Citation
West side recorder, September, 1967

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, September, 1967
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 4. Number 5
Monthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
September, 1967
SPECIAL PRE-SCHOOL PROGRAM AT AURARIA
The therapeutic program for pre-school children resumed September 18, under the direction of { .Gladys Evans who is', assisted* by Mrs. Donald Walden and Chris Danl, a | VISTA volunteer*
The therapeutic pre-schooj program is a' class designed for dfe-sehool children, those with average intelligence, who hiave shown that they might benefit more from a smaller, more individualized class than in a regular Head Start class. These youngsters have difficul-; ties in the areas of- appropriate behavior and personality development, in certain kinds of learning abilities, in speech and language skills, and/or in physical coordination.
The therapeutic pre-school class is therapeutic in the goals that it strives to achieve:'
1. Organized" and supervised play 'activities having socialization and education values.
%. Trbinirig in how to work and live together.
EDITORIAL
3. Opportunity for self expression.
4. Parent involvement .as individuals and/or in groups to better understand and help these. children.
5. More individualized help for those youngsters who need it.
Miss Gladys Evans, a Special Education teacher, has been trained to work with the. youngsters in each of the areas! covered above. A consulting team consisting of ah education consultant, social worker, an administrative director, a child physchiatrist and a psychologist will be working with the teaching staff to provide evaluations, social histories, problem identification and a program for v those children and families involved.
Parents interested in learning more about: the therapeutic pre-schpol' may contact' Miss Marylou Morgan, director of the Head Start classes and social worker for the therapeutic class.
United Way Campaign Beginning Now
United Way leaders join Auraria Community Center children in showing the .1967 goal. From left, are Dennis Diaz, 11, 1146 Mariposa; Sheryl Lofton, 11, 1051 Mariposa; Jeff Van Velkinburgh, 10, 1249 West 10th Avenue; and W. Coles Hudgins, 1967 campaign chairman; Mrs. Ruth Stockton, metropolitan chairman; Edward Hirschfeld, board chairman.
BOUQUETS AND BRICKBATS
Barry To Discuss Conservation Program
Mr. Joe Barry, Administrator, Community Development A-gency, will talk about the Neighborhood Conservation Program at the meeting of Districts 7 and 9 of the West Side Improvement Association, to be held at the First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 120 West 1st Avenue, Friday, Sep-
tember 22, at 7:30 p.m. District elections will also be held.
These two districts include the area of the Association south of W. 5th Avenue and east of Elati.
Elmwood Threatened With loss Of Teacher
Sanitary Services have been cutting weeds and removing rubbish in "the West Side in recent weeks. They have responded to West Side v Improvement Association requests for action on problems of high weeds and rubbish quickly and effectively. At! this time, their weed-cutting program for the year is com-, pleted.
While Sanitary Services have given West. Siders bang-up service, another city agency has been somewhat less responsive. Since the beginning of May, six requests have gone to the city engineers on sidewalk problems broken walks, walks pushed up by tree roots, and other conditions. These walks are still defective, and the West Side Improvement Association has Had no answer from fie engineers about any of them.
FALL
CLEAN UP
The West Side has seen a certain amount, of progress recently on run-down property. The building at 1069 to 1079 Kalamath has been tom down, as have the terraces from §pi to 817 W. 3rd Avenue* Buildings at 614 and 618 Mariposa have also been demolished. 912 to. 920 W. 11th Avenue re now vacant.
People are still concerned 4bout 927 Kalamath, 942 Li-pan, and 1354 lipan, which continue to be hazards and eyesores.
Elmwood School is threatened with overloaded classes if a proposal from the Personnel Services office of the Schools is put into effect Because the student registration at Elmwood is below the number which was estimated last spring, it is proposed that one teacher will be removed from the faculty. As a result, each first grade class will have more than 80 students, and there will be 38 third-graders. The average class size will be over 30 pupils.
In the past, the school administration has accepted the concept that class sizes should be smaller in schools in disadvantaged areas, es-
pecially in the lower grades. There is little value in the "compensatory" programs and gimthicks if the class sizes are too large.
Leslie Kalanquin, President of the West Side Improvement Association, reports that the Association will work for smaller classes at Elmwood. What are we ; going to do? What good does it do to work for a new school if classes are too big? Should we work for the bond issue?"
Comments should be sent to:
Harold Stqtzler Personnel Services Denver Public Schools 414 14ih Street
Tuesday, October 3rd is the kickoff. date for the. 1967;, Mil High1 United Wdy campaign. Starting on this date volunteers throughout the Denver metropolitan area will begin the door to door campaign to raise in a single campaign funds for local and national health and welfare agencies.
This year's goal of $5,354,780 will be used to help support the needs of 108 agencies in the Denver metropolitan area. Among these agem; cies are the Auraria Community Center, Boys Clubs of Denver, Big Brothers, Inc., Legal Aid Society, Community Homemaker Service and the1 Neighborhood House Association.
Over 15,000 people will ao ttyrely ^articipatq^ inthe 1967 fcctti$dign" to' nSlpr me§t this year's goal which represents an increase of $205,950 over the amount raised last year. The 1967 goal will be broken down to include- $4,667,330 for agency purposes, of which $92,600 will be used for USO and Red Cross Viet Nam and disaster funds.
In 1966 United Way agencies provided a broad variety of health and welfare services tor 1,906,974 people throughout the five county metropolitan areas of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Jefferson and Denver counties.
WEST SIDERS TO HEAR ABOUT SCHOOL BOND ISSUE
West Siders will have the charic to learn about the proposed school bond issue at a meeting sponsored by the Denver County P-TA at West High School, Wednesday, October 18, at 7:30 p. m.
. The school bond issue, for $32,OOp,000, will provide for a number of important changes in our area. It will, if passed, prpvide for replacement of Elmwood School, either at the same location or neafby. With the leadership of the New Elmwood Committee, West Siders have been seeking construction of a new Elmwood School. Many people have been working for a new Elmwood long before that.
Greenlee would become a niddle (or intermediate) school,
for grades four through six, While nearby elementary schools would1 handle grades kindergarten through third.
Parents and others in the West Side have been concerned about needs at West for better athletic and industrial arts facilities. This bond issue will provide for improvements of these facilities at West, including addition of a swimming pool.
People have many questions about the bond issue. How far will children have to go to school? Do plans for West include a new athletic field? Hew much will this cost property owners? For the answers to these and other questions, come to the meeting on Wednesday, October 18.


Page Two
*HE RECORDER
September, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West'Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phon6 244-3301
Editor: Erma Jean Harris
Assistant Editor:
Jaye Martinez
Staff Reporters:
Margot Serumgard, Mildred Tordan, Juanita Winterhaiaer
Mr. Gerald Glynn of 12531 Anne Molien of Anna's Kalamath has been quit ill Beauty Salon, of,,., .971. Santa..,
I for the past two weeks.
jFe Drive spent one week va-
1 Things have not been too
rationing atGlenwood Springs quiet for thirty. tw0 6th
I Dickie and Eddie Frsequezja wonderful time. She and her1 durina^ftie month^
mother16 Patsy ||1 tg |i|| durtog August, there was lots of prac-
mother Patsy Fresquez ana the vacation. |||PHf ,,ri+Vt
LJody Herrera of ,n,cl - 1 hcma Wlttl
uncle

Mr. and Mrs.' Marshall White of 230 Cherokee St. were visited by his ^brother Ralph White and family of Hayti, Missouri.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Malberry of 308 Inca St. went with friends to Glenwood, Colorado for the weekend of Labor Day.
Miss Nancy Garcia of 240 W. 3rd Avenue celebrated her
Lipan Street.
Charline Francis of
12151 mBB vaca^on* I ticing with Mrs. Davis the
[music teacher. Then the week Jimmy Martinez, the grand- J August 21 through) 25th son of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph these students sang twice a 1259 pacheco of 1253 Lipan Street, daY on the mall at May D &
Kalamath has been visiting phoned twice last week from as a part of the Annual her aunt in California. She is Manila. He is recuperating L)enver Public School demon-al home and reports a won- fr0m wounds received in Viet, stration.
dsrful time.
Mrs. Adolph Pacheco of 1253 lipan'. Street had two wonder-
New Arrivals
Weighing in at 5~ lbs 8 ozs. Wendi Yvette Apodaca made her debut at St. Joseph's Hospital on July 8. Proud parents are Mr. and Mrs. William Apodaca.
A baby girl, Hope Soledad,. was bom to Mr. and Mrs. Ruperto Guedea August 24. The mother is the former editor of the West Side Recorder.
Nam. He. .reported he was Each student who partici-geT :ng along fine. ,/' . i pated for. the whole1 week re-j LINCOLN AND SOUTH.
j ceived a five dollar gift cer-, LINCOLN PARE
RESIDENT COUNCIL
| t a, r j, tificate from May D & F. This
r i tt j r r-> Herrera of 1215 Lipcm .g. first time .the schools fal weeks. Her srsters from,street was injured August 18, have had M tqlent fe || New Mexico and California 11967, but is now improved. He j demonstration tj * Was taken to Denver General1
Hospital by ambulance.
were with her. Her sister Mrs. Louisa Campos of New Mexico and her niece Sister Carmine Louisa of Santa Rosa, New Mexico, spent several
Marine Corps PFC William
days wth her. Her sister Mrs. Gallegos of 863 Fox was pro-Leticia Madrid and her chil- moted to Lance Corporal on dren from California also August 29th at Gamp S. D. spent several days with the Butler Okinawa.
Pachecos.
Mrs. Martha Olsen, president Abel Espinosa, son of Mrs..of the Lincoln Park and South 6th birthday on September 6,|Eva Espinosa of 1458 Navajo Lincoln Park Resident Coun-1967. Cake, ice cream and | Street, is now stationed in Ja- oil, is in Colorado General games were enjoyed by many pan and hoping to be home Hospital, of the neighborhood children, for Christmas. j
BUSINESS NOTES
Mrs. Helen Burke of 226 Cherokee Street spent her vacation in Beatrice, Nebraska, and in Yuma, Colorado. She attended a family reunion in pan Street. Nebraska on Sunday, August 18.
Mrs. Dorothy Solano and
I Art Guerrero, son of Mrs. Dennis Evenson, who teaches Alvero Guerrero of 720 Elati physics in Cleveland, is visit- and brother of Mrs. Bernard ing his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Trujillo, has been awarded Warner Evenson of 1208 Li-'the Silver Star for galantry in.
Viet Nam. He is now at Fitz-I simons Army Hospital recov- j |
Maria Mendoza, daughter ering from rounds, of Mr. and Mrs. Leonardo j
Mendoza of 1468,Navajo, has ,Manuel Perez o{ 1325 Upan
Due to the fact that the^ secretary and treasurer of the Lincoln and South Lincoln Park: Resident Council, Mrs. Florence Joe and Mrs. Loretta Rhym, have moved, new offi-XT ! ., ...... x cers were elected to fill their
Nate Mendelsberg, owner SMB terms. Miss Bee-
of Nates Crown Liquors, has Wales_ a volunteer M
completely remodeled his store i ^ ^ 1460 Navajo_ is ^ newr He a^remates the support all, secret and Mrs. Lucia: hre friends and customers, Gormani H27 Mariposa, is the gave him during the remod- treasurer
The Resident Council wilL have babysitting§ at its meetings at Auraria Community Center now. The next meeting will be October 5 at 7:30 p.m. All residents, new and old, are welcome.
eling.
Golden Wedding
I
family of 678 Elati have mov- been chosen as one of the Street has just retumed from
Rest In Peace
ed to Corona, California
Mrs. Gilbert Trujillo and children of Santa Fe, New Mexico, were August visitors at the homes of her sisters Mrs. Ben Hodges of 1114 Mariposa and Mrs. Luz Sanchez of 1127 Lipan. Earlier in the summer Mrs. Hodges and Mrs. Sanchez enjoyed the visit of their brother and sister-in-law Mr. and Mrs. Roman Salazar from Bisbee, Arizona, and their mother Mrs. Felipe Salazar from las Vegas, New Mexico.
Gary and Michael Gregory, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gregory, will soon be leaving to attend school in Grand Junction, Colorado. They hope to get home for Christmas.
Norma Lou Lofton (Nonnie), daughter of Mrs. Gracie Lofton <.f 1051 Mariposa St., has been chosen as one of the cheer leaders for West High School.
Mrs. Bessie Bolton, who is in the Lake Manor Nursing Home, would enjoy hearing from friends and neighbors.
We are glad that Mr. Omer Duncan ris now at home after his recent stay in a nursing home.
We are glad for the speedy improvement of Mrs. Lola Miller following her stay at St. Luke's Hospital.
We feel .with Mr. Bob Tower,
cheer leaders for St. Josephs Viet Nam. He is the nephew High School. | .......NftM Q{ Edward and Patsy Fres-
quez of 1215 Lipcfti; His Sis-Mr. and Mrs. Warner Even- tors and brothers live at 1325 son of 1208 Lipan Street had Lipan Street, a wonderful vacation. They left Denver on August 12th and went to Calgary, Canada.
While in Canada they were at Lake Louise and Vancouver. Coming back through Seattle they went to Tacoma where they had a family reunion. From there they went to Westport on the Pacific where the men went deep sea fishing for salmon and bass.
They retumed home on August 26th.
George Gilbert Ward of 1264r Mariposa passed away Aug-11 just. ist. He is survived by his wife Elsie Ward. Mr. and Mrs. Ward have been living i at 1264 Mariposa for five years.. Mr. and Mrs. Louis PinedoiHe was employed at Temple
v Mr. and Mrs. Alphonzo Martinez of 1378 Mariposa Street are vacationing in New Mex-
Mr. and Mis. Abel Chavez of 1451 Navajo Street have spent a lovely vacation in New Mexico.
Mrs. Alfonzo Rios of 1378 Mariposa Street has just returned from Hawaii where she met her husband on leave from Viet Nam. She reports he looks fine but has lost quite a bit, of weight. They had a wonderful time during his leave. She is staying with her folks in Denver.
Kathy Winters, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Wells, visited the West Side in August. She lives in Monmouth,
Mrs. H. Larsen of 1127 kica Street has just retumed from a visit with her daughter in black shoes. There were about
of 1254 Kalamath celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on September 3rd. They renewed their wedding vows at St. Cajetan during the 9 o'clock; mass. The reception was held at 1212 Mariposa in the Auraria Center. Mrs. Pinedo wore a pink dress and
Buell College.
Sincere sympathy to Rev. Herschel Leichty in his sorrow with the death of his wife..
Dayton, Ohio. She reports a wonderful time and was thrilled with the rolling green of Ohio.
100 guests at the reception.
Boys' Club
James D. Martinez, 17, som of Mrs. Shirley Martinez of.
WEDDING BELLS
The West Side congratulates 1256 W. 10th Avenue, has them and wishes them many been awarded a $3,000 schol-years of happiness. arship for a year of study at
the St. John's Military School in Salina, Kansas. Martinez will be a high school junior. He was nominated for the* ; scholarship by the Boys' Club-Ens. John Harlan and Nancy j of Denver. Denver was selec-L. Urtado of 681 Elati were j ted1 as the pilot city for the married Saturday August 2, in scholarship program because-
more cadets have attended
URTADO-HARLAN
LOFTON-RAGLAND
The former Jewell Lee Lofton of 1051 Mariposa Street is now Mrs. Charles Ragland.
The couple was married on'a civil ceremony by Munici-June 21, 1967, at Garden Home! pal Judge Wm. Conley in Presbyterian Church. The'Judge Conley's chambers, bride wore a white brocade!They were attended by Barbara street length dress with a white Collins of Denver and William hat. She carried a bouquet Dent of Omaha, Nebraska, of white carnations. Matron
the school from Denver than from any other city.
of honor was Connie Futrell, sister of the bride. Best man was Charles Armstrong, brother-in-law of the bride. The couple is now in residence at 2623 Vine Street in Denver. Congratulations and best wishes.
GONZALES-DIPPEL
custodian -at First Avenue] Oredbn, but the family for-Presbyteri^n Church,. Mnivpcin j merly divqd/oh the Wesfr£ide. and discomfort .with a broken She brings greetings from the foot sustained in recent days, family.
Harlan's mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Harlan oi Newton, Iowa, and his two sisters came from Newton, Iowa, to see their son and brother married.A dinner was held for the immediate family at Mrs. S. Vigil's home. They spent their honeymoon in Bridal Falls, Utah. Then home will be in San Diego, California.
St. Joseph's Catholic Church QUINTANA-SANCHEZ was the setting for the 10:001 I t _
a. m. wedding of Miss Eleanor! Miss Mary Elizabeth Quin-Rose Gonzales of 1022 W. 9th tana of 1223 Lipan Street was Avenue and Mr. Mike Dippel, married September 2nd to of Jasper, Indiana. The Rev- jessie Sanchez from east Den-
erend James P. Nugent per-l SSS RHH
r i iii T > fT ver. ine reception was neia formed the double ring rites. . , , TT
> at her parents home. Her After a wedding trip to las bridesmaid was Virginia Perez Vegas, Nevada, the couple ,i , ,
will, live in^Pueblo where Mr. and best man was Albert pippel is..a senior at Southernirctn There were 30 guests at Colorado State College. ' the reception.
Visitors From Great Britain
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mena had two British Boy Scouts visiting them from August 11th to August 21st. Ian Daniel is from Teddington, Middlesex, and Andy Winter is from Bognor Regis, Sussex, England. The boys visited Central City, the Glory Hole. They said they didn't know there" was any place like that in the world. The boys enjoyed the baseball game, Little Britches Rodeo and went on tours. On August 18, a birthday party was held for Ian, who was 16 years old. A good time was had by all. Everyone agreed that! their visit was all too short.


September, 1967
THE REC.ORDEP
Page Three
ST. JOSEPH'S HIGH SCHOOL
Front Row (Left to Right): Virginia Garcia, Mary Trujillo,. Diane Maestas, Genette Trancoso and Kathy Portuese. Standing (Left to. Right): Gloria Avila, Lois Arguello, Lindd Santistevan, Cathy Lucero and1 Sandra Salas.
The Queen contest for St. "Joseph's Fall Festival is now under way. The girl who sells
Baker Junior High
the most chances on a 19671 §1 .. ~
^ ,nc m r President Mrs. Dorothy
Comoro (25c each, live tor | j_jndsay
$1.00) will be queen and will
Baker P-TA Officers are as,a good breakfast at the
school. For only five cents, a typical meal is hot cereal, Swbbt roll, juice and milk,
get a $100 prize. The first and second runnerups get $75 and $50. Trophies also will be awarded. The queen is to be Crowned on Sunday, October 8 at 11 p. m.
The fall festival will be held October 5, 6, 7, and 8. There will be games and' booths and refreshments, including Mexican food, hamburgers, hot dogs, and cold sandwiches. Everyone is invited.
First Vice PresidentMrs. Alfonso Borrego Second Vice President Mr. Jack Beardshear Third Vice PresidentMrs. Florence Joe
Secretary S Mrs. Fedelirio Chacon.
TreasurerMrs. Henry Apo-daca
HistorianMrs. Vera Schell-
chairmen and
Other breakfasts include a cheese arid egg sandwich, juice > and milk or similar nutritious foods.
The lunchroom is open for breakfast from 7:45 to 8:30 a m. Students may eat all the meal, or any portion of it. Because it is known that chil-
ST. ELIZABETH'S
On July 14, 1917, a new era in the history of St. Elizabeth's School began. On that day, three Sisters of St. Francis, of Penance and Christian Charity ft their motherhouse in SteL la Niagara, New York, for Denver. Since the Franciscan Sisters of St. Louis had decided to give up teaching elementary schools to devote their, time to institutional work, these new Franciscans were to take up where their predecessors had left off.
When Mother Borromea, Sister Emily, and' Sister Casimir arrived in Denver, they found a flourishing German community, a beautiful Gothic church, a well equipped school, and a recently erected convent adjoining the school. By August three more Sisters; Sister Sophia, Sister Johanna, and Sister Amanda had joined the community and on September 5, 1917, they opened their doors to two hundred seventy-six children.
ed by those1 of dedicated .lay teachers. At the present time* the faculty consists of five Sisters and four lay teachers.
In 1964 Sister Cecilia Lin* enbrink began a new endeavor at St. Elizabeth's. A survey in the parish area had revealed that many of. the adults were eager to complete their high school educations In response Sister Cecilia organized the Adult Education. Tutorial' Program which holds twice-weekly, -sessions in St. Elizabeth's School. This program has served as a model for several similar programs in, Denver.
. Beginning in the fall of 1965 students of St. Elizabeth's were among those permitted to participate in the lunch program sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture.. The parish supplies a' modern kitchen and two excellent cooks, the federal government supplies surplus foods and subsidizes other
At that time the three-story necessary purchases, and par-building contained meeting ents provide volunteer help eo> rooms and a bawling alley that each child can receive a on the ground floor, four large wholesome, hot meal for only
classrooms on the next. floor, and a combined gymnasium and auditorium on the top floor. As the years passed/ steadily increasing enrollment and modern ideas in education necessitated the conver-
dren do better in school after j slon of meeting rooms into a good breakfast, this special i classrooms. The effects of age
able.
mg
Committee
r0mr6presentatiJes a\f nf?d'i Similar breakfast ed. if interested, call Mrs.
Lindsay, 255-2707.
low-cost meal is made avail- i c^d fir regulations made the, functioning.
ten cents every day of th school year.
Federal funds again brougJii benefits' to students' at St. Elizabeth's when, in the spring? of 1966, a remedial reading program sponsored by Title I of the Elementary and. Secondary Education Act begau
top floor unsuitable as a school auditorium, so in 1955 the]
The Sisters. are proud and happy to be a part of the' LAs-
are provided, at of the oldest par-
All students at. Baker Junior Elmwood Elementary Schools High School are able to eat in the West Side.
AURARIA COMMUNITY CENTER
On Wednesday night, Sep-j fare Department, the Better Glenda Lyle, social worker, tember 27th at' 7:00 p. m.,| Business Bureau and legisla- Anne Eyre, speech therapist, Auraria will hold general test- tors. During the summer the and Marylou Morgan, Head _ing for the G. E. D. classesi group began a pilot projectt Start \Director, to be held this fall at the with Montgomery Ward's.
Center. Anyone who is interested in attending these classes may stop by on the 27th.
Of special interest to the adults in the neighborhood will be the new classes for adults in Auraria's fall program. A woodshop class for men will be held at the center on Thursday evenings from 7:00 p. m. to 9:00 p. m. Also a short six week course on ''How to purchase a home" will begin the last part of September at the Center. Anyone who is interesed in buying a house should stop by the Center and enroll in the class. Many good tips will be given in how to purchase a home.
Mothers Morning Out
jRM ., . .I, : We have had a very en-
Miss Marylou Morgan will; joyokle summer with our Ito be the Director of Head Start |jg ones home from school; at Auraria Community Caiv| There- |M H| been time to ter. She has had experience in gQ (o ^ ^ the City
aeveloping hew programs' in /Auditorium and a game day community centers. Miss Morgan is looking forward to
ishes in Denver arid we look forward to continuing to serve the people of Denver's. West Side.
The present faculty includes:
into a combined assembly hall and lunch room.
As the German immigrants gradually became Americanized'and moved to the suburbs,
St. .Elizabeth's began serving a g^ter *Rose, Principal; Sister new wave of immigrants. This. Maryclare 7-8; Mrs. Scharz 6r time they came from the agri- Earley 5;.. Sister Mary-
cultural regions of"New Mexico .jorddy 4; Mrs. Chaverri 3; and southern Colorado, ]Mrs. Karr 2; Sister Ellen 1?
The Parent Teacher Associa- Sister- Jolenta 7-8; Physical tion was organized in 1943 in Education teachers Sister Mary an effort to fulfill the need for Judea and Brother Nicholas, a better school-home relation-j Open house will be October ship. II, 1967, for school and con-
Beginning in 1950, the Sisters', vent1 to 5 o'clock in the a£-efforts have been supplement ternoon.
On Friday, September- 15/ Mrs. Rose Mary Galindo, Mrs. Verna Ball and Mrs. Maria Samora attended a meeting of the board of the Consumer's Council, of the Better Business Bureau. The discussion :at the meeting" was centered on how the Consumer's Council can best serve us as consumers, communicate our needs to business, and present the concerns, of business to the consumer.
The Auraria .Neighborhood Group discussed at the first meeting this fall how ADC mothers' can make construc-
nieeting and working with the people of the area.
Miss Morgan said, "As Director of the Headstart classes and social worker with the therapeutic pre-school program, I find both the program and participants most exciting and
Lincoln Park. Our last meeting was supposed to be a swimming party at the park pool, but it was too cold We did have a meeting at Auraria Center to discuss some of the new' ideas for fun time this fall and came up with these ideasceramics, wood-shop, first. aid and cooking.
enjoyable. I' would hope that j ^ .coffee time will follow in parents would feel free to drop j -which we shall learn about in to say 'Hello' so that we Rome decorations, child behav-
can become acquainted.
"I think that the therapeutic pre-school program is particularly- .exciting as it provides us with an Opportunity to work with youngsters at an earlier age than usual. I will be meeting with the parents so that all of us (staff, consultants, and children) can work together to help the youngsters gain confidence and esteem in their abilities and in themselves as unique individuals." * '
Head Start classes at Auraria are again in session, with Mrs. Lois Pierre and Eleanor Lucero returning to the staff. We wish to welcome Nancy Hurst to our teaching staff.
ior, hair care, and budgeting
There may be other things of importance you may want to hear. Come, bring your ideas and join, in the fun, Meetings will be Thursday mornings from 9 to 11:30 a.m
Scout News
Troop 200 has had a successful year. Their softball team came in first place winning from the team that had beaten them in league play.
August 14 Cub Pack 200 had
birth control question
Are oral contraceptives safe?
Oral contraceptives were cleared for safety and effectiveness by the U. S. Food arid Drug Administration before they were permitted to be released-However, these drugs present an 1 unusual case, since, no
a carnival at Sunken Gardens drug ever has been used;: be-which was a lot of fun. Prizes j forel by so many people over were won on the many games such an extended period of tim and a cake sale was held with in the absence of disease,-Ac-many a delicious cake sold.! cordlngly, these drugs have?
Any boys 8 to 18 interested! ^ bHEBBI H
in scouting are invited to call
August, 1966, one of the groups
Mr. Morris 244-1529 or Mr. Me- lmakinS, *ls study-fce EB| na 623-1049 to obtain more in- lOT1 Comirdttee to the U S.
formation. They would like to hear from any adult interested in working with boys also.
The first skating party will be September 25, 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. Family $1.25, Admission' 40c per person, rental 30c each. 1990 South Broadway. Tickets can be bought at 427 Fox.
tive changes through working,! assisted by Jaye
together qpdv withj Alsr> on staff are
Have you paid your $li West High School dues to the West Side Improvement Association? If West High School P-TA Get not, mail it today768 Santa Acquainted Night will be Oc-Fe Drive, Denver 80204. , jjober 4 at 7:45 p. m.
Food and Drug Administration, on Obstetrics and Gynecology concluded that there" is* at present "no adequate scientific data proving these compounds unsafe for human use."'
However, since there are "possible theoretic risks" (cancer, blood clots, diabetes, adverse vision effects, etc.) the Committee urged that further studies be undertaken. Oral Contraceptives have been cleared for sale only on a doctor's--prescription, and they should be used only as a physician directs; and under his supervision, j


Page Four
THE RECORDER
September, 1967
Advertisements
FOR SALE
3 rm brick house. Clean and clear. Leaving. 623-4659.
TEENAGERS SPE,
INTER AGENCY COUNCIL
The Recorder is now carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 30c per line, $.50 minimum. Box 50% extra. Bold face35c a line.
Ads must be brought to the office of the West Side Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Dnve, by the 10th of each month. Payment for the ad must be made at the same time the ad is brought in.
The t Recorder is offering this service to the community feeling that it will be useful to our readers.
Church
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST
The Reverend Thomas Sepul-. -veda was recently reappointed, for the 4th year, as full time chaplain at Denver General Hospital and as pastor of the First Spanish Methodist Church, for the 9th year, by Bishop A. Marvin Stuart and Dr. William O. Byrd of the Rocky Mountain Conference of the Methodist Church.
DENVER INNER CITY PROTESTANT PARISH
The full program of activities will begin in October, but the rummage sales will be held the rest of this month on Tuesday mornings at 9:00. There will also be bread distribution and community meetings every Wednesday morning at 9:00. Staff nurses will bo available for consultation every Friday morning. Family night programs will begin on October 6th and will be held on the first and third Friday nights at 7:30. The benefit Dinner and Dance held at the Parish on August 25 raised $43.85. for the Community Food Bank of the West Side Action Center,, and the Parish wishes +o thank all those who supported this event.
} The speaker at the October' 14th community meeting will be Mr. Meon of the American 'Red Cross ,who will present a -demonstration of first aid in the home. On October 18, the speaker will be Officer Nieto of the Police Community Relations Department. Everyone is invited to attend these Wed-_r.3sd'ay morning meetings.
, Persons in the community who would -like assistance with housing problems are asked to contact a new group of pen sons who have recently form-, ed an Inner City Task Force on Housing. Problems with landlords, legal information, and property maintenance and repair problems may be called to the attention of this group by calling the Inner City Parish at 244-2636 or Mrs. Tommie Garcia at the office of Mr. John Doyle, Baker Junior High School, 222-9718.
We the teenagers from the 1. A Canteenthere is no I West Side area have been try- place in the West Side area ing for some time to extend where we can meet, after our. summer program. The school, to at least relax, have YEA Summer Program, that es- a coke and play the juke box tablished the Young Adult Cen-' or play pool, ter, was quite ah experience, 2. Bowlingat reasonable for us. We felt that we were rates that we can afford, ible to participate in activities 3 A charm school for girls,
tot we were unable to afford 4 Various types of sports
{or th§ boys.
It is true, at the beginning! ft *s verY important to us,, of the program, we were not ^e teenagers, that some type well organized being that this 9| recreational facilities be was an experimental program. I available for us on Friday Many .of the residents com-Jand Saturday nights. We feel plained about our dances but recreation will keep the with the help qfthe director,I teenager off. the streets and Mr, Ernie Quintana, we triedout( 9? trouble. We want the :o control any disorder that PeoPle to know that ail work did occur. Since the building j and no- play makes Jack a where our center was housed .dull boy.
was inadequate, we felt that We have been, meeting we should not be held respon-j since the middle of August sible for S§ of the vandalism and we feel that these, meet-that occurred in our center, l ings will have been of no
value or purpose to us unless-
We hope that with the help interested parties can help us; of the community, business first of all, finance an adequate people and the agencies, we building. We are willing to may be able to merit trust in fix up or do any type of any activities that we might painting required if someone endeavor to pursue. The West can come to our aid.
Side Action Center personnel We are proud to say that has attended our meetings in the West Side area this and these are some of the de- yegr there, hasn't been a hiqh sires we have expressed to rate of vandalism or disturb-hem. , ances.
Denver General WEST SIDE Expansion Plans!
Mr. Phil Frieder, Deputy Manager, Department of Health and Hospitals, will discuss expansion plans of Denver General Hospital at the meeting of Districts 5 and 11 of the West Side Improvement Association, to be held at the parish house of First Bethany Lutheran Church, 215 W. 5th Avenue, 7:30 p. m Thursday,
September 21. Elections of district directors will also be held. This is also a chance for people to bring up any other topics they want to raise.
These two districts include the area of the Association south of West 8th Avenue,: east of Santa Fe Drive, and: north of West 5th Avenue.
DENVER ART MUSEUM
"Art Through, The Ages," which opens Monday, September 25, at the Denver Art Museum's Chappell House Branch, -1.300 ^pg<^L Street, will follow the main stream of art from prehistoric rock carvings to the art forms of the '60's.
Though the show will touch upon rfhe art expression of-all the continents, it will place special emphasis cm the evolution qf art in Europe. On view will be prehistoric art from Sweden, France, Spain and, Afririq. The Ancient Mediterranean wood will be represented by examples from the cultures of Egypt, Crete, Mycenaea,,. Greece and Rome. There will be handsome pottery and bronzes from the Orient, gold work and' textiles from America before Columbus.
"Art Through The Ages" will close January 28, 1968. Hours are: Sunday 2 to 5 p. m.; Monday 1 to 5 p. m.; Tuesday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p. m. The public is invited, free of charge.
Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS
September 21 WSIA Dis-ricts 5 and, 11 Meeting at Par- ish House, First Bethany Lutheran Church, 215 W. 5th Avenue, 7:30 p. m.
September 22 WSIA Districts 7 and 9 Meeting at First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 120 W. 1st Avenue, 7:30 p.m.
September 25Opening of "Art Through The Ages" at Denver Art Museum's Chappell House Branch, 1300 Logan.
September 27Auraria Community Center testing for G. E. D. classes, 7:00 p. m.
October 1Open House, St. Elizabeth's School, 1 to 5 p.m.
October 3 Beginning of 1967 Mile High United Way Campaign.
October 4West High School P-TA Get Acquainted Night, 7:45 p.m.
. October 5Baker P-TA Board Meeting, 1:30 p.m.
October 5Resident Council Meeting, Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7:30 p. m.
October 5- 8St. Joseph's Fall Festival.
October 12Baker Back-to-Schobl Night, 7:30 p. m.
October 18 Tuberculosis X-ray unit, City and County Bldg., 14th & Bannock, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
October 18, 7:30 p.m.West High SchoolPublic meeting on the School Bond issue. 1
EACH WEEK
"To Know Ourselves Better," Spanish culture, history and religious message on KFSC radio every Saturday afternoon 4:45 p. m. by Rev. Thomas jSepulyeda, of First Spanish Methodist Church.
Auraria, Community Center, Mother's Morning Out group meets at Auraria Center, 1212 Mariposa, each Thursday, 9 a. m. to 11:30 a. m.
The Inter-Agency Council is comprised of .agency personnel who service Target Area E. We of the West Side Ac- j tion Center were fortunate to j have such a Council establish-1 ed in this area.
Through them,, we have been able to service and assist the community in a more efficient manner and have helped .expedite matters by cutting some of the red tape. The Food Bank had been in existence prior to. the forming of this, action center. Through' this food bank, we have helped over one hundred families. 1
The; Inter Agency Council has wdrked closely with the1 West Side Action Center in suggestions for ways and I means of alleviating some of | the problems .that exist in the community, one of these being the formation of the Young Adult Club. A committee was set up for the purpose of surveying Target Area E and* finding but what recreational facilities' were available in the, community. The results were:
1. Limited recreational facilities for young adults.
2. No type of weekend recreation for the teenagers at present.
The Inter-Agency Council and the West Side Action Center are interested riot only in the young adults but in the young married couples and the senior citizens as well. We feel that by working together, we can better serve the community, strengthen and extend our resources and line of com-
munication.
We are confident that together we can make this community a better place in which to live.
BYERS LIBRARY
W. 7th Ave. Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 2-5:30 1 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m.-12 noon and 1-5:30 p.m. | Closed Wednes^ days.
Fall leaves and book leaves have several things in common. Both are colorful, enjoyable, and a delightful change for us. It's refreshing"'to feel fall in the air and just as pleasant to start a new book.. Have you read any of .these interesting, new, non-fiction books listed for September? They're all available at your Byers Neighborhood LibrarV':
THE SEARCH FOR AMELIA EARHART, by Fred Goerner. What really happened to the famous woman flier who disappeared 30 years ago? Here is a stubborn reporter's a-stounding and controversial
. ^hobbittc Tits.
THE JURY RETURNS, by Louis Nizer. The human drama of four suspenseful court cases from the author's files. These are tense trials involving .murder, divorce, bribery, and blacklisting.
GOD PLANTED FIVE SEEDS, by Jean Dye Johnson. The previously" untold story of five young missionaries'*m the Bolivian jungle.' They hoped to bring the message of the Gospel to the Ayores, a native tribe never before contacted by white people. In Santa Cruz, the missionaries went on alone and were never seen again. This is the story of their mysterious disappearance.
RENDEZVOUS AT MIDWAY, by Pat Frank and Joseph D. Harrington. Here, for the first time in book form, the dramatic information of the aircraft Carrier, U.S.S. York-Itorwn, and the battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. America's most crucial victory at sea is completely revealed after 20 years of secrecy due to security regulations.
Plentiful Foods. Turkey is again the feature on the U. S. Department of Agriculture's plentiful food list. But other foodslike orange juice, seasonal vegetables, peanuts, and peanut products will also fill the wise shopper's basket during September.
Flavor First. To make sure you're getting the best flavor from your chickens, use a fresh chicken within two days after you purchase it or else freeze it, U. S. Department oi Agriculture home economists advice. Frozen chickens can be stored up to 12 months at zero degrees, but when you take them out for cookirig it's best to thaw them in the refrigerator for about 1 day.
Inexpensive Recipe. Orange juice and carrots. Orange juice is plentiful during the month of September. Why not prepare a special treat for the family? Team up carrots and orange juice to make Carrots Glorious.
Peel and coarsely grate 2 pounds fresh carrots. Melt V* cup margarine or butter in heavy fry pan; stk in 2 teaspoons each salt and sugar. Add the carrots. Cover pan, arid cook over medium heat, about 10 minutes. Stir several times. Add % cup of orange juice and continue cooking another 5 minutes, or Uritil carrots are crisply tender. ; (Makes 6 servings). The recipe can be doubled.
Dairy Council of Colorado,
Inc.


Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 4. Number 5
Monthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
September, 1967
SPECIAL PRE-SCHOOL PROGRAM AT AURARIA
The therapeutic program for pre-school children resumed September 18, under the direction of { .Gladys Evans who is', assisted* by Mrs. Donald Walden and Chris Danl, a | VISTA volunteer*
The therapeutic pre-schooj program is a' class designed for dfe-sehool children, those with average intelligence, who hiave shown that they might benefit more from a smaller, more individualized class than in a regular Head Start class. These youngsters have difficul-; ties in the areas of- appropriate behavior and personality development, in certain kinds of learning abilities, in speech and language skills, and/or in physical coordination.
The therapeutic pre-school class is therapeutic in the goals that it strives to achieve:'
1. Organized" and supervised play 'activities having socialization and education values.
%. Trbinirig in how to work and live together.
EDITORIAL
3. Opportunity for self expression.
4. Parent involvement .as individuals and/or in groups to better understand and help these. children.
5. More individualized help for those youngsters who need it.
Miss Gladys Evans, a Special Education teacher, has been trained to work with the. youngsters in each of the areas! covered above. A consulting team consisting of ah education consultant, social worker, an administrative director, a child physchiatrist and a psychologist will be working with the teaching staff to provide evaluations, social histories, problem identification and a program for v those children and families involved.
Parents interested in learning more about: the therapeutic pre-schpol' may contact' Miss Marylou Morgan, director of the Head Start classes and social worker for the therapeutic class.
United Way Campaign Beginning Now
United Way leaders join Auraria Community Center children in showing the .1967 goal. From left, are Dennis Diaz, 11, 1146 Mariposa; Sheryl Lofton, 11, 1051 Mariposa; Jeff Van Velkinburgh, 10, 1249 West 10th Avenue; and W. Coles Hudgins, 1967 campaign chairman; Mrs. Ruth Stockton, metropolitan chairman; Edward Hirschfeld, board chairman.
BOUQUETS AND BRICKBATS
Barry To Discuss Conservation Program
Mr. Joe Barry, Administrator, Community Development A-gency, will talk about the Neighborhood Conservation Program at the meeting of Districts 7 and 9 of the West Side Improvement Association, to be held at the First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 120 West 1st Avenue, Friday, Sep-
tember 22, at 7:30 p.m. District elections will also be held.
These two districts include the area of the Association south of W. 5th Avenue and east of Elati.
Elmwood Threatened With loss Of Teacher
Sanitary Services have been cutting weeds and removing rubbish in "the West Side in recent weeks. They have responded to West Side v Improvement Association requests for action on problems of high weeds and rubbish quickly and effectively. At! this time, their weed-cutting program for the year is com-, pleted.
While Sanitary Services have given West. Siders bang-up service, another city agency has been somewhat less responsive. Since the beginning of May, six requests have gone to the city engineers on sidewalk problems broken walks, walks pushed up by tree roots, and other conditions. These walks are still defective, and the West Side Improvement Association has Had no answer from fie engineers about any of them.
FALL
CLEAN UP
The West Side has seen a certain amount, of progress recently on run-down property. The building at 1069 to 1079 Kalamath has been tom down, as have the terraces from §pi to 817 W. 3rd Avenue* Buildings at 614 and 618 Mariposa have also been demolished. 912 to. 920 W. 11th Avenue re now vacant.
People are still concerned 4bout 927 Kalamath, 942 Li-pan, and 1354 lipan, which continue to be hazards and eyesores.
Elmwood School is threatened with overloaded classes if a proposal from the Personnel Services office of the Schools is put into effect Because the student registration at Elmwood is below the number which was estimated last spring, it is proposed that one teacher will be removed from the faculty. As a result, each first grade class will have more than 80 students, and there will be 38 third-graders. The average class size will be over 30 pupils.
In the past, the school administration has accepted the concept that class sizes should be smaller in schools in disadvantaged areas, es-
pecially in the lower grades. There is little value in the "compensatory" programs and gimthicks if the class sizes are too large.
Leslie Kalanquin, President of the West Side Improvement Association, reports that the Association will work for smaller classes at Elmwood. What are we ; going to do? What good does it do to work for a new school if classes are too big? Should we work for the bond issue?"
Comments should be sent to:
Harold Stqtzler Personnel Services Denver Public Schools 414 14ih Street
Tuesday, October 3rd is the kickoff. date for the. 1967;, Mil High1 United Wdy campaign. Starting on this date volunteers throughout the Denver metropolitan area will begin the door to door campaign to raise in a single campaign funds for local and national health and welfare agencies.
This year's goal of $5,354,780 will be used to help support the needs of 108 agencies in the Denver metropolitan area. Among these agem; cies are the Auraria Community Center, Boys Clubs of Denver, Big Brothers, Inc., Legal Aid Society, Community Homemaker Service and the1 Neighborhood House Association.
Over 15,000 people will ao ttyrely ^articipatq^ inthe 1967 fcctti$dign" to' nSlpr me§t this year's goal which represents an increase of $205,950 over the amount raised last year. The 1967 goal will be broken down to include- $4,667,330 for agency purposes, of which $92,600 will be used for USO and Red Cross Viet Nam and disaster funds.
In 1966 United Way agencies provided a broad variety of health and welfare services tor 1,906,974 people throughout the five county metropolitan areas of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Jefferson and Denver counties.
WEST SIDERS TO HEAR ABOUT SCHOOL BOND ISSUE
West Siders will have the charic to learn about the proposed school bond issue at a meeting sponsored by the Denver County P-TA at West High School, Wednesday, October 18, at 7:30 p. m.
. The school bond issue, for $32,OOp,000, will provide for a number of important changes in our area. It will, if passed, prpvide for replacement of Elmwood School, either at the same location or neafby. With the leadership of the New Elmwood Committee, West Siders have been seeking construction of a new Elmwood School. Many people have been working for a new Elmwood long before that.
Greenlee would become a niddle (or intermediate) school,
for grades four through six, While nearby elementary schools would1 handle grades kindergarten through third.
Parents and others in the West Side have been concerned about needs at West for better athletic and industrial arts facilities. This bond issue will provide for improvements of these facilities at West, including addition of a swimming pool.
People have many questions about the bond issue. How far will children have to go to school? Do plans for West include a new athletic field? Hew much will this cost property owners? For the answers to these and other questions, come to the meeting on Wednesday, October 18.


Page Two
*HE RECORDER
September, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West'Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive Phon6 244-3301
Editor: Erma Jean Harris
Assistant Editor:
Jaye Martinez
Staff Reporters:
Margot Serumgard, Mildred Tordan, Juanita Winterhaiaer
Mr. Gerald Glynn of 12531 Anne Molien of Anna's Kalamath has been quit ill Beauty Salon, of,,., .971. Santa..,
I for the past two weeks.
jFe Drive spent one week va-
1 Things have not been too
rationing atGlenwood Springs quiet for thirty. tw0 6th
I Dickie and Eddie Frsequezja wonderful time. She and her1 durina^ftie month^
mother16 Patsy ||1 tg |i|| durtog August, there was lots of prac-
mother Patsy Fresquez ana the vacation. |||PHf ,,ri+Vt
LJody Herrera of ,n,cl - 1 hcma Wlttl
uncle

Mr. and Mrs.' Marshall White of 230 Cherokee St. were visited by his ^brother Ralph White and family of Hayti, Missouri.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Malberry of 308 Inca St. went with friends to Glenwood, Colorado for the weekend of Labor Day.
Miss Nancy Garcia of 240 W. 3rd Avenue celebrated her
Lipan Street.
Charline Francis of
12151 mBB vaca^on* I ticing with Mrs. Davis the
[music teacher. Then the week Jimmy Martinez, the grand- J August 21 through) 25th son of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph these students sang twice a 1259 pacheco of 1253 Lipan Street, daY on the mall at May D &
Kalamath has been visiting phoned twice last week from as a part of the Annual her aunt in California. She is Manila. He is recuperating L)enver Public School demon-al home and reports a won- fr0m wounds received in Viet, stration.
dsrful time.
Mrs. Adolph Pacheco of 1253 lipan'. Street had two wonder-
New Arrivals
Weighing in at 5~ lbs 8 ozs. Wendi Yvette Apodaca made her debut at St. Joseph's Hospital on July 8. Proud parents are Mr. and Mrs. William Apodaca.
A baby girl, Hope Soledad,. was bom to Mr. and Mrs. Ruperto Guedea August 24. The mother is the former editor of the West Side Recorder.
Nam. He. .reported he was Each student who partici-geT :ng along fine. ,/' . i pated for. the whole1 week re-j LINCOLN AND SOUTH.
j ceived a five dollar gift cer-, LINCOLN PARE
RESIDENT COUNCIL
| t a, r j, tificate from May D & F. This
r i tt j r r-> Herrera of 1215 Lipcm .g. first time .the schools fal weeks. Her srsters from,street was injured August 18, have had M tqlent fe || New Mexico and California 11967, but is now improved. He j demonstration tj * Was taken to Denver General1
Hospital by ambulance.
were with her. Her sister Mrs. Louisa Campos of New Mexico and her niece Sister Carmine Louisa of Santa Rosa, New Mexico, spent several
Marine Corps PFC William
days wth her. Her sister Mrs. Gallegos of 863 Fox was pro-Leticia Madrid and her chil- moted to Lance Corporal on dren from California also August 29th at Gamp S. D. spent several days with the Butler Okinawa.
Pachecos.
Mrs. Martha Olsen, president Abel Espinosa, son of Mrs..of the Lincoln Park and South 6th birthday on September 6,|Eva Espinosa of 1458 Navajo Lincoln Park Resident Coun-1967. Cake, ice cream and | Street, is now stationed in Ja- oil, is in Colorado General games were enjoyed by many pan and hoping to be home Hospital, of the neighborhood children, for Christmas. j
BUSINESS NOTES
Mrs. Helen Burke of 226 Cherokee Street spent her vacation in Beatrice, Nebraska, and in Yuma, Colorado. She attended a family reunion in pan Street. Nebraska on Sunday, August 18.
Mrs. Dorothy Solano and
I Art Guerrero, son of Mrs. Dennis Evenson, who teaches Alvero Guerrero of 720 Elati physics in Cleveland, is visit- and brother of Mrs. Bernard ing his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Trujillo, has been awarded Warner Evenson of 1208 Li-'the Silver Star for galantry in.
Viet Nam. He is now at Fitz-I simons Army Hospital recov- j |
Maria Mendoza, daughter ering from rounds, of Mr. and Mrs. Leonardo j
Mendoza of 1468,Navajo, has ,Manuel Perez o{ 1325 Upan
Due to the fact that the^ secretary and treasurer of the Lincoln and South Lincoln Park: Resident Council, Mrs. Florence Joe and Mrs. Loretta Rhym, have moved, new offi-XT ! ., ...... x cers were elected to fill their
Nate Mendelsberg, owner SMB terms. Miss Bee-
of Nates Crown Liquors, has Wales_ a volunteer M
completely remodeled his store i ^ ^ 1460 Navajo_ is ^ newr He a^remates the support all, secret and Mrs. Lucia: hre friends and customers, Gormani H27 Mariposa, is the gave him during the remod- treasurer
The Resident Council wilL have babysitting§ at its meetings at Auraria Community Center now. The next meeting will be October 5 at 7:30 p.m. All residents, new and old, are welcome.
eling.
Golden Wedding
I
family of 678 Elati have mov- been chosen as one of the Street has just retumed from
Rest In Peace
ed to Corona, California
Mrs. Gilbert Trujillo and children of Santa Fe, New Mexico, were August visitors at the homes of her sisters Mrs. Ben Hodges of 1114 Mariposa and Mrs. Luz Sanchez of 1127 Lipan. Earlier in the summer Mrs. Hodges and Mrs. Sanchez enjoyed the visit of their brother and sister-in-law Mr. and Mrs. Roman Salazar from Bisbee, Arizona, and their mother Mrs. Felipe Salazar from las Vegas, New Mexico.
Gary and Michael Gregory, sons of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gregory, will soon be leaving to attend school in Grand Junction, Colorado. They hope to get home for Christmas.
Norma Lou Lofton (Nonnie), daughter of Mrs. Gracie Lofton <.f 1051 Mariposa St., has been chosen as one of the cheer leaders for West High School.
Mrs. Bessie Bolton, who is in the Lake Manor Nursing Home, would enjoy hearing from friends and neighbors.
We are glad that Mr. Omer Duncan ris now at home after his recent stay in a nursing home.
We are glad for the speedy improvement of Mrs. Lola Miller following her stay at St. Luke's Hospital.
We feel .with Mr. Bob Tower,
cheer leaders for St. Josephs Viet Nam. He is the nephew High School. | .......NftM Q{ Edward and Patsy Fres-
quez of 1215 Lipcfti; His Sis-Mr. and Mrs. Warner Even- tors and brothers live at 1325 son of 1208 Lipan Street had Lipan Street, a wonderful vacation. They left Denver on August 12th and went to Calgary, Canada.
While in Canada they were at Lake Louise and Vancouver. Coming back through Seattle they went to Tacoma where they had a family reunion. From there they went to Westport on the Pacific where the men went deep sea fishing for salmon and bass.
They retumed home on August 26th.
George Gilbert Ward of 1264r Mariposa passed away Aug-11 just. ist. He is survived by his wife Elsie Ward. Mr. and Mrs. Ward have been living i at 1264 Mariposa for five years.. Mr. and Mrs. Louis PinedoiHe was employed at Temple
v Mr. and Mrs. Alphonzo Martinez of 1378 Mariposa Street are vacationing in New Mex-
Mr. and Mis. Abel Chavez of 1451 Navajo Street have spent a lovely vacation in New Mexico.
Mrs. Alfonzo Rios of 1378 Mariposa Street has just returned from Hawaii where she met her husband on leave from Viet Nam. She reports he looks fine but has lost quite a bit, of weight. They had a wonderful time during his leave. She is staying with her folks in Denver.
Kathy Winters, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Wells, visited the West Side in August. She lives in Monmouth,
Mrs. H. Larsen of 1127 kica Street has just retumed from a visit with her daughter in black shoes. There were about
of 1254 Kalamath celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on September 3rd. They renewed their wedding vows at St. Cajetan during the 9 o'clock; mass. The reception was held at 1212 Mariposa in the Auraria Center. Mrs. Pinedo wore a pink dress and
Buell College.
Sincere sympathy to Rev. Herschel Leichty in his sorrow with the death of his wife..
Dayton, Ohio. She reports a wonderful time and was thrilled with the rolling green of Ohio.
100 guests at the reception.
Boys' Club
James D. Martinez, 17, som of Mrs. Shirley Martinez of.
WEDDING BELLS
The West Side congratulates 1256 W. 10th Avenue, has them and wishes them many been awarded a $3,000 schol-years of happiness. arship for a year of study at
the St. John's Military School in Salina, Kansas. Martinez will be a high school junior. He was nominated for the* ; scholarship by the Boys' Club-Ens. John Harlan and Nancy j of Denver. Denver was selec-L. Urtado of 681 Elati were j ted1 as the pilot city for the married Saturday August 2, in scholarship program because-
more cadets have attended
URTADO-HARLAN
LOFTON-RAGLAND
The former Jewell Lee Lofton of 1051 Mariposa Street is now Mrs. Charles Ragland.
The couple was married on'a civil ceremony by Munici-June 21, 1967, at Garden Home! pal Judge Wm. Conley in Presbyterian Church. The'Judge Conley's chambers, bride wore a white brocade!They were attended by Barbara street length dress with a white Collins of Denver and William hat. She carried a bouquet Dent of Omaha, Nebraska, of white carnations. Matron
the school from Denver than from any other city.
of honor was Connie Futrell, sister of the bride. Best man was Charles Armstrong, brother-in-law of the bride. The couple is now in residence at 2623 Vine Street in Denver. Congratulations and best wishes.
GONZALES-DIPPEL
custodian -at First Avenue] Oredbn, but the family for-Presbyteri^n Church,. Mnivpcin j merly divqd/oh the Wesfr£ide. and discomfort .with a broken She brings greetings from the foot sustained in recent days, family.
Harlan's mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Harlan oi Newton, Iowa, and his two sisters came from Newton, Iowa, to see their son and brother married.A dinner was held for the immediate family at Mrs. S. Vigil's home. They spent their honeymoon in Bridal Falls, Utah. Then home will be in San Diego, California.
St. Joseph's Catholic Church QUINTANA-SANCHEZ was the setting for the 10:001 I t _
a. m. wedding of Miss Eleanor! Miss Mary Elizabeth Quin-Rose Gonzales of 1022 W. 9th tana of 1223 Lipan Street was Avenue and Mr. Mike Dippel, married September 2nd to of Jasper, Indiana. The Rev- jessie Sanchez from east Den-
erend James P. Nugent per-l SSS RHH
r i iii T > fT ver. ine reception was neia formed the double ring rites. . , , TT
> at her parents home. Her After a wedding trip to las bridesmaid was Virginia Perez Vegas, Nevada, the couple ,i , ,
will, live in^Pueblo where Mr. and best man was Albert pippel is..a senior at Southernirctn There were 30 guests at Colorado State College. ' the reception.
Visitors From Great Britain
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mena had two British Boy Scouts visiting them from August 11th to August 21st. Ian Daniel is from Teddington, Middlesex, and Andy Winter is from Bognor Regis, Sussex, England. The boys visited Central City, the Glory Hole. They said they didn't know there" was any place like that in the world. The boys enjoyed the baseball game, Little Britches Rodeo and went on tours. On August 18, a birthday party was held for Ian, who was 16 years old. A good time was had by all. Everyone agreed that! their visit was all too short.


September, 1967
THE REC.ORDEP
Page Three
ST. JOSEPH'S HIGH SCHOOL
Front Row (Left to Right): Virginia Garcia, Mary Trujillo,. Diane Maestas, Genette Trancoso and Kathy Portuese. Standing (Left to. Right): Gloria Avila, Lois Arguello, Lindd Santistevan, Cathy Lucero and1 Sandra Salas.
The Queen contest for St. "Joseph's Fall Festival is now under way. The girl who sells
Baker Junior High
the most chances on a 19671 §1 .. ~
^ ,nc m r President Mrs. Dorothy
Comoro (25c each, live tor | j_jndsay
$1.00) will be queen and will
Baker P-TA Officers are as,a good breakfast at the
school. For only five cents, a typical meal is hot cereal, Swbbt roll, juice and milk,
get a $100 prize. The first and second runnerups get $75 and $50. Trophies also will be awarded. The queen is to be Crowned on Sunday, October 8 at 11 p. m.
The fall festival will be held October 5, 6, 7, and 8. There will be games and' booths and refreshments, including Mexican food, hamburgers, hot dogs, and cold sandwiches. Everyone is invited.
First Vice PresidentMrs. Alfonso Borrego Second Vice President Mr. Jack Beardshear Third Vice PresidentMrs. Florence Joe
Secretary S Mrs. Fedelirio Chacon.
TreasurerMrs. Henry Apo-daca
HistorianMrs. Vera Schell-
chairmen and
Other breakfasts include a cheese arid egg sandwich, juice > and milk or similar nutritious foods.
The lunchroom is open for breakfast from 7:45 to 8:30 a m. Students may eat all the meal, or any portion of it. Because it is known that chil-
ST. ELIZABETH'S
On July 14, 1917, a new era in the history of St. Elizabeth's School began. On that day, three Sisters of St. Francis, of Penance and Christian Charity ft their motherhouse in SteL la Niagara, New York, for Denver. Since the Franciscan Sisters of St. Louis had decided to give up teaching elementary schools to devote their, time to institutional work, these new Franciscans were to take up where their predecessors had left off.
When Mother Borromea, Sister Emily, and' Sister Casimir arrived in Denver, they found a flourishing German community, a beautiful Gothic church, a well equipped school, and a recently erected convent adjoining the school. By August three more Sisters; Sister Sophia, Sister Johanna, and Sister Amanda had joined the community and on September 5, 1917, they opened their doors to two hundred seventy-six children.
ed by those1 of dedicated .lay teachers. At the present time* the faculty consists of five Sisters and four lay teachers.
In 1964 Sister Cecilia Lin* enbrink began a new endeavor at St. Elizabeth's. A survey in the parish area had revealed that many of. the adults were eager to complete their high school educations In response Sister Cecilia organized the Adult Education. Tutorial' Program which holds twice-weekly, -sessions in St. Elizabeth's School. This program has served as a model for several similar programs in, Denver.
. Beginning in the fall of 1965 students of St. Elizabeth's were among those permitted to participate in the lunch program sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture.. The parish supplies a' modern kitchen and two excellent cooks, the federal government supplies surplus foods and subsidizes other
At that time the three-story necessary purchases, and par-building contained meeting ents provide volunteer help eo> rooms and a bawling alley that each child can receive a on the ground floor, four large wholesome, hot meal for only
classrooms on the next. floor, and a combined gymnasium and auditorium on the top floor. As the years passed/ steadily increasing enrollment and modern ideas in education necessitated the conver-
dren do better in school after j slon of meeting rooms into a good breakfast, this special i classrooms. The effects of age
able.
mg
Committee
r0mr6presentatiJes a\f nf?d'i Similar breakfast ed. if interested, call Mrs.
Lindsay, 255-2707.
low-cost meal is made avail- i c^d fir regulations made the, functioning.
ten cents every day of th school year.
Federal funds again brougJii benefits' to students' at St. Elizabeth's when, in the spring? of 1966, a remedial reading program sponsored by Title I of the Elementary and. Secondary Education Act begau
top floor unsuitable as a school auditorium, so in 1955 the]
The Sisters. are proud and happy to be a part of the' LAs-
are provided, at of the oldest par-
All students at. Baker Junior Elmwood Elementary Schools High School are able to eat in the West Side.
AURARIA COMMUNITY CENTER
On Wednesday night, Sep-j fare Department, the Better Glenda Lyle, social worker, tember 27th at' 7:00 p. m.,| Business Bureau and legisla- Anne Eyre, speech therapist, Auraria will hold general test- tors. During the summer the and Marylou Morgan, Head _ing for the G. E. D. classesi group began a pilot projectt Start \Director, to be held this fall at the with Montgomery Ward's.
Center. Anyone who is interested in attending these classes may stop by on the 27th.
Of special interest to the adults in the neighborhood will be the new classes for adults in Auraria's fall program. A woodshop class for men will be held at the center on Thursday evenings from 7:00 p. m. to 9:00 p. m. Also a short six week course on ''How to purchase a home" will begin the last part of September at the Center. Anyone who is interesed in buying a house should stop by the Center and enroll in the class. Many good tips will be given in how to purchase a home.
Mothers Morning Out
jRM ., . .I, : We have had a very en-
Miss Marylou Morgan will; joyokle summer with our Ito be the Director of Head Start |jg ones home from school; at Auraria Community Caiv| There- |M H| been time to ter. She has had experience in gQ (o ^ ^ the City
aeveloping hew programs' in /Auditorium and a game day community centers. Miss Morgan is looking forward to
ishes in Denver arid we look forward to continuing to serve the people of Denver's. West Side.
The present faculty includes:
into a combined assembly hall and lunch room.
As the German immigrants gradually became Americanized'and moved to the suburbs,
St. .Elizabeth's began serving a g^ter *Rose, Principal; Sister new wave of immigrants. This. Maryclare 7-8; Mrs. Scharz 6r time they came from the agri- Earley 5;.. Sister Mary-
cultural regions of"New Mexico .jorddy 4; Mrs. Chaverri 3; and southern Colorado, ]Mrs. Karr 2; Sister Ellen 1?
The Parent Teacher Associa- Sister- Jolenta 7-8; Physical tion was organized in 1943 in Education teachers Sister Mary an effort to fulfill the need for Judea and Brother Nicholas, a better school-home relation-j Open house will be October ship. II, 1967, for school and con-
Beginning in 1950, the Sisters', vent1 to 5 o'clock in the a£-efforts have been supplement ternoon.
On Friday, September- 15/ Mrs. Rose Mary Galindo, Mrs. Verna Ball and Mrs. Maria Samora attended a meeting of the board of the Consumer's Council, of the Better Business Bureau. The discussion :at the meeting" was centered on how the Consumer's Council can best serve us as consumers, communicate our needs to business, and present the concerns, of business to the consumer.
The Auraria .Neighborhood Group discussed at the first meeting this fall how ADC mothers' can make construc-
nieeting and working with the people of the area.
Miss Morgan said, "As Director of the Headstart classes and social worker with the therapeutic pre-school program, I find both the program and participants most exciting and
Lincoln Park. Our last meeting was supposed to be a swimming party at the park pool, but it was too cold We did have a meeting at Auraria Center to discuss some of the new' ideas for fun time this fall and came up with these ideasceramics, wood-shop, first. aid and cooking.
enjoyable. I' would hope that j ^ .coffee time will follow in parents would feel free to drop j -which we shall learn about in to say 'Hello' so that we Rome decorations, child behav-
can become acquainted.
"I think that the therapeutic pre-school program is particularly- .exciting as it provides us with an Opportunity to work with youngsters at an earlier age than usual. I will be meeting with the parents so that all of us (staff, consultants, and children) can work together to help the youngsters gain confidence and esteem in their abilities and in themselves as unique individuals." '
Head Start classes at Auraria are again in session, with Mrs. Lois Pierre and Eleanor Lucero returning to the staff. We wish to welcome Nancy Hurst to our teaching staff.
ior, hair care, and budgeting
There may be other things of importance you may want to hear. Come, bring your ideas and join, in the fun, Meetings will be Thursday mornings from 9 to 11:30 a.m
Scout News
Troop 200 has had a successful year. Their softball team came in first place winning from the team that had beaten them in league play.
August 14 Cub Pack 200 had
birth control question
Are oral contraceptives safe?
Oral contraceptives were cleared for safety and effectiveness by the U. S. Food arid Drug Administration before they were permitted to be released-However, these drugs present an 1 unusual case, since, no
a carnival at Sunken Gardens drug ever has been used;: be-which was a lot of fun. Prizes j forel by so many people over were won on the many games such an extended period of tim and a cake sale was held with in the absence of disease,-Ac-many a delicious cake sold.! cordlngly, these drugs have?
Any boys 8 to 18 interested! ^ bHEBBI H
in scouting are invited to call
August, 1966, one of the groups
Mr. Morris 244-1529 or Mr. Me- lmakinS, *ls study-fce EB| na 623-1049 to obtain more in- lOT1 Comirdttee to the U S.
formation. They would like to hear from any adult interested in working with boys also.
The first skating party will be September 25, 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. Family $1.25, Admission' 40c per person, rental 30c each. 1990 South Broadway. Tickets can be bought at 427 Fox.
tive changes through working,! assisted by Jaye
together qpdv withj Alsr> on staff are
Have you paid your $li West High School dues to the West Side Improvement Association? If West High School P-TA Get not, mail it today768 Santa Acquainted Night will be Oc-Fe Drive, Denver 80204. , jjober 4 at 7:45 p. m.
Food and Drug Administration, on Obstetrics and Gynecology concluded that there" is* at present "no adequate scientific data proving these compounds unsafe for human use."'
However, since there are "possible theoretic risks" (cancer, blood clots, diabetes, adverse vision effects, etc.) the Committee urged that further studies be undertaken. Oral Contraceptives have been cleared for sale only on a doctor's--prescription, and they should be used only as a physician directs; and under his supervision, j


Page Four
THE RECORDER
September, 1967
Advertisements
FOR SALE
3 rm brick house. Clean and clear. Leaving. 623-4659.
TEENAGERS SPE,
INTER AGENCY COUNCIL
The Recorder is now carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 30c per line, $.50 minimum. Box 50% extra. Bold face35c a line.
Ads must be brought to the office of the West Side Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Dnve, by the 10th of each month. Payment for the ad must be made at the same time the ad is brought in.
The t Recorder is offering this service to the community feeling that it will be useful to our readers.
Church
FIRST SPANISH METHODIST
The Reverend Thomas Sepul-. -veda was recently reappointed, for the 4th year, as full time chaplain at Denver General Hospital and as pastor of the First Spanish Methodist Church, for the 9th year, by Bishop A. Marvin Stuart and Dr. William O. Byrd of the Rocky Mountain Conference of the Methodist Church.
DENVER INNER CITY PROTESTANT PARISH
The full program of activities will begin in October, but the rummage sales will be held the rest of this month on Tuesday mornings at 9:00. There will also be bread distribution and community meetings every Wednesday morning at 9:00. Staff nurses will bo available for consultation every Friday morning. Family night programs will begin on October 6th and will be held on the first and third Friday nights at 7:30. The benefit Dinner and Dance held at the Parish on August 25 raised $43.85. for the Community Food Bank of the West Side Action Center,, and the Parish wishes +o thank all those who supported this event.
} The speaker at the October' 14th community meeting will be Mr. Meon of the American 'Red Cross ,who will present a -demonstration of first aid in the home. On October 18, the speaker will be Officer Nieto of the Police Community Relations Department. Everyone is invited to attend these Wed-_r.3sd'ay morning meetings.
, Persons in the community who would -like assistance with housing problems are asked to contact a new group of pen sons who have recently form-, ed an Inner City Task Force on Housing. Problems with landlords, legal information, and property maintenance and repair problems may be called to the attention of this group by calling the Inner City Parish at 244-2636 or Mrs. Tommie Garcia at the office of Mr. John Doyle, Baker Junior High School, 222-9718.
We the teenagers from the 1. A Canteenthere is no I West Side area have been try- place in the West Side area ing for some time to extend where we can meet, after our. summer program. The school, to at least relax, have YEA Summer Program, that es- a coke and play the juke box tablished the Young Adult Cen-' or play pool, ter, was quite ah experience, 2. Bowlingat reasonable for us. We felt that we were rates that we can afford, ible to participate in activities 3 A charm school for girls,
tot we were unable to afford 4 Various types of sports
{or th§ boys.
It is true, at the beginning! ft *s verY important to us,, of the program, we were not ^e teenagers, that some type well organized being that this 9| recreational facilities be was an experimental program. I available for us on Friday Many .of the residents com-Jand Saturday nights. We feel plained about our dances but recreation will keep the with the help qfthe director,I teenager off. the streets and Mr, Ernie Quintana, we triedout( 9? trouble. We want the :o control any disorder that PeoPle to know that ail work did occur. Since the building j and no- play makes Jack a where our center was housed .dull boy.
was inadequate, we felt that We have been, meeting we should not be held respon-j since the middle of August sible for S§ of the vandalism and we feel that these, meet-that occurred in our center, l ings will have been of no
value or purpose to us unless-
We hope that with the help interested parties can help us; of the community, business first of all, finance an adequate people and the agencies, we building. We are willing to may be able to merit trust in fix up or do any type of any activities that we might painting required if someone endeavor to pursue. The West can come to our aid.
Side Action Center personnel We are proud to say that has attended our meetings in the West Side area this and these are some of the de- yegr there, hasn't been a hiqh sires we have expressed to rate of vandalism or disturb-hem. , ances.
Denver General WEST SIDE Expansion Plans!
Mr. Phil Frieder, Deputy Manager, Department of Health and Hospitals, will discuss expansion plans of Denver General Hospital at the meeting of Districts 5 and 11 of the West Side Improvement Association, to be held at the parish house of First Bethany Lutheran Church, 215 W. 5th Avenue, 7:30 p. m Thursday,
September 21. Elections of district directors will also be held. This is also a chance for people to bring up any other topics they want to raise.
These two districts include the area of the Association south of West 8th Avenue,: east of Santa Fe Drive, and: north of West 5th Avenue.
DENVER ART MUSEUM
"Art Through, The Ages," which opens Monday, September 25, at the Denver Art Museum's Chappell House Branch, -1.300 ^pg<^L Street, will follow the main stream of art from prehistoric rock carvings to the art forms of the '60's.
Though the show will touch upon rfhe art expression of-all the continents, it will place special emphasis cm the evolution qf art in Europe. On view will be prehistoric art from Sweden, France, Spain and, Afririq. The Ancient Mediterranean wood will be represented by examples from the cultures of Egypt, Crete, Mycenaea,,. Greece and Rome. There will be handsome pottery and bronzes from the Orient, gold work and' textiles from America before Columbus.
"Art Through The Ages" will close January 28, 1968. Hours are: Sunday 2 to 5 p. m.; Monday 1 to 5 p. m.; Tuesday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p. m. The public is invited, free of charge.
Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS
September 21 WSIA Dis-ricts 5 and, 11 Meeting at Par- ish House, First Bethany Lutheran Church, 215 W. 5th Avenue, 7:30 p. m.
September 22 WSIA Districts 7 and 9 Meeting at First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 120 W. 1st Avenue, 7:30 p.m.
September 25Opening of "Art Through The Ages" at Denver Art Museum's Chappell House Branch, 1300 Logan.
September 27Auraria Community Center testing for G. E. D. classes, 7:00 p. m.
October 1Open House, St. Elizabeth's School, 1 to 5 p.m.
October 3 Beginning of 1967 Mile High United Way Campaign.
October 4West High School P-TA Get Acquainted Night, 7:45 p.m.
. October 5Baker P-TA Board Meeting, 1:30 p.m.
October 5Resident Council Meeting, Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7:30 p. m.
October 5- 8St. Joseph's Fall Festival.
October 12Baker Back-to-Schobl Night, 7:30 p. m.
October 18 Tuberculosis X-ray unit, City and County Bldg., 14th & Bannock, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
October 18, 7:30 p.m.West High SchoolPublic meeting on the School Bond issue. 1
EACH WEEK
"To Know Ourselves Better," Spanish culture, history and religious message on KFSC radio every Saturday afternoon 4:45 p. m. by Rev. Thomas jSepulyeda, of First Spanish Methodist Church.
Auraria, Community Center, Mother's Morning Out group meets at Auraria Center, 1212 Mariposa, each Thursday, 9 a. m. to 11:30 a. m.
The Inter-Agency Council is comprised of .agency personnel who service Target Area E. We of the West Side Ac- j tion Center were fortunate to j have such a Council establish-1 ed in this area.
Through them,, we have been able to service and assist the community in a more efficient manner and have helped .expedite matters by cutting some of the red tape. The Food Bank had been in existence prior to. the forming of this, action center. Through' this food bank, we have helped over one hundred families. 1
The; Inter Agency Council has wdrked closely with the1 West Side Action Center in suggestions for ways and I means of alleviating some of | the problems .that exist in the community, one of these being the formation of the Young Adult Club. A committee was set up for the purpose of surveying Target Area E and* finding but what recreational facilities' were available in the, community. The results were:
1. Limited recreational facilities for young adults.
2. No type of weekend recreation for the teenagers at present.
The Inter-Agency Council and the West Side Action Center are interested riot only in the young adults but in the young married couples and the senior citizens as well. We feel that by working together, we can better serve the community, strengthen and extend our resources and line of com-
munication.
We are confident that together we can make this community a better place in which to live.
BYERS LIBRARY
W. 7th Ave. Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 2-5:30 1 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m.-12 noon and 1-5:30 p.m. | Closed Wednes^ days.
Fall leaves and book leaves have several things in common. Both are colorful, enjoyable, and a delightful change for us. It's refreshing"'to feel fall in the air and just as pleasant to start a new book.. Have you read any of .these interesting, new, non-fiction books listed for September? They're all available at your Byers Neighborhood LibrarV':
THE SEARCH FOR AMELIA EARHART, by Fred Goerner. What really happened to the famous woman flier who disappeared 30 years ago? Here is a stubborn reporter's a-stounding and controversial
. ^hobbittc Tits.
THE JURY RETURNS, by Louis Nizer. The human drama of four suspenseful court cases from the author's files. These are tense trials involving .murder, divorce, bribery, and blacklisting.
GOD PLANTED FIVE SEEDS, by Jean Dye Johnson. The previously" untold story of five young missionaries'*m the Bolivian jungle.' They hoped to bring the message of the Gospel to the Ayores, a native tribe never before contacted by white people. In Santa Cruz, the missionaries went on alone and were never seen again. This is the story of their mysterious disappearance.
RENDEZVOUS AT MIDWAY, by Pat Frank and Joseph D. Harrington. Here, for the first time in book form, the dramatic information of the aircraft Carrier, U.S.S. York-Itorwn, and the battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. America's most crucial victory at sea is completely revealed after 20 years of secrecy due to security regulations.
Plentiful Foods. Turkey is again the feature on the U. S. Department of Agriculture's plentiful food list. But other foodslike orange juice, seasonal vegetables, peanuts, and peanut products will also fill the wise shopper's basket during September.
Flavor First. To make sure you're getting the best flavor from your chickens, use a fresh chicken within two days after you purchase it or else freeze it, U. S. Department oi Agriculture home economists advice. Frozen chickens can be stored up to 12 months at zero degrees, but when you take them out for cookirig it's best to thaw them in the refrigerator for about 1 day.
Inexpensive Recipe. Orange juice and carrots. Orange juice is plentiful during the month of September. Why not prepare a special treat for the family? Team up carrots and orange juice to make Carrots Glorious.
Peel and coarsely grate 2 pounds fresh carrots. Melt V* cup margarine or butter in heavy fry pan; stk in 2 teaspoons each salt and sugar. Add the carrots. Cover pan, arid cook over medium heat, about 10 minutes. Stir several times. Add % cup of orange juice and continue cooking another 5 minutes, or Uritil carrots are crisply tender. ; (Makes 6 servings). The recipe can be doubled.
Dairy Council of Colorado,
Inc.