogan and Dr. Hector Garcia, founder of the G. I. Forum.


Pag Two
HE RECORDER
August, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West Sid Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phone 244-3301
Editor: Erma Jean Harris Assistant Editor:
Jaye Martinez
Staff Reporters:
Rose Gomez, Iris Hewlings. Margot Serumaard, Mildred Tordan, Juanita Winterhalder
'TteiqMon&aecl 'Ttotet
Louie and Gloria Gonzales became the proud parents of a baby girl bom July 12, 1967, Now living on 9th and Kala-math, they have both been liv-
EDITORIAL
Officials of Denver Opportunity express surprise and disappointment at the small turnout of voters for the Action Councils on July 31. In all five Target Areas, the number of voters this year was 17 per cent less than last year; in Target Area E (West Side), a 40 per cent drop in voters was recorded.
It should be no surprise that citizen interest in voting is decreasing rapidly. Several reasons can be given.
1. A year ago, the elected Action Councils were ready and anxious to begin planning for programs and services. Months of busy-work followed, with thick and wordy applications to be reviewed, almost overnight, but with little real ^attention paid to the ideas and knowledge that local representatives had to offer. Action Councils have been accepted as necessary for the formalities of "representation of the poor," but the real action is organized in the D. O. office, without involving the neighborhoods.
2. In spite of much talk about Action Centers and services in Target Areas, almost a year passed after the 1966 elections until the Centers were opened.. Even yet the Action Council programs are not operating with all the proposed programs
Aragon Grand-Daughter in Book
Caryn Marie Sanchez, grand-i
WEDDING SELLS
Nancy Urtado will become* the bride of John Harlan U.S.. N.R. on August 26, 1967, The' bride will be attired in oc white cotton lace street length dress with white accessories/ A reception will be held after the ceremony at the bride's; homo for the immediate families, after which the couple will leave for San Diego, California. Nancy, presently employed at Auraria, will be attending Mesa Jr. College in San Diego.
Out of town guests will be the groom's parents who will fly in from Iowa for the ceremony.
mg in the West Side all their Tfle neighborhood has not yet felt much impact from the ser- daughter of ^ ^ 'Mrs_
lives,
Mrs. Mattie Cochran and daughter Helen of 242 Cherokee enjoyed a week in Chicago, Illinois and vicinity. They flew by jet and enjoyed the trip very much.
Mr. and Mrs. Wiliam Reis-burg of 227 Cherokee Street recently rerturned from a trip to Minnesota.
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Rios of 229 Cherokee enjoyed a trip to California.
Mr. and Mrs. Cariell Russell and children of 231 Cherokee St., are enjoying a trip to Missouri.
Mr. and Mrs. Moses Haro and family of 233 West 3rd Ave. enjoyed a weekend Glenwood, Colorado.
Mrs. Helen Burke of 226 Cherokee and Mrs. Mattie Cochran enjoyed a trip to Estes Park on August 6.
Mrs. Rhym who recently moved from Lincoln Park Homes was very active in the Lincoln and South JJncoln Park Resident Council. However, she will continue to be active with the PTA's and Girl Scouts in the area.
Pfc. William B. Gallegos U. S. M. C., son of Mrs. Ellen Gallegos and brother to Irene Gallegos of 863 Fox St, was wounded in Vietnam. He is being treated aboard the hospital ship USS Tripole. This is the second time he has been wounded.
After a two week vacation n Los Angeles, Tijuana, and Das Vegas, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lucero Jr. have returned to their home at 1411 Lipcm Street.
Reverend Joe Kamman of th: Wesley Methodist Church left July 25th for Indianapolis, Indiana. He was transferred to the Lawrence Methodist Church of that city.
vices. When residents were asked to go to the polls on July 31, the common response was: "Why should I vote? We're not getting anything out of it.'
3. It has apparently been assumed by D. O. that the elected Action Councils can be ignored because staff members have been hired from the neighborhood. The functions of the Councils, as advisory and policy-making bodies representing the community, are different from the function of employees, representing D. O. Real respect for residents of Target Areas would mean involving the representatives, not ignoring them or manipulating them.
4. As for the election itself, the Action Councils did not even have a chance to plan for their own election.. Plans were made downtown, and approved by the D. O. Board, without consulting the Councils. Consequently, the poor showing at .the polls reflects on D. O-'s lack of effectiveness in reaching the Target Area resident.
Blame certainly cannot be placed on the Councils, because they did not have a chance to develop the procedures or philosophy. (Last year, a neigborhood committee in the West Side worked hard to plan the election; results were much better.) Communication is a two-way process, not just from the top down.
mon Aragon of ,1049 Kalamath has been chosen as one of
three children in a kindergar-| ten and pre-kindergarten book; coiled The Three Baby Chicks. | Caryn's father is a graduate of West High School and Colo-, rado State College in Greeley.
Caryn's family now lives in j West Covina, California.
Mrs. Joanne Brown of Evergreen, Colorado, visited Velva
Mrs. Tony Valanzuela and Judy Gallardo of 1251 Kala-Mrs. Dolores Dominguez, twin math is home recovering from daughters of Mr. and Mrs. El-.a serious operation, mer Salazar celebrated their:
21st birthdays with their families at 338 Delaware on August 10th.
Mrs. Lee Williams of 1433 Mariposa St., has returned home from a trip to Millen, Georgia, where her father who. was 97 years old passed away.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Spotts-wood of 1038 W. 13th Ave.' and his family all gathered together for a barbecue. There were 7 grandchildren, 6 great grandchildren, two daughters and their husbands, and son, and this is the first time the entire family has gotten together for some time. The family all live in different parts of the country.
Mrs. Lulu Young of 241 Inca street Was hostess to Mrs. May Day, Mrs. Ira Davis, Mrs. lone Schroeder and Mrs. Esther Sullivan at a dinner at the Little Banquet followed by a grand touting through the suburbs.
Arthur Serumgard of 1247 Lipan is home after a long stay at the VA Hospital. He is progressing rapidly. His many friends and well wishers are so glad he is recovering.
Mrs. May Day of 138 West 1st Ave., had luncheon andNa short visit with relatives at the Albany Hotel. They were en route from New York to Utah. Said they suffered hot weather all the way.
Denise Rhym Attends Scout Conference
Miss Denise Rhym of 1338 Navajo was selected to attend] the National Girl Scout Inner City Conference to be held at Indianapolis, Indiana, August 7 to 17. She is a member of Cadette Troop No. 726 and will enter a Senior Troop in the fall. She will be accompanied by one adult, Mrs. Barbara Packer from Denver, and a Senior Scout, Miss Marcia Munson, from Boulder. The job of the team has been to gather information about agencies, problems of residents special Girl Scout projects, and roles of women in the Inner City. Some of their materials and information were derived from Auraria Community Center, West Side Improvement Association,, the West Side Recorder, and the Inner-City Parish.
Before returning home, Denise will visit her aunt,- Mrs. Florence Burrell in Lawrenceville, Illinois.
She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Shelley Rhym.
LEGION POST SPONSORS MASS
Joe P. Martinez American Legion Post No. 204, is sponsoring a high mass on Sunday, August 27, at 10:00 a. m_ The mass will be held in Joe P. Martinez Park, 9th Avenuo and Perry Street.
Regular -meetings of the Joe-P. Martinez Post are held at 80S Santa Fe Drive, on the first. Friday of each month at 7:30-p. m.
Mr. Robert C. Stark Jr. of Castle Rock and his wife left recently for Lubbock, Texas,
to finish his Air Force train- Miss Judy Stark of Ft. Collins, ing. He is the grandson of the granddaughter of Mr. and Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Churchill Mrs. Churchill of 1209 Lipcm,
of 1209 Upon Street.
Mrs. Mary Treadway and three sons were here from Burbank, California, visiting Mr,
ieaves soon fcwr Alaska to take up a teaching post this fall.
Rosalie Soriano, daughter ol Mr and Mrs. Elmer Salazar, of 338 Delaware St., graduated from nurses aide training at St. Anthony's Hospital on August 10th, 1967.
Trash Burning Questioned
Is there a law gbpitf fcosh
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Mqrrulfp., . 0 1 , II
and Mrs. Elmer Me Upon Street She spent a can be done about promiscuous
week here. Mrs. Treadway is f?JmlY are from Galt, Illinois. feygjBi MBBfc 21------------- H
the sister of Mrs. Medina. A Afl the family is haying very nice picnic was enjoyed wonderful^ time sightseeing and by all in the mountains.
burning? Please answer.
A. The hours for burning relatives trash are from 1 to 6 oclock
also visiting other
here. Mrs. Marruffo is a sis- unless otherwise instructed, ter to Christine DeLeon of 1129 Channel 7, 11 oclock news Mr. and Mrs. Inez Apodacajw. 13th Ave. giving daily infor-
of 1244 Lipan Street will havej company from Hawthorne,Cal-!
Farrow of 1248 Lipan Street I ifomia, Mr. Ortiz and Mrs. A1 Mr. and Mrs. A1 Vigil of 1328 the days and they both painted the out-1 Castaneda and daughter. They Kalamath are proud grandpar- | ter the side walls of
house. , ust.
motion on this. They will only give information now on you cant bum. Af-
Senior Citizens
Although no regular meetings: oi the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club are scheduled for July and August, the club was-entertained Friday, July 28th* at the South Ogden Street home-of Mrs. Lynn Bradley, club coordinator. A cook out lunch, hamburgers with all the fixings, was served on the patio^
Mr. and Mrs. Lorens Olsen* 1406 Navajo Street, returned July 9th from Kearney, Nebraska, where they attended a family reunion. Mrs. Olsen was one of thirteen brothers and sisters, eleven of whom survive. In all 128 family members were present.
Mrs. Anna Olderog, 1351 Mariposa St., grandmother of Mrs. Jeannette Lewis, Derby* died of a heart attack, Monday, July ;f7th, at St; Luke's Hospital. She was eighty-three years old. Mrs. Olderog had lived mostly in the west side area since 1911. She was a member of St. Peter's Episcopal church and was active in the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club.
Mrs. Anna M. O'Neill, 1427 Mariposa St, wishes to thank |jj her friends for the flowers and other expressions of sympathy for the death of her son, Eugene A. O'Neill. He had been a resident of the west side all his life. He passed away suddenly in his home of a heart .attack July 12th.
__________________ _ __ first of the year,
Mrs. Farrow's! will arrive on the 13th of Aug- entsof a new grandson named; there will be no trash burning
Christopher Carey. I allowed at all.
lessons in Make-Up
A. lesson in makeup for women over 50 will be presented at 2:30 p. m., August 28 at Coordinated Services for the Aging Community Center, 1620 Meade Street. Merle Norman Studio of Arvada will conduct the lesson. Senior citizens throughout the metropolitan area are invited to attend. Who can afford not to look her best?


August, 1967
THE RECORDER
Page Three
AURARIA COMMUNITY CENTER
Three families from Auraria attended Camp. Insmont sponsored by Denver Opportunity for Head Start families. .They were: Mr. and Mrs. Ralph
Gaschler, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lucero, Jr, and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Castellano and' their families.
At the camp, they were divided into groups according to age. The pre-schoolers were named Chipmunks, the elementary aged groups were called Badgers' and the older kids were named Eagles. The older boys and girls camped in tents, while the parents and babies slept in cabins. There were many interesting activities to enjoy for each age group, the children enjoyed crafts, games, etc., while the parents played games, went on hikes, and had evening activities. Babysitting was provided so that the parents could relax and enjoy themselves.
All the families ate together. The adults also discussed the Head Start program.
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Members of "Mothers Morning Out" at Auraria Community Center announce their plans for fall. Every Thursday morning beginning September 28 the mothers will meet at 9:00 until 11:30. Half of the time will be spent doing pottery making, woodshop, first aid or cooking, and the other half the four groups will meet for coffee and discussions of topics of interest to-all of them such as home decorating and child behavior. Babysitting for preschool children will be provided. All west side mothers and grandmothers are invited to come.
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HEAD START NEWS
Mrs. Omega Van Velkin-burgh, parent program aide at Auraria Community Center wishes to thank all the Head Start parents from Auraria Community Center, for their cooperation and attendance in parent meetings and excursions throughout the past year. This has been a wonderful experience for me and I shall remember it always.
Auraria Head Start has ended their summer session with some very interesting trips. They visited Karl's Dairy, and went on a hayride and horseback riding in Castle Rock at the ranch of Robin Wellborn, a Head Start volunteer.
On August 10th they had graduation ceremonies at which the children received a scrapbook with their silhouette and a certificate for completing Head Stdrt lot 1967.
On Friday, August 11th they took their last trip which was a train trip to Winter Park where they enjpyed a picnic with parents and staff. They rettimed back to the Center by train at 3:30 p. m. and a good time
was had by all.
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The staff at Auraria wishes to congratulate Alex Vigil on being elected to the West Side Action Council.
After a brief stay in the hospital, Barbara Maxie is back to work at Auraria. Welcome back Barbara, from the Auraria staff.
The dance sponsored by the Star Dusters of Auraria Com-munty Center was given as a benefit for the children's Christmas party at Lincoln Park Homes. The Question Marks played for the event. Members of the Star Dusters are Vivian Armstrong, Jewell* Ragland, Sharon Jones, Delores Arellano, Betty Headen, Ann Ragland, Given Elliston, Wanda Murray arid Connie Futtrell. Dorothy Clark has been assisting the group this summer.
The Auraria Neighborhood Group has recently been able to get credit accounts at Montgomery Wards. This group had tried getting credit at many other stores before being accepted at Wards. At present, six of the women in this group have a working credit account. They are having a ball getting their children ready for school. They have also been able to get a few nice things for themselves and homes. The Auraria Neighborhood Group has a lot to "offer women in the area. Meeting in the evening is convenient and some are learning to knit, also there is a workshop. During the Consumer Fair, they work ed with the Law Center arid the women put ori a skit on "How to Get Gyped in Buying Household Items." Also they went in a group to see the movie "The Bible" and had a Christmas party. This is a group. that is going forward. The Credit Bureau has been a big help. They checked the credit of the women. Some felt they might have a lot oi debts and not be able to get credit because of this. The Credit Bureau checked and helped these women by encouraging them.
Boys' Club Camp
Boys Club Camp started August 8th and will finish September 1st. Plenty of time to go to camp. So sign up at the Boys' Camp today. Free to all boys club members. Fun and good food, hiking, pool, basketball, boating and outside games. Fun for all boys. One week; leave Monday at 7:30 a. m. and come home Friday at 6:00 p: m.
The outstanding boy of the month for July was Louis Martinez. He lived at 766 Gala-pago and is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Martinez.
HEAD START ENDS SEWING CLASS WITH STYLE SHOW
Elati Head Start
The last day of the summer Head Start program at the Elati Center, 228 Elati St., was one of much excitement for the children as they started the day with a tour through the new low cost housing for the elderly located at Ellsworth and Cherokee, now near completion. For many of the children, the tour provided | many exciting "firsts" in their young lives. They rode an^elevator, saw the city from windows high above the- trees, examined new garbage disposals, showers, and different color schemes of the apartments, and watched an electrician at work. When they returned to the Center with their teacher Mrs. Leah Keller and teachor f aide Josephine Norman, they had, a party which they themselves had helped plan, making their own party hats and frosting their own cupcakes. The afternoon class with teacher Karen Ogata and teacher aide Genevieve Martinez also enjoyed the tour with party aifeiwards. "
bhhHI
Mrs. Jaramillo, Mrs. Ortega (teacher), Mrs. Maes, (parent representative), Mrs. Ruiz, Mrs. Ebell, and Mrs. Williams with their children.
Greenlee PTA
Greenlee PTA has lost two officers over the summer, and so far, no one has been found to fill these vacancies. With a new principal, Mr. Gorsline. coming to Greenlee, the PTA should be there to welcome him in full force. Many new and interesting ideas for PTA's are beginning to take form. This community will not be able to benefit unless volunteers offer their assistance in helping promote these ideas, as well as your own ideas.; The PTA is made up of parents, teachers and others in the; community. Jt can be success-, ful only when there is wide-parent participation and interest in improving your school and community. There will always be someone to help you carry out your duties so please don't use lack of knowledge about PTA's as an excuse for hot offering your services. There is a job for each of Us in the PTA. If you are interested in filling an office or giving general assistance, please leave your name, address and telephone number at the office of Greenlee School or call Mrs. Phyllis Bieber ,255-0137.
Earlier in August the parents and children of the Elati Street Head Start Center took a train trip to Pine Cliff near Boulder where they enjoyed a picnic and hike. The 22 adults ana 26 children returned to Denver by bus, stopping first at Central City.
This trip was just cne of the many activities enjoyed by parents and children of Head Start programs. A weekly discussion meeting is also held to give parents and teachers a chance to get acquainted, discuss problems, and plan family outings.
' Registration for the fall Head Start program at the Elati Center will be conducted the week of September 5. Children, age 4, can be enrolled by contacting Rose Lopez, program parent aide, at the Elati Head Start Center, 228 Elati, phone 722-4878. Classes will begin September 11.
ii
§i
Head Start children 1 model clothing made by their mothers in:class. _ ' If $
.. .. _. ~ Our sewing class of Head
Baker Junior Hiah I Start mothers under the pat-^ ient direction of Mrs. Ortega
Eighth and ninth grade stu- has had a very successful year, dents' at Baker Jr'. High School I. -
wilt, conduct an' Orieniation for The last class which was on incoming : seventh graders in Tuesday, August 8, ended with advance of the opening of style show and a picnic school. Planning began, with "which was attended by 6 moth-student leaders, during the last rs an^ their children, school year. The purpose of ( Several ladies who were be-th orientation program is to ginners in sewing were very familiarize the new students; excited over their finished ar-with- the school building and I ficles. programs at Baker and to help!
students feel welcome and aj These pictures show only a part of the school. I part of our class. The follow*
Dates for the special orientation are set for August 30 and 31, with about 150 new students expected each day. Student leaders, who are being paid for their work, will meet on August 28 and 29 to complete the plans, rehearse their responsibilities and telephone the new seventh graders to remind them of the program. On the* orientation days, each of the student leaders will guide groups of about six new students in tours of the building and discussion of the school program, costs, lunchroom procedures and other topics. Lunch will be provided for all students who attend and after lunch a skit on school life will be presented by the student leaders.
ing names are parents who be long to this class: Mrs. Antoinette Maes, parent representative; Lupi Medina, Lula Adams, Marcella DeLeon, Loretta Williams, Mary Williams, Frances Ebell, Beverly Billingslee, Amelia Zamora, Patricia Boots, Josephine Ruiz, Olive jaramil--lo, Pauline Ruiz, Mrs. Kirby,, .'ranees Martinez and Delores Salazar. There are other names not available at this time.
Loretha Williams
St Cajetan Bazaar Successful
Rev. Max Santamaria, pastor of StCajetan's Catholic Church, and the Bazaar Committee, wish to express their sincerest theimks to everyone's cooperation toward helping make their bazaar such a big success.
Winner of the 1967 Chevelle Sports Coupe was Rosendo Medinq, 357 Inca Street.
BAKER JUNIOR HIGH COMMUNITY AIDES
Community aid.es &pip. Bak-. er Junior High School are continuing 'their work in helping with school problems in the area. John Doyle, Community Organizer, can be contacted through the school, phone 222-9718. Aides can be reached through the school or at home to discuss school related problems. Mrs. Rodriguez, 953 Clay Way (phone 255-0119) works in the Fairview School area. Mrs. Garcia, 418 Santa Fe Drive (phone 255-1259) represents the Fairmont and Elmwood districts. Mr. Soliz, 940 11th St. (phone 255-8474) works in the;from
Greenlee and Baker areas.
HOUSEHOLD
TIPS
Removing Summer's Green*
Picnic time usually means grass stains on clothes'. How to remove them? For washable fabrics, the U. S. Department of Agriculture recommends working a detergent into the stain and rinse. If stain remains, use a chlorine or so* dium perborate bleach or hydrogen peroxide. But don't use a chlorine bleach on silks, woofs, or special finishes. Read the labels on wash-and-wear fabrics to see if a chlorine bleach is safe to use. Treat grass stains on non-washable fabrics the samebut try alcohol first, if it's safe for the dye. Use one part alcohol to two parts water for stains on an acetate fabric. For all stain removal rememberit's best to work the wrong side of the
fabric.


S*age Fou
August, 1967
Advertisements
JOB WANTED
Want steady job, full or part lime. Day or night. Babysitting, ironing, cleaning. Live out. Vicinity of 1035 W. 8th Ave.
*
TRAILER RENTAL "Harold's Shamrock Service "You Haul Trailers"
501 Kalamath, phone 623-9845
The Recorder is now carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 30c per line, $.50 minimum. Box 50% extra. Bold face35c a line.
Ads must be brought to the office of the West Side Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Drive, by the 10th of each month. Payment for the ad must be made at the same time the ad is brought in.
The Recorder is offering this service to the community feeling that it will be useful to our readers.
TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL ^DENVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL EXHIBIT
Beginning Sunday, August 20, the annual Denver Public Schools Exhibit opens in the windows of the May-D&F store at Sixteenth and Tremont Sts. Last year it is estimated more than 200,000 persons viewed the exhibit. This year's exhibit, which will run through August 27, marks the twenty-seveiith year of the display.
Pupil .demonstrations will be given in the windows: daily from 9:30 a. m. to 3:37 p. m., Monday, August 21, through Saturday, August 26.
WESTSIDE STORY,
Young Adult Center
Recreation Hours: 4-11 p. m. Phone 222-6398 912 Galapago St.
Age Required: 16-23 years Position: To try and help find employment for young adults Recreation: Varies
The Young Adult Center is especially designed for young adults in the West Denver area, who are seeking employ-.ment.. The Center is well supervised. There is staff to help with supervision of Cen-'ter activities and Saturday night dances at the Center.
Anyone interested is asked to call Ernest Quintana, at 222-6398
BYERS LIBRARY
W. 7th Ave. & Santa Fe Drive Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 2-5:30 p.m. Sat. 10 c.m<-12 noon and 1-5:30 p.m. Closed Wednesdays.
"COOL BOOKS FOR HOT DAYS" certainly help to make jne feel cooler even if temperatures don't drop. Some of the following books are new and some are old, several are fiction, and three are exciting true stories. Why not cry these for a summer chiller?
GRUE OF ICE by Geoffrey Jenkins, does cause chills because it is a novel of suspense and terror in the Antarctic. Here the mystery of the sea is real and still unsolved. Conflict between a happy marriage and a winter's love occurs in an icy French resort town during the Christmas holidays in a book by the name, A WINTER'S LOVE, by Madeleine L'Engle.
Edna Ferber's story, THE ICE PALACE, covers two generations in an exciting adventure and love account of Alaskan families.
An icy, howling storm cut the Mercer family off from the outside world in the suspenseful BLIZZARD, by Phil Strong. They just happened to have guests at the time, plus many odd characters driven in by the storm. Things were bound to happen, and they did!
Nathaniel Benchley relates an unusual story in his humorous A WINTER'S TALE. An old maid is hired to put on a series of plays off the coast of New England during the dead of winter. The unexpected keeps happening throughout this witty story. Adventure, served through missions of mercy in deep snow-, frigid temperatures, sorrow and laughter, is the fine non-fiction account of A NURSE IN THE YUKON, by Amy V. Wilson, R. N.
WANDER 'THROUGH WINTER is Edwin W. Teale's exciting record of a naturalist's 20,000 mile journey through the North American winter. The book is full of outstanding photographs of winter scenes, animals, and nature.
An enchanting account of a young family's Alaskan adventure makes one forget August temperatures in FOLLOW THE NORTH STAR by Toy Thomas. The descriptive account of cold winter days is so well done that you might have to put on your sweater! All of these books are at Byers Neighborhood Library. Come in and cool off!
LARASA Appoints Charles Tafoya
METRO STATE COLLEGE REGISTRATION SET
Charles Tafoya, 841 Bronco Road, has been appointed director of LARASA (Latin A-merican Research and Service Agency). The appointment became effective August 1, LARASA Board President Don Pacheco announced.
The Metropolitan State College 1967-68 catalog is now available at the Office of Admissions, 250 West 14th Ave nue, Denver.
Dean Harold Benn, editor of the catalog, reports that 387 courses are listed'. Junior courses will be taught for the first time this fall, and senior courses will be offered in 196.8.
Students may now work for either a bachelor's degree, or for an associate degree which can be earned in two years.
Arts and sciences courses are offered' in anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, economics, education, English, French, German, Spanish, geology, history, mathematics, music, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, sociology, speech, and health, physical education and recreation.
There are numerous applied sciences vocational technical programs which emphasize preparation for an occupation.
The fall quarter starts, with placement tests September 11-
Formerly a consultant with the Denver Commission on Community Relations, Tafoya is a member of the Mile High United Way Board of trustees,
a board member and treasurer q^Yoilowed by new'student
NEW X-RAY TECHNICIAN TRAINING PROGRAM ANNOUNCED
A new college-affiliated X-ray Technician Training program has been announced by Denver General Hospital and Metropolitan State College.
During a 33-month, period, students will take courses at the college and serve an in-terneship at the hospital. They will be awarded an associate degree upon successful completion of the course work and training, and graduates will be eligible to take the registry examination to become licensed x-ray technicians.
Persons interested in the program should contact the Office of Admissions of Metropolitan State College as soon as possible. Admission to the program will be based on meeting entrance requirements of the college and being acceptable to representatives of the hospital. Only a limited number of students can be enrolled.
A tour through the Air Force Academy is planned for August 17 for teenagers and young /adults of the Wqst Side. Buses will leave from the Inner City Protestant Parish,- 910 .Galapa- go at 9 a. m. This tour is be-:img sponsored, by, the West ;Side Young Adult Center. For -.more informaton and details, 'you may call 222-6398.'
The Young Adult Center, 912 Galapago, which opened recently, is in need of a pool table, juke box, and records. If you have, and would like to donate, any of these items, please contact Ernest Quintana, 222-6398.
DENVER ART MUSEUM
The Denver Art Museum now offers "Recent Accessions in Twentieth Century .Art" on view in. Schleier Gallery. It includes some pf the well known names -in the field of modem art: Roualt, Grosz, Mondrian, Leger, Modigliani, Chagall, Braque, Klee, Dubuffet and, of course, Picasso. There are also paintings, and. sculpture by Juan Jose Tharrats, Edward1 Broccia, and by Denver's Vance Kirkland, Watson Bidwell and Edgar Britton. It will remain on view throughout the summer, as will "Indians of the Plains" at Chappell House, 1300 Logan Street, which is the Native Arts branch of the Art Museum.
of LARASA, and a board mem ber of Curtis Park Community Center and the Denver Area Council on Alcoholism, all United Way agencies. .
The Latin American Research and Service Agency, designed to meet the special needs and' problems of Denver's Spanish-American residents, was created by leaders in the Spanishspeaking community. LARASA gives assistance to persons of Latin American descent in situations arising from language Barriers, discrimination or handicaps of other sorts related to the differing' culture and background. Services or guidance. are provided without charge.
LARASA became affiliated with Mile High United Way in 1965. The organization's headquarters are located in the U W Service Center, 1375 Delaware.
orientation Sept. 19-20. Registration will be Sept. 21-22.
Benn urges those wishing to attend the college this fall to submit applications for admission as soon as possible. Forms may be obtained at the admissions office either by a personal visit or calling 292-5190.
TROOP 200 NEWS
WEST SIDE Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS August 17^-Young Adult Center, tour through Air Force A-cademy
August 22"Special Day at the, Races" sponsored by Coordinated Services for the Aging Community Center
August 23 and 30 Youth meetings, age 1.3-9, 7:00 p. m Westside Action Center, 1042 Santa Fe Drive.
August 25Inner City Parish Benefit Dinner and Dance, (<6 p._ m.; 910 Galapago St.
August 28-Lesson in makeup for women over 50 at Co-ordinated Services for the Ag-
best summer camp outings at Tahosa. Eight boys' went, p .i Randy. Mena obtained the rank of star. Robert Cunningham,
1st class; Tommy Davis, 1st class; and Randy Mena all received merit badges in camping, cooking, pro marksmen on the rifle range. Mike Kellum, tenderfoot 2nd class pro marksman; Brian Morris, 2nd class, a good start on pioneering merit badge. Pete Maj, pro marksman; Ben Maj, cooking pro marksman; Dennis Brem-mer, second class and pro marksman. Some of the boys were given financial assist qtfce from the Industrial Optimist Club. With this help they were. able, to attend .camp. Horseshoe games .were played.
A good time was had by all.
Rev. Nichols Leaving For Training In Mexico i
August 13 was the last Sunday in Denver for the Rev. Randy W. Nichols, Pastor of the Apostolic Faith Church, located at 1000 Kalamath.
Rev. Nichols, his wife and daughter Nancy left for Guadalajara, Mexico," where they will be -located for a year. While studying the language, they will carry On missionary activities in that area; After completing the year in Guadalajara, he expects to be- serving throughout South America and Central America and also the )A/est Indies Islands.
The new pastor pf the church will. k>e; the Rev. Leroy- Toews, who arrived in Denver from Tacoma, Washngtpn with his wife and four children.
DISTRICT 9
Anyone wanting to pay $1
m nnn i , . ing Community Center, 1620
T.rOOrL£00 h?l_ne,i ^ Meade St., 2:30 p. m.
August 31-West^de Action >enibersh.p | w ;Sj^. M.
P n nienng' . provement Association, pleas#
HM 7:30 P- Hi call Mrs. Benita Clark-office SePf Biflin E. 4th Ave., 744-0073; home
The Denver Area Qouncil Boy Scouts of America, a United Way agency, held its Friendship Camporee July 28th, 29'th and 30th at the Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch, Elbert, Colorado. Troop 200 Elmwood PTA, 7th and Galapago were in attendance.
meeting, 7:30 p m., 805 Santa
Fe Drive
Sept.5:Registration for Head StartElati St. Center, 228 E-lati St.
, -Sept. 6RegistrationDenver Public Schools Sept. 6 RegistrationDay Division, Opportunity School, 8:45 a m. to 3:00 p. m.
Sept 7RegistrationEven-; ing Division, Opportunity, School^7:00 to 9:00 p. m. Sept. 11'Beginning of school? Denver Public Schools Sept, rl 1 Beginning of fall Head Start program at Elati St. Head Start. Center Sept. 11-13 Fall quarter, placement tests, Metro State College
Sept 19-20New student orientation, Metro State College Sept. 21-22 Registration, Metro State College
EACH WEEK
Boys' Club Camp. Sign up at Boys Club. Free to all Boys Club* members
236 W. 3rd Ave., 733-0908
Girl Scout Leaders Needed
With ohly 16 hours of training YOU may be the shining star in the eyes /of several girls. Many girls are anxiously awaiting same mother to say, 'Til be your leader." We need parents from the following schools: Alameda, Elm-wdbd', Fairmont, Greenlee, St. Elizabeth, St. Cajetan, St. Joseph, Sherman and Baker Junior High School. Let's set our goal for at least one troop from every school. Other neighborhoods do it; Why can't we? For. information about training and how you can start a troop, please contact Mrs. Loretta Rhym 255-4910. Make our community a shining example of good citizenship and parent interest.