Citation
West side recorder, September, 1968

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, September, 1968
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume VNumber 4 Monthly Newspaper of the West Side, Denver, Colorado September, 1968
New Health Station Opening At 8011Vest Fifth Avenue
Good News: West Side To Have Its Own Federal Credit Union
Neighborhood representatives of the West Side Action Center and West Side residents47 persons in allhave completed the first step to set up a credit union for West Siders.
The group chose the name, West Denver Federal Credit Union, and made proper application this week for the neces-
Casita Esperanza at 801 W. Fifth Ave., Denvers newest neighborhood Health Station, is scheduled to open for patient care Monday (Sept. 30). The date for the formal opening had not been announced as the Recorder went to press.
The new station will offer the same services as the Mariposa Health Station at 1178 Mariposa St.
These include doctors care for adults and children, laboratory services, social services, nutrition information and free birth control aid.
Although the Health Station will not have a regular pharmacy, it will be possible to get medications prescribed by doctors there.
"Family Doctor"
The outstanding difference in the staffing of Casita Esperanza will be a family doctor" instead of several specialists such as pediatricians, obstetricians, and others. Later, another family doctor will be added to the staff.
It is hoped this different staffing will help families to establish a real family relationship with one doctor.
Also on the staff will be two neighborhood health aides. They are Mary Benevidez ^nd Margaret Bargas.
The building for the new station is quite new, with carpeting and all wood paneling. The Research and Program Development section of Denver Department of Health and Hospitals will be on the lower level of the building. Patient care will be upstairs on the second floor.
5,000 Patients
. Casita Esperanza is supposed to serve an immediate area Containing 5,000 low-income persons not being serviced by any other health facility, according to the requirements the West Side Health Board was asked to consider in suggesting possible new health station sites.
This requirement was stated Jan. 16, 1968, in a letter to Vincent Garza, West Side Health
Pawn Shop Move Blocked by Council
Pawn shops will not move into the West Side, according to action taken by the Denver City Council at its meeting Sept. 3.
The protest against proposed zone changes to benefit pawn shops seeking new locations was supported by the Council when only one councilman voted for the proposed change.
The West Side Improvement Association joined in the protest, as did merchants from the area around First Avenue and Broadway.
Board Consultant, from Armando R. Atencio, Project Administrator for the West Side Health Center. The location at West Fifth Ave. and Inca St. was not suggested by the West Side Health Board.
Also mentioned in the letter was a need for off-street parking space for 20 cars. The new station site does not have the required parking space.
Four Districts In Association Change Directors
Three of the eleven districts in the West Side Improvement Association have elected new directors to serve during the 1968-69 year, and another district has a new director.
Charles Garcia of 1325 Kala-math St. suoceeds Leslie Ka-lanquin of 1423 Lipan, St. in District 1, the area bounded by Speer Blvd., Colfax Ave., Mariposa St. and West 12th Ave.
In District 4, Miss Carmen Lucero of 1022 We&t Ninth Ave. succeeds Mrs. Carmen Hodges of 1114 Mariposa St. The district is bounded by Sante Fe Dr. on the east, West 12th Ave. on the north, South Lincoln. Park and the railroad tracks on the west, and West Eighth Ave. on the south.
James Maestas of 769 Elati St. is the new director of District 11, formerly represented by Julian Kreoger of 533 Galapa-go St. The district is between West Fifth and West Eighth Aves, from Elati St. to Sante Fe Dr.
Manuel Garcia of 638 Kala-math St. is serving as director of District 6, succeeding Harold Munson of 466 Kalamath St.
(Contiuned on Page 4)
Festival Oct. 3-6 At St. Josephs
St Josephs Annual Fall Festival will be Thursday, Oct. 3, through Sunday, Oct. 6, from 7 p.m. to midnight each day.
One of the highlights of the Festival will be the Queen Contest. Several girls from the West Side area are hoping to be crowned queen of the Festival. The Queen will receive a cash prize of $200 and a beautiful trophy.
The Festival itself has something to appeal to every age group. There will be games of chance and of skill. As always there will be delicious Spanish food, piping hot, served throughout the Festival.
The climax of the Festival will be the raffle of the 1969 Camaro on Sunday evening, the last night of the Festival.
SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS FOR THIS ISSUE OF THE WEST SIDE RECORDER
Colorado Printers_____$10
First Bethany
Lutheran__________ $10
First Mennonite $10
First Spanish United
Methodist___________$10
Inner City Parish_____$10
Theresa Jacinto:______$10
Laurel Liskow__________$5
St. Elizabeths
Catholic ___________$10
St. Josephs Catholic $10
Dorothea Spellman____$5
United Methodist Church, Rocky Mountain
Conference________$100
Wesley United Methodist __________$10
Gifts under $5: Boy Scouts of America, Metropolitan Council for Community Service, Colorado Federation of Teachers, Mrs. Dorothy A. Berry, Everett J. Dobson, Mr. and Mrs. Frank V. Gumma, Dr. William J. Huddleston.
And a special thank you to Adolph Coors Co.
Bill Baker: West Side pictures.
Angela and Snoopy
Among the piany West Side children who took part in the Lincoln Park Fiesta Parade Aug. 2 was Angela Garcia, 9. At that time her guinea pig, Snoopy, was three months old, Angela told the RECORDER photographer. Dont they look nice?
Jim Hall Elected Action Ministry Head
The West Side Action Ministry recently elected James Hall, pastor of Wesleyan United Methodist Church, convenor, and Bernice Eriksen, First Bethany Lutheran Church, secretary.
The next meeting of the Action Ministry will be Thursday, Oct. 10, at 7:30 p.m. at Wesiey United Methodist Church, 465 Galapago St.
Lincoln Council Gets Six Requests
Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes Resident Council received a six-point petition from project residents at the councils meeting Sept. 5.
The petition covered the following: paint and tile; regular maintenance of heaters, windows and Kitchen cabinets; health hazards; work crew; rent money; and police assistance.
The tenants voiced their opinions on these matters, and were given a promise for action by the management of the project.
In turn, the residents were asked to be cooperative in helping to make Lincoln Homes a better place to live.
Guest speakers for the Council meeting, held at Auraria Community Center, were State Sen. George Brown, Austin Robinson and Bill Ratzlaff, all from Denver Housing Authority. Toby Beatty was introduced as the new maintenance supervisor for Lincoln Homes.
About 125 persons attended the meeting.
Housewives Want Stores To Improve
The West Side housewife hoping to have her neighborhood grocery store be a cleaner place is getting support from a group of volunteers who picketed one store in late August and may picket others.
Also, a meeting is being planned for housewives to meet in the near future with a representative of the Rocky Mountain Food Dealers Assn., to discuss ways of checking on grocery products for quality and freshness.
West Denver housewives three months ago expressed their concern over dirty stores, bad food handling, poor quality merchandise, and bad personal treatment from some clerks. A group picketed at the corner of West 13th Ave. and Kalamath St. Later, a meeting was held at Auraria Community Center for neighborhood women, five grocery store owners, three representatives from the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals, and persons from different West Side organizations.
Plans are underway for further action by residents of the neighborhood as they try to get grocery store owners to improve their buildings and their food handling methods.
Two Free Shopping Trips Arranged for Housewives
Two shopping trips to Brentwood Shopping Center have been arranged for West Side housewives, on Friday, Oct 4, and Thursday, Oct. 9.
The Lincoln Park Homes bus will be used for the free transportation. It will leave from the Mariposa Health Station at 1178 Mariposa SL, at 12:30 p.m. each day of the two days, and also pick up passengers at West 10th Ave. and Decatur St. at 12:45 p.m. Shoppers will be delivered directly to their homes at the end of the trip.
sary legal papers. The purpose is to provide a locally controlled and operated place where West Siders can borrow and save money with confidence.
The credit union will provide low-cost services, and programs to help members know how to get better value for their money. It also will offer family financial counseling, help in making and following budgets, and education in basic thrift.
Everyone who lives on the West Side may become a member and may benefit by the credit union. Residents who are on public assistance are allowed by the Welfare Department to save as much as $2,000.
A membership will be a $5 share which can be bought for as little as 25 cents a month.
In order to start a credit union, 30 residents must be interested and must receive orientation from the Colorado Credit Union League on how to operate a credit union. The orientation lasts 90 minutes, once a week for eight weeks.
Members of the credit union will decide who will be on the board of directors and three committeescredit, supervision, and consumer education.
Perfecto Martinez, neighborhood representative at the West Side Action Center, is in charge of the project under the guidance of Action Center coordinator Leo Rodriguez who helped start the East Denver Credit Union last year.
Mr. Martinez said, This credit union is badly needed. People on the West Side should get involved! Lets say good-bye to loan sharks, red tape, and cosigners. We, as citizens, should care enough to get this credit union started as soon as possible."
All interested persons should contact Mr. Martinez at the West Side Action Center, 1042 Santa Fe Dr., Telephone 534-5141.
Recreation Set at Greenlee School
Recreation for junior high and high school pupils has been set at Greenlee School on Tuesdays and Thursdays after school. These activities are being arranged and staffed by the RFK Recreation Center.
Tuesday evenings will be for junior high children. Thursdays, there will be a basketball league for 15-year-olds and over. They may sign up for the league at the RFK Center at 500 Kalamath St.
The RFK Center still has recreational activities for elementary and junior high children, Mondays through Fridays from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
From 1 to 3:30 p.in. the Center is available to West Side hobby groups, special interest groups, and any others interested. Arrangements may be made by calling 534-6525.
Denver Opportunity is also using the RFK Center to arrange Saturday tours for West Side young people. A schedule of the tours may be obtained by calling the Center at 534-6525.


Action at the Action Center
Within West Denver there are many individuals, groups, and agencies working collectively for the improvement of conditions in this area.
One of these groups is West Side Action Council composed of elected residents of West Denver who unselfishly devote countless hours to the administration of the West Side Action Center and introduce new programs and ideas which will contribute to the improvement and development of the West Side.
The Council represents a vivid cross section of the complex urban population.: housewives, working fathers and mothers, members of the clergy, part-time students, unemployed but concerned residents, and the professional and semi-professional; all with the concerted understanding and attitude that "theres work to be done.
During the past few weeks, the Council Members have devoted, with great diligence, their time, effort and resourcefulness in preparation of plans and priorities to be submitted to the Board of Directors of Denver Opportunity, Inc.
These priorities are listed under any extra monies which may be appropriated for 1969. However, if no monies are obtained, the Action Council will attempt to get funding from other sources for projects such as a cooperative grocery store, credit union, child care center, leadership development and education.
For further information, call West Side Action Center (534-5141) and ask for the name of your Action Council Member.
Letters From West Siders
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Founded May, 1964
Office: 465 Galapago St. Denver, Colo. 80204 Telephone: 534-4408 Sponsored by WESTSEDE ACTION MINISTRY
Staff for This Issue:
Rachel Guedea, Bea Acosta, Margot Serumgard, Alberta Crespin, Barbara Karr, Jo Ann Park.
Contributors:
Else Gruen, lone Helman, Arnold Blomquist, Reuel Amdur, Mrs. Leonard Essig, Leo Rodriguez, John Gallegos, Irene Gallagher, Leona Partney, Perfecto Martinez, Mrs. Raymond Gasser.
Editorial Advisor:
Pat Geddes.
Advertising Representatives for
This Issue:
Jim Hall, Joe Barry.
Advertising Manager:
Allen Martin.
Please, As Usual
All of us who work on the Recorder from month to month agree that nobody seems to be impressed with any deadlines we announce.
Only Byers Neighborhood Library gets its material in to the paper in good time without a special reminder or plea from us.
Heres your huge gold star, Byers (and Martha Cooper).
As for the rest of our readersthe many of you who are involved with PTA or schools, churches or community organizations, service agencies or youth groups, weddings or babies, any kind of project or program on the old West Side make a note of this:
Were setting the October deadline for the RECORDER at MONDAY, OCT. 14. If you know of something important thats going to happen after that but before Oct. 18, please let us knowwell try to include it in the paper that will come out the last week-end in October (25-26)).
Now, dont tell us you werent told. Ads should be in by OCT. 18 for sure, too.
After all, where else can you get family-to-family newspaper coverage every month of the more than 100 blocks between Broadway and Speer on the east and the railroad tracks oh the west, from Colfax down to Ellsworth?
Use ink, pencil, lipstick, axle greasebut make a note of the deadline for the next paper, and get your news in to us, will you? Please, and thank you.
P. S. Also please write out names clearly, in full, with home addresses of neighborhood people. Its important.
Religion Classes Set For All 12 Grades
Religion classes for Catholic students in public schools will be held at St. Josephs Grade School beginning the week of Oct. 7. Classes are arranged for grade-level groups. Plans also are underway for informal classes for parents.
Pupils in grades one through four will have classes on Saturdays between 9:30 and 10:30 a.m., beginning Oct. 12. Grades five and six will meet from 4 to 5 p.m. on Wednesdays beginning Oct. 9, and upper grades will have classes from 7 to 8 p.m., also beginning Wednesday, Oct. 9.
Registration will be between 3:30 and 5:30 Tuesday, Oct. 1, in the St. Joseph Church Hall, for pupils from all 12 grades. There are no fees for the classes except for the books for Grades 1-6 which cost 85 cents per child.
To the Editor:
We, the undersigned, are members of the West Side Action Council and the West Side Health Board. The announced re-organization at the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals has caused us great concern and left us with many questions.
We have heard both sides of the dispute resulting from the re-organization. But we still do not understand clearly and we feel that the public does not understand, either. Further, we think the public deserves to know and understand what is happening at their institution.
First, we do not understand why the West Side Health Board was not officially notified of the re-organization until nearly a month after it happened. Obviously the re-organization was of prime importance and interest to the Health Board.
Second, we do not understand why some of the changes were made without the Office of Economic Opportunity being notified first. OEO regulations are quite specific on an organization gaining OEO approval prior to the replacement of a project director.
Finally, the reasons given for the re-organization do not seem adequate to us. We do not understand the need for such a far-reaching re-organization because one man. reportedly has riot done his job.
We are not reassured that the proposed changes will not bring about undesirable results in the Neighborhood Health Program. The neighborhood people would not like to see the centers and statibns become like Denver General Hospital.
We are prepared to listen to explanation but we do want intelligent and reasonable ones.
Donald Gallegos Rachel Guedea
To the Editor:
I would like to express my feelings as a parent who lives in West Denver. To other parents: What do you really want for your children? Do you know how our schools are operated? Do our children enjoy their teachers? Do the teachers understand our children? What are the schoolsWest High, Baker Junior High, Greenlee, Elmwood and Fairmont Elementary-offering? Do we know? As parents why dont we find out, visit the schools, talk to the teachers? See if the social worker makes home visits. Attend PTA meetings; participate and voice your opinions. Really find out what makes your schools tick.
A concerned parent, Alberta L. Crespin 1467 Navajo St.
Goodbye to Ellie
Good-bye to a friend and a neighbor, Ellie Mitchell, a Vista worker in Denver for more than a year. Having her as a neighbor and friend has been very rewarding.
Ellie did a lot for the community, and helped persons in need. We wish her good luck as she goes back to Kittery Point, Maine, for her last year of college, and we hope she comes back in the future.
Ellie lived in Las Casis Homes before moving to 1461 Navajo St., in Lincoln Park Homes. She worked very hard at our fiesta and won many friends. She also worked very closely with our children.
Alberta L. Crespin John A. Gallegos Vince Crespin Bea Acosta Ray and Lupe Crespin
To the Editor:
You might be interested in my air trip to Detroit. I thought it would be boring to watch from the air the wide and bare plains of the east countries because we are so much used to the mountains covered with snow.
But it was not so. The land from above looked like a picture puzzle with everything neatly divided into squares, rounds and other little green patches and with silver-colored little streams running between. Altogether it made a lively, colorful picture.
The sky, colored with milky shining clouds on a light blue background, seemed quite unreal. Some clouds were formed like prehistoric animals, others like huge, snowy mountain peaks. We flew 30,000 feet high; our plane moved within thick clouds and below we saw that picture puzzle in a mist.
The sky at that height looked mysterious, around us more clouds shining like gold. They seemed to engulf us, and the peaks with the rays of the life-giving sun enthralled me without end.
Who wants to fly beyond it? And who wants to know what is beyond all the mystery and beauty? I think human beings wont find out ever what is beyond all that, just as we do not know truly what eternity means!
That was what I saw and thought, and I could hardly believe that was the end of my trip to Detroit alreadyjust three hours! So much to see and to think in so short a time!
Else Gruen 1429 Mariposa St.
Job open: Part-time work for the West Side Recorder selling advertising and overseeing distribution. Must be careful and reliable. Reasonable pay. Please telephone 7225310.
New Mexican Pastor
The Rev. Ramiro Cruz-Aedo is a recent arrival on the West Side, coming here to be pastor for the First Spanish Methodist congregation and a staff member at the Inner City Parish. He and his wife, Carol, are living at 4515 East 25th Ave., telephone 322-7089.
Mr. Cruz-Aedo is a native of Mexico City, Mexico, and attended Methodist High School in Laredo, Texas. He is a graduate of Sul Ross State College in Alpine, Texas, and Drew Theological Seminary in Madison, N.J.
Auraria Offers Recreation and Serious Study
Auraria Community Center is now enrolling families and individuals for the fall program designed to serve all ages.
There will be small groups and game-room program for elementary age, groups for junior high, Mothers Morning Out, Auraria Neighborhood Group, senior citizens, work shop, sewing, and teen lounge.
Fees are quite reasonable $1.50 per family, or, for individuals, 25c for youngsters 12 and under, 50c for those 13 through 15, 75c for 16 and 17 year-olds, and $1 for those 18 and over.
Auraria also has information about programs at the Jewish Community Centerswimming, arts and crafts for children and adults, etc. The Jewish Community Center has approached Auraria in order to get more West Siders into their programs, without regard to religion.
Woodshop for men will be meeting at the Auraria center one evening a week. It will not meet on nights when there are classes, so anyone interested can come to both class and wood-shop.
Mothers Morning Out will meet on Thursday mornings from 9 to noon. There will be arts and crafts, ceramics, exercising, and perhaps home nursing and woodshop. Babysitting is provided for pre-school children. The first meeting will be Thursday, Oct. 10.
Sewing class is already in progress on Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with babysitting provided.
Again this year Auraria Community .Center will have classes for West Siders 18 and above. Classes are open to all, whether they are interested in learning to read or want a quick brush-up before taking the G.E.D. exam.
There will be classes in English, mathematics, social studies, and science.
Registration will be on Wednesday, Oct. 2, from 7 to 9 p.m. at Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa St. Classes will meet every Monday and Wednesday evening from 7 to 10, beginning Monday, Oct. 7.
Anyone interested in attending classes but wishing more information before registering Oct. 2 should visit the Center at 1212 Mariposa St., or call 534-7615.
Would you like to help deliver the West Side Recorder? Volunteers needed, only about two hours a month. Please leave your name and address at Telephone 534-4408.
West Side Calendar
Oct. 1 (Tues.)Council meeting, Hirschfeld Towers, 333 W. Ellsworth, 1 p.m.
Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Luncheon and meeting, Lincoln Park Community Center, 11:45 a.m.
|p||Religious Class registration for Catholic public school pupils, St. Josephs Church Hall, W. Sixth Ave. and Galapago, 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Oct. 2 (Wed.)Adult Education registration, Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7-9 p.m.
|||West High School PTA, High School Auditorium, ^.ll>4T^,p.m.
Oct. 3 (Thurs.) Lincoln Park Residents Council, Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7:30 p.m. (Open to all residents of Lincoln Park Homes.)
Oct. 3-6Annual Fall Festival, St. Josephs Schools, W. Sixth Ave. and Galapa-go.
Oct. 4 (Fri.) gi West Side housewives shopping trip to Brentwood Shopping Center: Bus leaves 1178 Mariposa (Health Station) at 12:30 p.m.
Friday (each week) 3 Well Baby Clinic, First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 120 W. First Ave., 9 a.m.-noon. noon.
Oct. 8 (Tues.) West Side Improvement Association board, Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7:30 p.m.
West Side Health Board, West Side Neighborhood Health Center, 990 Federal Blvd., 8:30 p.m.
Oct. 9 (Wed.) West Side housewives shopping trip to Brentwood Shopping Center: Bus leaves 1178 Mariposa (Health Station) at 12:30 p.m.
Get-Acquainted Tea, Fairmont PTA, Fairmont School, 2-3:30 p.m.
Oct. 10 (Thurs.) Westside Action Ministry, Wesley United Methodist Church, 465 Galapago St., 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 15 (Tues.) '--General Meeting, West Side Improvement Assoc i a t i on, "Meet the Candidates, Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 16 (Wed.)DEADLINE FOR NEWS FOR OCT. 25 ISSUE OF The West Side Recorder: Mail or deliver to 465 Galapago St.
Social Security and Medicare Alliance, First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 120 W. First Ave., 1:30 p.m.
Oct. 17 (Thurs.) Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Luncheon, Lincoln Park Community Center, 11:45 a.m.
Oct. 21 (Mon.)DEADLINE FOR ADS FOR OCT. 25 ISSUE OF The West Side Recorder: Mail or deliver to 465 Galapago St., or telephone 722-5310.
A u r a r i a Community Center Board, Auraria Center, 1212 Mariposa, noon.
WE WANT TO HELP!
Returned Peaee Corps Volunteers
Phone:
Carolyn Burgin 297-4720
COMMUNITY PROJECTS
CLEAN UP
COMMUNITY
ORGANIZATION
EDUCATION
Page 2WEST SIDE RECORDER, September, 1968


We had a big Fiesta . I and
queens J| and kids R.
A Thank-You From a Queen
I wish to express my thanks to all of the people in Denver who made it possible for me to win the senior queen division in the Lincoln Park Homes Fiesta Aug. 2. It was my greatest pleasure to have participated. I am very happy to see this Fiesta raised more than $2,000 for the program. I also thank you for the beautiful gifts and $100 certificate which I received.
Thank you very much,
Bonnie T. Acosta, Senior Queen
200 Enrolled in "Drop-In School"
High-Rise Hirschfeld Towers Program Open to All West Siders Over 50
The new high-rise building that can be seen from many places in the south part of the West Side is Hirschfeld Towers, at 333 W. Ellsworth Ave., across from Daley Park. It was built by the Denver Housing Authority to house 250 low-income residents of 50 years of age and older.
Although Hirschfeld Towers is full and has a waiting list, other West Siders in the 50-plus age bracket can still enjoy its many social and recreational services.
There is a complete six-day-a-week program of crafts, recreation and entertainment, all free.
It is hoped that older West Siders will make use of this lovely facility which includes a large meeting room, card room, kitchen and billiards room. There are also beautiful, well-lighted grounds with an enclosed garden and a covered patio.
Crafts and classes on many subjects are available throughout the week. A ceramics class meets Tuesdays through Fridays at 9:30 a.m. An advanced class meets Monday and Friday evenings at 6:30.
On Tuesdays, classes in leather carving meet at 1 p.m. and classes in modeling and charm meet at 10 a.m. Purse-making instructions are given at 1 p.m. on Wednesdays. Painting is a big item on Thursdays with pastels at 10 a.m. and oil painting at 1 p.m. in the afternoon.
Social and recreational activities include dances, card parties, movies, clubs and a friendship hour each Sunday at 12:30 p.m. followed by a program at 1:30 p.m.
There is a dance every Wednesday evening at 7:30 and a movie every Friday afternoon at 3. Bingo is featured on Thursday evenings at 6:30 and there is a card party at 12 noon on Wednesdays.
Other services and programs offered include the Denver Public Library Bookmobile on Wednesdays at 11 a.m. and book reviews at 1 p.m. the same day. A group meets to make cancer pads on Friday mornings at 9:30.
A calendar of monthly events is available from Edward Whitlock, the recreation director, whose office is Room 107. A bulletin board outside the meeting hall also carries notices of all special events which are open to the general public.
The extensive program at Hirschfeld Towers is sponsored by the Denver Department of Parks and Recreation under a state grant from the Colorado Commission on Aging. The program is provided for all West Side residents 50 or over. All are invited to drop by at 333 W. Ellsworth Ave. and see what is offered. All activities are free of charge. In groups such as ceramics where materials are needed, participants can buy their own supplies at cost, Mr. Whitlock said.
Maestas Running For State Office
James A. (Jim) Maestas, a Denver businessman who lives at 769 Elati St., is a Republican candidate for election to the Colorado House of Representatives from District 7 in Denver.
Mr. Maestas was born on the West Side and attended St. Ca-jetans Elementary, Baker Junior High, and West High Schools. In addition to training in vocational education through Colorado State University, he was graduated from Bon Ton Cosmetology College and has completed a cosmetology instructors course.
The candidate from the West Side is president of the Colorado State Board of Cosmetology and has served as a national and district officer in professional organizations. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps from early 1952 through 1954 and was in the Korean War.
Mr. Maestas is particularly interested in legislation to provide every young person an opportunity for a good education and preparation for a good job. He says he will work for close communication between state and local government agencies and the people of his district
Greenlee School News
Greenlee Elementary School is off to a good start with 1,010 pupils enrolled54 more than at the end of last school year. Because of the additional enrollment, some classes are quite large.
There are six new members on the staff. Miss Nella Piccina-ti is the new assistant principal; Miss Wenonah Wiiliams and Mrs. Marie Lopez, first grade teachers; Miss Mary Ann Bour-ke, second grade; Miss Marjorie Van Riper, special education; Miss Dianne Burry, social worker; and Mrs. Shirley Downing, part-time clerk.
Three teachers received masters degrees during the summerMiss Jan Schneider, Miss Sharon Lazuk, and Joseph Connors. A large number of the Greenlee faculty now hold degrees beyond the BA, and others'* are working toward them.
Greenlee has been selected to be able to serve 15-cent lunchs for every child. However, with almost twice as many children eating at school as before, it is necessary to have two separate lunch periods.
The after-school recreation program at Greenlee will continue as in the past. Beginning Sept. 30 there also will be programs before and after school in drama, study hall, primary and intermediate art, boys club, and primary story time. Children take part in these on a voluntary basis.
West PTA Opens Year With General Meeting
West High School PTA will have its first general meeting at 7:45 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2, in the school auditorium. Mrs. Shelley Rhym is president for the year.
Interested persons will be able to join PTA and get acquainted with the faculty at the same time. All parents of West High students are invited to visit the school and see what it has to offer.
Senior Citizens To Plan Bazaar
Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club had its first fall meeting Sept. 9, featuring a report on the- Lincoln Park Homes Fiesta Aug. 2.
Manager Bill Ratzlaff gave the report. He was assisted on the Fiesta by Mrs. Marthd Olsen, club president, and other members who worked on fancy crafts, dressed dolls, and made pastries for sale at the fiesta. The money helped to get a bus for residents of all ages, particularly children and elderly people.
The 17 members and 3 guests present celebrated Mrs. Elsie Lilienthals birthday anniversary. Mrs. Bernice Adelman, social director, suggested tours for the group, including to the City Park and the Natural History Museum and to the Salvation Army organization. She also encouraged the members to begin getting ready for a bazaar in November.
A few members of the dub visited the new Metro Denver Fair Housing Center and Botanical Gardens Sept. 6.
Meetings of the club this year will be on Tuesdays.
Children's Garden Fenced Off in Park
Flowers and vegetables were grown by small city farmers in Lincoln Park this summer.
Eight children from special education classes at Greenlee Elementary School worked each Wednesday morning taking care of individual plots near the tennis court. The gardens were fenced off by the Department of Parks and Recreation.
Under the volunteer supervision of Mrs. Barbara Blue, a teacher, and her father, Jacob Schaetzel, called Uncle Jake by the children, the boys and girls grew radishes, onions, lettuce, squash, cucumbers and flowers. The produce was shared with their families and each other.
At the end of the gardening Mrs. Blue gave awards for the best garden and the best attendance.
Two hundred persons have enrolled for the fall adult education classes in the Drop-In School at St. Elizabeths Center, 1020 11th St.
They are working toward their high school degree, to meet other educational requirements, or to improve their English. "
Housewives, mothers, employed and unemployed persons between the ages of 18 and 61 are in classes Monday through Thursday mornings or Tuesday and Thursday evenings. They are taking typing, mathematics, science, social studies, reading and English.
There is a class for persons who are learning English as a second language.
More volunteer tutors are needed, according to Sister Cecilia, program director.
Enrollment is still open for those who want to attend. They should call Rose Marie Feam, adult education coordinator, at 255-7759 between 9 a.m. and noon any weekday.
Summer Class Makes Go-Carts, Mini-Bikes
The go carts and mini-bikes in the Fiesta Parade Aug. 2 were made in the Baker Junior High School summer shop program, which had 20 boys taking part. There also were 20. boys in the summer shop work at West High School.
Roland Ray and Richard Graw supervised the classes at Baker, and Dale Wieland and Roger Rolben supervised at West. The boys learned that by working with tools and motors they could build almost anything.
The classes to develop more mechanical skills will be continued at West High School.
Burke's Grocery
226 Cherokee
Groceries School Supplies
722-8274
___________________
WEST SIDE RECORDER, September, 1968Page -3


Neighborhood Notes
Long-Time Resident Gives Lasting Gifts to City
By Mrs. Raymond Gasser
Miss Berta Dee (Biddy) Tang-ye of 1258 Kalamath St. and David Karney were married Aug. 28 at St. Lukes Episcopal Church. The brides brother, Kenneth Tangye and his wife were home on leave for the wedding.
Mrs. Elsie Ward of 1266 Mariposa St. has cleaned the vacant lot on her block and works hard to try to keep the alley clean behind her property.
Leslie Kalanquin of 1423 Li-pan St. is recovering from surgery for a cataract on his eye.
On Labor Day, Vista worker Jo Ann Park broke her finger while playing touch football at a picnic of the Crespin and Acosta families and friends. Jo Anns team lost by two points.
Mrs. Rex Mayes of 1300 Kalamath St. went to Terre Haute, Ind., because of the death of her mother, Mrs. Nellie Cassidy.
Mrs. Lulie Crane of 241 Inca St. is improving after recent illness.
House guests of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Sullivan of 282 Inca St. have been her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Perry Heap of Medina, 111.
Mr. and Mrs. Ernal Underwood of Salt Lake City visited her aunt, Mrs. May Day of 138 West First Ave., en route to the Dakotas on a sight-seeing trip. Mrs. Day has recovered from recent illness.
Jerry Soliz, former school-community aide at Baker Junior High, Greenlee Elementary and West High School, is now a trainer in the New Careers program at the University of Colorado Center for Urban Affairs, located at the CU Denver Center. Persons who receive training in this program are employed as aides in various state, federal and city agencies.
Best wishes are extended to two Greenlee Elementary School teachers. Miss Frieda Suter is now Mrs. Skiles, and Miss Lu-anna Hancey is now Mrs. Leavitt.
Arthur and Judith (DeMent) Fullenwider of 1438 Franklin St., former West Siders who were married in 1961, are the parents of a son, Michael Lee, born Aug. 30. He jveighed 6 pounds, 6 ounces. Judy lived at 1454 Osage St., from 1947 to 1962.
Young people from First Avenue Presbyterian Church attending college this year include Linda Stevens, freshman at Colorado State Teachers College at Greeley; Marsha White and Sandra Winterhalder, sophomores, Alan Price and Paul Blomquist, freshmen,' and Joel Blomquist, senior, all at Sterling College, Sterling, Kans.; Pat Muray, junior, and Chuck Murray, freshman, at Southern Colorado State College, Pueblo; A1 Kuemmerlin, senior at Metropolitan State College; Merre-lyn Miller, sophomore at University of Denver; Nancy Coughlin, sophomore at Colorado State University, Fort Collins; and Rick Taylor, junior at Colorado School of Mines, Golden.
Auraria Day Campers On Ranch Two Weeks
Summer fun on a ranch was provided for 72 boys and girls from the Auraria Community Center between June 24 and Aug. 2.
Each morning for two weeks, 12 boys and 12 girls in similar age groups boarded a bus at the Center to spend the day on a ranch near Morrison.
The children hiked in the woods, went swimming and horseback riding, and had a wonderful time being outdoors rather than seeing it on television.
Miss Virginia Wilson was director of the camp, assisted by Keith J Henriques. Counselors were from the Neighborhood Youth Corps, or were volunteers Andree Gross, Randi Sunshine and Sheri Radetsky.
A group of boys who live in Lincoln Park Homes need a garage somewhere nearby where they can form an auto mechanics club and learn to work on cars this winter. They planned to meet with John Doyle of Baker Junior High School, Del Peterson of West High School, and Bill Ratzlaff of Lincoln Park Homes, to make plans for their self-help project. They hope to have help from adults, and the use of the necessary tools. Anyone interested in helping the boys is asked to contact Art Tate, 534-8892, or Del Peterson at West High School, or Jo Ann Park, 534-1648.
Phil Torres of 1033 Ninth St. is a new member of the Auraria Community Center board of directors.
Carol Casey, who worked in the Lincoln Park recreation program last summer, has become a full-time staff member in the resident relations department of the Denver Housing Authority. She will work in family counseling in Lincoln Park Homes and in activities involving other agencies serving the West Side. Carol is a graduate of the University of Denver, a former Wheatridge high school teacher, and is a masters degree student at the University of Colorado Denver Center.
Byers Neighborhood Library West Seventh Ave. at Santa Fe Dr.
Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.
2 5:30 p.m.
Sat.10 a.m.-noon; 1-5:30 p.m.
Closed Wednesdays and Sundays.
MYSTERY
The Ghost of Megan, by Marc Lowell. After a nervous breakdown, Hollywood actress Stella Griffith travels to her grandmother's village in Wales where she finds herself surrounded by hostility and discovers a murdet no one will believe.
Crptozoic! by Brian W. Al-diss. Here is an imaginative novel set within a science fiction framework. Edward Brush is a man haunted by his destiny and a Dark Woman. His .search for both takes him back in time and eventually drives him into a home for the mentally disturbed. Was the cause of his madness a religious vision or only childish fantasy?
N ON FICTION
Back in Cripple Creek, by Mabel Barbee Lee. Cripple Creek, Colorado, is one of the legendary names in the history of the American West. In this new book, the author tells how her award winning Cripple Creek Days came to be written. As a sequel, she re-visits some of the colorful characters who survive from the towns golden daysTwo Bit Lil, Tom Sailor Boy Sharkey, and those few left who remember the mining camp during its rip-roaring heyday.
Heroic Mexico, by William Weber Johnson. A fascinating history of modern Mexico, told in terms of the extraordinary men who. helped to build it, filled with violent action, intrigue, and deep patriotism. The 30 years of upheaval known as the Mexican Revolution produced legendary heroes like Made-ro, Villa, and Zapataall lar-
Piano lessons in my West Side home. Hand exercises, scales, graded progress. $1.25 hour. 244-0544.
Special Programs Held in August
Community Development Month was observed on the West Side during August, under the combined leadership of the communitys organizations and agencies.
Better Health for a Better Community was the theme of health week Aug. 5-9. Mariposa Health Station had open house each afternoon. There were tours of the West Side Health Center and Denver General Hospital.
Each day at least two public programs gave information on child immunization, cancer, drinking problems, sex education, smoking, and health careers. These programs were held at Inner City Parish, Auraria Community Center, Robert F. Kennedy Recreation Center and West Side Action Center.
The second week emphasized Hispano Culture for a Hispano Community. The third week was for clean up and paint up. During this week the West Side Action Center organized volunteers and materials for work on West Side homes whose residents were financially or physically unable to do painting, repairs, cleaning up, etc. The West Side Improvement Association painted the trash barrels in Lincoln Park.
The final week, ending the month, was on community education.
ger-than-life characters destined for martyrdom by assassination. This book tells a story about which little is known.
FICTION
Among Thieves, by George Cuomo. The story of three men from three worlds who are drawn together in a raging, human drama at a prison on the edge of the desert. An extra-ordindary tale shocking, funny, and true-to-life, disclosing the courage and loyalty that can sometimes motivate men, including the outcasts of society.
The Queens Confession, by Victoria Holt. Written in the first person, this is the story of Marie Antionette, the ill-fated Queen of France, as she might herself have written it. A tale filled with the color, suspense, and sweeping drama of a royal courtseen through the eyes of a young girl, then by a woman who has matured as a wife and loving mother and finally, in the chaos of revolution, by a Queen who cannot escape her inevitable fate.
A Hero for Henry, by Hubert R. Purdum. The amusing action-filled story of an Eastern dude who made good in the Wild West. A new novel by the prize-winning author of My Brother John.
WESTERN
Danger Valley, by Richard Poole. A fabulous poker game provides Greg Corwin with the grubstake he has always dreamed of. But the ranch he buys is located in range war territory, and Greg becomes involved in a tense and exciting conflict.
J-A-K
Automotive Service and Parts
Quality Repairs at Reasonable Prices 136 ELATI STREET 722-2895
Mrs. Clara Katona, who lived for many years in the rear of 642 Santa Fe Dr., passed away at Saint Anthonys Hospital July 10, 1968. A high mass was sung for her at Saint Josephs church July 13 and she was buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery.
Mrs. Katona and the late Mr. Katona had operated the taxidermist shop at 642, and previously at 640 Santa Fe Dr., since 1921. Their two children, Margaret and Helen, attended Saint Josephs grade and high schools and both were graduated from the University of Denver.
Their taxidermist shop was one of the most outstanding in Denver, for not only was Mr. Katona noted for his excellent mountings of animals and fowls, but he was a talented artist, and made beautiful oil paintings as backgrounds for his birds.
His shop windows were always artistically and beautifully decorated, and many a West Sider paused before them on his way down Santa Fe Drive. The children were especially delighted with a two-headed calf that graced his window for some time.
A hobby dear to Mr. Katona was the raising and developing of hybrid prize iris. Some he crossed and named himself; some were worth as much as $25 for a single bulb. He became known for the unusually beautiful iris he raised in his gardens in Englewood, most of which he transplanted onto his Santa Fe property.
After his death, Mrs. Katona continued to care for and enjoy the iris and to keep up with her hobby of making lovely patch-work quilts, all by hand. One of the loveliest and most gracious ladies who ever lived on the West Side, she gave these quilts to many of her closest friends. Beautifully made, with unusual patterns, these quilts are indeed a treasure. Only a serious illness was capable of making her put down her needle and still her busy hands.
Before she died, Mrs. Katona directed that all of the treasures
Fairmont Tea Planned For "New" Parents
A get-acquainted tea for parents new to the Fairmont School District will be held Wednesday, Oct. 9, from 2 to 3:20 p.m. in the Fairmont school gymnasium.
Newcomers will be welcomed by the principal, Kenneth Goff, by PTA offqicers and by parents whose children have been in the school in other years.
There will be a social time with refreshments. Parents wishing to join PTA will be given an opportunity to do so.
Before school dismisses for the day, all. interested persons may visit the classrooms.
All new residents in the Fairmont area are invited to attend the get-acquainted tea to meet other parents and to learn more about the school and the PTA.
RFK
Community
Center
Tiny Tots
Kids it Adults
| Seniors
t
| Programs for All
500 KALAMATH
t 297-5918
!
of the taxidermist shopthe stuffed fowl, the animals, the oil painting backgrounds for water-fowlbe given to the Colorado Museum of Natural History. She also donated all of the mounting tools in the shop of the late Mr. Katona. Members of the Museum on a limited budget found this indeed a welcome gift.
The skins and furs and feathers were donated to the Buffalo Indian Tribe for their ceremonials.
Her dearly loved iris, some of the most beautiful in Denver, were entrusted to the care of an old and beloved friend, the school chum of her daughter Helen, Flora Gasser, to be kept until they could come back on Santa Fe Dr. and bloom on the new Spanish Plaza, now in the formulating stage. Mrs. Gasser hopes to preserve Mrs. Katonas shrubbery and Roses of Sharon and evergreen trees also for the Plaza. They are planted on her property at 357 Delaware St. and are being cared for by her tenant, Theodore Medina of that address.
Mrs. Katona is survived by her two daughters, Mrs. Howard Blackburn of Arvada, and Mrs. Gerald Neel of Luthers-ville, Md. Her only grandchild, John Titus of the United States Army, was given leave so he could be with his grandmother before she passed away.
Change Directors
(Continued from Page 1)
The district lies west of Santa Fe Dr. to the railroad tracks, between West Fifth and West Eighth Aves.
Other directors of the association who were scheduled to participate in the annual election of officers Tuesday evening of this week are Mrs. Wills Mae Stencil of 13JL0 West Colfax Ave., District 2; Mrs. Wilma Dabrowski of 1115 Inca St., District 3; Mrs. Leona Part-ney of 713 Delaware St., District 5; Mrs. Lela Swanson of 327 Delaware St., District 7; E. H. Haviland of 457 Galapago St., DistrictjB; and Mrs. Beni-ta Clark of 236 West Third Ave. District 9.
No one had been named the first of this week to assume the directorship of District 10, the area between West Third Ave. and West Ellsworth Ave., west of Elati St. to the railroad tracks.
The Improvement Association will sponsor a public meeting, Meet the Candidates, Tuesday evening, Oct. 8, at Auraria Community Center. Political candidates from both parties will be present to answer questions from the audience.
THE
RICHARDS REALTY CO.
BENITA CLARKE, Broker Office 744-0073 Home 733-0908
# REAL ESTATE
# LOANS
O INSURANCE
5 East 4th Ave. Denver
Annes Beauty Salon
971 Santo Fe Drive
Cold Wave ..... $20.00
SPECIAL ...... 10.00
Shampoo & Style $2.50
Style Hair Cuts 2,50
244-5604
JAMES ABE
MAEST
FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT # 7
Page 4WEST SIDE RECORDER, September 1968
On the Byers' Bookshelf -


Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume VNumber 4 Monthly Newspaper of the West Side, Denver, Colorado September, 1968
New Health Station Opening At 8011Vest Fifth Avenue
Good News: West Side To Have Its Own Federal Credit Union
Neighborhood representatives of the West Side Action Center and West Side residents47 persons in allhave completed the first step to set up a credit union for West Siders.
The group chose the name, West Denver Federal Credit Union, and made proper application this week for the neces-
Casita Esperanza at 801 W. Fifth Ave., Denvers newest neighborhood Health Station, is scheduled to open for patient care Monday (Sept. 30). The date for the formal opening had not been announced as the Recorder went to press.
The new station will offer the same services as the Mariposa Health Station at 1178 Mariposa St.
These include doctors care for adults and children, laboratory services, social services, nutrition information and free birth control aid.
Although the Health Station will not have a regular pharmacy, it will be possible to get medications prescribed by doctors there.
"Family Doctor"
The outstanding difference in the staffing of Casita Esperanza will be a family doctor" instead of several specialists such as pediatricians, obstetricians, and others. Later, another family doctor will be added to the staff.
It is hoped this different staffing will help families to establish a real family relationship with one doctor.
Also on the staff will be two neighborhood health aides. They are Mary Benevidez ^nd Margaret Bargas.
The building for the new station is quite new, with carpeting and all wood paneling. The Research and Program Development section of Denver Department of Health and Hospitals will be on the lower level of the building. Patient care will be upstairs on the second floor.
5,000 Patients
. Casita Esperanza is supposed to serve an immediate area Containing 5,000 low-income persons not being serviced by any other health facility, according to the requirements the West Side Health Board was asked to consider in suggesting possible new health station sites.
This requirement was stated Jan. 16, 1968, in a letter to Vincent Garza, West Side Health
Pawn Shop Move Blocked by Council
Pawn shops will not move into the West Side, according to action taken by the Denver City Council at its meeting Sept. 3.
The protest against proposed zone changes to benefit pawn shops seeking new locations was supported by the Council when only one councilman voted for the proposed change.
The West Side Improvement Association joined in the protest, as did merchants from the area around First Avenue and Broadway.
Board Consultant, from Armando R. Atencio, Project Administrator for the West Side Health Center. The location at West Fifth Ave. and Inca St. was not suggested by the West Side Health Board.
Also mentioned in the letter was a need for off-street parking space for 20 cars. The new station site does not have the required parking space.
Four Districts In Association Change Directors
Three of the eleven districts in the West Side Improvement Association have elected new directors to serve during the 1968-69 year, and another district has a new director.
Charles Garcia of 1325 Kala-math St. suoceeds Leslie Ka-lanquin of 1423 Lipan, St. in District 1, the area bounded by Speer Blvd., Colfax Ave., Mariposa St. and West 12th Ave.
In District 4, Miss Carmen Lucero of 1022 We&t Ninth Ave. succeeds Mrs. Carmen Hodges of 1114 Mariposa St. The district is bounded by Sante Fe Dr. on the east, West 12th Ave. on the north, South Lincoln. Park and the railroad tracks on the west, and West Eighth Ave. on the south.
James Maestas of 769 Elati St. is the new director of District 11, formerly represented by Julian Kreoger of 533 Galapa-go St. The district is between West Fifth and West Eighth Aves, from Elati St. to Sante Fe Dr.
Manuel Garcia of 638 Kala-math St. is serving as director of District 6, succeeding Harold Munson of 466 Kalamath St.
(Contiuned on Page 4)
Festival Oct. 3-6 At St. Josephs
St Josephs Annual Fall Festival will be Thursday, Oct. 3, through Sunday, Oct. 6, from 7 p.m. to midnight each day.
One of the highlights of the Festival will be the Queen Contest. Several girls from the West Side area are hoping to be crowned queen of the Festival. The Queen will receive a cash prize of $200 and a beautiful trophy.
The Festival itself has something to appeal to every age group. There will be games of chance and of skill. As always there will be delicious Spanish food, piping hot, served throughout the Festival.
The climax of the Festival will be the raffle of the 1969 Camaro on Sunday evening, the last night of the Festival.
SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS FOR THIS ISSUE OF THE WEST SIDE RECORDER
Colorado Printers_____$10
First Bethany
Lutheran__________ $10
First Mennonite $10
First Spanish United
Methodist___________$10
Inner City Parish_____$10
Theresa Jacinto:______$10
Laurel Liskow__________$5
St. Elizabeths
Catholic ___________$10
St. Josephs Catholic $10
Dorothea Spellman____$5
United Methodist Church, Rocky Mountain
Conference________$100
Wesley United Methodist __________$10
Gifts under $5: Boy Scouts of America, Metropolitan Council for Community Service, Colorado Federation of Teachers, Mrs. Dorothy A. Berry, Everett J. Dobson, Mr. and Mrs. Frank V. Gumma, Dr. William J. Huddleston.
And a special thank you to Adolph Coors Co.
Bill Baker: West Side pictures.
Angela and Snoopy
Among the piany West Side children who took part in the Lincoln Park Fiesta Parade Aug. 2 was Angela Garcia, 9. At that time her guinea pig, Snoopy, was three months old, Angela told the RECORDER photographer. Dont they look nice?
Jim Hall Elected Action Ministry Head
The West Side Action Ministry recently elected James Hall, pastor of Wesleyan United Methodist Church, convenor, and Bernice Eriksen, First Bethany Lutheran Church, secretary.
The next meeting of the Action Ministry will be Thursday, Oct. 10, at 7:30 p.m. at Wesiey United Methodist Church, 465 Galapago St.
Lincoln Council Gets Six Requests
Lincoln and South Lincoln Park Homes Resident Council received a six-point petition from project residents at the councils meeting Sept. 5.
The petition covered the following: paint and tile; regular maintenance of heaters, windows and Kitchen cabinets; health hazards; work crew; rent money; and police assistance.
The tenants voiced their opinions on these matters, and were given a promise for action by the management of the project.
In turn, the residents were asked to be cooperative in helping to make Lincoln Homes a better place to live.
Guest speakers for the Council meeting, held at Auraria Community Center, were State Sen. George Brown, Austin Robinson and Bill Ratzlaff, all from Denver Housing Authority. Toby Beatty was introduced as the new maintenance supervisor for Lincoln Homes.
About 125 persons attended the meeting.
Housewives Want Stores To Improve
The West Side housewife hoping to have her neighborhood grocery store be a cleaner place is getting support from a group of volunteers who picketed one store in late August and may picket others.
Also, a meeting is being planned for housewives to meet in the near future with a representative of the Rocky Mountain Food Dealers Assn., to discuss ways of checking on grocery products for quality and freshness.
West Denver housewives three months ago expressed their concern over dirty stores, bad food handling, poor quality merchandise, and bad personal treatment from some clerks. A group picketed at the corner of West 13th Ave. and Kalamath St. Later, a meeting was held at Auraria Community Center for neighborhood women, five grocery store owners, three representatives from the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals, and persons from different West Side organizations.
Plans are underway for further action by residents of the neighborhood as they try to get grocery store owners to improve their buildings and their food handling methods.
Two Free Shopping Trips Arranged for Housewives
Two shopping trips to Brentwood Shopping Center have been arranged for West Side housewives, on Friday, Oct 4, and Thursday, Oct. 9.
The Lincoln Park Homes bus will be used for the free transportation. It will leave from the Mariposa Health Station at 1178 Mariposa SL, at 12:30 p.m. each day of the two days, and also pick up passengers at West 10th Ave. and Decatur St. at 12:45 p.m. Shoppers will be delivered directly to their homes at the end of the trip.
sary legal papers. The purpose is to provide a locally controlled and operated place where West Siders can borrow and save money with confidence.
The credit union will provide low-cost services, and programs to help members know how to get better value for their money. It also will offer family financial counseling, help in making and following budgets, and education in basic thrift.
Everyone who lives on the West Side may become a member and may benefit by the credit union. Residents who are on public assistance are allowed by the Welfare Department to save as much as $2,000.
A membership will be a $5 share which can be bought for as little as 25 cents a month.
In order to start a credit union, 30 residents must be interested and must receive orientation from the Colorado Credit Union League on how to operate a credit union. The orientation lasts 90 minutes, once a week for eight weeks.
Members of the credit union will decide who will be on the board of directors and three committeescredit, supervision, and consumer education.
Perfecto Martinez, neighborhood representative at the West Side Action Center, is in charge of the project under the guidance of Action Center coordinator Leo Rodriguez who helped start the East Denver Credit Union last year.
Mr. Martinez said, This credit union is badly needed. People on the West Side should get involved! Lets say good-bye to loan sharks, red tape, and cosigners. We, as citizens, should care enough to get this credit union started as soon as possible."
All interested persons should contact Mr. Martinez at the West Side Action Center, 1042 Santa Fe Dr., Telephone 534-5141.
Recreation Set at Greenlee School
Recreation for junior high and high school pupils has been set at Greenlee School on Tuesdays and Thursdays after school. These activities are being arranged and staffed by the RFK Recreation Center.
Tuesday evenings will be for junior high children. Thursdays, there will be a basketball league for 15-year-olds and over. They may sign up for the league at the RFK Center at 500 Kalamath St.
The RFK Center still has recreational activities for elementary and junior high children, Mondays through Fridays from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
From 1 to 3:30 p.in. the Center is available to West Side hobby groups, special interest groups, and any others interested. Arrangements may be made by calling 534-6525.
Denver Opportunity is also using the RFK Center to arrange Saturday tours for West Side young people. A schedule of the tours may be obtained by calling the Center at 534-6525.


Action at the Action Center
Within West Denver there are many individuals, groups, and agencies working collectively for the improvement of conditions in this area.
One of these groups is West Side Action Council composed of elected residents of West Denver who unselfishly devote countless hours to the administration of the West Side Action Center and introduce new programs and ideas which will contribute to the improvement and development of the West Side.
The Council represents a vivid cross section of the complex urban population.: housewives, working fathers and mothers, members of the clergy, part-time students, unemployed but concerned residents, and the professional and semi-professional; all with the concerted understanding and attitude that "theres work to be done.
During the past few weeks, the Council Members have devoted, with great diligence, their time, effort and resourcefulness in preparation of plans and priorities to be submitted to the Board of Directors of Denver Opportunity, Inc.
These priorities are listed under any extra monies which may be appropriated for 1969. However, if no monies are obtained, the Action Council will attempt to get funding from other sources for projects such as a cooperative grocery store, credit union, child care center, leadership development and education.
For further information, call West Side Action Center (534-5141) and ask for the name of your Action Council Member.
Letters From West Siders
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Founded May, 1964
Office: 465 Galapago St. Denver, Colo. 80204 Telephone: 534-4408 Sponsored by WESTSEDE ACTION MINISTRY
Staff for This Issue:
Rachel Guedea, Bea Acosta, Margot Serumgard, Alberta Crespin, Barbara Karr, Jo Ann Park.
Contributors:
Else Gruen, lone Helman, Arnold Blomquist, Reuel Amdur, Mrs. Leonard Essig, Leo Rodriguez, John Gallegos, Irene Gallagher, Leona Partney, Perfecto Martinez, Mrs. Raymond Gasser.
Editorial Advisor:
Pat Geddes.
Advertising Representatives for
This Issue:
Jim Hall, Joe Barry.
Advertising Manager:
Allen Martin.
Please, As Usual
All of us who work on the Recorder from month to month agree that nobody seems to be impressed with any deadlines we announce.
Only Byers Neighborhood Library gets its material in to the paper in good time without a special reminder or plea from us.
Heres your huge gold star, Byers (and Martha Cooper).
As for the rest of our readersthe many of you who are involved with PTA or schools, churches or community organizations, service agencies or youth groups, weddings or babies, any kind of project or program on the old West Side make a note of this:
Were setting the October deadline for the RECORDER at MONDAY, OCT. 14. If you know of something important thats going to happen after that but before Oct. 18, please let us knowwell try to include it in the paper that will come out the last week-end in October (25-26)).
Now, dont tell us you werent told. Ads should be in by OCT. 18 for sure, too.
After all, where else can you get family-to-family newspaper coverage every month of the more than 100 blocks between Broadway and Speer on the east and the railroad tracks oh the west, from Colfax down to Ellsworth?
Use ink, pencil, lipstick, axle greasebut make a note of the deadline for the next paper, and get your news in to us, will you? Please, and thank you.
P. S. Also please write out names clearly, in full, with home addresses of neighborhood people. Its important.
Religion Classes Set For All 12 Grades
Religion classes for Catholic students in public schools will be held at St. Josephs Grade School beginning the week of Oct. 7. Classes are arranged for grade-level groups. Plans also are underway for informal classes for parents.
Pupils in grades one through four will have classes on Saturdays between 9:30 and 10:30 a.m., beginning Oct. 12. Grades five and six will meet from 4 to 5 p.m. on Wednesdays beginning Oct. 9, and upper grades will have classes from 7 to 8 p.m., also beginning Wednesday, Oct. 9.
Registration will be between 3:30 and 5:30 Tuesday, Oct. 1, in the St. Joseph Church Hall, for pupils from all 12 grades. There are no fees for the classes except for the books for Grades 1-6 which cost 85 cents per child.
To the Editor:
We, the undersigned, are members of the West Side Action Council and the West Side Health Board. The announced re-organization at the Denver Department of Health and Hospitals has caused us great concern and left us with many questions.
We have heard both sides of the dispute resulting from the re-organization. But we still do not understand clearly and we feel that the public does not understand, either. Further, we think the public deserves to know and understand what is happening at their institution.
First, we do not understand why the West Side Health Board was not officially notified of the re-organization until nearly a month after it happened. Obviously the re-organization was of prime importance and interest to the Health Board.
Second, we do not understand why some of the changes were made without the Office of Economic Opportunity being notified first. OEO regulations are quite specific on an organization gaining OEO approval prior to the replacement of a project director.
Finally, the reasons given for the re-organization do not seem adequate to us. We do not understand the need for such a far-reaching re-organization because one man. reportedly has riot done his job.
We are not reassured that the proposed changes will not bring about undesirable results in the Neighborhood Health Program. The neighborhood people would not like to see the centers and statibns become like Denver General Hospital.
We are prepared to listen to explanation but we do want intelligent and reasonable ones.
Donald Gallegos Rachel Guedea
To the Editor:
I would like to express my feelings as a parent who lives in West Denver. To other parents: What do you really want for your children? Do you know how our schools are operated? Do our children enjoy their teachers? Do the teachers understand our children? What are the schoolsWest High, Baker Junior High, Greenlee, Elmwood and Fairmont Elementary-offering? Do we know? As parents why dont we find out, visit the schools, talk to the teachers? See if the social worker makes home visits. Attend PTA meetings; participate and voice your opinions. Really find out what makes your schools tick.
A concerned parent, Alberta L. Crespin 1467 Navajo St.
Goodbye to Ellie
Good-bye to a friend and a neighbor, Ellie Mitchell, a Vista worker in Denver for more than a year. Having her as a neighbor and friend has been very rewarding.
Ellie did a lot for the community, and helped persons in need. We wish her good luck as she goes back to Kittery Point, Maine, for her last year of college, and we hope she comes back in the future.
Ellie lived in Las Casis Homes before moving to 1461 Navajo St., in Lincoln Park Homes. She worked very hard at our fiesta and won many friends. She also worked very closely with our children.
Alberta L. Crespin John A. Gallegos Vince Crespin Bea Acosta Ray and Lupe Crespin
To the Editor:
You might be interested in my air trip to Detroit. I thought it would be boring to watch from the air the wide and bare plains of the east countries because we are so much used to the mountains covered with snow.
But it was not so. The land from above looked like a picture puzzle with everything neatly divided into squares, rounds and other little green patches and with silver-colored little streams running between. Altogether it made a lively, colorful picture.
The sky, colored with milky shining clouds on a light blue background, seemed quite unreal. Some clouds were formed like prehistoric animals, others like huge, snowy mountain peaks. We flew 30,000 feet high; our plane moved within thick clouds and below we saw that picture puzzle in a mist.
The sky at that height looked mysterious, around us more clouds shining like gold. They seemed to engulf us, and the peaks with the rays of the life-giving sun enthralled me without end.
Who wants to fly beyond it? And who wants to know what is beyond all the mystery and beauty? I think human beings wont find out ever what is beyond all that, just as we do not know truly what eternity means!
That was what I saw and thought, and I could hardly believe that was the end of my trip to Detroit alreadyjust three hours! So much to see and to think in so short a time!
Else Gruen 1429 Mariposa St.
Job open: Part-time work for the West Side Recorder selling advertising and overseeing distribution. Must be careful and reliable. Reasonable pay. Please telephone 7225310.
New Mexican Pastor
The Rev. Ramiro Cruz-Aedo is a recent arrival on the West Side, coming here to be pastor for the First Spanish Methodist congregation and a staff member at the Inner City Parish. He and his wife, Carol, are living at 4515 East 25th Ave., telephone 322-7089.
Mr. Cruz-Aedo is a native of Mexico City, Mexico, and attended Methodist High School in Laredo, Texas. He is a graduate of Sul Ross State College in Alpine, Texas, and Drew Theological Seminary in Madison, N.J.
Auraria Offers Recreation and Serious Study
Auraria Community Center is now enrolling families and individuals for the fall program designed to serve all ages.
There will be small groups and game-room program for elementary age, groups for junior high, Mothers Morning Out, Auraria Neighborhood Group, senior citizens, work shop, sewing, and teen lounge.
Fees are quite reasonable $1.50 per family, or, for individuals, 25c for youngsters 12 and under, 50c for those 13 through 15, 75c for 16 and 17 year-olds, and $1 for those 18 and over.
Auraria also has information about programs at the Jewish Community Centerswimming, arts and crafts for children and adults, etc. The Jewish Community Center has approached Auraria in order to get more West Siders into their programs, without regard to religion.
Woodshop for men will be meeting at the Auraria center one evening a week. It will not meet on nights when there are classes, so anyone interested can come to both class and wood-shop.
Mothers Morning Out will meet on Thursday mornings from 9 to noon. There will be arts and crafts, ceramics, exercising, and perhaps home nursing and woodshop. Babysitting is provided for pre-school children. The first meeting will be Thursday, Oct. 10.
Sewing class is already in progress on Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with babysitting provided.
Again this year Auraria Community .Center will have classes for West Siders 18 and above. Classes are open to all, whether they are interested in learning to read or want a quick brush-up before taking the G.E.D. exam.
There will be classes in English, mathematics, social studies, and science.
Registration will be on Wednesday, Oct. 2, from 7 to 9 p.m. at Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa St. Classes will meet every Monday and Wednesday evening from 7 to 10, beginning Monday, Oct. 7.
Anyone interested in attending classes but wishing more information before registering Oct. 2 should visit the Center at 1212 Mariposa St., or call 534-7615.
Would you like to help deliver the West Side Recorder? Volunteers needed, only about two hours a month. Please leave your name and address at Telephone 534-4408.
West Side Calendar
Oct. 1 (Tues.)Council meeting, Hirschfeld Towers, 333 W. Ellsworth, 1 p.m.
Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Luncheon and meeting, Lincoln Park Community Center, 11:45 a.m.
|p||Religious Class registration for Catholic public school pupils, St. Josephs Church Hall, W. Sixth Ave. and Galapago, 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Oct. 2 (Wed.)Adult Education registration, Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7-9 p.m.
|||West High School PTA, High School Auditorium, ^.ll>4T^,p.m.
Oct. 3 (Thurs.) Lincoln Park Residents Council, Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7:30 p.m. (Open to all residents of Lincoln Park Homes.)
Oct. 3-6Annual Fall Festival, St. Josephs Schools, W. Sixth Ave. and Galapa-go.
Oct. 4 (Fri.) gi West Side housewives shopping trip to Brentwood Shopping Center: Bus leaves 1178 Mariposa (Health Station) at 12:30 p.m.
Friday (each week) 3 Well Baby Clinic, First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 120 W. First Ave., 9 a.m.-noon. noon.
Oct. 8 (Tues.) West Side Improvement Association board, Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7:30 p.m.
West Side Health Board, West Side Neighborhood Health Center, 990 Federal Blvd., 8:30 p.m.
Oct. 9 (Wed.) West Side housewives shopping trip to Brentwood Shopping Center: Bus leaves 1178 Mariposa (Health Station) at 12:30 p.m.
Get-Acquainted Tea, Fairmont PTA, Fairmont School, 2-3:30 p.m.
Oct. 10 (Thurs.) Westside Action Ministry, Wesley United Methodist Church, 465 Galapago St., 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 15 (Tues.) '--General Meeting, West Side Improvement Assoc i a t i on, "Meet the Candidates, Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa, 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 16 (Wed.)DEADLINE FOR NEWS FOR OCT. 25 ISSUE OF The West Side Recorder: Mail or deliver to 465 Galapago St.
Social Security and Medicare Alliance, First Avenue Presbyterian Church, 120 W. First Ave., 1:30 p.m.
Oct. 17 (Thurs.) Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Luncheon, Lincoln Park Community Center, 11:45 a.m.
Oct. 21 (Mon.)DEADLINE FOR ADS FOR OCT. 25 ISSUE OF The West Side Recorder: Mail or deliver to 465 Galapago St., or telephone 722-5310.
A u r a r i a Community Center Board, Auraria Center, 1212 Mariposa, noon.
WE WANT TO HELP!
Returned Peaee Corps Volunteers
Phone:
Carolyn Burgin 297-4720
COMMUNITY PROJECTS
CLEAN UP
COMMUNITY
ORGANIZATION
EDUCATION
Page 2WEST SIDE RECORDER, September, 1968


We had a big Fiesta I and
queens J| and kids R.
A Thank-You From a Queen
I wish to express my thanks to all of the people in Denver who made it possible for me to win the senior queen division in the Lincoln Park Homes Fiesta Aug. 2. It was my greatest pleasure to have participated. I am very happy to see this Fiesta raised more than $2,000 for the program. I also thank you for the beautiful gifts and $100 certificate which I received.
Thank you very much,
Bonnie T. Acosta, Senior Queen
200 Enrolled in "Drop-In School"
High-Rise Hirschfeld Towers Program Open to All West Siders Over 50
The new high-rise building that can be seen from many places in the south part of the West Side is Hirschfeld Towers, at 333 W. Ellsworth Ave., across from Daley Park. It was built by the Denver Housing Authority to house 250 low-income residents of 50 years of age and older.
Although Hirschfeld Towers is full and has a waiting list, other West Siders in the 50-plus age bracket can still enjoy its many social and recreational services.
There is a complete six-day-a-week program of crafts, recreation and entertainment, all free.
It is hoped that older West Siders will make use of this lovely facility which includes a large meeting room, card room, kitchen and billiards room. There are also beautiful, well-lighted grounds with an enclosed garden and a covered patio.
Crafts and classes on many subjects are available throughout the week. A ceramics class meets Tuesdays through Fridays at 9:30 a.m. An advanced class meets Monday and Friday evenings at 6:30.
On Tuesdays, classes in leather carving meet at 1 p.m. and classes in modeling and charm meet at 10 a.m. Purse-making instructions are given at 1 p.m. on Wednesdays. Painting is a big item on Thursdays with pastels at 10 a.m. and oil painting at 1 p.m. in the afternoon.
Social and recreational activities include dances, card parties, movies, clubs and a friendship hour each Sunday at 12:30 p.m. followed by a program at 1:30 p.m.
There is a dance every Wednesday evening at 7:30 and a movie every Friday afternoon at 3. Bingo is featured on Thursday evenings at 6:30 and there is a card party at 12 noon on Wednesdays.
Other services and programs offered include the Denver Public Library Bookmobile on Wednesdays at 11 a.m. and book reviews at 1 p.m. the same day. A group meets to make cancer pads on Friday mornings at 9:30.
A calendar of monthly events is available from Edward Whitlock, the recreation director, whose office is Room 107. A bulletin board outside the meeting hall also carries notices of all special events which are open to the general public.
The extensive program at Hirschfeld Towers is sponsored by the Denver Department of Parks and Recreation under a state grant from the Colorado Commission on Aging. The program is provided for all West Side residents 50 or over. All are invited to drop by at 333 W. Ellsworth Ave. and see what is offered. All activities are free of charge. In groups such as ceramics where materials are needed, participants can buy their own supplies at cost, Mr. Whitlock said.
Maestas Running For State Office
James A. (Jim) Maestas, a Denver businessman who lives at 769 Elati St., is a Republican candidate for election to the Colorado House of Representatives from District 7 in Denver.
Mr. Maestas was born on the West Side and attended St. Ca-jetans Elementary, Baker Junior High, and West High Schools. In addition to training in vocational education through Colorado State University, he was graduated from Bon Ton Cosmetology College and has completed a cosmetology instructors course.
The candidate from the West Side is president of the Colorado State Board of Cosmetology and has served as a national and district officer in professional organizations. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps from early 1952 through 1954 and was in the Korean War.
Mr. Maestas is particularly interested in legislation to provide every young person an opportunity for a good education and preparation for a good job. He says he will work for close communication between state and local government agencies and the people of his district
Greenlee School News
Greenlee Elementary School is off to a good start with 1,010 pupils enrolled54 more than at the end of last school year. Because of the additional enrollment, some classes are quite large.
There are six new members on the staff. Miss Nella Piccina-ti is the new assistant principal; Miss Wenonah Wiiliams and Mrs. Marie Lopez, first grade teachers; Miss Mary Ann Bour-ke, second grade; Miss Marjorie Van Riper, special education; Miss Dianne Burry, social worker; and Mrs. Shirley Downing, part-time clerk.
Three teachers received masters degrees during the summerMiss Jan Schneider, Miss Sharon Lazuk, and Joseph Connors. A large number of the Greenlee faculty now hold degrees beyond the BA, and others'* are working toward them.
Greenlee has been selected to be able to serve 15-cent lunchs for every child. However, with almost twice as many children eating at school as before, it is necessary to have two separate lunch periods.
The after-school recreation program at Greenlee will continue as in the past. Beginning Sept. 30 there also will be programs before and after school in drama, study hall, primary and intermediate art, boys club, and primary story time. Children take part in these on a voluntary basis.
West PTA Opens Year With General Meeting
West High School PTA will have its first general meeting at 7:45 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2, in the school auditorium. Mrs. Shelley Rhym is president for the year.
Interested persons will be able to join PTA and get acquainted with the faculty at the same time. All parents of West High students are invited to visit the school and see what it has to offer.
Senior Citizens To Plan Bazaar
Lincoln Park Senior Citizens Club had its first fall meeting Sept. 9, featuring a report on the- Lincoln Park Homes Fiesta Aug. 2.
Manager Bill Ratzlaff gave the report. He was assisted on the Fiesta by Mrs. Marthd Olsen, club president, and other members who worked on fancy crafts, dressed dolls, and made pastries for sale at the fiesta. The money helped to get a bus for residents of all ages, particularly children and elderly people.
The 17 members and 3 guests present celebrated Mrs. Elsie Lilienthals birthday anniversary. Mrs. Bernice Adelman, social director, suggested tours for the group, including to the City Park and the Natural History Museum and to the Salvation Army organization. She also encouraged the members to begin getting ready for a bazaar in November.
A few members of the dub visited the new Metro Denver Fair Housing Center and Botanical Gardens Sept. 6.
Meetings of the club this year will be on Tuesdays.
Children's Garden Fenced Off in Park
Flowers and vegetables were grown by small city farmers in Lincoln Park this summer.
Eight children from special education classes at Greenlee Elementary School worked each Wednesday morning taking care of individual plots near the tennis court. The gardens were fenced off by the Department of Parks and Recreation.
Under the volunteer supervision of Mrs. Barbara Blue, a teacher, and her father, Jacob Schaetzel, called Uncle Jake by the children, the boys and girls grew radishes, onions, lettuce, squash, cucumbers and flowers. The produce was shared with their families and each other.
At the end of the gardening Mrs. Blue gave awards for the best garden and the best attendance.
Two hundred persons have enrolled for the fall adult education classes in the Drop-In School at St. Elizabeths Center, 1020 11th St.
They are working toward their high school degree, to meet other educational requirements, or to improve their English. "
Housewives, mothers, employed and unemployed persons between the ages of 18 and 61 are in classes Monday through Thursday mornings or Tuesday and Thursday evenings. They are taking typing, mathematics, science, social studies, reading and English.
There is a class for persons who are learning English as a second language.
More volunteer tutors are needed, according to Sister Cecilia, program director.
Enrollment is still open for those who want to attend. They should call Rose Marie Feam, adult education coordinator, at 255-7759 between 9 a.m. and noon any weekday.
Summer Class Makes Go-Carts, Mini-Bikes
The go carts and mini-bikes in the Fiesta Parade Aug. 2 were made in the Baker Junior High School summer shop program, which had 20 boys taking part. There also were 20. boys in the summer shop work at West High School.
Roland Ray and Richard Graw supervised the classes at Baker, and Dale Wieland and Roger Rolben supervised at West. The boys learned that by working with tools and motors they could build almost anything.
The classes to develop more mechanical skills will be continued at West High School.
Burke's Grocery
226 Cherokee
Groceries School Supplies
722-8274
___________________
WEST SIDE RECORDER, September, 1968Page -3


Neighborhood Notes
Long-Time Resident Gives Lasting Gifts to City
By Mrs. Raymond Gasser
Miss Berta Dee (Biddy) Tang-ye of 1258 Kalamath St. and David Karney were married Aug. 28 at St. Lukes Episcopal Church. The brides brother, Kenneth Tangye and his wife were home on leave for the wedding.
Mrs. Elsie Ward of 1266 Mariposa St. has cleaned the vacant lot on her block and works hard to try to keep the alley clean behind her property.
Leslie Kalanquin of 1423 Li-pan St. is recovering from surgery for a cataract on his eye.
On Labor Day, Vista worker Jo Ann Park broke her finger while playing touch football at a picnic of the Crespin and Acosta families and friends. Jo Anns team lost by two points.
Mrs. Rex Mayes of 1300 Kalamath St. went to Terre Haute, Ind., because of the death of her mother, Mrs. Nellie Cassidy.
Mrs. Lulie Crane of 241 Inca St. is improving after recent illness.
House guests of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Sullivan of 282 Inca St. have been her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Perry Heap of Medina, 111.
Mr. and Mrs. Ernal Underwood of Salt Lake City visited her aunt, Mrs. May Day of 138 West First Ave., en route to the Dakotas on a sight-seeing trip. Mrs. Day has recovered from recent illness.
Jerry Soliz, former school-community aide at Baker Junior High, Greenlee Elementary and West High School, is now a trainer in the New Careers program at the University of Colorado Center for Urban Affairs, located at the CU Denver Center. Persons who receive training in this program are employed as aides in various state, federal and city agencies.
Best wishes are extended to two Greenlee Elementary School teachers. Miss Frieda Suter is now Mrs. Skiles, and Miss Lu-anna Hancey is now Mrs. Leavitt.
Arthur and Judith (DeMent) Fullenwider of 1438 Franklin St., former West Siders who were married in 1961, are the parents of a son, Michael Lee, born Aug. 30. He jveighed 6 pounds, 6 ounces. Judy lived at 1454 Osage St., from 1947 to 1962.
Young people from First Avenue Presbyterian Church attending college this year include Linda Stevens, freshman at Colorado State Teachers College at Greeley; Marsha White and Sandra Winterhalder, sophomores, Alan Price and Paul Blomquist, freshmen,' and Joel Blomquist, senior, all at Sterling College, Sterling, Kans.; Pat Muray, junior, and Chuck Murray, freshman, at Southern Colorado State College, Pueblo; A1 Kuemmerlin, senior at Metropolitan State College; Merre-lyn Miller, sophomore at University of Denver; Nancy Coughlin, sophomore at Colorado State University, Fort Collins; and Rick Taylor, junior at Colorado School of Mines, Golden.
Auraria Day Campers On Ranch Two Weeks
Summer fun on a ranch was provided for 72 boys and girls from the Auraria Community Center between June 24 and Aug. 2.
Each morning for two weeks, 12 boys and 12 girls in similar age groups boarded a bus at the Center to spend the day on a ranch near Morrison.
The children hiked in the woods, went swimming and horseback riding, and had a wonderful time being outdoors rather than seeing it on television.
Miss Virginia Wilson was director of the camp, assisted by Keith J Henriques. Counselors were from the Neighborhood Youth Corps, or were volunteers Andree Gross, Randi Sunshine and Sheri Radetsky.
A group of boys who live in Lincoln Park Homes need a garage somewhere nearby where they can form an auto mechanics club and learn to work on cars this winter. They planned to meet with John Doyle of Baker Junior High School, Del Peterson of West High School, and Bill Ratzlaff of Lincoln Park Homes, to make plans for their self-help project. They hope to have help from adults, and the use of the necessary tools. Anyone interested in helping the boys is asked to contact Art Tate, 534-8892, or Del Peterson at West High School, or Jo Ann Park, 534-1648.
Phil Torres of 1033 Ninth St. is a new member of the Auraria Community Center board of directors.
Carol Casey, who worked in the Lincoln Park recreation program last summer, has become a full-time staff member in the resident relations department of the Denver Housing Authority. She will work in family counseling in Lincoln Park Homes and in activities involving other agencies serving the West Side. Carol is a graduate of the University of Denver, a former Wheatridge high school teacher, and is a masters degree student at the University of Colorado Denver Center.
Byers Neighborhood Library West Seventh Ave. at Santa Fe Dr.
Hours:
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.
2 5:30 p.m.
Sat.10 a.m.-noon; 1-5:30 p.m.
Closed Wednesdays and Sundays.
MYSTERY
The Ghost of Megan, by Marc Lowell. After a nervous breakdown, Hollywood actress Stella Griffith travels to her grandmother's village in Wales where she finds herself surrounded by hostility and discovers a murdet no one will believe.
Crptozoic! by Brian W. Al-diss. Here is an imaginative novel set within a science fiction framework. Edward Brush is a man haunted by his destiny and a Dark Woman. His .search for both takes him back in time and eventually drives him into a home for the mentally disturbed. Was the cause of his madness a religious vision or only childish fantasy?
N ON FICTION
Back in Cripple Creek, by Mabel Barbee Lee. Cripple Creek, Colorado, is one of the legendary names in the history of the American West. In this new book, the author tells how her award winning Cripple Creek Days came to be written. As a sequel, she re-visits some of the colorful characters who survive from the towns golden daysTwo Bit Lil, Tom Sailor Boy Sharkey, and those few left who remember the mining camp during its rip-roaring heyday.
Heroic Mexico, by William Weber Johnson. A fascinating history of modern Mexico, told in terms of the extraordinary men who. helped to build it, filled with violent action, intrigue, and deep patriotism. The 30 years of upheaval known as the Mexican Revolution produced legendary heroes like Made-ro, Villa, and Zapataall lar-
Piano lessons in my West Side home. Hand exercises, scales, graded progress. $1.25 hour. 244-0544.
Special Programs Held in August
Community Development Month was observed on the West Side during August, under the combined leadership of the communitys organizations and agencies.
Better Health for a Better Community was the theme of health week Aug. 5-9. Mariposa Health Station had open house each afternoon. There were tours of the West Side Health Center and Denver General Hospital.
Each day at least two public programs gave information on child immunization, cancer, drinking problems, sex education, smoking, and health careers. These programs were held at Inner City Parish, Auraria Community Center, Robert F. Kennedy Recreation Center and West Side Action Center.
The second week emphasized Hispano Culture for a Hispano Community. The third week was for clean up and paint up. During this week the West Side Action Center organized volunteers and materials for work on West Side homes whose residents were financially or physically unable to do painting, repairs, cleaning up, etc. The West Side Improvement Association painted the trash barrels in Lincoln Park.
The final week, ending the month, was on community education.
ger-than-life characters destined for martyrdom by assassination. This book tells a story about which little is known.
FICTION
Among Thieves, by George Cuomo. The story of three men from three worlds who are drawn together in a raging, human drama at a prison on the edge of the desert. An extra-ordindary tale shocking, funny, and true-to-life, disclosing the courage and loyalty that can sometimes motivate men, including the outcasts of society.
The Queens Confession, by Victoria Holt. Written in the first person, this is the story of Marie Antionette, the ill-fated Queen of France, as she might herself have written it. A tale filled with the color, suspense, and sweeping drama of a royal courtseen through the eyes of a young girl, then by a woman who has matured as a wife and loving mother and finally, in the chaos of revolution, by a Queen who cannot escape her inevitable fate.
A Hero for Henry, by Hubert R. Purdum. The amusing action-filled story of an Eastern dude who made good in the Wild West. A new novel by the prize-winning author of My Brother John.
WESTERN
Danger Valley, by Richard Poole. A fabulous poker game provides Greg Corwin with the grubstake he has always dreamed of. But the ranch he buys is located in range war territory, and Greg becomes involved in a tense and exciting conflict.
J-A-K
Automotive Service and Parts
Quality Repairs at Reasonable Prices 136 ELATI STREET 722-2895
Mrs. Clara Katona, who lived for many years in the rear of 642 Santa Fe Dr., passed away at Saint Anthonys Hospital July 10, 1968. A high mass was sung for her at Saint Josephs church July 13 and she was buried in Mount Olivet Cemetery.
Mrs. Katona and the late Mr. Katona had operated the taxidermist shop at 642, and previously at 640 Santa Fe Dr., since 1921. Their two children, Margaret and Helen, attended Saint Josephs grade and high schools and both were graduated from the University of Denver.
Their taxidermist shop was one of the most outstanding in Denver, for not only was Mr. Katona noted for his excellent mountings of animals and fowls, but he was a talented artist, and made beautiful oil paintings as backgrounds for his birds.
His shop windows were always artistically and beautifully decorated, and many a West Sider paused before them on his way down Santa Fe Drive. The children were especially delighted with a two-headed calf that graced his window for some time.
A hobby dear to Mr. Katona was the raising and developing of hybrid prize iris. Some he crossed and named himself; some were worth as much as $25 for a single bulb. He became known for the unusually beautiful iris he raised in his gardens in Englewood, most of which he transplanted onto his Santa Fe property.
After his death, Mrs. Katona continued to care for and enjoy the iris and to keep up with her hobby of making lovely patch-work quilts, all by hand. One of the loveliest and most gracious ladies who ever lived on the West Side, she gave these quilts to many of her closest friends. Beautifully made, with unusual patterns, these quilts are indeed a treasure. Only a serious illness was capable of making her put down her needle and still her busy hands.
Before she died, Mrs. Katona directed that all of the treasures
Fairmont Tea Planned For "New" Parents
A get-acquainted tea for parents new to the Fairmont School District will be held Wednesday, Oct. 9, from 2 to 3:20 p.m. in the Fairmont school gymnasium.
Newcomers will be welcomed by the principal, Kenneth Goff, by PTA offqicers and by parents whose children have been in the school in other years.
There will be a social time with refreshments. Parents wishing to join PTA will be given an opportunity to do so.
Before school dismisses for the day, all. interested persons may visit the classrooms.
All new residents in the Fairmont area are invited to attend the get-acquainted tea to meet other parents and to learn more about the school and the PTA.
RFK
Community
Center
Tiny Tots
Kids it Adults
| Seniors
t
| Programs for All
500 KALAMATH
t 297-5918
!
of the taxidermist shopthe stuffed fowl, the animals, the oil painting backgrounds for water-fowlbe given to the Colorado Museum of Natural History. She also donated all of the mounting tools in the shop of the late Mr. Katona. Members of the Museum on a limited budget found this indeed a welcome gift.
The skins and furs and feathers were donated to the Buffalo Indian Tribe for their ceremonials.
Her dearly loved iris, some of the most beautiful in Denver, were entrusted to the care of an old and beloved friend, the school chum of her daughter Helen, Flora Gasser, to be kept until they could come back on Santa Fe Dr. and bloom on the new Spanish Plaza, now in the formulating stage. Mrs. Gasser hopes to preserve Mrs. Katonas shrubbery and Roses of Sharon and evergreen trees also for the Plaza. They are planted on her property at 357 Delaware St. and are being cared for by her tenant, Theodore Medina of that address.
Mrs. Katona is survived by her two daughters, Mrs. Howard Blackburn of Arvada, and Mrs. Gerald Neel of Luthers-ville, Md. Her only grandchild, John Titus of the United States Army, was given leave so he could be with his grandmother before she passed away.
Change Directors
(Continued from Page 1)
The district lies west of Santa Fe Dr. to the railroad tracks, between West Fifth and West Eighth Aves.
Other directors of the association who were scheduled to participate in the annual election of officers Tuesday evening of this week are Mrs. Wills Mae Stencil of 13JL0 West Colfax Ave., District 2; Mrs. Wilma Dabrowski of 1115 Inca St., District 3; Mrs. Leona Part-ney of 713 Delaware St., District 5; Mrs. Lela Swanson of 327 Delaware St., District 7; E. H. Haviland of 457 Galapago St., DistrictjB; and Mrs. Beni-ta Clark of 236 West Third Ave. District 9.
No one had been named the first of this week to assume the directorship of District 10, the area between West Third Ave. and West Ellsworth Ave., west of Elati St. to the railroad tracks.
The Improvement Association will sponsor a public meeting, Meet the Candidates, Tuesday evening, Oct. 8, at Auraria Community Center. Political candidates from both parties will be present to answer questions from the audience.
THE
RICHARDS REALTY CO.
BENITA CLARKE, Broker Office 744-0073 Home 733-0908
# REAL ESTATE
# LOANS
O INSURANCE
5 East 4th Ave. Denver
Annes Beauty Salon
971 Santo Fe Drive
Cold Wave ..... $20.00
SPECIAL ...... 10.00
Shampoo & Style $2.50
Style Hair Cuts 2,50
244-5604
JAMES ABE
MAEST
FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT # 7
Page 4WEST SIDE RECORDER, September 1968
On the Byers' Bookshelf -