Citation
West side recorder, December, 1967

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Title:
West side recorder, December, 1967
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

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Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
I
1
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 4, Number 7
JyfonJthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
December, 1967
Christmas £>erutt£8
Apostolic Fcdth Church, 1000 Kalamath, Rev. Leroy Toews Dec. 17Sunday School Program 7 p. m.
Dec. 24Christmas Music Program 11 a. m.
Church of God, 5th and Fox St, Rev. Leroy Vance Dec. 17Christmas Program 7 p. m.
Dec. 25Christmas Services 11 a. m. 7:30 p. m.
Evangelistic Temple, 738 Santa Fe, Michael Roybal, Minister Dec. 24^Sunday Morning Service 10 a. m.
Bags of candy, nuts and apples will be distributed to all children attending the service. Everyone invited.
No services Christmas Day.
First Ave.. Presbyterian, 120 W. 1st Ave., Rev. A. J. Blomquist Dec. 22Sunday School Christmas Program 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 24Sunday Services 11 a. m., 6:-30 p. m.
Sunday School 9:45 a. m.
Nd services Christmas Day.*'' *.>
First Bethany Lutheran, 215 W. 5th Ave., Rev. Fred A Bloch Dec. 17-Choir Program 7 p. m.
Dec. 24Sunday Services 11 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Dec. 25Christmas Service 11 a. m.
First Spanish Methodist, 935 W. 11th, Rev. Thomas Sepulveda Dec. 24Christmas Service and Communion 11a. m.
No services Christmas day.
St Cajetan Catholic, 9th & Lawrence, Father Max Santamaria ( Dec. 22-23Confessions: 2 to 5 p. m. and 6:00 to 9 p. m.
Dec. 24^Christrrids Choir will sing carols, beginning at 11:30 p. m*- ;JMidhigh^. Mctss, .:12 midnight Dec. 2$Mc^s: 7/ 8, 9, 10:30 a. m. and \i'boon.
No evening mass on Christmas Day.
Jan. 1Mass: 7, 8, 9, 10:30 a. m. and 12 noon.
No evening mass on New Year's Day.
St. Elizabeth Catholic, 11th and Curtis St. Rev. Fabian Flynn Dec. 23Confessions: 3:30 to 5:30 p. m.; 7:30 to 8:30 p. m. Dec. 24Christmas Choir 11:30 p. m.
Midnight Mass, 12 midnight Dec. 25Mass 6, 8, 9, 11 a. m. and 12:15 p. m.
St. John's Lutheran, W. 3rd Ave. & Acoma, Rev. Paul Hansen Dec. 17Choir Concert 7:Q0i" p. m.
Deb. 24''Children's reogram 7 :u0 p. m.
Candlelight Service 11:00ft)- m.
Dec. 25"Das Begebnis," Pastor C. H. Mundinger 9:00 g. rh.
"ThS Happening'' Pastor G. H.; Mundinger 11:00 a. m. Dec. 31'Th^ Nick of Time,". Pastor Hansen 8:30 & 11 am/; 'Loving Kindness," Seminarian Charles Corbin, 8:30 at chapel. ,
, Communion Service 7:00 p. m. f
Jan. L-r-^'A Blessed New Year," Pastor E. J. Friedrich,] 11 a.m.
St. Peter's Episcopal, 126 W. 2nd Ave., Rev. David Minton Dec. 17y-Holy Communion 8 a. m.
Morning Prayer 11 a. m.
Sunday School Service and Christmas Party 4 p. m.,;' Dec. 24Morning Prayer 10 a, Lm.
Holy Communion 11:30 p. m.
Dec. 25Holy Communion 10:00 a. m.
Dec. 26Bishop Thayer will be at St. Peter's to confirm the Rector's nephew and to celebrate Holy Communion at 10 a. m.
Dec. 31Holy Communion 8 a. m. 11 a. m.
Wesley Methodist Church, 465 Galapago, Rev. James E. Hall Dec. 17Christmas Program 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 24Christmas Eve Candlelight Service 7:30 p. m.
West Side Christian, 668 Inca St., Rev. Ronald D. Cook Dec. 17Christmas Program 7 p. m.
Dec. 24Choir Cantata 7 p. mf
Apostolic Church of Jesus, 1039 W. 13th Av., Rev. Toby Rampa Dec. 24Sunday School, 9:30 a. m.
Sunday Morning Worship Service 10j30 a. m.
Christmas Pageant 7 p. m.
No services Christmas Day.
St Joseph's Redemptorist, 605 W. 6th Ave. Rev. James Nugent Dec. 19Confessions before and during the Mother of Perpetual Help Noyena Services at. 3:00, 5:30 and 7:30 p. ip. Dec. 22Confessions: In the afternoon from 3:30-5:30 and 7:30-8:30 p. m.
Dec. 23Confessions: 3:30-5:30 and 7:30-8:30 p. m.
There will be rio confessions heard on Sunday, Dec. 24. Dec. 24Solemn Concelebrated Mass at Midnight followed by two Shepherd Masses.. 1
Dec. 25rMasses: 6:00, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00 and 11:30 a. m. No Evening Mass on Christmas Day Jan. 1Masses: 6:00, 7^00, 8:30, 10:00 and 11:30 a. m.
No Evening Mass on New Year's Day
Inner City Protestant Parish, 910 Galapago, Marilou Taggart Dec. 22-Christmas Party, 7:30 p. m.
All parish programs will be closed from Dec. 23 to Jan. 2. The office will be open during this time.
First Mennonite, 430 W. 9th Ave., Marcus Bishop, Minister Dec. 17Sunday School Christmas Program followed by short pastoral message and candlelighting service 9:00 a.m. Choral program of Christmas music by Church choir and Choristers Choir, 7:00 p. m.
West High To Present Singing Christmas Tree
Commission On Community Relations Presents Program On Minority Problems
The Coordinating Council, crttzeh arm of th4 Denver. Coim mission ; on .Community Rela-
Monday eveningl'DeCember 4 h at 3the United Wy Auditorium! demonstrating ^ome of the! problems* a minority person gods through in | attempting to-get employment! Mr. Carl Hollander, staff member of the Tort Logan Meiitgl Health Cen-. terf played the) role of a Spanish: American iridn in the socio-dramdVMrs. friscilla Cody, dlsb -of'; Fort Logan, assisted Mr. Hollander. : fether persons fn the drama Were Mrs. Rachel Npel,. Consultant, Commission oh Community Relations; Mrs. Anna Maria Sltndoval, North Denver Action Center; and Alex Marin, student ft Metro State College.
Reacting to th# dramatic presentation, Sam i Martinez, Director of the Cdlorado O.E.O., remarked, 'T'm |tire the drama you've, just see} is not atypi-al of the situation in Colorado. I think, it. is time- to become acti on-oriented Jristead of verbal-oriented. .'*'%4any of our (OEO) programs in Colorado have had to shutdown because of insufficient funds. We have made some progress in Colorado . .. but it Iseems that for each person placed in a job, another one frops out of school.".
Olin Webb, representing the Denver Chamber of Commerce said that his organization has become increasingly aware of the needs of the unskilled person. According to Webb, the Chamber has "become increasingly aware that instead of 300 job training program slots, we need 3000 to 4000 training slots to do a good job
This is what we are trying to lace up to now."
After eGich'_ of the eight pqn-Imsts hWi. o'chcmbe; lo Ireaet to the drama, questions, -from the floor were accepted: Questions ] ranged from why the Colorado Employment .Service; is riot more effective to why the Mountain States Telephone Company does not seem.-!to have, a fairer hiring policy. To the question dm .whether the asking for arrest records on job appl.cations is not a violation of a person's rights,. James Reynolds, Director of the Colorado Civil Rights Commit Sion answered, "It certainly; is-q. violation of. his rights. We. are trying to get this question off employment applications. The question is irrelevant, since many arrest records contain no; 'convictions-which the employer does not knowand it has nothing to do with getting a job anyway. An exception would be if someone was trying to get a job as a bank teller and had been arrested, for burglary, theft, or something like .that."
A crowd of over 350. persons: in the United. Way auditorium, enthusiastically applauded the: drama and questioned the panel of eight. Senator John 3ermingham (R-Denver) moderated the panel. Attorney Frank King, President of the Coordinating Council, chaired the meeting. Other panel members were John Lewis, Colorado Apprenticeship Council; Stanley Moskal, Mountain States Telephone Company; Mrs. Olga Thallev, Colorado Urban League; and Harold Adams, Colo: ado Employment Service.
This year, West's Singing Christmas Tree is celebrating its twenty-seventh anniversary.
West's Singing Christmas Tree became a reality in 1941, when Mrs.. Willia Girault, former West High School teacher, organized the first singing tree. The tree Consisted of 50 choir members and West's National Honor Society sponsored the tree financially with a donation of $50. The first performances were originally presented only as a school assembly.
literally overnight, the tree became famous; and news of the tree was spread over the world by famous syndicated newspapers. A feature about the tree was even found1 in a newspaper in Japan. In 1945, a picture of,the Singing Christmas Tree> wgs blown up to life-size and .^splayed in Rockefeller Center, in New York. City, for the holiday season.
For many years a wooden frame was used for the choir members to stand on but on *he tree's tenth anniversary the school administration donated a new steel framework csting $2500.
This year, for the first time -boixcjbs will :fee used: Thes^; boughs cost $300 but will be used for at least three years. The boughs will, be brayed with silver and'gpld /Point. Also adding more real-; ism are, the ,] tinted flashlights held by each choir member.
Huge fans counteract the heat, of the lights. The Singing Christmas Tree enchants the audience with a changing kaleidoscope of blended light and sound.
Performances for the public dre.at the following times: Dec. 187:30 p. m..; Dec. 197:3Q p. m.; Dec. 207:30 p. m.; Dec 21-^7:30 p. m.
Following the meeting, re-
in preparing people for jobs. frc?r ments we're, served.
Art Museum Features Doll Display Fbr Holidays
For the Holiday Season, the Denver Art Museum has brought out ofstorage some choice examples from its famous collection of dolls. From Dec. 9 through Dec. 31, "Dolls and Doll Houses" are on display at the Denver Art -Museum's Chappell House Gallery, 1300 Logan Street. It should make a delightful excursion for the whole family. Admission is free.
Doll houses exhibited include a three-bedroom Victorian house, an 18th century Netherlands house, a German china and glassware shop and a dry goods store, all completely equipped with the tiny objects of eveiwdav life which have charmed people ever the cen-1 tunes.


Page two
recorder
December, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West' Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Sastid' Fe Drive Phone
Editor: Erma lean Harris Assistant Editor:
Jaye Martinez
Staff Reporters:
Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder
We are glad with Mrs. Juan ita Winterhalder and her.j family in the good success of i
ller hospitalization for surgery Buses pr<>ve Usefu,
Senior Citizens News
in recent, days.
To Senior Citizens
7ieifMo'i6ooct Tiotct
Dickie and Eddie Fresquez were the guesits over Thanksgiving holidays at their grandmother's, Mrs. Patsy Fresquez and Uncle Jody of 1215 Lipcm Street.
. Janice and Yvonne Baca of 1325 Lipan Street were ill with ,the flu but are much better) They are. the nieces of Patsy Fresquez of 1215 Lipan Street.
1" Gary Perez of 1325 Lipan Street has been ill in the Children's' Hospital 'fbr a week. : He will be coming* home- soon. He' is the nephew*. ;of. Patsy Fresquez of 1215 Lipan Street,
. Jody Herrera has.- been ill with the flu but; is back in school, 8 ...
Mrs. May Day. of 138 Wst 1st Avenue was a luncheon guest of the Otto Larnbert-sons. The Lambertsons are from Salt Lake. City)-' The, luncheon was enjoyed at the Top of .the Rockies restaurant., Mrs. Lambertson is the .sister of Mrs. May Day.
On Friday, December 1st, at the Wesley Methodist Church, Miss Mary Wiley was married to Richard Myers of Rawlins, Wyoming. The couple will make their home there. Mrs. Myers was a long time resident of the West Side.
Mr. Lee Sullivan of 282 Inca is recovering rapidly from his recent major operation.
Mrs. Faye Brott, 1426 Osage St, was visiting relatives in Nebraska over the Thanksgiving holiday.
Presently "settled in" at the new Hirschfeld Towers are: Mr. and Mrs. Everett Dobson, Mrs. Marie Jacobs, Mrs. Maude Deranbeau, Mrs. Gertrude Prosser. The apartments ranging from buffet to one and twc bedrooms with modem kitchen and private bath facilities are the "last word" in modem day engineering and building achievement for comfort and convenience. Mr. Leonard Chadwick is the new manager.
Mr. Newton L. Richardson who lived at 1200 Lipan ior .18 years, fell recently and broke his hip. After being in the hospital for several weeks.-he is now at the Columbine Nursing Home, 3835 Harlan Street Cards and letters would be appreciated by Mr. Richardson.
Terence- Coleman, nephew A study recently completed by of Rev. and Mrs. David Min- Transportation Committee pi ton, will be in Denver for file Coordinated Services for the Christmas holidays. Mr. Cole- Aging Project shows that 1, man, who is also godson of, out of 1/186 older persons Rev. Minton is presently work- surveyed usebuses occasioning in Canada and is origi- j oily or frequently. Only 15 do iqlly from England, as is Rev.; not. Only 37 per cent own Minton. automobiles and only 30 per
cent are able to drive themselves. Nearly 90 percent live within walking distance of a bus line, and nearly 67 per cent use the bus a* least once
cent
Pvt. Ira Gene Rencomfoe spent his leave at home w'-r his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Bear and family, 424 W. 3rd, . . 0
Ave. He is now stationed at a I gl§ *
Camp rendleton, Calif., with sald Bi BB use the bus Hi , . . -lore often if fare were re-
tne Marines. , 1. * _ .
I vuce-\ Heaviest usage is on
. weekdays between 9:30 a. m..
First Avenue Presbyterian I and 4 p. m.'i
Church, 120 West 1st Avenue, ! __________________
would appreciate any Gold Pond stamps or certificates anyone could donate. ... They are replacing the dining room ;ables with the stamps and certificates.; These could be mailed or taken to the church.
Mrs b Marsha Stanek is in Fitzsimons Army: Hospital for ircarment.
Scrndi Winterhalder, Marsha White and Joel., Blomqihst. are students at §|eriing : /College. Joel- .served cts' 'cd^^tqih'-",'bf the Sterling ;. JooBall team which has had a good season with 3 wins, 1 tie, and 4 loss-
^K| IS '
Local Graduate
COORDINATED SERVICES FOR THE AGING COMMUNITY CENTER
Metropolitan-area senior citizens are invited--to a songfest of popular and old-time songs at 2:30 p.- De^mber 18 at Coordinated : Servfees for the Aging a Community fCenter, 1620 Meade Street.'-
;A-The progrdm" will be led by Mrs. Nptma S. Wahl, 1825 Logon. Street, playing the piano
free
LINCOLN PARK CLUB
On November 7, following a delicious light luncheon, the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club installed the newly elected officers who will serve during the coming year. Eighteen members were present when the outgoing president, Mrs. Grace Musgrove, turned the gavel over to Mrs. Martha Olsen, 1406 Navajo St. Mrs. Laura Gregory, 1328 W. Colfax, became the vice-president, Mrs. Lucia Gorman, 1427 Mariposa St., retained the office of treasurer, and Mrs. Elsie Lil-ienthal, 1320 W. Colfax, became secretary.
The first duty of the new president was to preside over the planning of the club's holiday' activities. Several very interesting programs were considered. Mr. Allen Bradley-oFLittleton, president of the Federation of Organizations of, Seniors presented the Veter-Older People in Metropolitan ans Hospital with three dozen Denver, was present and gave large feeding bibs made by a short informal talk on subjects ;of interest to Denver's seniors.
Lincoln Park Community Center, 1,£38 Navajq St., Nov. 21. Seventeen members and thirteen guests enjoyed' a buffet of baked ham with a wide variety of vegetables, salads, and desserts. The tables were most effectively decorated with mats of dark green linen, orange candles, and baskets of ruit and flowers. Although there was little time for business, Mr. William Ratzlaff, newly appointed manager of Lincoln Park Homes, spoke of some of the safety devices he hopes to install in the buildings occupied exclusively by Older people.
On Nov. 5, a group of five' ladies from the Lindoln Park
The annual fall pot luck din-
members of the -club. The material was also donated by the club. A tcur of the hos-Cpital : completed a very. inter-
Mr. Raymond M. Soriano, son of Mr. and Kirs. Elmer- Sala-. zar graduated from Colorado State College On the 13th of December, 1967. He is the husband of Nora Soriano and has a 6 month old son, Ray Jr. Ke hopes to further his education by returning to college for a Master's Degree.
A message To West; Siders
The following is. directed to tjiose peopl^on the West ISide who supported ; the West' joide Action Courfel election iff i July by casting their votes for the candidates they preferred. We assume that the candidates elected were elected because they received the most votes from people who believed in them enough to vote for them. Now we would like to know why some* of these people elected have been so unconcerned about that trust, that they have failed to show up at ANY of the Council meetings. Others come but once in a while,/-perhaps just often enough (every third meeting) to stay a member of the Council. We know that for everyone there will be times that they cannot attend. But the courtesy of a quick phone call to the Action Center would produce an absence with cause which is acceptable to /the Council and the community. Th several of the census tracts q| ICIKIECC KiriTEC absent members have left those
DUdllMCdO INwIEd areas with only half or even
Mrs. Mary Salaz is the new less representation on the Owner of the Acoma Beauty Council.
Bar, 16 Acoma, phone number, If you, a voting resident In 777-5412. Mrs. Salaz, a native the last election, are concerned of Vancouver, Washington,! by this apparent irresponsible purchased the business from I behavior by YOUR representa-the former owner, Mrs. Gladys -tive that YOU elected, we sug-i Georgette Douglas, in August. | gest two ways of showing that Mrs. Salaz lives with her hus- concern. One, attend the Counband and three children in j cil meetings the last Thursday forth Denver. j of each month (call the Action
A graduate of training at j Canter, 534-5141 for exact time Opportunity School, Mis. Salazjand placeTor two, make a call blamed her license in 1964 and has worked in the hair-ressirig field since. She welcomes the chance to serve West Side women rat Iter salon.
ner of the Lincoln Park Sen- u £. a - , .
. . m i____u t .i esting afternoon.- On Tuesday,
ror Citizens was held at the ^
. JNov.v 2-8, tne';-I^i^i--;met/again.
----- ----:-----------rto sew oh -layettes which will
be given to needy mothers-
WEDDING BELLS through rAtirand Comjritihi-ty:
Center:
Miss: Rita DeNqvq,; : daughter of Mr. and! Mrs. Lupe De Nava,. 444 Elati Street/ will become the bride of; Mr. ..Victor m Lucerp. on December.23 in a ceremony at Sf. Joseph's Re demptorist Church. . The mar-ridge ; '. ceremony *; will jbe' C6h-)ucted by Father Raymond Stewart.
Resident Council
OF LINCOLN AND SOUTH LINCOLN PARE HOMES
The Resident Council would
Rest In Peace
CRANE
Rev.X. C. Crane of 241 Inca: passed awby November 15th.. Interment was at Crown Hill. Cemetery.
ROCK
Mr. John Rock, of 1256 Lipan. Street, passed away November 23rd and was buried at Mt. Olivet Cemetery. Mr. Rock was 83 years old when he passed away. He lived at like to welcome all of its new 1236 Lipan 'Street for over 21
residents.
The next meeting of the Lincoln and South Lincoln Resident Council will be January 4, 1968, at 7:30 p.m., at Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mari: posa. Come and bring a friend.
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes would like to wish you a Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year.
years. Mr. .Rock was bom in Russia and came to the United States 62 years ago. His wife-passed away four years ago. He is survived by five sons and four daughters.
McGUERE
Mrs. Reed McGuire of Indianapolis, Indiana, the sister of Mrs. Louise Churchill of 1209 Lipan Street, passed away November 14th in Indiana.
to vour reorese-n+rHive rmd find out how manv of the four regular meetings since the election bat he has attended. You elected him, you have a right to know.
May your heart sing with the true joy of Christmas time.


THE RECORDER
D§c§mber, 196?
Page Three.
NEW PRINCIPAL AT FAIRMONT
The beginning of the school year in September sqw niany .changes at Fairmont.' Probably one of file most important anges was a new principal Mr. Kenneth Goff.
Mr. Goff comes to Fairmont from Wyman Elementary School where he was principal for six years. He has been with the Denver Public School System since 1942. He was assistant principal at Smiley Jr. High for 19 years. His first teaching job was at Englewood where he was employed for two years.
Mr.. Goff is a graduate of Colo'rado schools. He re-, ceived his public school education. on the Western Slope and has degrees from Colo rado State Teachers College and Denver University.
Mr. Goff stated his goal at Fairmont is to meet the immediate needs of students there. So far this has produced a hot lunch program, the start of special education classes and other new programs. The West Side extends a sincere welcome to Mr. Goff and also a thank you for progress ah ready achieved^
. . On, December 5th the kinder-. garten students at" "Fairmont enjoyed- a chance", to-Tide in;, a police,/ car -through the f cpun tesv of the Denver.: Police De-pOTtment In smcjl"'groups they wetej^iven. -a iiae around e school, grounds with lig.h+ flashing and-, siren wailing. It was a big^ .event for everyone, 'including the neighbors around who were watching:.'
FAIRMONT PTA The Board of Managers, held a 'Christmas pot Juck \ dinner j on December 12th- with a 50c gift exchange. The nejct Board ot Managers meeting is January 9lh. All parents are invited to attend.
More parents are needed to join the PTA. If you are. interested, contact the school office for information.

Greenlee Students Present Holiday Plays
One of the sixth grade class es at Greenlee School, Room 201/ gave a Thanksgiving play on Nov. 22 called "Give Thanks for the Pilgrims." The entire class helped in planning and presenting the play. They made invitations, pilgrim costumes, a mural, and even fudge for the play. Parents and some of the classes were invited to attend.

The annual Greenlee Ele*-mentary Christmas Program will be presented Thursday, Dec. 21 and Friday, Dec. 22, fa our auditorium. Four performances will be given in order to accommodate all of the children who attend this school. Parents are invited to attend arv of the performances 9:30 a. m. and 1:30 p. m.
This year, the program is a Chris'mas Plcrv. Participating stn^e-n+s are from grades one, two, four, five and six. There will be sneaking, pantomimin'- md1 singing, dancing, and performing calisthenics. The boys and girls are working verv hard and are eager to present this program. Hope all of you will come out to see us.
Fairmont Begins New Programs
Thursday, December 7th saw the start of a primary level special .education class at Fairmont. Miss Roberta Freidl will teach'a class of. 12 children in one; of the newly remodeled shower rooms off the gym. Plans are being made for another special education class j of older children in the other | shower room as so6n as renovations are completed there. Hopefully this will be in time for the second eeihester. '
Fairmont has.'. several programs' % provided by various teachers-. in which- 'pupils 'may qcMaij^le if ; they wish.' Miss CprnwcM,-'. 'the'' ;music- tqdC'her,: :has? ';'d. Special music "classv for 1st,. 2nd/"and 3rd' gfaders-one norning d week fiom* 8:00 to. 8:30. ; She' also directs a 6th. grade "Chorus; at the noon hour.- -This; Mr. r Ri'dhardson conducts a' Voluntary 1 art Glass one after-noe>n a week and Mrs. Beards-, worth has a science project once a week for 3rd graders.
The upper grades at Fairmont will present a Christmas program for the rest of the >hooj and parents on December 20*h at 2:00 p. m. in the auditorium. They will repeat :=%e. program itxt 7:30. p. m. for paren+s unable to attend dur-:ng' the day.
Religious Education Classes Slated At St. Joseph's
Religious education 1 is provided for, all students in junior and senior.high school on Wednesdays from 7:30 p. m. to 8:30 in the St. Joseph's High School. Students from grades 7 through 12 will receive confirmation- this year, but only if their attendance to classes is regular. If students have! received confirmation, their religious training should still continue through the twelfth grade. Teachers that are students at Loretto Heights, Colorado School of Mines, and Regis are offering a fine program in addition /to the Sisters who are teaching.
Class far 5th, 6th grades is Wednesday from 4 to 5 p. m. in the Grade School. Class for 1st through 4th grades is on Saturday from 9:30 to 10:30 a. in. in St. Joseph's Grade School.
Students who have not yet received their first communion should attend4 class at the time their, regular grade level attends.
The last .classes before Christmas for.grades;! through 4 will be. Saturday/ December 15th. THe Glasses will' resume Saturday, January I3th?
... If, there is any "question, please.. contact Sister Mary -laudette, .r623r2833. :
AURARIA NEWS
NEW STAFF j
r Mrs. Elizabeth Kester, pro--gram director at Auraria Community Center, has resigned tc take a position as Head Start Consultant with Denver Opportunity. Reuel Amdur, who has been working in the office of he West Side Improvement ssociatiOn, is the new program director. Welcome Reuel, from all the staff at Auraria.
* ...
Vern Wilson, who had the basketball teams for some time, has had to resign his position because of illness. He is mi^ed by the fellows, in his teams and also by members of the A urmia staff.
TO PRESENT FITT
The Auraria I'^-ia^^orhood Group is proud to. p~e:ent a
skit for your entertainment ort Channel 6 at 9 p. iri., December 19. Hie players are as follows: ,
Mrs. Trusting SoulRosiann Lewis
. Mrs. Good Neighbor lay Martinez
Salesman for Friendly Furniture HouseJean Decker
Manager-, High Rate Finance CoKathamay Hart
This was the slat presented at the Consumer Fair at Auraria last spring. It concerns the problems of buyers with gyp stores, door-to-door salesmen and sales gimmicks.
'
We, the staff at Auraria* want; to wish all the people in the community a 'Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year.
STUDENTS AT BAKER HELP NEEDY
All- students who brought bYs for needy enliven; or con .tribute*! 5'c were (entitled tc take part in' gj drawing for. a tape "recorder^ qnH-fece'mber' B The sev'erith graqe was top contributor to the <^ood, cause with the.... ninth grade coming in second and the eighth grade -PS third. Laura Valdez won the tape recorder in the draw ing.
HEAD START CENTERS BUSY WITH CHRIST/:AS PLANS
FT.ATT CENTER I Claus will be on hand to dis-
I tribute gifts and Christmas The Elati Head Start Center stockings to the children, would like to thank Mrs. Piper and Mrs. Geobel. an! their Girl Scout troop for p ;eir gifts to the -children. The Girl Scout *roop made, and gave, to the children of the Head Stcrt Center, pine;cone 'furVTe,rs for Thanksgiving and a bean bag game._ o,'
.* .*
Open House' will be held at the Elati Head'- St^rt Center,.
228 Elati, on Dee. 19. Everyone. is invited fo-' attend ...from 7 : to 9 p.;<: m. ,. Refreshments will be served.
ST. ELIZABETHS PLANS FOR CHRISTMAS
Children at St. Elizabeth School will be entertained by Santa Claus oh December 22, and given Christmas treats from the Sisters and the PTA.
St. Elizabeth's soccer team is o be congratulated for winning 3rd place in the Soccer League.
Mrs. Swartz, 5th grade teacher at St. Elizabeth, and her class will be at the Security Life Bank to sing Christmas carols on Thursday, December 21 from 12 noon to 1 p. m.
St Elizabeth School PTA had a pot luck supper December 13, 1967. Staff and teachers were given Christmas gifts from the PTA and Sisters from Marycrest led everyone in Christmas carols. A good time was had by all.
Elmwood News
Back-to-School Night was held at Elmwood on Nov. 29. Punch and coffee were served. The event was a big success in that many of the parents attended.
Baker PTA
The Baker PTA had a luncheon on December 6 and will have their annual Teachers' Christmas luncheon on December 20th. The-monthly Board
Fathers of Head Start children at the Elati Center pitched in and together painted the play equipment for the chil dren at the Center. Those fathers taking part were: Reuben Arellano, George Lopez 'im Montano, Joe Vialpando and Manuel Moreno. The staff nd children both thank the fathers who took the time and effort for this project.
December 21 will be the last 3 ay of school at the Elati
meeting will be on January 3|cnter- School will resume on at 10:00 a. m. All parents of Tanuary 2. A Christmas party Baker students are invited' to js planned for the children a? attend. . .<* jthe Center on Dec. 21. Santa
AURARIA CENTER
The regular Head Start classes at Auraria and Elati are filled. Applicants will be put n a waiting list and will be notified of future openings.
The Therapeutic Preschool at r'nraria is still accepting referrals.,- Information can. be obtained by calling Mary Lou Monan -at 534-8431.
I§ The Auraria Head Start Parents held a. "Pot Luck Luncheon" on November 15; which: iproye,irdo be very successful.. A^spe5ql thank's to all the parents/who brought food and participqf.;- 1 in .helping make the luncheon a huge success.
On Friday, December I, the Auraria Head Start .children and parents took a trip to City Park Zoo and the Museum of Natural History. They are al-4o planning on a trip to the May, D&F to see the Christmas displays and on December 21 they will have their Christmas party.
"Merry Christmas and a ^appy New Year is wished o all parents and children from 'he Head Start staff.
Pupils At St. Joseph's Elementary School Stage Christmas Pageant
A theatre in the; round production will be held on December 21 .at 7:30* p. m.
St. loseph's Grade School will present "The Christmas Story" in the church hall. The six lecturers will read passages of the New Testament concerning the Birth of Christ as the first grade class will be
&
responsible for the tableau. The seventh grade choir, under the direction of Sister Mary Christopher, R.S.M., will sing many of the traditional Christmas songs and help put the audience into the real joy of Chrismas by re-living that First Christmas once again The public is invited.
Mite,,
Brownie Girl Scouts
A new Brownie Troop has been organized in the Fairmont and St. Joseph school districts. The group is under *he direction of Mrs., Dorothy* Britton. The troop number is 1343. Eleven girls were invested on November 2Tst They are: Mary Sue Britton, Loretta and Wanda Cordova, Cherie Fairbanks, Margo Garda, Esther Guedea, Kathy Loftin, Kathy Mulder, Frcmcine Martinez, Anna Marie Prichett, Laura Sturedevaut, and Rosie Trujillo.
The troop received thefr flag on December 4th through the -ouriesy of the V.F.W. They have made two trips. One ms a visit to the Safeway Dairies and another to a show ^ the Cadets and Sector Girl Scouts called the "Hillbilly House."
Right now the Brownies are busy making things for Christmas.



r*n Qp
Tout
T H E- R'E C 6 R D S R -------Hp§.. - .... -.......... -- December, 1967'
Advertisements
.. Welcome to Wesley
Methodist Church 5th and Galapago
Sunday School 9:45. Church 11:00. Rev. James E. Hall, 222-3337.
FOR RENT
Studio apt. Heater, refrig., stove. Very reasonable. Phone 543-7439.
WORK WANTED Would like any kind of housework job. Call anytime. 266-9650. Louise Arellano.
Babysitting done in my home. Infants to school age. $10 for 1 child, $15 for 2. 777-7268.
WANTED TO BUY I will buy almost anything of value. Guns, antique, old coins, furniture, dishes, wire all kinds. 808 Santa Fe Drive. Santa Fe Auction. Call 255-8133
The Recorder is now,carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 30c per line, $.50 minimum. Box 50% extra. Bold face35c a line.
Ads must be brought to the office of the West Side Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Drive, by the 10th of each month. Payment for the ad must be made at the same time the ad is brought in.
The Recorder is offering this service to the community feeling that ijt will be useful to our readers.
West
Side
Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS
Dec. 18Songfest Coordinated Services for the Aging Community Center, 1620 Meade Street, 2:30 p. m.
Dec. 18, 19, 20, 2k^West High School Christmas Program 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 20Fairmont Christmas Program, 2:00 p. m. and 7:30
P. m.
Dec. 21, 22Greenlee School Christmas Program in auditorium at 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Dec., .21St.' Joseph's Christmas Program,. Grade School, 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 28 Westside Action Council Meeting, 1042 Santa Fe Drive, 7:30 p. m.
__
EACH "WEEK
"Spanish Culture, History and Religious Message" presented on KFSC radio station every Sunday, 7:30 a. m. by Rev.. Thomas Sepulveda, of First Spanish Methodist Church.
Stop Being A Drop-Out!
Action Council
Be A Drop-In!
WHO?
Anyone from 18 to 99 whc wants help in preparing for a high school diploma and who comes within the low income bracket.
WHY?
To get a better paying job; to catch up on basic reading, English, and math; to enjoy learning; to meet new friends.
WHERE?
At St. Elizabeth's School, 11th and Curtis: (1040 11th St.)
WHEN?
Ten weeks at two evenings a week: TuesdaysMath and Science; Thursdays Reading, English, and Social Studies.
HOW MUCH?
Nothing! 000000000! No charge for books or tuition.
HOW COME?
Because interested adults want you to have what you should havea high school diploma'; and they have set it at night so you can hold a job and go to school, too; and they feel' that to be successr ful, there must be only 3 or 4 students per teacher.
Won't YOU Drop In?
First Session-7 p. m., Jan. 4, 1968.
If you miss this date, come to St. Elizabeth's. Come Tuesday or Thursday evening and fill out an application for the next session.
Program Director: Sister M.. Cecilia, O. S. F.
. Expenses of ,thiis program are paid through, donations.
UNITED WAY GOAL ALMOST ACHIEVED
A total of $5,318,940 or 99.3% of goal was raised in the United Way campaign, Roy L. Mason, MH.UW president, announced.
Mason praised the work of Campaigri Chairman W. Coles Hudgins, executive vice president, Mountain States Telephone Company, and the 10,000 volunteers in the five-county MHUW area who made pos-, sible the "greatest amount available for distribution \ to voluntary agencies in the 80-year history of the United Way.
Don't Forget To Help!
Ronald A. Miller, Executive Director of the Tuberulosis and Respiratory Disease Association of Denver and Tri-County said today the Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association is very appreciative of the early returns from the Christmas Seals. However, we know many people have neglected to reply to the letter about Christmas Seals, so we are mailing a reminder to those people; from whom we have not heard. No doubt there will be many people whose contributions were in the mail when we mailed the reminder. We wish we could avoid this but we don't know how to do so. We can only apologize and say "Thank You."
News
The Westside Action Council met on November 30th for their regulai* meeting. They. heard a report from Mr. Grisbee, Deputy Director of D. O. on the YEA fpr Denver program for Young Adults. Also given was a .report by Council member Phil Torres on a meeting he had attended concerning the Legal Services program future plans. He reported to the Council that there had been some discussion concerning the possibility of taking lhe Legal Services out of the five Action Centers and consolidating them into two or three centers. Mr. Torres, on behalf of the Council and the West Side, stated that he felt this would prove inadequate to provide legal services to the target areas. It was stated that at the present the Legal Service is handling 100 cases per month at each Action Center on an average. The Coun--i\ passed a motion to follow up Mr. Torres' statement with a letter expressing the Council's concern that the Legal Services continue iri each Action Center.
The Council voted to send a letter to the West Side Improvement Association Board of Directors expressing the Council's desire to see the WSIA continue to function in the neighborhood as a community organization regardless of 'the expiration o£ the fund under | which the Office operates. | u
The] Council elected .two members to represent -them in two organizations. Mr. Phil 11 ones was elected to sit on the D. O. Board of Directors arid Mrs. Rachel Guedea on the Health Board, which is responsible for the planning and direction of the proposed West-side Health Center.
The. Action Council meets the last Thursday of every month! at 7:30 p. m. at the
W. 7th Ave. <& Santa Fe Drive
Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.; 2-5:30 p.m. Sat 10 a.m.-12 noon and 1-5:30 p.m. Closed Wednesdays.
: Christmas books are waiting for you at Byerg Neighborhood Library. The history, customs, and legends of Christmas, as well as favorite tales and brand new stories, are included in the holiday books. You'll find "how to make it" books on decorations, gifts, cards, and candles. Books of i Christmas plays, activities, and entertainment also are available.
A great many magazines feature the theme of Christmas in the December issue. BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS,
THE NEW YEAR MENU
MAIN COURSEMEAT AND POULTRY. The amount of food we are likely to eat in 1968 on a per person basiswill show little change from 1967, predict U. S. Department of Agriculture specialists. Based on supply estimates, we'll eat about the same amount of beef, pork, and potatoes. Chicken will be on the menu more often, while turkey and eggs will likely; be less plentiful ; over the ; course of the year. (They were in record supply in 1967). Expect less Veal and lamb, as well.
FRUIT FQR DESSERT? Supplies of fruit this winter are expected to be smaller. Higher prices are likely for most items, both fresh and processed. A smaller citrus crop is in prospect.
.-DECEMBER PLENTIFUL Foods. Turkey, the favorite for holiday dinners, is in plentiful supply, according to the U., S, Department of Agriculture. In q variety of sizes top; from
AMERICAN HOME, THE LAD-IES' HOME JOURNAL, and McCALLS' all have special holiday articles and- stories, and these magazines are available at. Byers.
A free Christmas pamphlet, prepared by the Denver Public Library and the Denver Public Schools, suggests children's books which would be fine for Christmas gifts. The price, description, and age-group of each lx>ok are given to help you select a gift that is just right! In addition, the October, 1967, issue of "Clues;" a-vailable free at any Denver library, lists new books for worthwhile adult reading.
Merry Christmas, everyone, and best wishes for many happy hours of reading In 1968.
Questions And Answers About Drugs
Will drugs deteriorate if stored a long time?
Many drugs deteriorate and t may become ineffective or ev- {I en dangerous when stored a i | long- time. A person should 1 date all over-the-counter drugs when he buys them. The }j pharmacist will date prescrip- S tion drugs. Some medicines I I bear an expiration date and > should be discarded when that i date is reached. In general, if a person is in doubt about j j the usabilitv or freshness of any 11 drug, he should throw it away.
How much of any one medicine should a person buy at jl one time?
Medicines and health supplies should be bought in realistic quantities. In the case of prescription medicines, the physician will decide how much should be bought at one || time. In buying over-the-caufi- j ter drugs, some considerations ) should be: How often is the i product used? How much is used each time? How many persons in the same household use the product?
, j ; *. ' * _ * *
fcyUU-OVER CORNER
Cookies for Christmas . for an easy and delicious gift . |
try:
Snicker-doodles.
1 cup (2 sticks butter or oleo) |^/2 cups confectioners sugar 1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla (
2% cups sifted flour 1 teaspoorL-eream of tartar 1 teaspoon baking soda Va teaspoon salt In a; mixing bowl" cream buttery gradually add sugar and beat until light and fluffy, j Beat in egg and vanilla. Sift together flour, baking soda, cream of tartar, and salt; gradually add to creamed' mixture. ;
. Chill dough for ease in handling. Shaper, into, balls about Klnch in diameter; roll in mixture of j cup sugar and 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Place on baking sheet- Bake 10-42 minutes. Yield dpz, .cppk-ies.
Action Council Plans Block Meetings
The Westside Action Reri-tcr Las had .se-ve al neighborhood 'group meetings to discuss :iume cl the problems in the neighborhood.
After- the firstof the year, the neighborhood representatives will start organizing block meetings throughout the target area,, in order to identify problems, in the community. This will enable the Center to work more collectively with the community.
The Center's philosophy is to help people help themselves. So, therefore, these group meetings will start giving an incentive to the people in the community to start developing programs they feel are needed In their community.
If any citizen is interested in holding a meeting, call Miss Helen Lucero, Community Developer at 534-5141.
The Westside Action Council and the Westside Action Center wish everyone a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.
Westside Action Center, 1042 Santa Fe Drive.- The community is urged to attend these meetings and to support the Council with their ideas and suggestions for improving the West Side.
the 8 to 10 pounders to jumbo turkeys, over 22 pounds. Broiler-fryers are in abundance too, and with egg production up, egg prices willf also be lower. Other plentiful foods are oranges, grapefruit, grape ( juice and cabbage.
BYERS BOOK REVIEWS


Full Text
I
1
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 4, Number 7
JyfonJthly Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
December, 1967
Christmas £>erutt£8
Apostolic Fcdth Church, 1000 Kalamath, Rev. Leroy Toews Dec. 17Sunday School Program 7 p. m.
Dec. 24Christmas Music Program 11 a. m.
Church of God, 5th and Fox St, Rev. Leroy Vance Dec. 17Christmas Program 7 p. m.
Dec. 25Christmas Services 11 a. m. 7:30 p. m.
Evangelistic Temple, 738 Santa Fe, Michael Roybal, Minister Dec. 24^Sunday Morning Service 10 a. m.
Bags of candy, nuts and apples will be distributed to all children attending the service. Everyone invited.
No services Christmas Day.
First Ave.. Presbyterian, 120 W. 1st Ave., Rev. A. J. Blomquist Dec. 22Sunday School Christmas Program 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 24Sunday Services 11 a. m., 6:-30 p. m.
Sunday School 9:45 a. m.
Nd services Christmas Day.*'' *.>
First Bethany Lutheran, 215 W. 5th Ave., Rev. Fred A Bloch Dec. 17-Choir Program 7 p. m.
Dec. 24Sunday Services 11 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Dec. 25Christmas Service 11 a. m.
First Spanish Methodist, 935 W. 11th, Rev. Thomas Sepulveda Dec. 24Christmas Service and Communion 11a. m.
No services Christmas day.
St Cajetan Catholic, 9th & Lawrence, Father Max Santamaria ( Dec. 22-23Confessions: 2 to 5 p. m. and 6:00 to 9 p. m.
Dec. 24^Christrrids Choir will sing carols, beginning at 11:30 p. m*- ;JMidhigh^. Mctss, .:12 midnight Dec. 2$Mc^s: 7/ 8, 9, 10:30 a. m. and \i'boon.
No evening mass on Christmas Day.
Jan. 1Mass: 7, 8, 9, 10:30 a. m. and 12 noon.
No evening mass on New Year's Day.
St. Elizabeth Catholic, 11th and Curtis St. Rev. Fabian Flynn Dec. 23Confessions: 3:30 to 5:30 p. m.; 7:30 to 8:30 p. m. Dec. 24Christmas Choir 11:30 p. m.
Midnight Mass, 12 midnight Dec. 25Mass 6, 8, 9, 11 a. m. and 12:15 p. m.
St. John's Lutheran, W. 3rd Ave. & Acoma, Rev. Paul Hansen Dec. 17Choir Concert 7:Q0i" p. m.
Deb. 24''Children's reogram 7 :u0 p. m.
Candlelight Service 11:00ft)- m.
Dec. 25"Das Begebnis," Pastor C. H. Mundinger 9:00 g. rh.
"ThS Happening'' Pastor G. H.; Mundinger 11:00 a. m. Dec. 31'Th^ Nick of Time,". Pastor Hansen 8:30 & 11 am/; 'Loving Kindness," Seminarian Charles Corbin, 8:30 at chapel. ,
, Communion Service 7:00 p. m. f
Jan. L-r-^'A Blessed New Year," Pastor E. J. Friedrich,] 11 a.m.
St. Peter's Episcopal, 126 W. 2nd Ave., Rev. David Minton Dec. 17y-Holy Communion 8 a. m.
Morning Prayer 11 a. m.
Sunday School Service and Christmas Party 4 p. m.,;' Dec. 24Morning Prayer 10 a, Lm.
Holy Communion 11:30 p. m.
Dec. 25Holy Communion 10:00 a. m.
Dec. 26Bishop Thayer will be at St. Peter's to confirm the Rector's nephew and to celebrate Holy Communion at 10 a. m.
Dec. 31Holy Communion 8 a. m. 11 a. m.
Wesley Methodist Church, 465 Galapago, Rev. James E. Hall Dec. 17Christmas Program 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 24Christmas Eve Candlelight Service 7:30 p. m.
West Side Christian, 668 Inca St., Rev. Ronald D. Cook Dec. 17Christmas Program 7 p. m.
Dec. 24Choir Cantata 7 p. mf
Apostolic Church of Jesus, 1039 W. 13th Av., Rev. Toby Rampa Dec. 24Sunday School, 9:30 a. m.
Sunday Morning Worship Service 10j30 a. m.
Christmas Pageant 7 p. m.
No services Christmas Day.
St Joseph's Redemptorist, 605 W. 6th Ave. Rev. James Nugent Dec. 19Confessions before and during the Mother of Perpetual Help Noyena Services at. 3:00, 5:30 and 7:30 p. ip. Dec. 22Confessions: In the afternoon from 3:30-5:30 and 7:30-8:30 p. m.
Dec. 23Confessions: 3:30-5:30 and 7:30-8:30 p. m.
There will be rio confessions heard on Sunday, Dec. 24. Dec. 24Solemn Concelebrated Mass at Midnight followed by two Shepherd Masses.. 1
Dec. 25rMasses: 6:00, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00 and 11:30 a. m. No Evening Mass on Christmas Day Jan. 1Masses: 6:00, 7^00, 8:30, 10:00 and 11:30 a. m.
No Evening Mass on New Year's Day
Inner City Protestant Parish, 910 Galapago, Marilou Taggart Dec. 22-Christmas Party, 7:30 p. m.
All parish programs will be closed from Dec. 23 to Jan. 2. The office will be open during this time.
First Mennonite, 430 W. 9th Ave., Marcus Bishop, Minister Dec. 17Sunday School Christmas Program followed by short pastoral message and candlelighting service 9:00 a.m. Choral program of Christmas music by Church choir and Choristers Choir, 7:00 p. m.
West High To Present Singing Christmas Tree
Commission On Community Relations Presents Program On Minority Problems
The Coordinating Council, crttzeh arm of th4 Denver. Coim mission ; on .Community Rela-
Monday eveningl'DeCember 4 h at 3the United Wy Auditorium! demonstrating ^ome of the! problems* a minority person gods through in | attempting to-get employment! Mr. Carl Hollander, staff member of the Tort Logan Meiitgl Health Cen-. terf played the) role of a Spanish: American iridn in the socio-dramdVMrs. friscilla Cody, dlsb -of'; Fort Logan, assisted Mr. Hollander. : fether persons fn the drama Were Mrs. Rachel Npel,. Consultant, Commission oh Community Relations; Mrs. Anna Maria Sltndoval, North Denver Action Center; and Alex Marin, student ft Metro State College.
Reacting to th# dramatic presentation, Sam i Martinez, Director of the Cdlorado O.E.O., remarked, 'T'm |tire the drama you've, just see} is not atypi-al of the situation in Colorado. I think, it. is time- to become acti on-oriented Jristead of verbal-oriented. .'*'%4any of our (OEO) programs in Colorado have had to shutdown because of insufficient funds. We have made some progress in Colorado .. but it Iseems that for each person placed in a job, another one frops out of school.".
Olin Webb, representing the Denver Chamber of Commerce said that his organization has become increasingly aware of the needs of the unskilled person. According to Webb, the Chamber has "become increasingly aware that instead of 300 job training program slots, we need 3000 to 4000 training slots to do a good job
This is what we are trying to lace up to now."
After eGich'_ of the eight pqn-Imsts hWi. o'chcmbe; lo Ireaet to the drama, questions, -from the floor were accepted: Questions ] ranged from why the Colorado Employment .Service; is riot more effective to why the Mountain States Telephone Company does not seem.-!to have, a fairer hiring policy. To the question dm .whether the asking for arrest records on job appl.cations is not a violation of a person's rights,. James Reynolds, Director of the Colorado Civil Rights Commit Sion answered, "It certainly; is-q. violation of. his rights. We. are trying to get this question off employment applications. The question is irrelevant, since many arrest records contain no; 'convictions-which the employer does not knowand it has nothing to do with getting a job anyway. An exception would be if someone was trying to get a job as a bank teller and had been arrested, for burglary, theft, or something like .that."
A crowd of over 350. persons: in the United. Way auditorium, enthusiastically applauded the: drama and questioned the panel of eight. Senator John 3ermingham (R-Denver) moderated the panel. Attorney Frank King, President of the Coordinating Council, chaired the meeting. Other panel members were John Lewis, Colorado Apprenticeship Council; Stanley Moskal, Mountain States Telephone Company; Mrs. Olga Thallev, Colorado Urban League; and Harold Adams, Colo: ado Employment Service.
This year, West's Singing Christmas Tree is celebrating its twenty-seventh anniversary.
West's Singing Christmas Tree became a reality in 1941, when Mrs.. Willia Girault, former West High School teacher, organized the first singing tree. The tree Consisted of 50 choir members and West's National Honor Society sponsored the tree financially with a donation of $50. The first performances were originally presented only as a school assembly.
literally overnight, the tree became famous; and news of the tree was spread over the world by famous syndicated newspapers. A feature about the tree was even found1 in a newspaper in Japan. In 1945, a picture of,the Singing Christmas Tree> wgs blown up to life-size and .^splayed in Rockefeller Center, in New York. City, for the holiday season.
For many years a wooden frame was used for the choir members to stand on but on *he tree's tenth anniversary the school administration donated a new steel framework csting $2500.
This year, for the first time -boixcjbs will :fee used: Thes^; boughs cost $300 but will be used for at least three years. The boughs will, be brayed with silver and'gpld /Point. Also adding more real-; ism are, the ,] tinted flashlights held by each choir member.
Huge fans counteract the heat, of the lights. The Singing Christmas Tree enchants the audience with a changing kaleidoscope of blended light and sound.
Performances for the public dre.at the following times: Dec. 187:30 p. m..; Dec. 197:3Q p. m.; Dec. 207:30 p. m.; Dec 21-^7:30 p. m.
Following the meeting, re-
in preparing people for jobs. frc?r ments we're, served.
Art Museum Features Doll Display Fbr Holidays
For the Holiday Season, the Denver Art Museum has brought out ofstorage some choice examples from its famous collection of dolls. From Dec. 9 through Dec. 31, "Dolls and Doll Houses" are on display at the Denver Art -Museum's Chappell House Gallery, 1300 Logan Street. It should make a delightful excursion for the whole family. Admission is free.
Doll houses exhibited include a three-bedroom Victorian house, an 18th century Netherlands house, a German china and glassware shop and a dry goods store, all completely equipped with the tiny objects of eveiwdav life which have charmed people ever the cen-1 tunes.


Page two
recorder
December, 1967
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West' Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Sastid' Fe Drive Phone
Editor: Erma lean Harris Assistant Editor:
Jaye Martinez
Staff Reporters:
Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder
We are glad with Mrs. Juan ita Winterhalder and her.j family in the good success of i
ller hospitalization for surgery Buses pr<>ve Usefu,
Senior Citizens News
in recent, days.
To Senior Citizens
7ieifMo'i6ooct Tiotct
Dickie and Eddie Fresquez were the guesits over Thanksgiving holidays at their grandmother's, Mrs. Patsy Fresquez and Uncle Jody of 1215 Lipcm Street.
. Janice and Yvonne Baca of 1325 Lipan Street were ill with ,the flu but are much better) They are. the nieces of Patsy Fresquez of 1215 Lipan Street.
1" Gary Perez of 1325 Lipan Street has been ill in the Children's' Hospital 'fbr a week. : He will be coming* home- soon. He' is the nephew*. ;of. Patsy Fresquez of 1215 Lipan Street,
. Jody Herrera has.- been ill with the flu but; is back in school, 8 ...
Mrs. May Day. of 138 Wst 1st Avenue was a luncheon guest of the Otto Larnbert-sons. The Lambertsons are from Salt Lake. City)-' The, luncheon was enjoyed at the Top of .the Rockies restaurant., Mrs. Lambertson is the .sister of Mrs. May Day.
On Friday, December 1st, at the Wesley Methodist Church, Miss Mary Wiley was married to Richard Myers of Rawlins, Wyoming. The couple will make their home there. Mrs. Myers was a long time resident of the West Side.
Mr. Lee Sullivan of 282 Inca is recovering rapidly from his recent major operation.
Mrs. Faye Brott, 1426 Osage St, was visiting relatives in Nebraska over the Thanksgiving holiday.
Presently "settled in" at the new Hirschfeld Towers are: Mr. and Mrs. Everett Dobson, Mrs. Marie Jacobs, Mrs. Maude Deranbeau, Mrs. Gertrude Prosser. The apartments ranging from buffet to one and twc bedrooms with modem kitchen and private bath facilities are the "last word" in modem day engineering and building achievement for comfort and convenience. Mr. Leonard Chadwick is the new manager.
Mr. Newton L. Richardson who lived at 1200 Lipan ior .18 years, fell recently and broke his hip. After being in the hospital for several weeks.-he is now at the Columbine Nursing Home, 3835 Harlan Street Cards and letters would be appreciated by Mr. Richardson.
Terence- Coleman, nephew A study recently completed by of Rev. and Mrs. David Min- Transportation Committee pi ton, will be in Denver for file Coordinated Services for the Christmas holidays. Mr. Cole- Aging Project shows that 1, man, who is also godson of, out of 1/186 older persons Rev. Minton is presently work- surveyed usebuses occasioning in Canada and is origi- j oily or frequently. Only 15 do iqlly from England, as is Rev.; not. Only 37 per cent own Minton. automobiles and only 30 per
cent are able to drive themselves. Nearly 90 percent live within walking distance of a bus line, and nearly 67 per cent use the bus a* least once
cent
Pvt. Ira Gene Rencomfoe spent his leave at home w'-r his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Bear and family, 424 W. 3rd, . . 0
Ave. He is now stationed at a I gl§ *
Camp rendleton, Calif., with sald Bi BB use the bus Hi . . -lore often if fare were re-
tne Marines. , 1. * _ .
I vuce-\ Heaviest usage is on
. weekdays between 9:30 a. m..
First Avenue Presbyterian I and 4 p. m.'i
Church, 120 West 1st Avenue, ! __________________
would appreciate any Gold Pond stamps or certificates anyone could donate. ... They are replacing the dining room ;ables with the stamps and certificates.; These could be mailed or taken to the church.
Mrs b Marsha Stanek is in Fitzsimons Army: Hospital for ircarment.
Scrndi Winterhalder, Marsha White and Joel., Blomqihst. are students at §|eriing : /College. Joel- .served cts' 'cd^^tqih'-",'bf the Sterling ;. JooBall team which has had a good season with 3 wins, 1 tie, and 4 loss-
^K| IS '
Local Graduate
COORDINATED SERVICES FOR THE AGING COMMUNITY CENTER
Metropolitan-area senior citizens are invited--to a songfest of popular and old-time songs at 2:30 p.- De^mber 18 at Coordinated : Servfees for the Aging a Community fCenter, 1620 Meade Street.'-
;A-The progrdm" will be led by Mrs. Nptma S. Wahl, 1825 Logon. Street, playing the piano
free
LINCOLN PARK CLUB
On November 7, following a delicious light luncheon, the Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club installed the newly elected officers who will serve during the coming year. Eighteen members were present when the outgoing president, Mrs. Grace Musgrove, turned the gavel over to Mrs. Martha Olsen, 1406 Navajo St. Mrs. Laura Gregory, 1328 W. Colfax, became the vice-president, Mrs. Lucia Gorman, 1427 Mariposa St., retained the office of treasurer, and Mrs. Elsie Lil-ienthal, 1320 W. Colfax, became secretary.
The first duty of the new president was to preside over the planning of the club's holiday' activities. Several very interesting programs were considered. Mr. Allen Bradley-oFLittleton, president of the Federation of Organizations of, Seniors presented the Veter-Older People in Metropolitan ans Hospital with three dozen Denver, was present and gave large feeding bibs made by a short informal talk on subjects ;of interest to Denver's seniors.
Lincoln Park Community Center, 1,£38 Navajq St., Nov. 21. Seventeen members and thirteen guests enjoyed' a buffet of baked ham with a wide variety of vegetables, salads, and desserts. The tables were most effectively decorated with mats of dark green linen, orange candles, and baskets of ruit and flowers. Although there was little time for business, Mr. William Ratzlaff, newly appointed manager of Lincoln Park Homes, spoke of some of the safety devices he hopes to install in the buildings occupied exclusively by Older people.
On Nov. 5, a group of five' ladies from the Lindoln Park
The annual fall pot luck din-
members of the -club. The material was also donated by the club. A tcur of the hos-Cpital : completed a very. inter-
Mr. Raymond M. Soriano, son of Mr. and Kirs. Elmer- Sala-. zar graduated from Colorado State College On the 13th of December, 1967. He is the husband of Nora Soriano and has a 6 month old son, Ray Jr. Ke hopes to further his education by returning to college for a Master's Degree.
A message To West; Siders
The following is. directed to tjiose peopl^on the West ISide who supported ; the West' joide Action Courfel election iff i July by casting their votes for the candidates they preferred. We assume that the candidates elected were elected because they received the most votes from people who believed in them enough to vote for them. Now we would like to know why some* of these people elected have been so unconcerned about that trust, that they have failed to show up at ANY of the Council meetings. Others come but once in a while,/-perhaps just often enough (every third meeting) to stay a member of the Council. We know that for everyone there will be times that they cannot attend. But the courtesy of a quick phone call to the Action Center would produce an absence with cause which is acceptable to /the Council and the community. Th several of the census tracts q| ICIKIECC KiriTEC absent members have left those
DUdllMCdO INwIEd areas with only half or even
Mrs. Mary Salaz is the new less representation on the Owner of the Acoma Beauty Council.
Bar, 16 Acoma, phone number, If you, a voting resident In 777-5412. Mrs. Salaz, a native the last election, are concerned of Vancouver, Washington,! by this apparent irresponsible purchased the business from I behavior by YOUR representa-the former owner, Mrs. Gladys -tive that YOU elected, we sug-i Georgette Douglas, in August. | gest two ways of showing that Mrs. Salaz lives with her hus- concern. One, attend the Counband and three children in j cil meetings the last Thursday forth Denver. j of each month (call the Action
A graduate of training at j Canter, 534-5141 for exact time Opportunity School, Mis. Salazjand placeTor two, make a call blamed her license in 1964 and has worked in the hair-ressirig field since. She welcomes the chance to serve West Side women rat Iter salon.
ner of the Lincoln Park Sen- u £. a - , .
. . m i____u t .i esting afternoon.- On Tuesday,
ror Citizens was held at the ^
. JNov.v 2-8, tne';-I^i^i--;met/again.
----- ----:-----------rto sew oh -layettes which will
be given to needy mothers-
WEDDING BELLS through rAtirand Comjritihi-ty:
Center:
Miss: Rita DeNqvq,; : daughter of Mr. and! Mrs. Lupe De Nava,. 444 Elati Street/ will become the bride of; Mr. ..Victor m Lucerp. on December.23 in a ceremony at Sf. Joseph's Re demptorist Church. The mar-ridge ; '. ceremony *; will jbe' C6h-)ucted by Father Raymond Stewart.
Resident Council
OF LINCOLN AND SOUTH LINCOLN PARE HOMES
The Resident Council would
Rest In Peace
CRANE
Rev.X. C. Crane of 241 Inca: passed awby November 15th.. Interment was at Crown Hill. Cemetery.
ROCK
Mr. John Rock, of 1256 Lipan. Street, passed away November 23rd and was buried at Mt. Olivet Cemetery. Mr. Rock was 83 years old when he passed away. He lived at like to welcome all of its new 1236 Lipan 'Street for over 21
residents.
The next meeting of the Lincoln and South Lincoln Resident Council will be January 4, 1968, at 7:30 p.m., at Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mari: posa. Come and bring a friend.
The Resident Council of Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes would like to wish you a Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year.
years. Mr. .Rock was bom in Russia and came to the United States 62 years ago. His wife-passed away four years ago. He is survived by five sons and four daughters.
McGUERE
Mrs. Reed McGuire of Indianapolis, Indiana, the sister of Mrs. Louise Churchill of 1209 Lipan Street, passed away November 14th in Indiana.
to vour reorese-n+rHive rmd find out how manv of the four regular meetings since the election bat he has attended. You elected him, you have a right to know.
May your heart sing with the true joy of Christmas time.


THE RECORDER
D§c§mber, 196?
Page Three.
NEW PRINCIPAL AT FAIRMONT
The beginning of the school year in September sqw niany .changes at Fairmont.' Probably one of file most important anges was a new principal Mr. Kenneth Goff.
Mr. Goff comes to Fairmont from Wyman Elementary School where he was principal for six years. He has been with the Denver Public School System since 1942. He was assistant principal at Smiley Jr. High for 19 years. His first teaching job was at Englewood where he was employed for two years.
Mr.. Goff is a graduate of Colo'rado schools. He re-, ceived his public school education. on the Western Slope and has degrees from Colo rado State Teachers College and Denver University.
Mr. Goff stated his goal at Fairmont is to meet the immediate needs of students there. So far this has produced a hot lunch program, the start of special education classes and other new programs. The West Side extends a sincere welcome to Mr. Goff and also a thank you for progress ah ready achieved^
. On, December 5th the kinder-. garten students at" "Fairmont enjoyed- a chance", to-Tide in;, a police,/ car -through the f cpun tesv of the Denver.: Police De-pOTtment In smcjl"'groups they wetej^iven. -a iiae around e school, grounds with lig.h+ flashing and-, siren wailing. It was a big^ .event for everyone, 'including the neighbors around who were watching:.'
FAIRMONT PTA The Board of Managers, held a 'Christmas pot Juck \ dinner j on December 12th- with a 50c gift exchange. The nejct Board ot Managers meeting is January 9lh. All parents are invited to attend.
More parents are needed to join the PTA. If you are. interested, contact the school office for information.

Greenlee Students Present Holiday Plays
One of the sixth grade class es at Greenlee School, Room 201/ gave a Thanksgiving play on Nov. 22 called "Give Thanks for the Pilgrims." The entire class helped in planning and presenting the play. They made invitations, pilgrim costumes, a mural, and even fudge for the play. Parents and some of the classes were invited to attend.

The annual Greenlee Ele*-mentary Christmas Program will be presented Thursday, Dec. 21 and Friday, Dec. 22, fa our auditorium. Four performances will be given in order to accommodate all of the children who attend this school. Parents are invited to attend arv of the performances 9:30 a. m. and 1:30 p. m.
This year, the program is a Chris'mas Plcrv. Participating stn^e-n+s are from grades one, two, four, five and six. There will be sneaking, pantomimin'- md1 singing, dancing, and performing calisthenics. The boys and girls are working verv hard and are eager to present this program. Hope all of you will come out to see us.
Fairmont Begins New Programs
Thursday, December 7th saw the start of a primary level special .education class at Fairmont. Miss Roberta Freidl will teach'a class of. 12 children in one; of the newly remodeled shower rooms off the gym. Plans are being made for another special education class j of older children in the other | shower room as so6n as renovations are completed there. Hopefully this will be in time for the second eeihester. '
Fairmont has.'. several programs' % provided by various teachers-. in which- 'pupils 'may qcMaij^le if ; they wish.' Miss CprnwcM,-'. 'the'' ;music- tqdC'her,: :has? ';'d. Special music "classv for 1st,. 2nd/"and 3rd' gfaders-one norning d week fiom* 8:00 to. 8:30. ; She' also directs a 6th. grade "Chorus; at the noon hour.- -This; Mr. r Ri'dhardson conducts a' Voluntary 1 art Glass one after-noe>n a week and Mrs. Beards-, worth has a science project once a week for 3rd graders.
The upper grades at Fairmont will present a Christmas program for the rest of the >hooj and parents on December 20*h at 2:00 p. m. in the auditorium. They will repeat :=%e. program itxt 7:30. p. m. for paren+s unable to attend dur-:ng' the day.
Religious Education Classes Slated At St. Joseph's
Religious education 1 is provided for, all students in junior and senior.high school on Wednesdays from 7:30 p. m. to 8:30 in the St. Joseph's High School. Students from grades 7 through 12 will receive confirmation- this year, but only if their attendance to classes is regular. If students have! received confirmation, their religious training should still continue through the twelfth grade. Teachers that are students at Loretto Heights, Colorado School of Mines, and Regis are offering a fine program in addition /to the Sisters who are teaching.
Class far 5th, 6th grades is Wednesday from 4 to 5 p. m. in the Grade School. Class for 1st through 4th grades is on Saturday from 9:30 to 10:30 a. in. in St. Joseph's Grade School.
Students who have not yet received their first communion should attend4 class at the time their, regular grade level attends.
The last .classes before Christmas for.grades;! through 4 will be. Saturday/ December 15th. THe Glasses will' resume Saturday, January I3th?
... If, there is any "question, please.. contact Sister Mary -laudette, .r623r2833. :
AURARIA NEWS
NEW STAFF j
r Mrs. Elizabeth Kester, pro--gram director at Auraria Community Center, has resigned tc take a position as Head Start Consultant with Denver Opportunity. Reuel Amdur, who has been working in the office of he West Side Improvement ssociatiOn, is the new program director. Welcome Reuel, from all the staff at Auraria.
* ...
Vern Wilson, who had the basketball teams for some time, has had to resign his position because of illness. He is mi^ed by the fellows, in his teams and also by members of the A urmia staff.
TO PRESENT FITT
The Auraria I'^-ia^^orhood Group is proud to. p~e:ent a
skit for your entertainment ort Channel 6 at 9 p. iri., December 19. Hie players are as follows: ,
Mrs. Trusting SoulRosiann Lewis
. Mrs. Good Neighbor lay Martinez
Salesman for Friendly Furniture HouseJean Decker
Manager-, High Rate Finance CoKathamay Hart
This was the slat presented at the Consumer Fair at Auraria last spring. It concerns the problems of buyers with gyp stores, door-to-door salesmen and sales gimmicks.
'
We, the staff at Auraria* want; to wish all the people in the community a 'Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year.
STUDENTS AT BAKER HELP NEEDY
All- students who brought bYs for needy enliven; or con .tribute*! 5'c were (entitled tc take part in' gj drawing for. a tape "recorder^ qnH-fece'mber' B The sev'erith graqe was top contributor to the <^ood, cause with the.... ninth grade coming in second and the eighth grade -PS third. Laura Valdez won the tape recorder in the draw ing.
HEAD START CENTERS BUSY WITH CHRIST/:AS PLANS
FT.ATT CENTER I Claus will be on hand to dis-
I tribute gifts and Christmas The Elati Head Start Center stockings to the children, would like to thank Mrs. Piper and Mrs. Geobel. an! their Girl Scout troop for p ;eir gifts to the -children. The Girl Scout *roop made, and gave, to the children of the Head Stcrt Center, pine;cone 'furVTe,rs for Thanksgiving and a bean bag game._ o,'
.* .*
Open House' will be held at the Elati Head'- St^rt Center,.
228 Elati, on Dee. 19. Everyone. is invited fo-' attend ...from 7 : to 9 p.;<: m. ,. Refreshments will be served.
ST. ELIZABETHS PLANS FOR CHRISTMAS
Children at St. Elizabeth School will be entertained by Santa Claus oh December 22, and given Christmas treats from the Sisters and the PTA.
St. Elizabeth's soccer team is o be congratulated for winning 3rd place in the Soccer League.
Mrs. Swartz, 5th grade teacher at St. Elizabeth, and her class will be at the Security Life Bank to sing Christmas carols on Thursday, December 21 from 12 noon to 1 p. m.
St Elizabeth School PTA had a pot luck supper December 13, 1967. Staff and teachers were given Christmas gifts from the PTA and Sisters from Marycrest led everyone in Christmas carols. A good time was had by all.
Elmwood News
Back-to-School Night was held at Elmwood on Nov. 29. Punch and coffee were served. The event was a big success in that many of the parents attended.
Baker PTA
The Baker PTA had a luncheon on December 6 and will have their annual Teachers' Christmas luncheon on December 20th. The-monthly Board
Fathers of Head Start children at the Elati Center pitched in and together painted the play equipment for the chil dren at the Center. Those fathers taking part were: Reuben Arellano, George Lopez 'im Montano, Joe Vialpando and Manuel Moreno. The staff nd children both thank the fathers who took the time and effort for this project.
December 21 will be the last 3 ay of school at the Elati
meeting will be on January 3|cnter- School will resume on at 10:00 a. m. All parents of Tanuary 2. A Christmas party Baker students are invited' to js planned for the children a? attend. . .<* jthe Center on Dec. 21. Santa
AURARIA CENTER
The regular Head Start classes at Auraria and Elati are filled. Applicants will be put n a waiting list and will be notified of future openings.
The Therapeutic Preschool at r'nraria is still accepting referrals.,- Information can. be obtained by calling Mary Lou Monan -at 534-8431.
I§ The Auraria Head Start Parents held a. "Pot Luck Luncheon" on November 15; which: iproye,irdo be very successful.. A^spe5ql thank's to all the parents/who brought food and participqf.;- 1 in .helping make the luncheon a huge success.
On Friday, December I, the Auraria Head Start .children and parents took a trip to City Park Zoo and the Museum of Natural History. They are al-4o planning on a trip to the May, D&F to see the Christmas displays and on December 21 they will have their Christmas party.
"Merry Christmas and a ^appy New Year is wished o all parents and children from 'he Head Start staff.
Pupils At St. Joseph's Elementary School Stage Christmas Pageant
A theatre in the; round production will be held on December 21 .at 7:30* p. m.
St. loseph's Grade School will present "The Christmas Story" in the church hall. The six lecturers will read passages of the New Testament concerning the Birth of Christ as the first grade class will be
&
responsible for the tableau. The seventh grade choir, under the direction of Sister Mary Christopher, R.S.M., will sing many of the traditional Christmas songs and help put the audience into the real joy of Chrismas by re-living that First Christmas once again The public is invited.
Mite,,
Brownie Girl Scouts
A new Brownie Troop has been organized in the Fairmont and St. Joseph school districts. The group is under *he direction of Mrs., Dorothy* Britton. The troop number is 1343. Eleven girls were invested on November 2Tst They are: Mary Sue Britton, Loretta and Wanda Cordova, Cherie Fairbanks, Margo Garda, Esther Guedea, Kathy Loftin, Kathy Mulder, Frcmcine Martinez, Anna Marie Prichett, Laura Sturedevaut, and Rosie Trujillo.
The troop received thefr flag on December 4th through the -ouriesy of the V.F.W. They have made two trips. One ms a visit to the Safeway Dairies and another to a show ^ the Cadets and Sector Girl Scouts called the "Hillbilly House."
Right now the Brownies are busy making things for Christmas.



r*n Qp
Tout
T H E- R'E C 6 R D S R -------Hp§.. - .... -.......... -- December, 1967'
Advertisements
.. Welcome to Wesley
Methodist Church 5th and Galapago
Sunday School 9:45. Church 11:00. Rev. James E. Hall, 222-3337.
FOR RENT
Studio apt. Heater, refrig., stove. Very reasonable. Phone 543-7439.
WORK WANTED Would like any kind of housework job. Call anytime. 266-9650. Louise Arellano.
Babysitting done in my home. Infants to school age. $10 for 1 child, $15 for 2. 777-7268.
WANTED TO BUY I will buy almost anything of value. Guns, antique, old coins, furniture, dishes, wire all kinds. 808 Santa Fe Drive. Santa Fe Auction. Call 255-8133
The Recorder is now,carrying classified advertising at the following rates: 30c per line, $.50 minimum. Box 50% extra. Bold face35c a line.
Ads must be brought to the office of the West Side Recorder, 768 Santa Fe Drive, by the 10th of each month. Payment for the ad must be made at the same time the ad is brought in.
The Recorder is offering this service to the community feeling that ijt will be useful to our readers.
West
Side
Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS
Dec. 18Songfest Coordinated Services for the Aging Community Center, 1620 Meade Street, 2:30 p. m.
Dec. 18, 19, 20, 2k^West High School Christmas Program 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 20Fairmont Christmas Program, 2:00 p. m. and 7:30
P. m.
Dec. 21, 22Greenlee School Christmas Program in auditorium at 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Dec., .21St.' Joseph's Christmas Program,. Grade School, 7:30 p. m.
Dec. 28 Westside Action Council Meeting, 1042 Santa Fe Drive, 7:30 p. m.
__
EACH "WEEK
"Spanish Culture, History and Religious Message" presented on KFSC radio station every Sunday, 7:30 a. m. by Rev.. Thomas Sepulveda, of First Spanish Methodist Church.
Stop Being A Drop-Out!
Action Council
Be A Drop-In!
WHO?
Anyone from 18 to 99 whc wants help in preparing for a high school diploma and who comes within the low income bracket.
WHY?
To get a better paying job; to catch up on basic reading, English, and math; to enjoy learning; to meet new friends.
WHERE?
At St. Elizabeth's School, 11th and Curtis: (1040 11th St.)
WHEN?
Ten weeks at two evenings a week: TuesdaysMath and Science; Thursdays Reading, English, and Social Studies.
HOW MUCH?
Nothing! 000000000! No charge for books or tuition.
HOW COME?
Because interested adults want you to have what you should havea high school diploma'; and they have set it at night so you can hold a job and go to school, too; and they feel' that to be successr ful, there must be only 3 or 4 students per teacher.
Won't YOU Drop In?
First Session-7 p. m., Jan. 4, 1968.
If you miss this date, come to St. Elizabeth's. Come Tuesday or Thursday evening and fill out an application for the next session.
Program Director: Sister M.. Cecilia, O. S. F.
. Expenses of ,thiis program are paid through, donations.
UNITED WAY GOAL ALMOST ACHIEVED
A total of $5,318,940 or 99.3% of goal was raised in the United Way campaign, Roy L. Mason, MH.UW president, announced.
Mason praised the work of Campaigri Chairman W. Coles Hudgins, executive vice president, Mountain States Telephone Company, and the 10,000 volunteers in the five-county MHUW area who made pos-, sible the "greatest amount available for distribution \ to voluntary agencies in the 80-year history of the United Way.
Don't Forget To Help!
Ronald A. Miller, Executive Director of the Tuberulosis and Respiratory Disease Association of Denver and Tri-County said today the Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association is very appreciative of the early returns from the Christmas Seals. However, we know many people have neglected to reply to the letter about Christmas Seals, so we are mailing a reminder to those people; from whom we have not heard. No doubt there will be many people whose contributions were in the mail when we mailed the reminder. We wish we could avoid this but we don't know how to do so. We can only apologize and say "Thank You."
News
The Westside Action Council met on November 30th for their regulai* meeting. They. heard a report from Mr. Grisbee, Deputy Director of D. O. on the YEA fpr Denver program for Young Adults. Also given was a .report by Council member Phil Torres on a meeting he had attended concerning the Legal Services program future plans. He reported to the Council that there had been some discussion concerning the possibility of taking lhe Legal Services out of the five Action Centers and consolidating them into two or three centers. Mr. Torres, on behalf of the Council and the West Side, stated that he felt this would prove inadequate to provide legal services to the target areas. It was stated that at the present the Legal Service is handling 100 cases per month at each Action Center on an average. The Coun--i\ passed a motion to follow up Mr. Torres' statement with a letter expressing the Council's concern that the Legal Services continue iri each Action Center.
The Council voted to send a letter to the West Side Improvement Association Board of Directors expressing the Council's desire to see the WSIA continue to function in the neighborhood as a community organization regardless of 'the expiration o£ the fund under | which the Office operates. | u
The] Council elected .two members to represent -them in two organizations. Mr. Phil 11 ones was elected to sit on the D. O. Board of Directors arid Mrs. Rachel Guedea on the Health Board, which is responsible for the planning and direction of the proposed West-side Health Center.
The. Action Council meets the last Thursday of every month! at 7:30 p. m. at the
W. 7th Ave. <& Santa Fe Drive
Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.; 2-5:30 p.m. Sat 10 a.m.-12 noon and 1-5:30 p.m. Closed Wednesdays.
: Christmas books are waiting for you at Byerg Neighborhood Library. The history, customs, and legends of Christmas, as well as favorite tales and brand new stories, are included in the holiday books. You'll find "how to make it" books on decorations, gifts, cards, and candles. Books of i Christmas plays, activities, and entertainment also are available.
A great many magazines feature the theme of Christmas in the December issue. BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS,
THE NEW YEAR MENU
MAIN COURSEMEAT AND POULTRY. The amount of food we are likely to eat in 1968 on a per person basiswill show little change from 1967, predict U. S. Department of Agriculture specialists. Based on supply estimates, we'll eat about the same amount of beef, pork, and potatoes. Chicken will be on the menu more often, while turkey and eggs will likely; be less plentiful ; over the ; course of the year. (They were in record supply in 1967). Expect less Veal and lamb, as well.
FRUIT FQR DESSERT? Supplies of fruit this winter are expected to be smaller. Higher prices are likely for most items, both fresh and processed. A smaller citrus crop is in prospect.
.-DECEMBER PLENTIFUL Foods. Turkey, the favorite for holiday dinners, is in plentiful supply, according to the U., S, Department of Agriculture. In q variety of sizes top; from
AMERICAN HOME, THE LAD-IES' HOME JOURNAL, and McCALLS' all have special holiday articles and- stories, and these magazines are available at. Byers.
A free Christmas pamphlet, prepared by the Denver Public Library and the Denver Public Schools, suggests children's books which would be fine for Christmas gifts. The price, description, and age-group of each lx>ok are given to help you select a gift that is just right! In addition, the October, 1967, issue of "Clues;" a-vailable free at any Denver library, lists new books for worthwhile adult reading.
Merry Christmas, everyone, and best wishes for many happy hours of reading In 1968.
Questions And Answers About Drugs
Will drugs deteriorate if stored a long time?
Many drugs deteriorate and t may become ineffective or ev- {I en dangerous when stored a i | long- time. A person should 1 date all over-the-counter drugs when he buys them. The }j pharmacist will date prescrip- S tion drugs. Some medicines I I bear an expiration date and > should be discarded when that i date is reached. In general, if a person is in doubt about j j the usabilitv or freshness of any 11 drug, he should throw it away.
How much of any one medicine should a person buy at jl one time?
Medicines and health supplies should be bought in realistic quantities. In the case of prescription medicines, the physician will decide how much should be bought at one || time. In buying over-the-caufi- j ter drugs, some considerations ) should be: How often is the i product used? How much is used each time? How many persons in the same household use the product?
, j ; *. ' * _ * *
fcyUU-OVER CORNER
Cookies for Christmas for an easy and delicious gift . |
try:
Snicker-doodles.
1 cup (2 sticks butter or oleo) |^/2 cups confectioners sugar 1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla (
2% cups sifted flour 1 teaspoorL-eream of tartar 1 teaspoon baking soda Va teaspoon salt In a; mixing bowl" cream buttery gradually add sugar and beat until light and fluffy, j Beat in egg and vanilla. Sift together flour, baking soda, cream of tartar, and salt; gradually add to creamed' mixture. ;
. Chill dough for ease in handling. Shaper, into, balls about Klnch in diameter; roll in mixture of j cup sugar and 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Place on baking sheet- Bake 10-42 minutes. Yield dpz, .cppk-ies.
Action Council Plans Block Meetings
The Westside Action Reri-tcr Las had .se-ve al neighborhood 'group meetings to discuss :iume cl the problems in the neighborhood.
After- the firstof the year, the neighborhood representatives will start organizing block meetings throughout the target area,, in order to identify problems, in the community. This will enable the Center to work more collectively with the community.
The Center's philosophy is to help people help themselves. So, therefore, these group meetings will start giving an incentive to the people in the community to start developing programs they feel are needed In their community.
If any citizen is interested in holding a meeting, call Miss Helen Lucero, Community Developer at 534-5141.
The Westside Action Council and the Westside Action Center wish everyone a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.
Westside Action Center, 1042 Santa Fe Drive.- The community is urged to attend these meetings and to support the Council with their ideas and suggestions for improving the West Side.
the 8 to 10 pounders to jumbo turkeys, over 22 pounds. Broiler-fryers are in abundance too, and with egg production up, egg prices willf also be lower. Other plentiful foods are oranges, grapefruit, grape ( juice and cabbage.
BYERS BOOK REVIEWS