Citation
West side recorder, February, 1968

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, February, 1968
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
Volume 4, Number 10
Monthly'Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
February, 1968
West
Side
Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS
Feb. 7-29 B- "The American Negro Legacy" Prehistoric to Contemporary Art. Chappell House, 1300 Logan St Open 2:30-5 p. mi week days.
Feb. 24Las Vegas Night St. Joseph's Parish, 6th and Galapago, 8 p. 'Hi.-1:00 a. m.
Feb; 25West Side Improvement Association General Meeting, 2:30 p. mr at Auaraia Community Center, 1212 Mariposa Street.
Feb. 26i§aker junior High School Career Day.
Feb. 26 Coordinated Services for the' Aging panel disr cussion on "Is Denver Next In Line To Blow I A Racial Fuse?" 2 p. rhv, 1620 Meade Street.
Feb. 27Auraria Neighborhood Group will appear on Channel 6 T. V. oh "The Other Side of ADC," 9 p. iiri
Feb; 29'- Stage Band of West High School program at West High Auditorium, 8 p. rh. Tickets at the door 75c. .dyfan.^. 8-^Eainric^:;,.Qarnival
6:00-9:30 ip. nri '\t
Mar.' 7-8 - Rummage Sale., sponsored by St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 9 to 5 p. m.
Mar. 17-May 27"Ar^ericag. Panorama" Visual review of American Histpry through arts and crafts of tihe,;hdtiph. Chappell House, 1300 Logan St. Open 2:30^5 p. m. week days.
E ACH WEE*
. Girl Scout Tropp No. 726 mjsets at Auraria CoimDiinity Center, 121?- Mariposa, on Thursday evenings 5:00 p. m. to 6:00 p.EQ.
Mobile Unit from Better Business i Bureau at yarious places in the neighborhood For locations caU; Westside Action Center at 534-5141.
Eight More Area Residents Hired
The, personnel .committee oJ the West;, Side Health Board has to date screened 1400 applications for non-professional trainee jobs,, at the West Side Health Center that will soon open at 10th and Federal. Of these applications, the committee has personally ..interviewed 400-500 of these and 63 of the approximately- 95 presently available positions have j been filled..
Additional Westsiders re-| cently hired are: Gloria Olguin, Research dnd Development; Irene Morales, Laboratory; Gloria Martinez, Dental; Dorothy Vaughn, Pharmacy; Connie Padilla, Dental; Judith Chavez, Laboratory; Mary Clark, Home Services; and Pauline Trujillo, Home Services.
Aide-trainees, employed at the Health Center will receive onrthe-j ob-training in various hospital related jobs. The purpose and aim of. t-fre program is dual. While providing increased medical and dental services to the .target areas, it will also be providing valuable training to many formerly unemployed people who lacked the.: training or skills to get jobs.
Tags BegjtK (infejjwilr serve the Ndrl^/Platte Valley, Southwest, and West Target areas. The.. Health Board, which seryes ;in an advisory capacity, is made up ,pf /people appointed by the Action^ Councils of each of the above target areas.
WSIA To Hold Meeting With Metro State College
West Siders To Be On TV
Tuesday, February 27, mem bers of the Auraria Neighbor-' hood Group will appear on] Channel 6 at 9 p.m. The show i is" called "The Other Side Of; ADC. They will talk about i ADC from the recipient's, point I of view. After tfre recent j trouble over censorship. at, Channel 6 members of the group and the producer of the! show have expressed the hope that the program will be shown j as. at is produced.
New Address For WSIA Office
The West Side Improvement Association will move their office to Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa Street, on March, 1. Due to the ending of the grant from the Nat-tonal Institute of Mental Heafti which has supported the com-jnunity prooTom, for five years, ffies omce*OTTwll do closed. The coordinator of WSIA, and the office secretary will be provided, with an office for the next few months in the Auraria building. The same telephone number244-33Q1 will reach the new office.
LAS VEGAS NIGHT
AT. ST. JOSEPH'S PARISH HALL
B. B. B.'s Mobile Unit Available To West Side
. The Better Business Bureau has a Mobil Ufrit that will be available every. Monday to groups' of 14 person^ throughout the. West. .Side for consumer education and counseling.-If there is a group of about 14 people who would like to have the Mobile Unit in their area to explain. the BBB's information on: Credit, Financing Budgeting, Shipping for Gra> caries ^andr Ctothing, etc,, they may call the Westside Action Center at 5.34-5141 and arrange for a Monday morning or afternoon in a central location available to the group. This would be an excellent project for mothers groups, PTA's and other community organizations.
On February 24,- 1968, St. Joseph Parish will ^conduct the second annual "Las Vengas Night." It will be in -the. gym and hall at 6th and Galapago Street.
\ Las Vegas Night will run from 8:00 to 1:00. The admission will be $7.00 per couple. There will be. gambling throughout the evening with- play money that will be furnished. Winnings. 'a from the. gambling tables can be used for valu- j able prizes auctioned during'
this exciting evening., Danny Sylva and his Jay Topes- will render the music for the. dancing. A delicious Dutch Lunch and; Refreshments will help to make it an enjoyable time for all, .
. ^he; proc^ds^ from Las Vegas Night this year will be used to repair and decorate the exterior of St. Josephs. Church. Anyone wishing tickets or more, information can Inquire at Sf. Joseph's Rectory, 6th and Fox or call 534-4408.
"Action-Education, uniqueness, community involve-ment-^-these words give a capsule definition of | Metropolitan State College.
"Metro State is a first of its/; kindan urban-oriented, extroverted college for an urban age. We. do not claim .ours is the only college with some form of these characteristics. But we do know none other has our combination of all. "We are ded-:ipated" tqT the'udefr tnardhe main reason for our existence is to* focus on the urban problems and needs of metro Denver."
Kenneth Phillips
President
1967
| Metropolitan State College i|§|§ i the concept and the location. wilL be the subject of a public meeting on Sunday, February 25, under the sponsorship of the West Side Improvement Association. Dr. Kenneth Phillips, President of the College, Will discuss the concept of the urban college. Dr. Robert O'ipelL,^ Administrative Dean, will describe the site selection process. Mr. Philip Milstein, Executive Director of the Downtown D9nver Improvement Association and a member of the Denver Planning Board, will be present to participate in the discussion of the location to be chosen for the College.
The meeting to inform community residents about plans for Metropolitan State College will be held at Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa Street, at 2:30 p. m. Everyone is urged to attend.
Metro College opened in the fall of .1965, with less than 1,900 students attending day and evening classes. In 1967, about 3600 students were registered, and 30,000 students are expected in 1982: A new, permndent campus. is planned, for 1972. Of the three sites recommended for final consideration most planning groups support the Auraria site north of. Qplfax, between Speer Boulevard .and the Platte River. The- decision as to location will, be made later. The West Side- Improvement Association has oppQjjqd the "Civic Center" area, between Sixth Avenue arid Colfax and has recommended that the College should be built in Auraria.
FACTS ABOUT METRO STATE Liberal Arts: Mathentoti&S* Science, Humanities*. .Social Sciences -rr. Applied:
Business, Health. SetViiflll Fub-ifc/. Service, Technold^v-2 dhd programs lot dss6Sidfe arid bachelor degree^ POit-tiirie and night-time. programs.
^SY ACCESS
accessibility: A
commuter college.
Final preparation for "Las Vegas Night" at St. Joseph's. Father Edgar Gastaldi, C. Ss. R., Father Ray Stewart, C. Ss. R.. and Father James Nugent, C. Ss. R., look on as Esidore Maez I paints finishing touches on decorations and Miss Theresa Kinealy cut the play money printed at St. Joseph's.
NEW GROUP TO SPONSOR "RECORDER"
With next month's.; issjue of t^e Beholder, sponsorship of tfre Jjew^pgper^ will bi%.trcms-iHgd*to groupsof West Side Cheches,^ /,.The est Sidp. Re-
, was initiated by' the West Side Improvement Assq: criation':fri-. May, 1964, to serye ast a mecms of communication and neighborhood identiifcd-
tiqn. Fqnds for. printing: fee j p0R METRO DENVER paper were, made available from the federaL grant for community organization, but most of the labor- in writing and distributing the Recorder came from volunteers. The grant rqon-ey is ending, Side churches have! pledged funds to help continue the paper. Other churches and organizations will be asked to participate in supporting the neighborhood newspaper Advertising will be solicited to help with printing costs. Through the Improvement Association and churches, volunteers will again be organized to deliver the newspaper door-to-door.
The new mailing address for the Recorder will be: Wesley Methodist Church, 465 Galapago St. 80204. Messages or news items for the Recorder mav b' telephoned to St. Joseph's Church534-4408, dur-I ing the day (except Wednes-1 days). , _
Physical city-center No dorms.
. Financial accessibility: Inexpensive. $87 the quarter for tuition and services. Psychological accessiblity: An urban collegeintimately one with the city and its. metro population.
RESPONSIVE TO COMMUNITY NEEDS
Industry-college liaison committeesCommunity advisory committees for labor, minorities and other special interact groups.
DOLLARS FOR DENVER
Not counting funds spent for continuing construction, the salaries, operation expenses qr^ expenditures bv faculty, staff and students will bring to downtown Denver: 1972 $30 million annually; 1982 $90 million annually.


Pag Two
THE RECORDER
February, 1968
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West'Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive | Editor: Erma Jean Harris Assistant Editor:
Jaye Martinez
Staff Reporters:
Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder
'7tec . Mrs. Edith Davis of 1427 Mariposa, suffered a broken hip eight months ago. She is now home from the hospital and is doing very nicely.
Mrs. Leland of 1429 Mariposa, is back home from St Anthony Hospital and is doing real well.
Julia Ortiz of 1314 Lipan, was in Mercy Hospital with a heart attack. She is now home and. feeling much better.
Mr. Arthur Manchago of Commerce City, the brother of Mrs. E. Quintana of 1223 Lipan Street, is in Porter's Hospital.
Sgt. Ronald A. Vasquez and his wife, Dolores, were home on a leave. They were the guests of his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Bennie Vas-j quez of 1239 Lipan Street Ronald has now returned to his base at San Dieg6, Cai-famia
Mrs. Marie Glynn of 125? Kalamath, spent a Sunday visiting her daughter, Betty Da-dy, and family.
Mrs. Helen Meyers of 1466 Mariposa, has just returned from a month's vacation touring along the Pacific coast.
EDITORIAL
BYERS LIBRARY BOOK REVIEWS
Charlene Francis of 1259 Kalamath, attended the birthday party of her nephew, David Francis.
Mrs. Gerald Glynn of -125S Kalamath, spent a few days visiting her daughter, Mrs. Elena Marshall and granddaughter Lore.
Proud parents of a new baby boy are Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ragland. Reginald Lee was bom Tuesday, February 13, weighed 5 lbs. 2V4 ozs., and was 17 inches long. The baby is the grandson of Mrs. Grade Lofton of 1051 Mariposa Street.
Mr. Alphonso Martinez of 1378 Mariposa, reports that his wife is home from the hospital. She is recovering nicely.
Jesse David Sanchez, Jr., was bom January 18th, 1968, weighing 6 pounds and 8 ounces.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Jesse Sanchez of 1223 Lipan
Street He is also the grand- --------
son of Mr. and Mrs. Eddie \ -
Quintana of 1223 Lipan Street Sfcll I Of Glli
Pollution Problems
Man is his own worst enemy! The biggest polluter, of course, is man himself notes the U.S. Department of Agriculture. His car, his crowded cities and his large factories disperse quantities of unwanted chemical and physical by-produds into the air, water and soil. Nearly all direct uses of water changes its characteristics to some degree. And once changed, most of the water: goes back into its previous flow. The Mississippi River is re-used at least 16 times between St. Louis and New Orleans.
Scouts Offer Helping Hands
The Senior Girl Scout Patrol of Troop No. 726 is available to other troops in the area to help teach scout skills, games, songs, and badge work. They are also available for community service, such as passing out materials for a community agency, assisting with children in various programs, babysitting for special meetings in evenings such as PTA and doing small errands for Senior Citizens or persons who are ilL However, they are not permitted to go in homes unless accompanied by their advisor, or are personally acquainted with these persons.
If anyone is interested, please call Loretta Rhym at 255-4910. Girls who live near Auraria Community Center and attend West High School or St. Joseph's High School are invited to attend scout meetings and join if they desire. Meetings are held on Thursday evenings, 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Auraria Community I Center, 1212 Mariposa Street.
Mr. and Mrs.. Roy Maberry [ Don't forget to buy Girl Scout ave both needed to be hos Cookies March 2nd to March, italized in recent days. 110th. I
Mrs. Pat Fresquez of 1215! Lipan Street, has* 1 moved to 2460 So:H Galapago Street
Mr. Kenny Stark, the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Churchill of .1209 Lipan Street, returned from .overseas; duty in Germany. He.has a month leave before being sent to Viet
I :dm on March 15th.
Mrs. May Day reports that she fell and broke her ribs. She is resting at home and although painful, she is up and ground. This is the third time Mrs. Day has had accidents of this nature and we Sincerely hope that this ends the series of falls.
Jimmy Martinez, the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Pacheco of 1253 Lipan, wrote that he is soon to be returned to duty. He was wounded several weeks ago, and has been convalescing in Guam. He is now at Fitzsimons Hospital. Jimmy sends greetings to all his friends on the West Side.
j On December 19th, many Westsiders watched a T. V. program on Channel 6 called : "Who Speaks for the Consumer?" A portion of this T. V. program was a skit, filmed as i it was presented to the Lin-I coin Park Resident Council. Participants in the skit were four West Side neighbors: Ros-ianna Lewis, Kathamay Hart, jjean Decker and Jay Martin-j ez. Practices by unethical | merchants was the major point made. The program, was so controversial in certain quar- ters that it has been banned on Channel 6 and the producer of the show, Mrs. Cindy Kahn, has resigned in protest. Mrs. Kahn stated in her resignation, "I have been accused oi producing a biased show. I have not been allowed to face my accusers or answer theii charges." Her accusers were: State Senator William Gamsey R. Greeley), Rep. Palmer Burch (R. Denver), Speaker of the House John Vanderhoff (R. Glenwood Springs), House Majority Leader John Mackie (R. Longmont), Sen. Ed Scott (R. Englewood), Rep. Ted Shu-beft (R. Calhan), Rep. Harold Koster (R. Salida). These men attended a private showing of the program and cancellation of the "repeat" program followed this meeting. Mrs. Kahn states that she asked to meet with these Republican legislators at the time of the viewing in order to answer the accusations directly, but the men threatened to walk out if she participated in the discussion. James Voorhes, President of the Denver School Board, Dr. Robert Gilberts, Superintendent of Schools; and Russell, Casement, : director of Channel 6 met with the legislators and apparently it was these three men who were pressured: into cancelling the reshowing.:* Mrs. Kahn protests that this censorsip of the program is contrary to the principle of freedom of the press, "Further* more, the decision not to reair the show fails to carry out an obligation to those persons who participated in the program',and more importantly, to the public.*' The final judgment of whether or not the show was biased and whether or not some of our state legislators have acted as censors should be left to you who saw the program "Who Speaks for ,the Consumer."
W. 7th Ave. & Santa Fe Drive
Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 2-5:30 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m.-12 noon and 1-5:30 p.m. Closed Wednesdays.
Sometimes the name of a book is fascinating enough tc make you want to read it. Many of the. new books at Byers Neighborhood Library have just that kind of title. In TOPAZ, the author of EXODUS and MILA 18, Leon Uris, has created another exciting story of espionage.
CHRISTY, Catherine Marshall's first novel, is a warm and tender story about a nineteen year-old girl who is called to teach in the Appalachians of Tennessee in 1912. Mrs. Marshall wrote the best seller, A MAN CALLED PETER.
A view of the adult world as seen through a child's eyes is presented by Mary Dutton in her book entitled THORPE. A similar point of view is used in Harper Lee's memorable TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD.
There are a number of new western books at the library.
Crooked river canyon
by Dwight Bennett is based on actual events and is an exciting case history of the evils of vigilante justice.
THE WAR ON CHARITY
ACTIVE WEST SIDER LEAVING DENVER SOON
Harold Munson, District Director of the West Side Improvement Association, will be leaving the West Side soon after six years in the community. Mr. Munson has operated the Shamrock Service Station at Fifth and Kalamath during his residence in the area. For health reasons he has been forced to retire from the service station and to relocate, at a lower altitude.
Mr. Munson has worked hard for tiie Improvement Association on behalf of his neighborhood. In reviewing the improvements that have come from community option, with his leadership, he states that the WSIA "is the best thing that's happened" in the Wesl Side. The community wishes him well in his new home and new endeavors.
Animal Vacdne Deadline
More than 35,000 of ( the 50,000,-dogs ;in Denver, fjre without 1968 rabies tags as the March 1 immunization deadline approaches.
Dr. Harvard Larson, chief of the veterinary health service of the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals, warned Denver dog owners that pets without 1968 tags will be picked up and impounded Tiftei March 1. He urged all metropolitan area pet owners to protect themselves and their pets against rabies by having the animals vaccinated.
Although Denver has not had a case of rabies in. a household pet since the'present vaccination registration system went into efiect in January, 1951, Dr, Larson emphasized that the disease, which is always fatal once symptoms appear, I is still present in Denver and the metropolitan area.
Dr. Larson added that rabies shots are recommended for cats as well as dogs, especially since cats are more likely to come into contact with infected bats. He said owners of hunting dogs should be particularly interested in protecting their dogs since they might encounter a diseased skunk while out in the fields. All dogs or c^rfcs three months of age or older should be vaccinated.
Each pet vaccinated is registered and given a numbered tag (the color is red this year) bv the veterinarian. Registration slips are kept on file by, the Denver, and Jefferson County Tri-County Health Departments so that a lost animal can easily be identified by the finder and reunited with his owner.
ROSS, by Jack M. Bickham, j tells the tale of a widow who was determined to hold onto j the land her husband died | protecting. Her stubborn at-| titude sparks an already ex- plosive situation into open battle.
I BITTER GRASS by the well-known author, Theodore V. Olsen, is an exciting western of a dynamic man destroying himself through the misuse of power.
The new mysteries at Byers Neighborhood Library are so numerous, there's only space for a partial list of the titles.
Here are just a few of them:
Murder. 1 Assassin
Winterwood Eliminator
Run, Man, Run Coffin Comer The Looking Glass Murder
Green Grow the Tresses .Code Name, Sebastian Game Without Rules Murder in Canton Midsummer Loki The Red Lamp Third Girl Hedgerow Sally
Pictures of the moon are still new and fascinating to most of us. For "that reason, PICTORIAL GUIDE TO THE MOON, by Dinsmore Alter, will be an educational pleasure for the reader. Until 1964, pictures of the moon were all taken from the earth, but the Ranger probes, exposed in that year, surpassed the finest terrestrial observatories. A selection of one hundred and thrity-eight of the best, photographs made by Ranger, Surveyor, and Orbiter spapcecraft are presented in this outstanding book. ' .
Art Museum Displays At Chappell House
Three of the four Civic Center galleries of the Denver Art Museum have been demolished to make way for the new six-story Art Museum building. Completion is expected in two to two and a half years.
Open for exhibitions and tours is Chappell House, 1300 Logan Street, original home of the Art Museum.
"THE AMERICAN NEGRO LEGACY" Jeb. 7-Feb. 29. Prehistoric to contemporary art. Paintings, sculpture, ceramics. Because .of. tours, open 2:30 5 week days. Regular weekend hours.
"AMERICAN PANORAMA" Mar. 17 May 27. Visual review of American history through the aits and crafts of the nation. Material from the Art Museum's own collections plus important loans from major museums and dealers a-~ross the country. Regular hours.
CARD OF THANKS
Many thanks to all the people who helped to make oui Bake Sale a success.
The, Parent Group,
1418 Navajo Head Start Center Loretha Williams Parent Aide-


THE RECORDER
February/ 1968
Page Three
Baker Junior High
Twenty-three Baker students attended the Midyear Leadership Conference at Thomas Jefferson Jr.-Sr.' High School on Saturday, February 3, from 9 to 4. Lars Brown, Sandra j Madrid, Modestine Smith, and Paul Lopez led a group discussion on school problems. Other students attending were: Wanda Westbrook, Helen Lopez, Sandra Sandoval, Phil Pacheco, Loretta Gomez, Ruth Gomez, Janell Cutshall) Murial Trujillo, Tomacita Rivera, Lisa Cordova, Andy Vigil, Harold Chacon, Sid Angelo, Liz Delgado, Loretta Lucero, Jeanne Silva, Joanne Thompson, Yen Yen Yin, and Jocelyn Croxton.
Parents driving cars to the conference were Mrs. Eloise Brown, Mrs. Croxton, Mr. Lopez, Mrs. Walden, and Mrs. Rivera.
Sandra Madrid and Wanda Westbrook led discussion groups at another leadership conference held Feb. 10 at John F. Kennedy Jr.-Sr. High.
STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS VISIT
Baker Student Council directors visited the Denver Board, for Retarded Children on Wednesday, January 31. A tour of the school was made. The directors were introduced to the students at an assembly, and a gift of food and money was given by Lars Brown, Head Boy on behali of all of the Baker students.
Also attending were Sandra Madrid, Modestine Smith, Wanda Westbrook, Bill Dyes, Paul Lopez, Miss Miller and Mr. Meier. ^
HEARING TESTS
Hearing tests will be given
St. Elizabeth's
What happened to Abraham Lincoln's stove pipe hat? Some sixth graders at St. Elizabeth's would like to tell you.
One day I was fishing, my little friend was also with me. He is only four years old. Then I saw a big black hat coming down stream. When it reached' me I picked it up. Then I looked at the name. It said Araham Lincoln. Then I told my friend it was Abraham Lincoln's hat. My friend said to me, "What's an Abraham Lincoln's hat?" So then I told him it was a president of long ago's hat. Then my friend said, "Was Abraham swimming," I asked him why. He said, "Well, maybe, he made a swan dive and his hat fell off." So then I told him about the story of Lincoln. After I asked him if he had any questions. He said millions of
them. So I threw that hat
back and I said forget it Well, no one else believes my story.
I hope you wilL
Donald Q'Cana
You'll never guess what I found on top of my roof§j Abraham Lincoln's hat! Would you, believe thatl I guess that a gust of wind came and blowed it out the museum window. I Went On top of the roof to clean out the gutters and there it laid. I have it in a glass case built in the dining room wall.
Sharon Bowers
What do you think hap-pentd to me? Well yesterday I was walking on Conjos Avenue. I happened to see an driinltriOoking rinrthe- trash bdrfels. He had ah old derby hat on that he got from the trash. I went looking, found a
FAIRMONT SCHOOL CARNIVAL PLANNED
March 8th is the date to re volunteers can be used. Any-member: the time, 6i30-9:3C one wishing to donate a cake
p.m. Mark this now as the date for the Cake Walk may call for Fairmont's Carnival. It Mrs. Guedea at 733-4968 or seems that this is the first Mrs. Britton at 722-8980. Carnival to be held at Fairmont So circle March 8th, 6:00-and lots of fun is in store for 9:30 p. m. on your calendar all who attend. Some of the and buy yoUr extra value cou-attractions planned are a Lolli- pons -now at Fairmont School pop Tree, Fish Pond, Cake and we'll see you at the Car-
to all seventh grade students hat with the signature of by the end. of February, | Abraham Lincoln. I forgot r* RDrm USH11 Si 1 ; - 1 ;; H labout it and started walking m 1 "I ran all the Way bade
A career day is being plan- started to wear it Just ned for March 14 at Baker. At thinker wore : it
Amanda Hernandez
this time,.. ninth graders will fray, an opportunity to talk
with:->mn, and women who, H HRR RMH H IHHH
work at many different kinds!' iliillMlI of jobs m I found. Abraham Lincoln s hat.
I was walking along in the
SWIMMING CLUB I 'theater that he was killed in
arid tripped over it. Boy, was it dusty! I can see why no one found; it by now, jj it's so dark. I was forced to give it up. So I gave it to the mus-
Walk, and a Spook House, nival! There will be popcorn and soft drinks for sale also.
A movie cartoon will be shown in the auditorium! throughout the evening. The Cake Walk will be in the kindergarten room, the Spook House in one of the new rooms off the gym and the rest of the games will be in the gym. Tickets will be sold the night of the Carnival in front, of the office.
Tickets can be purchased now at a saving. For one dollar you can purchase a coupon that can be redeemed the night of the Carnival for 22 tickets. When the Carnival starts, $1.00 will buy only, 20 tickets. Coupons can be bought from the school or at 447 Fox Street. Another bonus for buying ahead will be a drawing for a prize using the redeemed coupons. So, if you buy a coupon, put your name on the back of it and stay. around for the drawing sometime during the evening!
A complete list of games and their chairmen- are as follows
ClownMr. Goff Lollipop TreeCaralee Kirby Dart FortuneLeon Morris Stand-'Em4IpViola Sanchez Bcriietoh^Dart:£--EstherGh<3vez %
W inter-
' ; holder
Seven-Eleyen-^Armando Garcia Pen GameRobert Allen Fish PondAlfred Rios Spook House-*-Kay Watts SI Cake Walk-Rachel Guedea Pop Corris-e-Bertha Acevedo Soft Drinks^-Rose Lopez -Ticket Qiairman-Martha De anda
West High Host Of Stage Band Festival
General Chairman, 'of the Carnival is Mr. Deonda. Any-
Mother Daughter Tea
On February 13 and 14, the Fairmont PTA held its annual Mother-Daughter Tea. On the 13th, girls in grades 1-3 and the two morning Kindergartens with their mothers enjoyed a program of music provided by various groups. Included in the program were two selec-ions by the Fairmont El men-tery Band under the direction of Mr. Thomas Gatschet. A Chorus made up of volunteer 1st, 2nd, and 3rd graders who meet on Monday mornings before school sang selections for the mothers. They were directed by Miss Judy Cornwall. Miss Kenney's 4th grade also sang some numbers. Cake and punch were served af.er-wards in the gym.
The program on the 15th foi he upper grade girls and the afternoon kindergartens varied a bit from the 13th. Once again the Band played selections plus the three soloists in the City Wide Band Contest, Soloists were Pameeia Burrell Frances Vialpando and Brian Morris. The kindergarten children sang five songs with great enthusiasm. Then a volunteer chorus -of upper grade children who meet during' the noon hour under the direction of Miss' Cornwall sang three songs.
Again refreshments were served afterwards. The cakes for the two teas were baked by Mrs. Martha Deanda, PTA secretary, and were attractively decorated with various floWers. There was a good attendance of mothers on both
The Stage Band of West High School will be host to a Stage Band Festival on February \ 29th at West High. Bands participating in the Festival in addition to West, will be the Manual High School Stage Band, under the direction of Mr. Hugh Avis, and the Stage Band from North High School, directed by Mr. Harold Tracy.
The program will also feature the Colorado University Stage Band with Mr. Jon Wie-gardt directing.
There are two reasons for having this special event. On is to expose students and parents to the big band sound. With the great popularity of small combos, the stage band, which is approximately a 17-piece group, has not been used as much recently. However, the stage band has much to offer in the way of enjoyment and entertainment. Funds from the program will be used for Stage Band equipment and library. ~~
So, remember February 29th, 8:00 p. m., at West High Auditorium* Tickets are 75c and can be purchased at the door.
The Swimming Club met at the YWCA for its first swim recently. Seventeen girls and Mrs. Mund, sponsor, were present. The ,cliib plans to swim every other week!
qn^p Vrho would like tb help j days and both affairs were a may call him at 255-9$13. More great success.
i T 1 ~~r ~
BAKER. PTA
The Baker PTA held a Founders Day Luncheon Wednesday, February 7. Eight past presidents were honored. Musical groups under the direction of Mr. Bridge entertained in the school auditorium.
Panel Discussion
On February 26th, a panel of five specjlaists will discuss the topic "Is Denver Next In Lin to Blow a Racial Fuse?" at the Coordinated Services for the Aging Community Center at 1620 Meade Street al 2 pi m. in the auditorium. Everyone is invited to this timely discussion. Panelists from various agencies and concerned groups have been selected
eum.
PTA
Sophie Gallegos
Mr. Dan Bell, of the Better j Business Bureau, was guest speaker at the February 21 meeting of the PTA. Mr. Bell gave a very interesting talk
concerning gyp artists how they operate.
and
St. Cajetan's Winter Carnival
The PTA of Saint Cajetan School held its annual1 "Winter Carnival" on February 17th and 18th in the cafeteria at 9th and Lawrence.
Many interesting booths were the center of attraction on these two days. Delicious
by Officer James A. Moore, Mexican foods, such as tamal-Community Relations Bureau I es, burritos, and enchiladas of the Police Department. were served.
Fairmont has two new classrooms to accommodate additional classes. This extra space was obtained by remodeling the two unused shower rooms, on either side of the gym. Above is one of the classes, taught by Miss Roberta Friedl.
West Side Mother Travels To Chicago
The weekend of February 3 thrqugh 5, Kalrigmay^ Hart went to a. conference in Chicago representing the Denver Welfare Rights Organization. Mrs. Hart reports that the meeting was very stimulating with each of the 22 states represented reporting on file operation and problems of welfare in its state. The Welfare Rights Organization is not connected with the Welfare Department in any way, but in each state it is a group of welfare recipients who are ddnqemegt^witix. their problems arid; feel: that through working. together they can better their pwn .circumstances. Mrs. Hart soys she enjoyed1 her first plane trip, going to Chicago,, meeting ,?an i .'talking to many of the representatives from the^'oth§r 2F-states, and especially the final meeting on Monday where she' met Dr. Martin Luther King.
On February 5th, Mrs. Grade Dixon, Mrs. Jean Decker of South Lincoln Park, Mrs. Verna Ball, formerly of the West Side, Mrs. Rose Wildman, Levi Martinez and Ginny Wilson representing the Denver Welfare Rights Organization went to see Bernard Valdez of the
Greenlee Participants In Cultural Arts Workshop
The Association for Child-1 were Robin Bieber, Debra Leh-
hbod Education, Denver branch, presented a Cultural Arts Workshop for Denver area teachers on February 6 at Rishel Junior High School, Seven Greenlee pupils parties
man, Vickie Lucero, David Nadeau, Rosa Palomo, Moni-co Rivera, and Jane Suekama. All are members of Mr., Connor's sixth grade class.
Denver Welfare Department. The purpose of the meeting with Mr. Valdz was to ask for his recognition of the Welfare Rights Organizations and permission to set up a recruiting booth in the Welfare office. Mr. Valdez agreed to both recognize the organization as a voice for welfare recipients and permit a booth to be set up in the Welfare Office.
The next meeting of the Den-
Members of the Greenlee
ipated in the music, art, and faculty attending this program ver Welfare Rights Organizer-drama demonstrations which were Mr. Kenneth Gorsline, tion will be on Monday even,-were a part of the program. | Mrs. Joyce Davis, Mrs. Mary ing, February 26, at St. Eliza-Taking part in. these -activities Nelle Ryan, and Mrs. Beth Hall, beth's School, at 7:30 p. m.


THE RECORDER
February, 1968
Page Four
Advertisements
FOR RENT
600 Elati. Comer Store completely furnished as church or may use as desired. Reasonable. 222-1143 or inquire at Thrifty Creamery.
RUMMAGE SALE February 24 8 a. m. 834 Santa Fe Drive
NEW MAILING ADDRESS
The new mailing address for the Recorder will be: Wesley Methodist Church, 465 Galapago St., 80204. Messages or news items for the Recorder may be telephoned to St. Joseph's Church 1534-4408, during
the day (except Wednesdays).

PICK THE PLENTITULS
Februaiy buys. Broiler-type fryers, potatoes, dairy products, and dry split peas.
DEHYDRATED FOODS ARE COMING
Use of dehydrated foods is on fhe upswng, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. About 1500 new food products will appear on grocers' shelves across the country this year. Among the new products will be fruits and fruit products even applesaucein the dehydrated form. Tomatoes, green jbeans, peas and asparagus, as -well as dairy products of eot-fitage cheese, sour cream and 7 processed cheese (and "dips" -wiU be on the market as dehydrated foods. Meats of improved quality and flavor will be available as new drying .techniques emerge.
L" ' ' ______
Rummage Sale
St Paul's Community Church of Lakewood is having a rummage sale on February 24 at 8 o'clock at 834 Santa Fe Drive. There will be all kinds of clothes and miscellaneous items.
Church News
WESLEY METHODIST
The Wesley Methodist Church is proud to announce that the Rev. Bill Byrd, the District Superintendent for the Denver Area, will be the special speaker at a Sunday morning service. This will be March 3rd, 1968, at 11:00 a.-m. Following the services Rev. Byrd will lead a talkbbrck session concerning the goals and aspirations of both the Wesley Methodist Church and the Rocky Mountain Conference for the coming year. Everyone is invited. The Wesley Methodist Church is at 465 Galapago Street.
*
The Wesley Methodist Church is proud to announce the pur-, chase of 50 new Methodist Hymnals. We will have them to start our Lenten Services, These were all donated by the members and friends of the church.
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL
St. Peter's Episcopal Church will hold a Rummage Sale in the Parish Hall, 126 W. 22nd Avenue, on March 7' and 8. The sale will be conducted between the hours of 9 a. m and 5 p. m. on both days, and will also feature a snack bar
Safeguard Your House
In midwinter examine attics especially insulated attics-lack ing proper ventilation, wqrns a U. S. Department of Agricul ture booklet on wood decay in houses. Check for conden sation moisture or frost accum ulation and decay. Note especially- the eaves level at the north side of the house. Persistence of condensation into the period of warm weather can permit decay. Attic con densation difficulties can be corrected easily by increased ventilation/ and most damage can be avoided. Read about preventing and controlling; yopd decay-Home and Garden. Bulled No. 73, "Wood Decay in Houses," write \J. & Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C; 20402. Price. -rrrl.5 cents. Please include your zip code.
RECIPES
Cari-Over Corner
^ry-using Instant Nonfat Dry Milk in your recipes, fe is easy to: use and saves. you money. =
CREAM GRAVY. 3 table spoons fneat or poultry drippings, 2 tablespoons flour, Va | cup dry milk, % teaspoon salt, Vs teaspoon pepper, 1 cup I luke-warm water. Melt fat in frying pan,. Mix flour with dry milk, salt and pepper. Stir into melted fat. Gradually add water, stirring constantly until mixture thickens and comes to a boil. Makes 1 cup,
SUGGESTIONS FOR SERVING: Add grated cheese and serve over vegetables, noodles. Add pieces of meat or poultry and serve over toast, rice, noodles, potatoes. If you want a thin gravy, add more water (small amount).
BOY SCOUT BADGES UPDATED
"Keeping up-to-date" is one of the aims of the Boy Scouts of America, and the latest list of requirements for Boy Scout merit badges shows that ten of 111 merit badges are new or revised.
Up-to-date merit badges include landscape architecture, which replaces landscaping; iheater, replacing dramatics; and American business, replacing business.
Revised or realigned requirements are newly offered to,Boy Scouts for the subjects of aviation, cooking, firemanship, personal fitness, and soil and water conservation.
The newest merit badges offered to Scouts this year are computers and engineering.
The, most popular merit badges still reflect Scouting skills, The top three are swimming, cooking, and first aid. Nation-: ally, in a year's time, more han 1,6Q0,000 merit badges are earned by Boy Scouts.
"FRIENDS OF SCOUTING" The West District is one of ten Scout Districts in the Denver. Area Council and the Council is a member of the Mile High United- Way. The Council will receive about two-thirds of its financial needs from the United Way this year, but the Council must secure the rest of its operating funds through Sustaining Memberships from "Friends of Scouting" to meet Scouting budget requirements.
The Sustaining Membership Enrollment will be conducted by hundreds of Scout adult volunteers in local neighborhoods during- February.
The Denver Area Scout Council provides seven essential services that, are vital jn the maintenance and. expansion of the local Scouting program. The services are as follows:
Council Service Center-r-The Denver Area Council Service Center, 1375.. Delaware Street, provided information and assistance, anyone interested ScQu&ng* IhAvkJual Scooting. k achievement records are maintained here. A Trading I Post m leaders. f Training servicesthe latest techniques, materials and e-quipment are used1 to train adult leaders to insure the best programs fop the boys. Organizational Serviceshelp is given in organizing new Cub Scout* Packs* Boy Scout Troqps .and. Explorer Posts.
Camping Activities and Services ? camping, one of the most exciting activities in Scouting, is provided the year-around at Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch and Camp Ta-hosa for the convenience of all boys in Scouting. Advancement Services Commissioners Services -ji 250 trained volunteer adults work with Cubmasters, Scoutmasters and Explorer Advisors to give help and assistance when needed.
Professional Staff Services Become "A Friend of Scouting" so that the current scouting program can be maintained and expanded to the 9,273 boys who are expected to join Scouting in 1968.
action council has busy month
The Westside Action Council i plained to the Council the
has met three times since the last edition of this paper.
At' their regular monthly meeting on January 25th, they listened and acted upon a pro-, posal from West Side Teenagers and also heard reports from the Action Center staff and agencies.
"he report presented to the Acuan Council by three, teenagers expressed their great desire and willingness to. work for recreational facilities for West Side Teenagers. A Teen Club is already. meeting on Tuesdays in the Action Center to play ping pong and card
games.. However, this space, -wsbhcjh gg ,
. 1. , , , . n 1 really needed was two lawyers
is limited and what is really.,. SBS^gl A pel . \, ,
, m /-I , m every Action. Center to ef-
needed is a Teen Center. where| 111 IHHB
there could possibly be a Canteen, Bowling, Pool Table, Record Player, Sports for boys, and
maybe a Charm School for girls.
The young people have expressed their desire to fix up a place that could : be made
planned new procedure for Legal Services. The Office of Economic Opportunity in Kansas City has decided that instead of on,e,' lawyer in every Action Center, Legal Services should;, hay§. two_ .lawyers, in ngt more than j three, outpost pffices in. the. Target Areas and then research staff in the office downtown at the United Fund Building. It mis stated that people on the near West Side: should go downtown for legal; .aid. r Memberst of the Council, fplt very strongly that this wquld reduce drastically the legal s.eiyices. to people needing' them and what ..was
fectively handle the, great load of legal, cases in each Target Area.
Because* this, ruling has come from Kansas City and is a result of their study, of various Legal Services throughout the country it is doubtful that the off ices, will not be reduced to
available and also their ambi- j number. However, the
tion to organize cmd run their Council instructed Mr. Torres Center as much as possible on
their Own. They did ask the support of the Council as a resource and suggestion group. A committee volunteered from
and Mr. Jaramillo, their representatives to the Legal Services Board, to express the great concern of the Council for the need to continue Legal
the Council to serve and to Services to every center with
look into various areas -of fin ancial and staff support for such an endeavor. Chairman of the committee, is Henry Maestas.
Attorney Douglas Donne gave a report on the activities H| the: Legal Services at the Action Center. He said that in three months they have handled 250 cases.
Mr. George reported on his work in the area of employment. He stated that 18 people had been referred to vo-cational training and 8 placed in. jobs, afterward. | Thirty-two men and thirteen women had been found jobs of the total of 143 persons who had come for help in job, finding. Mr. George stated that the main problem
increased staff.
The most recent meeting of the Council was on February 17 at 8:00 p. m. The Council at that time considered the letter of resignation submitted by the Chairman, Mr. Don Gallegos. This resignaion was made because of a change in w;ork schedule;; which nxqkes it impossible j for Mr>, SfaUegos* to attend, eyenjng. -meetings.
The Council, unanimously agreed that they want Mr. Gallegos' to continue as chairman and th&y would consider changing the time and day of meetings to accommodate him. They would also like to see him continue as DO representative. For this purpose a letter with the signatures of all
in finding;, good paying jobs is j the Council members was that, inpst need skill, exper- made and presented to Mr. ienee or at least a high school, Cavender, Denver Postmaster,
diploma or G. E. D^.,He; had spoken fa the Welfare MStiv-' ers at Auraria on job pq^bjil-/itips and .said he wasjqvaild^ hie to speak to other interested groups. Mr. George may be contacted at the West-side Action Center.
On February 7, the Council met for a special meeting. Manual Salinas from DO ex-
on February} 20m in which it was requested ;fagt> Mr. Gallegos be given two nights^ a month < off to -continue ^ygriring in these areas.
The regular monthly meeting of the Council was on February 22nd. At this meeting further business on the matters of Chairman arid ViceChair-man were considered.
Progress Slow But Steady At West Side Health Center
At the regular monthly meeting of the West Side Health Board a' report was given by Mr. Amando Atencio on the progress of thp Health Center at 1 Pth and Federal. Due to many delays in construction thq Center is nojt yet ready for use. Haweyer, it is hoped that it will be in partial use by the middle of March. It will take 30 days from completion of construction to reach full operation. Equipment is arriving arid part of the professional staff is already hired, Almost all of the nursing staff has been hired, but there is still a need for more general
practitioners.
The .Health Board plans to hgld its regular meeting in March jn the Center and o committee is planning now for the Grand, Opening as soon as it is possible.
Mr. Atencio also reported on plans for satellite stations In various neighborhoods to supplement the Health Center. Six or seven possible sites were mentioned. Satellites should be located in a poverty area with adequate parking facilities and at least 3600 sg. feet of space on the first floor of the building.


Full Text
Volume 4, Number 10
Monthly'Newspaper of the West Side Improvement Association
February, 1968
West
Side
Calendar
SPECIAL EVENTS
Feb. 7-29 B- "The American Negro Legacy" Prehistoric to Contemporary Art. Chappell House, 1300 Logan St Open 2:30-5 p. mi week days.
Feb. 24Las Vegas Night St. Joseph's Parish, 6th and Galapago, 8 p. 'Hi.-1:00 a. m.
Feb; 25West Side Improvement Association General Meeting, 2:30 p. mr at Auaraia Community Center, 1212 Mariposa Street.
Feb. 26i§aker junior High School Career Day.
Feb. 26 Coordinated Services for the' Aging panel disr cussion on "Is Denver Next In Line To Blow I A Racial Fuse?" 2 p. rhv, 1620 Meade Street.
Feb. 27Auraria Neighborhood Group will appear on Channel 6 T. V. oh "The Other Side of ADC," 9 p. iiri
Feb; 29'- Stage Band of West High School program at West High Auditorium, 8 p. rh. Tickets at the door 75c. .dyfan.^. 8-^Eainric^:;,.Qarnival
6:00-9:30 ip. nri '\t
Mar.' 7-8 Rummage Sale., sponsored by St. Peter's Episcopal Church, 9 to 5 p. m.
Mar. 17-May 27"Ar^ericag. Panorama" Visual review of American Histpry through arts and crafts of tihe,;hdtiph. Chappell House, 1300 Logan St. Open 2:30^5 p. m. week days.
E ACH WEE*
. Girl Scout Tropp No. 726 mjsets at Auraria CoimDiinity Center, 121?- Mariposa, on Thursday evenings 5:00 p. m. to 6:00 p.EQ.
Mobile Unit from Better Business i Bureau at yarious places in the neighborhood For locations caU; Westside Action Center at 534-5141.
Eight More Area Residents Hired
The, personnel .committee oJ the West;, Side Health Board has to date screened 1400 applications for non-professional trainee jobs,, at the West Side Health Center that will soon open at 10th and Federal. Of these applications, the committee has personally ..interviewed 400-500 of these and 63 of the approximately- 95 presently available positions have j been filled..
Additional Westsiders re-| cently hired are: Gloria Olguin, Research dnd Development; Irene Morales, Laboratory; Gloria Martinez, Dental; Dorothy Vaughn, Pharmacy; Connie Padilla, Dental; Judith Chavez, Laboratory; Mary Clark, Home Services; and Pauline Trujillo, Home Services.
Aide-trainees, employed at the Health Center will receive onrthe-j ob-training in various hospital related jobs. The purpose and aim of. t-fre program is dual. While providing increased medical and dental services to the .target areas, it will also be providing valuable training to many formerly unemployed people who lacked the.: training or skills to get jobs.
Tags BegjtK (infejjwilr serve the Ndrl^/Platte Valley, Southwest, and West Target areas. The.. Health Board, which seryes ;in an advisory capacity, is made up ,pf /people appointed by the Action^ Councils of each of the above target areas.
WSIA To Hold Meeting With Metro State College
West Siders To Be On TV
Tuesday, February 27, mem bers of the Auraria Neighbor-' hood Group will appear on] Channel 6 at 9 p.m. The show i is" called "The Other Side Of; ADC. They will talk about i ADC from the recipient's, point I of view. After tfre recent j trouble over censorship. at, Channel 6 members of the group and the producer of the! show have expressed the hope that the program will be shown j as. at is produced.
New Address For WSIA Office
The West Side Improvement Association will move their office to Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa Street, on March, 1. Due to the ending of the grant from the Nat-tonal Institute of Mental Heafti which has supported the com-jnunity prooTom, for five years, ffies omce*OTTwll do closed. The coordinator of WSIA, and the office secretary will be provided, with an office for the next few months in the Auraria building. The same telephone number244-33Q1 will reach the new office.
LAS VEGAS NIGHT
AT. ST. JOSEPH'S PARISH HALL
B. B. B.'s Mobile Unit Available To West Side
. The Better Business Bureau has a Mobil Ufrit that will be available every. Monday to groups' of 14 person^ throughout the. West. .Side for consumer education and counseling.-If there is a group of about 14 people who would like to have the Mobile Unit in their area to explain. the BBB's information on: Credit, Financing Budgeting, Shipping for Gra> caries ^andr Ctothing, etc,, they may call the Westside Action Center at 5.34-5141 and arrange for a Monday morning or afternoon in a central location available to the group. This would be an excellent project for mothers groups, PTA's and other community organizations.
On February 24,- 1968, St. Joseph Parish will ^conduct the second annual "Las Vengas Night." It will be in -the. gym and hall at 6th and Galapago Street.
\ Las Vegas Night will run from 8:00 to 1:00. The admission will be $7.00 per couple. There will be. gambling throughout the evening with- play money that will be furnished. Winnings. 'a from the. gambling tables can be used for valu- j able prizes auctioned during'
this exciting evening., Danny Sylva and his Jay Topes- will render the music for the. dancing. A delicious Dutch Lunch and; Refreshments will help to make it an enjoyable time for all, .
. ^he; proc^ds^ from Las Vegas Night this year will be used to repair and decorate the exterior of St. Josephs. Church. Anyone wishing tickets or more, information can Inquire at Sf. Joseph's Rectory, 6th and Fox or call 534-4408.
"Action-Education, uniqueness, community involve-ment-^-these words give a capsule definition of | Metropolitan State College.
"Metro State is a first of its/; kindan urban-oriented, extroverted college for an urban age. We. do not claim .ours is the only college with some form of these characteristics. But we do know none other has our combination of all. "We are ded-:ipated" tqT the'udefr tnardhe main reason for our existence is to* focus on the urban problems and needs of metro Denver."
Kenneth Phillips
President
1967
| Metropolitan State College i|§|§ i the concept and the location. wilL be the subject of a public meeting on Sunday, February 25, under the sponsorship of the West Side Improvement Association. Dr. Kenneth Phillips, President of the College, Will discuss the concept of the urban college. Dr. Robert O'ipelL,^ Administrative Dean, will describe the site selection process. Mr. Philip Milstein, Executive Director of the Downtown D9nver Improvement Association and a member of the Denver Planning Board, will be present to participate in the discussion of the location to be chosen for the College.
The meeting to inform community residents about plans for Metropolitan State College will be held at Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa Street, at 2:30 p. m. Everyone is urged to attend.
Metro College opened in the fall of .1965, with less than 1,900 students attending day and evening classes. In 1967, about 3600 students were registered, and 30,000 students are expected in 1982: A new, permndent campus. is planned, for 1972. Of the three sites recommended for final consideration most planning groups support the Auraria site north of. Qplfax, between Speer Boulevard .and the Platte River. The- decision as to location will, be made later. The West Side- Improvement Association has oppQjjqd the "Civic Center" area, between Sixth Avenue arid Colfax and has recommended that the College should be built in Auraria.
FACTS ABOUT METRO STATE Liberal Arts: Mathentoti&S* Science, Humanities*. .Social Sciences -rr. Applied:
Business, Health. SetViiflll Fub-ifc/. Service, Technold^v-2 dhd programs lot dss6Sidfe arid bachelor degree^ POit-tiirie and night-time. programs.
^SY ACCESS
accessibility: A
commuter college.
Final preparation for "Las Vegas Night" at St. Joseph's. Father Edgar Gastaldi, C. Ss. R., Father Ray Stewart, C. Ss. R.. and Father James Nugent, C. Ss. R., look on as Esidore Maez I paints finishing touches on decorations and Miss Theresa Kinealy cut the play money printed at St. Joseph's.
NEW GROUP TO SPONSOR "RECORDER"
With next month's.; issjue of t^e Beholder, sponsorship of tfre Jjew^pgper^ will bi%.trcms-iHgd*to groupsof West Side Cheches,^ /,.The est Sidp. Re-
, was initiated by' the West Side Improvement Assq: criation':fri-. May, 1964, to serye ast a mecms of communication and neighborhood identiifcd-
tiqn. Fqnds for. printing: fee j p0R METRO DENVER paper were, made available from the federaL grant for community organization, but most of the labor- in writing and distributing the Recorder came from volunteers. The grant rqon-ey is ending, Side churches have! pledged funds to help continue the paper. Other churches and organizations will be asked to participate in supporting the neighborhood newspaper Advertising will be solicited to help with printing costs. Through the Improvement Association and churches, volunteers will again be organized to deliver the newspaper door-to-door.
The new mailing address for the Recorder will be: Wesley Methodist Church, 465 Galapago St. 80204. Messages or news items for the Recorder mav b' telephoned to St. Joseph's Church534-4408, dur-I ing the day (except Wednes-1 days). , _
Physical city-center No dorms.
. Financial accessibility: Inexpensive. $87 the quarter for tuition and services. Psychological accessiblity: An urban collegeintimately one with the city and its. metro population.
RESPONSIVE TO COMMUNITY NEEDS
Industry-college liaison committeesCommunity advisory committees for labor, minorities and other special interact groups.
DOLLARS FOR DENVER
Not counting funds spent for continuing construction, the salaries, operation expenses qr^ expenditures bv faculty, staff and students will bring to downtown Denver: 1972 $30 million annually; 1982 $90 million annually.


Pag Two
THE RECORDER
February, 1968
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Sponsored by West'Side Improvement Association
Office: 768 Santa Fe Drive | Editor: Erma Jean Harris Assistant Editor:
Jaye Martinez
Staff Reporters:
Margot Serumgard, Mildred Jordan, Juanita Winterhalder
'7tec . Mrs. Edith Davis of 1427 Mariposa, suffered a broken hip eight months ago. She is now home from the hospital and is doing very nicely.
Mrs. Leland of 1429 Mariposa, is back home from St Anthony Hospital and is doing real well.
Julia Ortiz of 1314 Lipan, was in Mercy Hospital with a heart attack. She is now home and. feeling much better.
Mr. Arthur Manchago of Commerce City, the brother of Mrs. E. Quintana of 1223 Lipan Street, is in Porter's Hospital.
Sgt. Ronald A. Vasquez and his wife, Dolores, were home on a leave. They were the guests of his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Bennie Vas-j quez of 1239 Lipan Street Ronald has now returned to his base at San Dieg6, Cai-famia
Mrs. Marie Glynn of 125? Kalamath, spent a Sunday visiting her daughter, Betty Da-dy, and family.
Mrs. Helen Meyers of 1466 Mariposa, has just returned from a month's vacation touring along the Pacific coast.
EDITORIAL
BYERS LIBRARY BOOK REVIEWS
Charlene Francis of 1259 Kalamath, attended the birthday party of her nephew, David Francis.
Mrs. Gerald Glynn of -125S Kalamath, spent a few days visiting her daughter, Mrs. Elena Marshall and granddaughter Lore.
Proud parents of a new baby boy are Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ragland. Reginald Lee was bom Tuesday, February 13, weighed 5 lbs. 2V4 ozs., and was 17 inches long. The baby is the grandson of Mrs. Grade Lofton of 1051 Mariposa Street.
Mr. Alphonso Martinez of 1378 Mariposa, reports that his wife is home from the hospital. She is recovering nicely.
Jesse David Sanchez, Jr., was bom January 18th, 1968, weighing 6 pounds and 8 ounces.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Jesse Sanchez of 1223 Lipan
Street He is also the grand- --------
son of Mr. and Mrs. Eddie \ -
Quintana of 1223 Lipan Street Sfcll I Of Glli
Pollution Problems
Man is his own worst enemy! The biggest polluter, of course, is man himself notes the U.S. Department of Agriculture. His car, his crowded cities and his large factories disperse quantities of unwanted chemical and physical by-produds into the air, water and soil. Nearly all direct uses of water changes its characteristics to some degree. And once changed, most of the water: goes back into its previous flow. The Mississippi River is re-used at least 16 times between St. Louis and New Orleans.
Scouts Offer Helping Hands
The Senior Girl Scout Patrol of Troop No. 726 is available to other troops in the area to help teach scout skills, games, songs, and badge work. They are also available for community service, such as passing out materials for a community agency, assisting with children in various programs, babysitting for special meetings in evenings such as PTA and doing small errands for Senior Citizens or persons who are ilL However, they are not permitted to go in homes unless accompanied by their advisor, or are personally acquainted with these persons.
If anyone is interested, please call Loretta Rhym at 255-4910. Girls who live near Auraria Community Center and attend West High School or St. Joseph's High School are invited to attend scout meetings and join if they desire. Meetings are held on Thursday evenings, 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Auraria Community I Center, 1212 Mariposa Street.
Mr. and Mrs.. Roy Maberry [ Don't forget to buy Girl Scout ave both needed to be hos Cookies March 2nd to March, italized in recent days. 110th. I
Mrs. Pat Fresquez of 1215! Lipan Street, has* 1 moved to 2460 So:H Galapago Street
Mr. Kenny Stark, the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Churchill of .1209 Lipan Street, returned from .overseas; duty in Germany. He.has a month leave before being sent to Viet
I :dm on March 15th.
Mrs. May Day reports that she fell and broke her ribs. She is resting at home and although painful, she is up and ground. This is the third time Mrs. Day has had accidents of this nature and we Sincerely hope that this ends the series of falls.
Jimmy Martinez, the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Pacheco of 1253 Lipan, wrote that he is soon to be returned to duty. He was wounded several weeks ago, and has been convalescing in Guam. He is now at Fitzsimons Hospital. Jimmy sends greetings to all his friends on the West Side.
j On December 19th, many Westsiders watched a T. V. program on Channel 6 called : "Who Speaks for the Consumer?" A portion of this T. V. program was a skit, filmed as i it was presented to the Lin-I coin Park Resident Council. Participants in the skit were four West Side neighbors: Ros-ianna Lewis, Kathamay Hart, jjean Decker and Jay Martin-j ez. Practices by unethical | merchants was the major point made. The program, was so controversial in certain quar- ters that it has been banned on Channel 6 and the producer of the show, Mrs. Cindy Kahn, has resigned in protest. Mrs. Kahn stated in her resignation, "I have been accused oi producing a biased show. I have not been allowed to face my accusers or answer theii charges." Her accusers were: State Senator William Gamsey R. Greeley), Rep. Palmer Burch (R. Denver), Speaker of the House John Vanderhoff (R. Glenwood Springs), House Majority Leader John Mackie (R. Longmont), Sen. Ed Scott (R. Englewood), Rep. Ted Shu-beft (R. Calhan), Rep. Harold Koster (R. Salida). These men attended a private showing of the program and cancellation of the "repeat" program followed this meeting. Mrs. Kahn states that she asked to meet with these Republican legislators at the time of the viewing in order to answer the accusations directly, but the men threatened to walk out if she participated in the discussion. James Voorhes, President of the Denver School Board, Dr. Robert Gilberts, Superintendent of Schools; and Russell, Casement, : director of Channel 6 met with the legislators and apparently it was these three men who were pressured: into cancelling the reshowing.:* Mrs. Kahn protests that this censorsip of the program is contrary to the principle of freedom of the press, "Further* more, the decision not to reair the show fails to carry out an obligation to those persons who participated in the program',and more importantly, to the public.*' The final judgment of whether or not the show was biased and whether or not some of our state legislators have acted as censors should be left to you who saw the program "Who Speaks for ,the Consumer."
W. 7th Ave. & Santa Fe Drive
Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 2-5:30 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m.-12 noon and 1-5:30 p.m. Closed Wednesdays.
Sometimes the name of a book is fascinating enough tc make you want to read it. Many of the. new books at Byers Neighborhood Library have just that kind of title. In TOPAZ, the author of EXODUS and MILA 18, Leon Uris, has created another exciting story of espionage.
CHRISTY, Catherine Marshall's first novel, is a warm and tender story about a nineteen year-old girl who is called to teach in the Appalachians of Tennessee in 1912. Mrs. Marshall wrote the best seller, A MAN CALLED PETER.
A view of the adult world as seen through a child's eyes is presented by Mary Dutton in her book entitled THORPE. A similar point of view is used in Harper Lee's memorable TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD.
There are a number of new western books at the library.
Crooked river canyon
by Dwight Bennett is based on actual events and is an exciting case history of the evils of vigilante justice.
THE WAR ON CHARITY
ACTIVE WEST SIDER LEAVING DENVER SOON
Harold Munson, District Director of the West Side Improvement Association, will be leaving the West Side soon after six years in the community. Mr. Munson has operated the Shamrock Service Station at Fifth and Kalamath during his residence in the area. For health reasons he has been forced to retire from the service station and to relocate, at a lower altitude.
Mr. Munson has worked hard for tiie Improvement Association on behalf of his neighborhood. In reviewing the improvements that have come from community option, with his leadership, he states that the WSIA "is the best thing that's happened" in the Wesl Side. The community wishes him well in his new home and new endeavors.
Animal Vacdne Deadline
More than 35,000 of ( the 50,000,-dogs ;in Denver, fjre without 1968 rabies tags as the March 1 immunization deadline approaches.
Dr. Harvard Larson, chief of the veterinary health service of the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals, warned Denver dog owners that pets without 1968 tags will be picked up and impounded Tiftei March 1. He urged all metropolitan area pet owners to protect themselves and their pets against rabies by having the animals vaccinated.
Although Denver has not had a case of rabies in. a household pet since the'present vaccination registration system went into efiect in January, 1951, Dr, Larson emphasized that the disease, which is always fatal once symptoms appear, I is still present in Denver and the metropolitan area.
Dr. Larson added that rabies shots are recommended for cats as well as dogs, especially since cats are more likely to come into contact with infected bats. He said owners of hunting dogs should be particularly interested in protecting their dogs since they might encounter a diseased skunk while out in the fields. All dogs or c^rfcs three months of age or older should be vaccinated.
Each pet vaccinated is registered and given a numbered tag (the color is red this year) bv the veterinarian. Registration slips are kept on file by, the Denver, and Jefferson County Tri-County Health Departments so that a lost animal can easily be identified by the finder and reunited with his owner.
ROSS, by Jack M. Bickham, j tells the tale of a widow who was determined to hold onto j the land her husband died | protecting. Her stubborn at-| titude sparks an already ex- plosive situation into open battle.
I BITTER GRASS by the well-known author, Theodore V. Olsen, is an exciting western of a dynamic man destroying himself through the misuse of power.
The new mysteries at Byers Neighborhood Library are so numerous, there's only space for a partial list of the titles.
Here are just a few of them:
Murder. 1 Assassin
Winterwood Eliminator
Run, Man, Run Coffin Comer The Looking Glass Murder
Green Grow the Tresses .Code Name, Sebastian Game Without Rules Murder in Canton Midsummer Loki The Red Lamp Third Girl Hedgerow Sally
Pictures of the moon are still new and fascinating to most of us. For "that reason, PICTORIAL GUIDE TO THE MOON, by Dinsmore Alter, will be an educational pleasure for the reader. Until 1964, pictures of the moon were all taken from the earth, but the Ranger probes, exposed in that year, surpassed the finest terrestrial observatories. A selection of one hundred and thrity-eight of the best, photographs made by Ranger, Surveyor, and Orbiter spapcecraft are presented in this outstanding book. ' .
Art Museum Displays At Chappell House
Three of the four Civic Center galleries of the Denver Art Museum have been demolished to make way for the new six-story Art Museum building. Completion is expected in two to two and a half years.
Open for exhibitions and tours is Chappell House, 1300 Logan Street, original home of the Art Museum.
"THE AMERICAN NEGRO LEGACY" Jeb. 7-Feb. 29. Prehistoric to contemporary art. Paintings, sculpture, ceramics. Because .of. tours, open 2:30 5 week days. Regular weekend hours.
"AMERICAN PANORAMA" Mar. 17 May 27. Visual review of American history through the aits and crafts of the nation. Material from the Art Museum's own collections plus important loans from major museums and dealers a-~ross the country. Regular hours.
CARD OF THANKS
Many thanks to all the people who helped to make oui Bake Sale a success.
The, Parent Group,
1418 Navajo Head Start Center Loretha Williams Parent Aide-


THE RECORDER
February/ 1968
Page Three
Baker Junior High
Twenty-three Baker students attended the Midyear Leadership Conference at Thomas Jefferson Jr.-Sr.' High School on Saturday, February 3, from 9 to 4. Lars Brown, Sandra j Madrid, Modestine Smith, and Paul Lopez led a group discussion on school problems. Other students attending were: Wanda Westbrook, Helen Lopez, Sandra Sandoval, Phil Pacheco, Loretta Gomez, Ruth Gomez, Janell Cutshall) Murial Trujillo, Tomacita Rivera, Lisa Cordova, Andy Vigil, Harold Chacon, Sid Angelo, Liz Delgado, Loretta Lucero, Jeanne Silva, Joanne Thompson, Yen Yen Yin, and Jocelyn Croxton.
Parents driving cars to the conference were Mrs. Eloise Brown, Mrs. Croxton, Mr. Lopez, Mrs. Walden, and Mrs. Rivera.
Sandra Madrid and Wanda Westbrook led discussion groups at another leadership conference held Feb. 10 at John F. Kennedy Jr.-Sr. High.
STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS VISIT
Baker Student Council directors visited the Denver Board, for Retarded Children on Wednesday, January 31. A tour of the school was made. The directors were introduced to the students at an assembly, and a gift of food and money was given by Lars Brown, Head Boy on behali of all of the Baker students.
Also attending were Sandra Madrid, Modestine Smith, Wanda Westbrook, Bill Dyes, Paul Lopez, Miss Miller and Mr. Meier. ^
HEARING TESTS
Hearing tests will be given
St. Elizabeth's
What happened to Abraham Lincoln's stove pipe hat? Some sixth graders at St. Elizabeth's would like to tell you.
One day I was fishing, my little friend was also with me. He is only four years old. Then I saw a big black hat coming down stream. When it reached' me I picked it up. Then I looked at the name. It said Araham Lincoln. Then I told my friend it was Abraham Lincoln's hat. My friend said to me, "What's an Abraham Lincoln's hat?" So then I told him it was a president of long ago's hat. Then my friend said, "Was Abraham swimming," I asked him why. He said, "Well, maybe, he made a swan dive and his hat fell off." So then I told him about the story of Lincoln. After I asked him if he had any questions. He said millions of
them. So I threw that hat
back and I said forget it Well, no one else believes my story.
I hope you wilL
Donald Q'Cana
You'll never guess what I found on top of my roof§j Abraham Lincoln's hat! Would you, believe thatl I guess that a gust of wind came and blowed it out the museum window. I Went On top of the roof to clean out the gutters and there it laid. I have it in a glass case built in the dining room wall.
Sharon Bowers
What do you think hap-pentd to me? Well yesterday I was walking on Conjos Avenue. I happened to see an driinltriOoking rinrthe- trash bdrfels. He had ah old derby hat on that he got from the trash. I went looking, found a
FAIRMONT SCHOOL CARNIVAL PLANNED
March 8th is the date to re volunteers can be used. Any-member: the time, 6i30-9:3C one wishing to donate a cake
p.m. Mark this now as the date for the Cake Walk may call for Fairmont's Carnival. It Mrs. Guedea at 733-4968 or seems that this is the first Mrs. Britton at 722-8980. Carnival to be held at Fairmont So circle March 8th, 6:00-and lots of fun is in store for 9:30 p. m. on your calendar all who attend. Some of the and buy yoUr extra value cou-attractions planned are a Lolli- pons -now at Fairmont School pop Tree, Fish Pond, Cake and we'll see you at the Car-
to all seventh grade students hat with the signature of by the end. of February, | Abraham Lincoln. I forgot r* RDrm USH11 Si 1 ; 1 ;; H labout it and started walking m 1 "I ran all the Way bade
A career day is being plan- started to wear it Just ned for March 14 at Baker. At thinker wore : it
Amanda Hernandez
this time,.. ninth graders will fray, an opportunity to talk
with:->mn, and women who, H HRR RMH H IHHH
work at many different kinds!' iliillMlI of jobs m I found. Abraham Lincoln s hat.
I was walking along in the
SWIMMING CLUB I 'theater that he was killed in
arid tripped over it. Boy, was it dusty! I can see why no one found; it by now, jj it's so dark. I was forced to give it up. So I gave it to the mus-
Walk, and a Spook House, nival! There will be popcorn and soft drinks for sale also.
A movie cartoon will be shown in the auditorium! throughout the evening. The Cake Walk will be in the kindergarten room, the Spook House in one of the new rooms off the gym and the rest of the games will be in the gym. Tickets will be sold the night of the Carnival in front, of the office.
Tickets can be purchased now at a saving. For one dollar you can purchase a coupon that can be redeemed the night of the Carnival for 22 tickets. When the Carnival starts, $1.00 will buy only, 20 tickets. Coupons can be bought from the school or at 447 Fox Street. Another bonus for buying ahead will be a drawing for a prize using the redeemed coupons. So, if you buy a coupon, put your name on the back of it and stay. around for the drawing sometime during the evening!
A complete list of games and their chairmen- are as follows
ClownMr. Goff Lollipop TreeCaralee Kirby Dart FortuneLeon Morris Stand-'Em4IpViola Sanchez Bcriietoh^Dart:£--EstherGh<3vez %
W inter-
' ; holder
Seven-Eleyen-^Armando Garcia Pen GameRobert Allen Fish PondAlfred Rios Spook House-*-Kay Watts SI Cake Walk-Rachel Guedea Pop Corris-e-Bertha Acevedo Soft Drinks^-Rose Lopez -Ticket Qiairman-Martha De anda
West High Host Of Stage Band Festival
General Chairman, 'of the Carnival is Mr. Deonda. Any-
Mother Daughter Tea
On February 13 and 14, the Fairmont PTA held its annual Mother-Daughter Tea. On the 13th, girls in grades 1-3 and the two morning Kindergartens with their mothers enjoyed a program of music provided by various groups. Included in the program were two selec-ions by the Fairmont El men-tery Band under the direction of Mr. Thomas Gatschet. A Chorus made up of volunteer 1st, 2nd, and 3rd graders who meet on Monday mornings before school sang selections for the mothers. They were directed by Miss Judy Cornwall. Miss Kenney's 4th grade also sang some numbers. Cake and punch were served af.er-wards in the gym.
The program on the 15th foi he upper grade girls and the afternoon kindergartens varied a bit from the 13th. Once again the Band played selections plus the three soloists in the City Wide Band Contest, Soloists were Pameeia Burrell Frances Vialpando and Brian Morris. The kindergarten children sang five songs with great enthusiasm. Then a volunteer chorus -of upper grade children who meet during' the noon hour under the direction of Miss' Cornwall sang three songs.
Again refreshments were served afterwards. The cakes for the two teas were baked by Mrs. Martha Deanda, PTA secretary, and were attractively decorated with various floWers. There was a good attendance of mothers on both
The Stage Band of West High School will be host to a Stage Band Festival on February \ 29th at West High. Bands participating in the Festival in addition to West, will be the Manual High School Stage Band, under the direction of Mr. Hugh Avis, and the Stage Band from North High School, directed by Mr. Harold Tracy.
The program will also feature the Colorado University Stage Band with Mr. Jon Wie-gardt directing.
There are two reasons for having this special event. On is to expose students and parents to the big band sound. With the great popularity of small combos, the stage band, which is approximately a 17-piece group, has not been used as much recently. However, the stage band has much to offer in the way of enjoyment and entertainment. Funds from the program will be used for Stage Band equipment and library. ~~
So, remember February 29th, 8:00 p. m., at West High Auditorium* Tickets are 75c and can be purchased at the door.
The Swimming Club met at the YWCA for its first swim recently. Seventeen girls and Mrs. Mund, sponsor, were present. The ,cliib plans to swim every other week!
qn^p Vrho would like tb help j days and both affairs were a may call him at 255-9$13. More great success.
i T 1 ~~r ~
BAKER. PTA
The Baker PTA held a Founders Day Luncheon Wednesday, February 7. Eight past presidents were honored. Musical groups under the direction of Mr. Bridge entertained in the school auditorium.
Panel Discussion
On February 26th, a panel of five specjlaists will discuss the topic "Is Denver Next In Lin to Blow a Racial Fuse?" at the Coordinated Services for the Aging Community Center at 1620 Meade Street al 2 pi m. in the auditorium. Everyone is invited to this timely discussion. Panelists from various agencies and concerned groups have been selected
eum.
PTA
Sophie Gallegos
Mr. Dan Bell, of the Better j Business Bureau, was guest speaker at the February 21 meeting of the PTA. Mr. Bell gave a very interesting talk
concerning gyp artists how they operate.
and
St. Cajetan's Winter Carnival
The PTA of Saint Cajetan School held its annual1 "Winter Carnival" on February 17th and 18th in the cafeteria at 9th and Lawrence.
Many interesting booths were the center of attraction on these two days. Delicious
by Officer James A. Moore, Mexican foods, such as tamal-Community Relations Bureau I es, burritos, and enchiladas of the Police Department. were served.
Fairmont has two new classrooms to accommodate additional classes. This extra space was obtained by remodeling the two unused shower rooms, on either side of the gym. Above is one of the classes, taught by Miss Roberta Friedl.
West Side Mother Travels To Chicago
The weekend of February 3 thrqugh 5, Kalrigmay^ Hart went to a. conference in Chicago representing the Denver Welfare Rights Organization. Mrs. Hart reports that the meeting was very stimulating with each of the 22 states represented reporting on file operation and problems of welfare in its state. The Welfare Rights Organization is not connected with the Welfare Department in any way, but in each state it is a group of welfare recipients who are ddnqemegt^witix. their problems arid; feel: that through working. together they can better their pwn .circumstances. Mrs. Hart soys she enjoyed1 her first plane trip, going to Chicago,, meeting ,?an i .'talking to many of the representatives from the^'oth§r 2F-states, and especially the final meeting on Monday where she' met Dr. Martin Luther King.
On February 5th, Mrs. Grade Dixon, Mrs. Jean Decker of South Lincoln Park, Mrs. Verna Ball, formerly of the West Side, Mrs. Rose Wildman, Levi Martinez and Ginny Wilson representing the Denver Welfare Rights Organization went to see Bernard Valdez of the
Greenlee Participants In Cultural Arts Workshop
The Association for Child-1 were Robin Bieber, Debra Leh-
hbod Education, Denver branch, presented a Cultural Arts Workshop for Denver area teachers on February 6 at Rishel Junior High School, Seven Greenlee pupils parties
man, Vickie Lucero, David Nadeau, Rosa Palomo, Moni-co Rivera, and Jane Suekama. All are members of Mr., Connor's sixth grade class.
Denver Welfare Department. The purpose of the meeting with Mr. Valdz was to ask for his recognition of the Welfare Rights Organizations and permission to set up a recruiting booth in the Welfare office. Mr. Valdez agreed to both recognize the organization as a voice for welfare recipients and permit a booth to be set up in the Welfare Office.
The next meeting of the Den-
Members of the Greenlee
ipated in the music, art, and faculty attending this program ver Welfare Rights Organizer-drama demonstrations which were Mr. Kenneth Gorsline, tion will be on Monday even,-were a part of the program. | Mrs. Joyce Davis, Mrs. Mary ing, February 26, at St. Eliza-Taking part in. these -activities Nelle Ryan, and Mrs. Beth Hall, beth's School, at 7:30 p. m.


THE RECORDER
February, 1968
Page Four
Advertisements
FOR RENT
600 Elati. Comer Store completely furnished as church or may use as desired. Reasonable. 222-1143 or inquire at Thrifty Creamery.
RUMMAGE SALE February 24 8 a. m. 834 Santa Fe Drive
NEW MAILING ADDRESS
The new mailing address for the Recorder will be: Wesley Methodist Church, 465 Galapago St., 80204. Messages or news items for the Recorder may be telephoned to St. Joseph's Church 1534-4408, during
the day (except Wednesdays).

PICK THE PLENTITULS
Februaiy buys. Broiler-type fryers, potatoes, dairy products, and dry split peas.
DEHYDRATED FOODS ARE COMING
Use of dehydrated foods is on fhe upswng, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. About 1500 new food products will appear on grocers' shelves across the country this year. Among the new products will be fruits and fruit products even applesaucein the dehydrated form. Tomatoes, green jbeans, peas and asparagus, as -well as dairy products of eot-fitage cheese, sour cream and 7 processed cheese (and "dips" -wiU be on the market as dehydrated foods. Meats of improved quality and flavor will be available as new drying .techniques emerge.
L" ' ______
Rummage Sale
St Paul's Community Church of Lakewood is having a rummage sale on February 24 at 8 o'clock at 834 Santa Fe Drive. There will be all kinds of clothes and miscellaneous items.
Church News
WESLEY METHODIST
The Wesley Methodist Church is proud to announce that the Rev. Bill Byrd, the District Superintendent for the Denver Area, will be the special speaker at a Sunday morning service. This will be March 3rd, 1968, at 11:00 a.-m. Following the services Rev. Byrd will lead a talkbbrck session concerning the goals and aspirations of both the Wesley Methodist Church and the Rocky Mountain Conference for the coming year. Everyone is invited. The Wesley Methodist Church is at 465 Galapago Street.
*
The Wesley Methodist Church is proud to announce the pur-, chase of 50 new Methodist Hymnals. We will have them to start our Lenten Services, These were all donated by the members and friends of the church.
ST. PETER'S EPISCOPAL
St. Peter's Episcopal Church will hold a Rummage Sale in the Parish Hall, 126 W. 22nd Avenue, on March 7' and 8. The sale will be conducted between the hours of 9 a. m and 5 p. m. on both days, and will also feature a snack bar
Safeguard Your House
In midwinter examine attics especially insulated attics-lack ing proper ventilation, wqrns a U. S. Department of Agricul ture booklet on wood decay in houses. Check for conden sation moisture or frost accum ulation and decay. Note especially- the eaves level at the north side of the house. Persistence of condensation into the period of warm weather can permit decay. Attic con densation difficulties can be corrected easily by increased ventilation/ and most damage can be avoided. Read about preventing and controlling; yopd decay-Home and Garden. Bulled No. 73, "Wood Decay in Houses," write \J. & Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C; 20402. Price. -rrrl.5 cents. Please include your zip code.
RECIPES
Cari-Over Corner
^ry-using Instant Nonfat Dry Milk in your recipes, fe is easy to: use and saves. you money. =
CREAM GRAVY. 3 table spoons fneat or poultry drippings, 2 tablespoons flour, Va | cup dry milk, % teaspoon salt, Vs teaspoon pepper, 1 cup I luke-warm water. Melt fat in frying pan,. Mix flour with dry milk, salt and pepper. Stir into melted fat. Gradually add water, stirring constantly until mixture thickens and comes to a boil. Makes 1 cup,
SUGGESTIONS FOR SERVING: Add grated cheese and serve over vegetables, noodles. Add pieces of meat or poultry and serve over toast, rice, noodles, potatoes. If you want a thin gravy, add more water (small amount).
BOY SCOUT BADGES UPDATED
"Keeping up-to-date" is one of the aims of the Boy Scouts of America, and the latest list of requirements for Boy Scout merit badges shows that ten of 111 merit badges are new or revised.
Up-to-date merit badges include landscape architecture, which replaces landscaping; iheater, replacing dramatics; and American business, replacing business.
Revised or realigned requirements are newly offered to,Boy Scouts for the subjects of aviation, cooking, firemanship, personal fitness, and soil and water conservation.
The newest merit badges offered to Scouts this year are computers and engineering.
The, most popular merit badges still reflect Scouting skills, The top three are swimming, cooking, and first aid. Nation-: ally, in a year's time, more han 1,6Q0,000 merit badges are earned by Boy Scouts.
"FRIENDS OF SCOUTING" The West District is one of ten Scout Districts in the Denver. Area Council and the Council is a member of the Mile High United- Way. The Council will receive about two-thirds of its financial needs from the United Way this year, but the Council must secure the rest of its operating funds through Sustaining Memberships from "Friends of Scouting" to meet Scouting budget requirements.
The Sustaining Membership Enrollment will be conducted by hundreds of Scout adult volunteers in local neighborhoods during- February.
The Denver Area Scout Council provides seven essential services that, are vital jn the maintenance and. expansion of the local Scouting program. The services are as follows:
Council Service Center-r-The Denver Area Council Service Center, 1375.. Delaware Street, provided information and assistance, anyone interested ScQu&ng* IhAvkJual Scooting. k achievement records are maintained here. A Trading I Post m leaders. f Training servicesthe latest techniques, materials and e-quipment are used1 to train adult leaders to insure the best programs fop the boys. Organizational Serviceshelp is given in organizing new Cub Scout* Packs* Boy Scout Troqps .and. Explorer Posts.
Camping Activities and Services ? camping, one of the most exciting activities in Scouting, is provided the year-around at Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch and Camp Ta-hosa for the convenience of all boys in Scouting. Advancement Services Commissioners Services -ji 250 trained volunteer adults work with Cubmasters, Scoutmasters and Explorer Advisors to give help and assistance when needed.
Professional Staff Services Become "A Friend of Scouting" so that the current scouting program can be maintained and expanded to the 9,273 boys who are expected to join Scouting in 1968.
action council has busy month
The Westside Action Council i plained to the Council the
has met three times since the last edition of this paper.
At' their regular monthly meeting on January 25th, they listened and acted upon a pro-, posal from West Side Teenagers and also heard reports from the Action Center staff and agencies.
"he report presented to the Acuan Council by three, teenagers expressed their great desire and willingness to. work for recreational facilities for West Side Teenagers. A Teen Club is already. meeting on Tuesdays in the Action Center to play ping pong and card
games.. However, this space, -wsbhcjh gg ,
. 1. , , , n 1 really needed was two lawyers
is limited and what is really.,. SBS^gl A pel \, ,
, m /-I , m every Action. Center to ef-
needed is a Teen Center. where| 111 IHHB
there could possibly be a Canteen, Bowling, Pool Table, Record Player, Sports for boys, and
maybe a Charm School for girls.
The young people have expressed their desire to fix up a place that could : be made
planned new procedure for Legal Services. The Office of Economic Opportunity in Kansas City has decided that instead of on,e,' lawyer in every Action Center, Legal Services should;, hay§. two_ .lawyers, in ngt more than j three, outpost pffices in. the. Target Areas and then research staff in the office downtown at the United Fund Building. It mis stated that people on the near West Side: should go downtown for legal; .aid. r Memberst of the Council, fplt very strongly that this wquld reduce drastically the legal s.eiyices. to people needing' them and what ..was
fectively handle the, great load of legal, cases in each Target Area.
Because* this, ruling has come from Kansas City and is a result of their study, of various Legal Services throughout the country it is doubtful that the off ices, will not be reduced to
available and also their ambi- j number. However, the
tion to organize cmd run their Council instructed Mr. Torres Center as much as possible on
their Own. They did ask the support of the Council as a resource and suggestion group. A committee volunteered from
and Mr. Jaramillo, their representatives to the Legal Services Board, to express the great concern of the Council for the need to continue Legal
the Council to serve and to Services to every center with
look into various areas -of fin ancial and staff support for such an endeavor. Chairman of the committee, is Henry Maestas.
Attorney Douglas Donne gave a report on the activities H| the: Legal Services at the Action Center. He said that in three months they have handled 250 cases.
Mr. George reported on his work in the area of employment. He stated that 18 people had been referred to vo-cational training and 8 placed in. jobs, afterward. | Thirty-two men and thirteen women had been found jobs of the total of 143 persons who had come for help in job, finding. Mr. George stated that the main problem
increased staff.
The most recent meeting of the Council was on February 17 at 8:00 p. m. The Council at that time considered the letter of resignation submitted by the Chairman, Mr. Don Gallegos. This resignaion was made because of a change in w;ork schedule;; which nxqkes it impossible j for Mr>, SfaUegos* to attend, eyenjng. -meetings.
The Council, unanimously agreed that they want Mr. Gallegos' to continue as chairman and th&y would consider changing the time and day of meetings to accommodate him. They would also like to see him continue as DO representative. For this purpose a letter with the signatures of all
in finding;, good paying jobs is j the Council members was that, inpst need skill, exper- made and presented to Mr. ienee or at least a high school, Cavender, Denver Postmaster,
diploma or G. E. D^.,He; had spoken fa the Welfare MStiv-' ers at Auraria on job pq^bjil-/itips and .said he wasjqvaild^ hie to speak to other interested groups. Mr. George may be contacted at the West-side Action Center.
On February 7, the Council met for a special meeting. Manual Salinas from DO ex-
on February} 20m in which it was requested ;fagt> Mr. Gallegos be given two nights^ a month < off to -continue ^ygriring in these areas.
The regular monthly meeting of the Council was on February 22nd. At this meeting further business on the matters of Chairman arid ViceChair-man were considered.
Progress Slow But Steady At West Side Health Center
At the regular monthly meeting of the West Side Health Board a' report was given by Mr. Amando Atencio on the progress of thp Health Center at 1 Pth and Federal. Due to many delays in construction thq Center is nojt yet ready for use. Haweyer, it is hoped that it will be in partial use by the middle of March. It will take 30 days from completion of construction to reach full operation. Equipment is arriving arid part of the professional staff is already hired, Almost all of the nursing staff has been hired, but there is still a need for more general
practitioners.
The .Health Board plans to hgld its regular meeting in March jn the Center and o committee is planning now for the Grand, Opening as soon as it is possible.
Mr. Atencio also reported on plans for satellite stations In various neighborhoods to supplement the Health Center. Six or seven possible sites were mentioned. Satellites should be located in a poverty area with adequate parking facilities and at least 3600 sg. feet of space on the first floor of the building.