Citation
West side recorder, April, 1970

Material Information

Title:
West side recorder, April, 1970
Series Title:
West side recorder
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo.
Publisher:
West Side Recorder
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Full Text
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Volume 6Number 12 Monthly Newspaper of the West Side, Denver, Colorado April, 1970
City Drops One Way Bridge Plans
A spokesman for City Council and the Mayors office, announced March 26 that a proposed bridge over Cherry Creek at 12th Avenue would not be built. The bridge had been planned by the traffic engineer in order to make possible a one-way system on 11th and 12th Avenues between Lincoln Park and Cheesman Park.
City Director of Engineering, Jack Bruce, informed representatives of 'the West Side Coalition that the Mayor's office and City Council had agreed to postpone the bridge for this year and next year, and perhaps indefinitely.
A meeting was held April 16 at Elmwood School to discuss the prospects for getting a new school building. The meeting, called by the West Side Coalition and Elmwood Principal Vic Romero, was attended by about thirty parents and teachers as well as organization representatives.
Bert Gallegos, chairman of the city-wide Hispano Lay Advisory Committee, stated that the Committee had placed a new Elmwood school at the top of its list of priorities. Rev. Ramiro Cruz-Aedo, acting director of Inner City Parish, described his efforts to get a new Elmwood school. Rev. Cruz-Aedo is chairman of the West Side Coalitions Committee on Elmwood as well as the Elmwood Committee of the West Side Action Ministry.
The city had budgeted $200,-000 for the bridge in this years budget. This amount will now be withdrawn and reapportioned.
The bridge and one-way had been opposed by residents of the West Side because it would have brought more traffic, dirt, and noise into the West Side.
The West Side Coalition spearheaded the opposition. Meetings were held with the Traffic Engineer and the Denver Planning Board to express opposition. Petitions were circulated.
Residents from Capiftol Hill also opposed the one-way and the bridge. Representatives of the West Side Coalition worked closely on the opposition with a Capitol Hill group called the Capitol Hill Congress.
It was agreed that an effort should be made to get speakers to all the School Board meetings and that petitions should be circulated.
Adolfo Gomez, 612 Elad, 825-7990; Mike Trujillo, 567 Inca, 292-1979; Mary Quintana, 1031 W. 7th Ave., 255-5763; and Steve Archuleta, 841 Galapago, 266-1086, agreed to work with Mr. Romero and Rev. Cruz-Aedo, 244-2636, on the speakers and petitions.
The West Side Coalition agreed to print the petitions. Steve Archuleta, who works for the West Side Action Center, said that the Neighborhood Representatives from the Center would circulate the petitions. Neighborhood people and especially Elmwood parents interested in a new building should get in touch with one of these people.
Jose Rangel, Baker Junior High School, was high point man for the RFK Center, Bam-um League, basketball season.
Top scorer with 169 points he was awarded the championship trophy. Other Baker students in
Junk Cars Must Go Where To Call
Junk cars are a menace on the West Side. Do you have a junk car that you want to get out of your yard? If so, here Is the number to call: 722-1646, Mr. Mike Cain, c/o Mrs. Lucero, or 534-8590, Mr. Bill Duran.
These people will haul your junk car free of charge. All junk cars are ugly and dangerous. Junk cars make your property or yard or street unsightly.
Report all junk cars to the Housing Department of Health and Hospitals, or the Police Department, 266-2421.
The weather has warmed up, and that means the children will be out more. So as West Siders we must make sure there are no junk cars or shacks that the children will play in. Lets keep the West Side dean by removing all hazards from private and public property.
For more information call Connie Griego at 825-6455.
At the regular board meeting of the West Side Coalition on April 15 the fourteen members of the Coalitions Neighborhood Planning Committee were approved.
The members from north of 6th Avenue are Connie Griego, 1416 Osage, 825-6455; Mary Aguirre, 872 Galapago, 534-5683; Leona Partney, 713 Delaware, 825-8829; Carlos Padilla, 1316 Mariposa, Mary Quintana, 1031 W. 7th Ave., 255-5763; Mike Archuleta, 1026 Inca, 244-2839; and Josephine Perez, 1154 Kala-math, 222-8297.
The members from south of 6th Avenue are Arthur Acevedo, 316 W. 1st Ave., 777-9057; Anna Flores, 345 Acoma, 722-0222; Salvador Delgado, 421
the League are Raul Rangel, captain, Lupe Quezada, Carlos Lopez, Alex Maestes and Manuel Martinez.
All are students in the Baker bi-lingual center. Martin Perez is their coach.
UMAS Has College Money For West Siders
UMAS (United Mexican American Students) at Colorado University Denver Center are offering scholarships to individuals who are interested In attending college but cannot afford college expense. UMAS goal Is to recruit as many students as possible even though their educational background may not be exceptional.
After entering the university the students are provided with assistance in their studies, this includes general counseling, advising with class selection and tutoring. Eligible students are high school graduates, G.E.D. students and college transfer students.
If you are interested in applying call 244-6081 ext 376 or 377 or write Barbara Montano, UMAS-CUDC, 1100 14th St., Denver, Colo.
Fox, 534-0588; Ruben Leal, 64 Fox, 722-5615; Jose Lopez, 367 Bannock, 733*1505; Juanita Herrera, 361 Elati, 222-2321; and Daniel Martinez, 275 Delaware, 722-5495.
The Neighborhood Planning Committee will be working to express the desires of residents for planning on the West Side. The Committee is now working with the Denver Planning office to develop a short term plan for the West Side to replace the citys present comprehensive plan.
West Siders with opinions and ideas on problems like zoning, traffic, parks, and schools, should get In touch with members of the Neighborhood Planning Committee.
RECORDER BOARD SET
The West Side Action Ministry has a RECORDER task force set up and now working. Its main job is to be a sounding board for the advisor and staff on paper content and policies. Don Schierling of First Men-' nonite Church is the chairman of the task force. Other members include Ramiro Cruz-Aedo of Inner City Parish, and Rich Castro, Betty Benavidez, Carlos Padilla, A1 Rouse, Mary Candelaria, and Leonard Vigil, all of whom live or are involved on the West Side. Jim Hall, the advisor to the paper is an exofficial member of the task force.
It is hoped that the task force can help to make the RECORDER even' more of a community paper than it already is.
If any one in the community has suggestions or complaints about the paper this task force will be glad to hear from you. You can reach Don Schierling week days at 892-1038.
RECORDER RECEIVES LUTHERAN GRANT
In April the West Side Recorder received a grant from the American Lutheran Church for $4000.00. A check for $2,000 was received in April and another for the other half will be arriving in October of 1970. This grant is the result of a proposal prepared by Rev. E. Gordon Jorgnesen, pastor of Bethany Lutheran Church at 5th and Bannock. Gordon is the convenor for the Westside Action Ministry this year.
MANPOWER
NEEDED
Your help is needed to continue a Valuable program that works because you and people like you have made It work.
Food Delivery Service is a high protein food supplement program sponsored by the Department of Agriculture. This program was started with the help of the people in your community.
If this program is to continue and grow it will be through your efforts because it is run by the people.
We need your help with the distribution at the center at 601 Galapago, Tuesday and Thursday from 1:00 to 5:00 or just one hour. We must also pick up the food from the warehouse for each center. Connie Griego needs help and a trade to pick up this food from the warehouse on Thursday mornings to supply the center with the needed food.
If there is someone with a truck to help pick up this food call Connie Griego at 825-6455 in the morning between 8 to 12.
Andy Cruz, Debra Martinez, Ruben Rangel, and Catharine Olivas are just four of the many Elmwood children who are trying to make their school a decent place to look at. Good lqck kids!
ELMWOOD PARENTS AND WESTSIDE LEADERS WORK FOR NEW SCHOOL
Coalition !f Neighborhood Planning Committee Approved


How much longer do we dare to send our children to Elmwood? After all, would Dr. Gilberts send his children there?
WEST SIDE RECORDER
Founded May, 1964
Office: 465 Galapago St. Denver, Colo. 80204 Telephones: 534-4408 or 266-1445 Sponsored by WESTSEDE ACTION MINISTRY
Member Churches:
First Avenue Presbyterian First Bethany Lutheran First Mennonite Inner City Parish St. Cajetans Catholic St. Elizabeth's Catholic St. Johns Lutheran St. Josephs Catholic Wesley United Methodist
Acting General Coordinator: James E. Hall.
Recorder Task Force Chairman: Don Schierling.
Staff This Issue: Barbara Baker, Betty Benavidez, Waldo Benavidez, Alberta Crespin, Anna Flores, Connie Griego, Rachel Guedea, Barbara Karr, Dean Punke, Mrs. Dan Romero.
Contributors This Issue: Ramiro Cruz-Aedo, Martha Cooper, Evelyn Elfstrom, Antoinette Gonzales, John Hushman, Jeff Langton, Mary Lou Morgan, Jim Romero, Dan Trujillo, Don Schierling.
Photography: Barbara Baker,
Artwork: John Flores.
Advertising and Distribution
Manager: Ruperto Gudea, Jr.
Mailing Crew: Bev and Gordon Jorgensen.
Guisinger Flower & Gift Shop
240 W. 6th Ave. 222-9207
FLOWERS For All Occasions
Mother's Day Special Co motions $2.89 doz.
Cash-Carry
Specializing in Weddings and Dish Gardens Priced to Meet Your Needs.
CONTRIBUTIONS FOR THIS ISSUE OF THE WEST SIDE RECORDER (BASIC COST $750)
American Lutheran
Churches ........$200
Catholic Archdiocese 200
Colorado Printers... 10
Drafting Engineering
School ............ 10
First Bethany
Lutheran Church .... 10 First Mennonite
Church ............ 10
Inner City Parish .... 10
St. Elizabeth's
Catholic Church .... 10
St. John's Lutheran
Church ............ 10
St. Joseph's
Catholic Church ...... 10
Skyline Chapter,
G.l. Forum-...... 5
Wesley United
Methodist Church ..10 West Side Coalition .... 10
West Side Improvement
Association ....... 5
UNDER $5:
College View Legal Services
Classified Ad
TRADE: Automatic dryer for automatic washer. Contact Cli-etta Hatcherson at 534-7614 or Mrs. Helen Castor at 606 Mariposa.
Request information or address leading to
Charles Kohler or Nolasco
Last known address was on 9th and Inca.
Contact Dave Marquez, 534-1583
Letters to the Editor Dear Editor:
We six students of West High School and members of La Raza Unida wish to express our thanks and gratitude to those people who gave us the opportunity to go on the trip to Mexico. The two week period we had to observe and mingle with the people was exceptionally worthwhile and very rewarding. This gave us a new outlook on our culture, and will have an effect on us as individuals, and how we try to accomplish a better way of life and meaning for our people in our society today.
Perhaps one of the best observations we had was that the Mexican people have a true feeling of warmth towards their family and the people around them. We seem' to be losing our family relationships in the United States, which is vitally important if the Mexican and Hispano people of Colorado wish to accomplish something which will benefit us as a people.
The, feeling of the Mexican people 'being able to run a country and various organizations gives us hope that we can also take part and do something constructive and worthwhile among the Anglo society of today.
Thank you,
Jerry Arellano, Lino Gonzales, Don Benavidez, Norman Winterhalder, Shirley Gomez, and Linda Chavez
(Ed. Note: We of the Action Ministry and RECORDER are glad to have been able to do our part and help these young people have this experience. They have said a number of times that they would like to make presentations to community organizations and groups. We certainly plan to take them up on this offer and hope that other West Side groups will too. For more information call Mr. Jim Romero at West High School.)
NEWS DEADLINE FOR MAY ISSUE MAY 14
Page 2-WEST SIDE RECORDER, April, 1970
OUR POSITION
Double Standard Hurts West Side
On the ll-12th one-way street fight leaders of the West Side Coalition and other community organizations went to the area schools and asked to pass out flyers to the children to take to their parents asking for their support in fighting the One-Way system. There was no problem at either Elmwood or Evans.
Greenlee was a different situation. Mrs. Metz, the principal, refused to have the flyers passed out, because, as she said, it would not be fair for the school to take sides.
It is bad enough that Mrs. Metz, who does not live in the community, would not want to take sides for the community in which she works, and for whose children she is partly responsible, it is even worse when she uses a double standard with community people.
In a memo from Chief Traffic Engineer Dick Thomas to the Denver Planning Board we find the following sentence under the heading of Greenlee School: Mrs. Metz agreed with our contention that one-way traffic flow on 12th avenue to Kalamath Street would not present any unusual difficulties. In other words with this statement and others in this memo, Mrs. Metz supported the one-way system.
Fortunately, in this case, West Side residents and leaders were able to overcome a back stabbing by an agency person. We may not be as lucky next time. Westsiders need support and not opposition from the agency people who make their living off the area, be they principals, teachers, ministers, social workers, or community organizers. City hall can take care of itself.
How Free Is Auraria?
In last months RECORDER there was a letter from resident members of the Auraria Community Center Board complaining that the Board had, over their opposition, endorsed the Auraria college site. This problem of the Board going against the desires and interests of West Side people seems to be a frequent one at Auraria Community Center.
We remember back in 1966 when Earl McCoy was working out of the Center and was assisting the West Side Improvement Association. At the time Johnson Moving and Storage was illegally parking its vans on land zoned residential. The Impovement Association with McCoys help tried to get this stopped. When efforts were made to get the law enforced the owner of the trucking firm refused to contribute to the United Fund which supports the Auraria Center. United Fund representatives complained to Auraria personnel about the withdrawal of the contribution. The United Fund representatives commented that the area around 2nd Avenue was all run down anyway.
This attitude that the agency can do anything to help the West Side that doesnt cross any powerful interest runs throughout most of the Centers activities. The center has cooperated vigorously with community people on issues like bad schools and the dirty movies at the Santa Fe Theater but on issues like zoning and traffic and college location it has been much less involved. The difference seems to be explained by the fact that powerful interests support things like rezon-ings and street-widenings but not dirty movies and bad schools. It is safe to be against dirty movies and bad schools.
The only problem with this approach is that if rezonings are allowed to tear down the whole neighborhood it wont matter whether there are any good schools here or what movies are showing at the Santa Fe Theater. Hopefully this attitude will change. United Fund has recently appointed a new director. The Auraria Board seems to be making efforts to expand its neighborhood representation. With a more concerned attitude on the part of both agencies Auraria Community Center might still become a center for the community.
Dear Sir:
We wish to extend our most sincere gratitude to ail who helped make the success of the Fairmont Festival possible. The success reflects the concern of our community.
Thank you,
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Trujillo ChairmanFairmont Festival
HELP NEEDED
Volunteers are urgently heeded for the Food Distribution Center at 6th and Galapago. If people are not found to staff the Center on Tuesdays and Thursdays, it may have to close. Could YOU give one day or even half a day once, twice or more times a month? Call Connie Griego at 534-5000.


Last Minute Concerns
RICH CASTRO PROUD CHICANO
Once again Denvers minority community puts up a Police Brutality cry, and once again City Hall promises to look into it. In the past the city fathers have written off all complaints as cries of radicals and trouble makers. Although we feel that they have been wrong in this stand in the past, and members of the Action Ministry have taken the witness stand to testify to truth our neighbors have spoken, it hasnt done too much good.
This time no one can deny that community leaders of the Chicanos have spoken out and will continue to speak out until justice is done.
Rich Castro, who was arrested and says that he was beaten and abused by the police
at Curtis Park last week, is a fine, decent young man. No one can deny that fact. He is the type of young man who should be a symbol to the Chicano youth in Denver. Rich is a student at Metro State College, an active members of UMAS at Metro, Vice-chairman of the West Side Coalition, and a youth worker at Curtis Park. Rich has no record, and at one time was a student at St. Thomas Seminary, studying for the priesthood.
We of the Action Ministry think enough of Rich that a few weeks ago we selected him to be on our WESTSIDE RECORDER task force. We felt that he could honestly and fairly represent the thoughts and goals of the young Chicanos in our community. We still feel this way.
MODEL CITIES SOME REAL QUESTIONS
On April 14 a proposal was made to expand Model Cities boundaries to include the West Side. Westsiders have fought to be in Model Cities ever since it started in Denver. However, now there seems to be some questions that we need answers to, if we are going to have a meaningful part of Model Cities, and not just be bought off with a $25 per month increase to ADC mothers.
Model Cities has two major branches: the City Demonstration Agency headed by Mike Di Nunzo and the Resident Participation of Denver, Incorporated (RPDI) headed by A1 Williams.
9 Why have various groups in East Denver, the center of Model Cities, been criticizing A1 Williams, head of Model Cities?
Why were RPDI elections held a few weeks ago to elect community people to the boards, just before the West Side and other areas were considered for inclusion?
If we become a part of Model Cities will we be given token representation on the boards and resident committees that make up RPDI, or will they have a new election?
Some of the questions that we need answers to are as follows:
How much power do the people in the Model Cities areas really have through RPDI?
Why did so few people vote in the RPDI election, if Model Cities is such a great help to communities?
We need answers to these and other questions if we are to work ourselves to death in another government project.
MR, WEST SIDE BUSINESSMAN:
THIS SPACE COULD HAVE BEEN YOURS FOR ONLY $1.50 PER COL INCH.
SORRY YOU MISSED IT THIS MONTH
Call Tito-266-1445 To Reserve it For Next Month

This truck is illegally parked. Large trucks are not allowed to park in residential areas.
Elmwood students, Ruben Rangel, Edward Maj, and Jo Ann Padilla show their art work displayed on cork panels made by Richard E. Gray, Industrial Arts Teacher at Baker Jr. High School.
Spring Music /. D. CARDS Comes to Area FOR ELDERLY
We have spring music coming to the Westside. The West side schools will have free, public spring music programs on the following dates:
West Vocal groups with James Fluckey and Blodwen Roberts conductors, Thursday, April 16 at 7:30 p.m.
Baker Boys Chorus, Concert Choir, and Eighth Grade Choir Neil Bridge and Beverly Hills Conductors, Sunday, May 17th at 7:30 p.m. Greenlee, Elmwood, Fainmont, and Cheltenham at Greenlee School May 13 at 7:30 p.m. Thomas Gatshet, Conductor. Also 6th grade students from our area schools will be singing in the Sixth Grade Chorus at City Auditorium Arena, on Sunday, April 26, at 3 p.m.
Identification cards for elderly, disabled or blind persons are now available at driver license bureaus throughout Colorado.
Drivers licenses are accepted almost everywhere as identification. Those persons who do not drive often have a very difficult time cashing checks.
The Colorado Identification Card Is designed to solve this problem for persons over 65 and the disabled and blind who cannot get a regular drivers license. Persons applying for the card must have a birth certificate or other documents giving their true name and birth date. The blind and disabled must also have proof of their disability from a qualified medical person.
The fee for the ID card is $2.25, the same as for a drivers license. The drivers license bureau in Denver is located at 140 West Sixth Ave.
WEST SIDE RECORDER, April, 1970Page 3


Yi Medrano
Vi Medrano
Vi is a very intense person who is willing to stand up for her rights, and respect those
Profiles in Courage" should not be limited to the countrys statesmen and national heroes, but should include todays woman who is rearing six children alone in the housing projects, who keeps a full-time job, and in addition to the demands of everyday living stUl has time and the strength to be involved in the life of the community.
And in spite of discouraging and defeating circumstances, she still has hope for the future and a feeling that there is opportunity for all.
When she was 11 years old Vldelia Medrano came to Denver from New Mexico with her family.
My father told us the streets of Denver were lined with gold, she said, meaning there would be so many more opportunities here.
The opportunities available to her parents were a laborers job for her father and housework at 15 cents an hour for her mother. But in New Mexico there had been no jobs.
Vi grew up on the West Side and attended public schools in the area. She has stayed on the West Side by choice and her six children have gone to the schools here.
She is often asked why she doesnt move out. This is what happens, she says, once you're working and start looking around for a house. They (the agencies through which she could finance a home) always
show you houses outside of the area.
Vi wants to stay on the West Side. She wants to help improve it and preserve it and make It an example to other communities. She doesnt want to move among strangers, to a strange neighborhood, strange schools.
Thats why I was against Auraria, she said. I'm not against having the college here. Its wonderful to have a college to walk to, but where would the people walk from. They are all to be moved out to strange neighborhoods, to places they cannot afford.
She is encouraged about the progress being made now on the West Side. People are beginning to group together. The West Side Coalition particularly has done a lot.
The lack of zoning in the area concerns Vi, and she feels she would like to wait until this is corrected before she buys a home. She has a four-bedroom apartment in Lincoln Park Homes, and though her children would like to move from the projects, similar living quarters elsewhere would be too expensive.
VI is employed as a family health counselor at Denver General Hospital, a Career Service job she has held for three years. She works mainly with Spanish-speaking patients, assisting them with infant and child care, family planning, nutrition and health problems. She is enrolled in an anthropology
course at Community College.
A widow, she expresses Intense parental concern for her six children and their future. She pushes them to do their homework regularly and wants them to do their best in school. She has objected to her children being put in high school arts and metal classes instead of academic courses and has had to call the school and insist they be transferred.
She feels parents should inquire about loans and scholarships and regrets that she discouraged her older daughter from becoming a teacher and preparing for college. But she was unaware of the aid available then. Now her other daughter is a freshman at Colorado State College at Greeley.
She says the schools do not make the parents aware of scholarships and the students
are not encouraged by the counselors to work toward getting one.
Her children are Gloria, 20 years old who is an office employee; Martha, 18, at CSCE; Frank, 16, at West; Alfred, 14, and Kathryn, 13, ait Baker, and Ernest, 5, who attends Neighborhood House nursery school.
In addition to her family responsibilities and her job, Vi finds time to be active in the Auraria Community Center as a member of the 'board of directors, the West Side Action Council, the West Side Coalition and the Denver Board for the Mentally Retarded.
A thin, intense, striking-looking woman with proud Spanish features, Vi Medrano is an example to women in every part of the city.
of her neighbors. With her courage, and the courage of others like her, how can the West Side help but win its fight for survival?
National City Bank is convenient, for one
thing. Lobby hours are from 9 to 6 every day, and all banking services ar^ifif-bne place. At National City Bank, your checking and savings kitty is always within easy reach!
national
CITY
BANK
99 South Broadway
New West Side Youth Center Open:Drop In
There is a new West Side Youth Center at 1438 Navajo St. The center is under the direction of Mr. Daniel Trujillo. The center which is a Denver Opportunity program is open to West Side youths and young adults between the ages of 16 and 22.
The program will include such things as tutoring classes,
THE MARK OF DEVOTION and of
REMEMBRANCE
As a mother, Vi is very concerned about her children and their future, yet it doesnt stop her from enjoying life.
i

IS A MARKER OR MONUMENT THAT NEVER FORGETS...
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Mail News to:
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For Ads Call:
266-1445
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Auto Repair Tune-ups
European Car Repair 255-4076
ERICKSON MEMORIAL CO.
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Carnival, Bazaar, Auction
FRIDAY, MAY 8
AURARIA COMMUNITY CENTER
1212 MARIPOSA 534-7614
Carnival and Bazaar to Start at 4 p.m.
Auction to Start at 5:30 p.m.
Proceeds Go to Summer Program
job placement, vocational training and a small portion of recreation. Mr. Trujillo says that the center will also act as an information center to different agencies.
Mr. Trujillo also says that West Side youth have selected 15 West Side youth to sit on a youth council for the center.
Their names are: Robert Martinez, Albie Gonzales, and Beatrice Acosta of tract 19; Freddy Lovato, Larry Gonzales, and Rose Marie Florez of tract 20, and Ray Lopez, and Dan VigU of tract 12.
Visitors are welcome to stop by the center and see what is happening, and meet Mr. Trujillo.
Measles Shots In May
An immunization program for prevention of German or three-day measles is being planned by Denver Public Schools. All elementary schools both public and parochial will participate in this during the week of May 25 to 29.
Three day measles are not usually serious in children. But if pregnant women contact them, they can cause damage to the unborn child such as mental retardation and blindness. For this reason a great effort is being made to immunize all elementary school age children (who might possibly expose their mother or other women.)
More information on the program will be distributed by the schools during May. Permission slips for the parents to sign will be sent home with the children. Pre-school age children may also be immunized if the parents obtain permission slips for them from the..schools.
Page 4WEST SIDE RECORDER, April, 1970


SUMMER SCHOOL CAN BE FUN
A fun experience in learning will be the theme for summer school at Baker Junior High School.
For pupils enrolled now in 7 and 8 there will be special help for them in English, reading, social studies or math.
Two teachers will be working with each class of 30 students. On four days of the week classes will be held from. 8:00 a.m. to noon. On one day each week the class will go on an excursion. Lunch will be furnished if the excursion extends into the noon hour.
There will be no fees. All fees are paid through ESEA, Title I. The only requirement is that the student must attend regularly. If he does not he will not be able to go on the field trip or excursion. Two excursions in the planning stage are an overnight stay at a luxury-type mountain lodge and the Central City Opera. Parents must sign permission slips for the excursions. Ten hours credit is granted to those who complete the program. For more information parents may call Baker Junior High School, 222-9718.
BAKER STUDENTS HONORED
Twenty-two Baker students were recognized for academic effort, good attendance and a willing attitude and taken to lunch and a movie on April 16.
Those honored were Arnett Bartlett, Diana Boyd, Chester Chacon, Leta Duncan, Mike Ruran, Willard Kirkendal, Patrick Madril, Joey Maj, Billie Mitchell, Rebecca Newkirk, Joanne Kimball, Lucille Patterson and Della Hernandez.
Other students include Henry Aragon, Genevieve Chavez, Lydia Silva, Clara Sandoval, Harry Whalen, Janet Porter, Pat Valdez, Mary Mondragon and Nickye Love.
The excursion was financed by the EAAC (Educational
Achievement Act of Colorado). Teachers, counselors and aides also attending were Robert Gaetz, Elaine Raines, Linda Al* egria, Gloria Alvarado, Albert Aguayo, and Shirley Bruno.
VOLUNTEERS
ARE ALWAYS NEEDED To
Distribute
THE
RECORDER Coll 266-1445
OPEN LETTER TO WEST SIDE PARENTS
Dear Parents,
Does your child know how to plan for himself? Does he enjoy hiking, fishing, swimming and other outdoor activities?
The West Side Action Ministry is planning four weeks of exciting camping at Rocky Mountain Camp, Divide, COlo. One week for all high school boys, one high school co-ed, one Jr. High, and one for grade school children. The camp will be staffed by four adult leaders. A maximum of 20 young people will be accepted for each week at a* cost of $5.00 per camper, which will include food, cabins and sports equipment.
The young people will do all their own planning for the entire week at camp. This will include cooking and the whole recreation program and they will be held responsible for their action by the adult leaders.
An application form is included in the West Side Recorder, please fill it out and send it in as soon as possible to assure a place for your child.
Other exciting things are being planned by the Action Ministry for the summer which will include arts & crafts, day camps, Bible schools, swimming (with RFK) for a full summer for your children, watch for further details in the West Side Recorder.
Yours in service to youth,
Westside Action Ministry
Baker Students In Optimists' Speech Contest
Max Vigil and Ronald Germany represented Baker Junior High School this year in the Optimist Club Oratorical Contest. The theme was Youth in Partnership with Tomorrow.
Max was sponsored by the Southwest Optimist Club and Ron by the Capitol Hill Optimist Club.
Pray-
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Delivery Service 733-9067
Draft Counseling Available
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Consider Other Alternatives Before Joining Army. 892-1038
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For the Price of One Please Bring In This Coupon When Bringing In Cleaning
WEST SIDE RECORDER, April. 1970Page 5


Mrs. Guedea, with Tito, her husband, and their Family.
RECORDER STAFF:
Rachel Guedea
The staff member who has worked the longest on the West Side Recorder is Rachel Guedea, of 257 Fox St. She has worked on the paper for the past 5 years, most of the time as a volunteer. She has edited copy, written news stories and editorials and done makeup.
In the last year she has involved her husband, Tito, who sells ads and is in charge of distribution. The Guedeas have
three daughters, Esther, 10 years old; Lisa, 8 years old and Hope, 2 and one-half.
They, like many others, have been tempted to move to other communities, but have chosen to stay on the West Side.
Rachel feels the Recorder, which is unique in that it is not published to make money, has an important part to play in the improvement of the West Side.
BYERS LIBRARY COLUMN
by Martha Cooper
In the last Byers book column, stories set in Mexico were featured. This time the books are about and by Mexican Americans in the United States. You can find all of these books at Byers Neighborhood Library, W. Seventh Ave. and Santa Fe Drive:
Across the Tracks, by Arthur J. Rubel.
A description of a border town, its citizens, and the process by which Mexican-Americans and Anglo-Americans have adapted to each other over the course of time.
Among the Valiant; Mexican-Americans In WW II and Korea, by Raul Morin.
Written by an American of Mexican descent, this is a true, chronological, and historical account of all the major campaigns in World War II and the Korean conflict.
North From Mexico, by Carey McWilliams.
Mr. McWilliams gives us some concept of where and at what time the Mexicans settled in significant numbers in this country, something of their history as Americans, and some idea of what books to read and places to see to complete the picture.
The Mexican Immigrant, autobiographical documents collected by Manuel Gamdo, giving the reader an idea of what is typical of immigrant experience and of immigrant reaction to that experience.
La Raza: Forgotten Americans, by Julian Samora.
A collection of seven essays provide an introduction to the history, education, religion, political activity, civil rights, and the emerging middle class of the Spanish-speaking minority of the Southwest.
Forgotten People: A Study of New Mexicans, by George I. Sanchez.
An interpretive study of the social and economic conditions faced by people of Spanish extraction of New Mexico. Spanish-Speaking Children of the Southwest: Their Education and Public Welfare, by Hersdhel T. Manuel.
The author points out problems encountered by Spanish-speaking children in American public schools, and gives information on the culture, occupational
characteristics, and attitudes of Spanish-speaking people of the Southwest.
Ill Tell You A Tale, by James F. Dobie.
These notable stories come from the folklore of the Southwest. Legends and Tales of the Rockies, by Amanda M. Ellis.
Many legends, some religious, abound in Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona and date to the 16th century when Spaniards and priests lived in the Rockies. Treasure of the Sangre De Cristos, by Arthur L. Campa. This is a book of folk legends from an author who is heir to both Spanish and Anglo cultures. It is filled with tales of lost mines, hidden gold, and legends of the people of the Southwest.
I Am Joaquin, by Rodolfo (Corky) Gonzales.
This is an epic poem by one of our own Denver authors. FICTION
Chicano, by Richard Vasquez. This story traces several generations of a family named Sandoval, who originally fled across the border from revolution-torn Mexico, persuing a dream, to try to make a home in the Southwest. Ultimately, the story becomes that of Marana Sandoval, of the East Los Angeles "barrio", who should have the best of both worlds, but instead is trapped between them by blind prejudice.
Death Comes For The Archbishop, by Willa Cather.
The first missionary bishop of New Mexico and his devoted vicar are the central characters of this early history of the Southwest.
Across The Tracks, by Bob and
Jan Young.

PLEASE 1
\ PATRONIZE i I
§ OUR
ADVERTISERS
and mention that you saw it in THE RECORDER
Fairmount Kindergarten Registration Scheduled for April 29
Fairmont School, 3rd and Fox, will hold registration for 1970-1971 Kindergarten class on Wednesday, April 29th, from 1:00 to 3:15 p.m. in the school auditorium.
In order to avoid split sessions and to improve the quality of instruction by having a manageable class size, enrollment will be limited to 100 children.
As each child is registered he will be given a number. If a child receives a number beyond 100, parents may elect to place him on a waiting list for Fairmont or have him bused to Evans School. Kindergarten is not required, but we will make every effort to get every child into kindergarten either here or at Evans.
No child will be given a number until the teacher has seen
A group of concerned citizens, organized for the sole purpose of improving the West Side, has formed the Brothers Investment Corporation.
Operating under this name the group has purchased two sites at 5th and Fox Streets. They would like to use the property to meet the needs of West Side residents. Persons wishing to offer suggestions may contact either Lou Esqui-bel, 623-3472, or Joe Giron, 534-
When gang wars are blamed on the Mexicans, a popular Mexi-can-American girl finds herself caught between her Mexican heritage and her understanding of herself as an American.
Lo Noche Mas Callente, by Daniel Suerio. (In Spanish)
After a village wedding, six friends decide to continue celebrating during the long hot night. The party comes to a climax with quarreling and a catastrophe or two.
The Pearl, by John Steinbeck. This is a simple folktale of the Mexican pearl divers, and the tragedy which comes to a contented young couple when the husband finds the sought-after perfect pearl.
The Rebel Trumpet, by Gordon D. Shlrreffs.
A courier for the Union forces and his friend, Heman Calvillo from Santa Fe, are involved in the New Mexico campaign otf 1862.
Red Sky at Morning, by Richard Bradford.
When his father enlists in World War -II.. Tosh and his mother move to a Spanish-American village in the New Mexican hills. There Josh makes friends and enemies and learns about becoming the head of the house.
Zick's
Market
Fresh cut meats Quality groceries Fresh fruits Gr vegetables
1301 SANTA FE DR. 825-9891
Open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Closed Sundays
his birth oertificaie, baptismal record or hospital record. (Any one of the three will be accepted.) Parents are asked to bring certificates with them when then come to register and they are reminded that the child must be five years old on or before September 15, 1970.
If a parent is unable to appear at the school on registration day, registration forms may be picked up at the school and filled out by the parent before hand. A relative or neighbor may then bring these forms with the birth verification to the school on April 29th, and register the child.
In the interest of fairness we will not formally register any kindergarten child before 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 29, 1970.
7058.
Other members of the Corporation are Dale L. Prine, Manuel Martinez, Otto F. Winter, Dan Silva, Granby Hillyer, Arthur Romero, Ted Salaz, Frank Vigil, Ellen Baptle, Richard Gutierrez, and Sam Navarro.
West Side Calendar
April 29WednesdayRegistration for kindergartenFairmont School, 520 W. Third Ave., 1-3:15 p.m.
May 1-3Friday to Sunday "Cino de Mayo" FiestarCentro Cultural, W. 11th Ave.
May 11MondayWest Side Action Council Meeting, West Side Action Center, 1042 Santa Fe Dr. 7:30 p.m.
May 12TuesdayDEADLINE FOR NEWSWest Side Recorder, 465 Galapago St. WSIA MeetingAuraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa 7:30 p.m.
May 13Wednesday Elementary School Music Program Greenlee School, Lipan St., 7:30 p.m. West Side West Side Action Ministry MeetingInner City Parish, 9 Galapago, 7:30 p.m.
May 15 Friday AD DEADLINE for RECORDER.
May 15SundayBaker Choir ConcertBaker Jr. High, W. Sixth Ave.7:30 p.m.
May 20WednesdayWest Side Coalition Meeting Auraria Community Center, 1212 Mariposa7:30 p.m.
May 25-29Rubella Immunization WeekDenver Public and Parochial Elementary Schools.
MASS SCHEDULE
Sunday-8:00-9:15- 11:00- 12:15 Daily 8:00 12:15 5:15 Holiday 7:00 8:00 12:15-5:15
CONFESSIONS-
Daily 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Saturdays 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
LEGION OF MARY-
Each Monday at 7:00 p.m.
THIRD ORDER-
4th Sunday of Month at 2:00 p.m.
NOVENA TO ST. ANTHONY -
Tuesdays at 8:00 a.m., 12:15 p.m.,
5:15 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
NOVENA TO ST. JUDE-
Fridays at 8:00 a.m., 12:15 p.m. and 5:15 p.m.
ST. ELIZABETH'S CHURCH
11th and Curtis Sts.
BROTHERS INVESTMENT CORPORATION
Page 6WEST SIDE RECORDER, April, 1970


ABOUT THE INNER CITY PARISH
are making real gains as well as having fun. We are trying to give the children a good bilingual background so that they will be able to use both Spanish and English fluently; There is opportunity for parem involvement in the learning and development of their children as we encourage parents to visit frequently or become regular volunteer helpers.
Elementary: Our biggest concern in this age group is to help individual children wherever possible; school, home, etc. We have four young staff members; Steve, Ken, Paula and Richard, working in and with Elmwood and Fairmont Schools with students that have problems. We had hoped that this age group would benefit from a slot car track (given to us by Auraria Community Center), but within two weeks the power plant was stolen so we can no longer use it. ('If you know its whereabouts please give us a call). Mondays at 4:30 we have a group of about 25 boys and girls in a swimming program. This is a year-round program in which they learn to swim and dive as well as have a good time.
with other church groups, teachers and professionals. This has been very rewarding.
Adults: Wednesday mornings at 9:30 we have a worship service community meeting followed every third Wednesday by a pot luck lunch at 12. Other programs; sewing classes on Tuesday mornings, 9:30 12; Spanish classes on Tuesday mornings; adult education on Thursday mornings at 9:30 (including typing, reading and writing, history, etc., offered in connection with Headstart), the mothers program mentioned above on Thursday mornings at 10; and a worship service Sunday afternoons at 4:00 followed on the first Sunday of each month by a pot luck supper in celebration of the last meal Jesus ate with his disciples. Both worship services are non-denominational and focus on applying religion to our every day lives, and the socio-economic problems of the community.
We would like to add two more classes, one in Mexican History, and one in English usage but as yet have not had enough response to do so.
Pardon us if this article becomes a lengthy one, but two facts are significant; 1) we have not written an article in a long time; therefore there is a great deed to share with the community; and 2) beoause of our neglect, people in the community have questioned us about this and requested that we write about our progress. I think the best way to do so is by ages and days.
Infants and toddlers below 3 years: This is a new program for mothers and their little ones. There are games and activities for the children, refreshments, activities and discussions for mothers, (example, sewing, crafts, exercises and many more), and field trips. This is every Thursday morning at 10 mothers, bring your children.
Young Married Couples: This is also a fairly new program. Young couples meet every other Tuesday evening at 6:30 for recreation, a pot luck supper, and discussions about matters of importance to them; children, home, etc. We have professional people in different areas available to take part in these discussions and answer questions. Come as a family.
Three and Four year olds: Our preschool program continues, but it is better than ever. There is more emphasis on actual learning, and the children
Junior and Senior High students: We are open every day after school from 2:30 to 5 for recreation. At times our teenagers engage in hot dialogues
If you want more details on any of these programs, please drop in. Well be happy to answer your questions or have you join us.
Coalition Supports Rich Castro
DRAFT
ALTERNATIVE
INFORMATION
Through the sponsorship of the Westside Action Ministry, a representative of the American Friends Service Committee of Denver has been doing draft counseling at First Mennonite Youth Center for the past few months, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays.
By draft counseling, we mean showing alternatives or other choices to young men who may not wish to go into the military service. There are many types of deferments, or reasons why some young men should not have to be in the service unless they choose to go. Too often the local draft boards either refuse or omit telling young men their rights. The draft counseling is set up to help each young man that comes to it to look at his personal choices, and alternatives.
Mr. Dale Schrag, of American Friends is the counselor in charge, and says that it is obvious that there is a need for people to be aware of their rights.
Anyone wishing draft alternative information may contact him on Tuesdays either at the Mennonite Youth Center, across from West High, or at Inner City Parish. If one needs information or help in a hurry one can contact Don Schierling at First Mennonite Church during the week at 892-1038.
First Avenue Presbyterian 120 West First Avenue Rev. A. J. Blomquist, Pastor Sunday School9:45 a.m.
Classes for all ages. Morning Worship11:00 a.m. Sunday EVening Gospel Service and Age Group Fellowship Meetings 7 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study and Prayer 7:30 p.m.
Jesus said, By this shall all men know that you are my disciples if you love one another.
ALL ARE WELCOME TO THESE SERVICE8
About 60 persons attended the regular monthly meeting of the Coalition for the Betterment of the West Side.
The board voted to donate $10 monthly to the support of the West Side Recorder, and to ask each organization in the Coalition to support the paper with donations as best they can.
Other business included the subject of model cities coming to the West Side with guest speakers, Louis Kelly, Director of Research and Planning for Metro Denver Fair Housing, Rich Hennesy and Tom Frank from legal aid.
Rich Castro, Vice-Chairman of
the Coalition, told of an incident he was involved in which led to his detention in jail. After hearing his story the Coalition voted to pursue the matter of Police Brutality to Rich, and other cases involving minorities.
The board voted to establish office space at Inner City Parish, 9th and Galapago. The space was provided by the Parish at a minimal fee.
Mrs. Herrera, the grape boycott representative on the West Side, informed the people present of the new agreement with some growers and that grapes will soon be available with the union label.
BOY SCOUT LEADER NEEDED
Boy Scout Troop 200 is without a leader. These boys would like to continue meeting if someone would be willing to volunteer their time as a leader. Anyone interested may contact Boy Scout Headquarters, 623-0235.
J-A-K
Auto and Truck Repair & Parte, Inc*
Quality Repairs at Reasonable Prices
136 ELATI STREET
722-2895
Other business included the approval of the neighborhood planning committee, and a celebration over the one-way street victory.
Arapahoe Glass
Need a Windshield?
We install windshields at; your home. We work with all insurance companies. Free pick-up and delivery service.
Complete Storm Door Service and Rescreening
Glass of All Types
45 W. 1st Ave.
722-5125
1970 Fund Drive for Archdiocesan
Elmwood children, accompanied by teacher aid, Mrs. Dan Romero, enjoy seeing various types of animals on school field trip.
Development Fund Started Here
Chairmen have been named in three West Side Catholic Parishes for the 1970 Archdiocesan Development Fund Campaign. The Chairman at St. Cajetans is John Archuleta, at St. Elizabeths, James Hofsetz and at St. Josephs Pete Lo* vato.
Among West Side projects which have received grants from the Archdiocesan Development Fund and and its Anti-Poverty Program are the following: Adult Education Tutorial Program, Auraria Community Center, Baker Junior High School Choir, Centro Cultural, the West Side Coalition, Head Start Childrens Education Fund, the grade school at St. Cajetans, Operation SER (Jobs for Progress), United Latin American Businessmens Association, the St. Vincent de Paul Society, West Side Health
Board, St. Josephs High School, West Side Improvement Association, and the West Side Recorder. Two grants, totaling $5,-400.00 have been given to the West Side Recorder.
The campaign for the Development Fund is conducted in each Catholic parish throughout the Archdiocese of Denver. A very small percentage of the funds are collected on Denvers West Side.
Persons may make an outright donation or extend pledge payments over the entire year. The plan calls for home visits by teams of volunteer workers, except in cases where the persons prefer to make their pledge at church.
In addition to the Anti-Poverty Program, the Archdiocesan Development Fund supports a wide range of religious, educational and charitable projects throughout northern Colorado.
Santa Fe Aulo Body
1101 Santa Fe Drive
(Next to Centro Cultural)
FREE ESTIMATES Paint & Body Shop Work Guaranteed
USED CARS AT FAIR PRICES
See Bob, o nuestros amigos que hablan Espanol hablen con"Chico"
phone 244-1201
WEST SIDE RECORDER. April, 1970Page 7


Neighborhood Notes
The Santa Ana Furniture Store opened at 741 Santa Fe Drive on April 20. It carries Mexican-made furniture on three floors. Hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. Manuel Adams is manager. Working with Mm are Charles Lucero, James Quintana, Noah Aragon and Henry Gutierrez.
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Serun-gard, 1247 Lipan St., were guests of honor at a luncheon on March 17 given by the Swiss Society of Denver and the Swiss-Amer-ican Friendship Society. Also present were Ambassador and Mrs. Felix Schnyder of Switzerland and the Swiss Counsel General. The meeting was held at the Mountain Room of the Howard Johnson Motor Hotel.
Mrs. Soledad G. Guedea of Chicago and Mexico is staying with her son and his family, Mr. and Mrs. Ruperto Guedea, Jr., of 257 Fox Street.
A big thank you to everyone who helped stuff the March Recorder. They were Rosemary and Anette Galvan, Freddy, Ernie and Frosty Valdez, Benny and Sammy Sanchez, Sheila Smalley and Esther and Lisa Guedea.
A group of girls who attended a slumber party given by Esther and Lisa* Guedea, helped pass out some of the Recorders in March. Those helping were Valerie Sandoval, Cherrie Fairbanks, Betty Todd, Lori Sturde-vant, Zita and Ruthie Valdez, Mary Sue Britton, Pat Valdez, Sheila Smalley, Anna Pritchett and Carol Martinez.
AURARIA'S ANNUAL BAZAAR
On Friday, May 8, Auraxia will hold its annual Bazaar and Carnival. The one money-raising event of the year will include carnival booths with prizes, selling projects made by adult groups, refreshments, and an auction of new merchandise donated by various merchants in the city.
Many Auraria club groups and neighborhood residents have planned and assumed responsibility for the event. Each club group will be responsible for their own Carnival booth. The young people are using many of their own original ideas. The Mothers Morning Out and Lincoln Park Senior Citizens group are making a variety of items. There will also be baked goods and food for sale throughout the evening.
The Carnival will begin at 4:00 p.m., and the auction will begin at 5:30 p.m. Proceeds will go toward summer activities at the Center. Come for fun, for supper, for a pretty article for yourself or your home.
Rummage Sale
Sat., May 9th
734 Santa Fe Dr.
From 8:30 to 5 p.m.
If you need it. .
We have it at the best price.
Mr. Michael Lucero and Mr. Manuel Lopez Thompson, both of San Francisco are visiting in Denver and staying at the home of Mrs. Alberta Crespin, 1467 Navajo St. Although Michael Lucero visits Denver every year, this is Manuel Lopez Thompsons first visit. Both mien will be staying longer if they can find some work in the area.
Salino Fresquez of 704 Elati celebrated his 100th birthday on the 12th of February. A Home Mass was given for him on February 15th by Father Fran-clscus of St. Josephs Church. He was bom in Longs Canyon, Colorado in 1870.
Denver Public Library concludes its free Sunday afternoon story hours at the Main Library, 1357 Broadway, with a special offering of the favorite Raggedy Ann and Andy scheduled at 3:00 p.m., Sunday, April 26, in Wyer Auditorium.
An original play based on the famous storybook characters will be presented by the New American Repertory Company directed by Joe Craft. The colorful theatrical production is a family program for youngsters of all ages and parents too.
The event is open to the public free of charge and does not require tickets.
Election of New Board Members
The monthly meeting of the Auraria Board of Directors was held on April 13, 1970. Several items were discussed including the proposed budget for the fiscal year beginning in October 1, 1970, participation in the fiesta at Centro Cultural, building problems, and election procedures for the new Board of Directors. The election will be held at the annual meeting on May 21st. Nominations are to be made to the nominating committee. Mrs. Vi Medrano, Mrs. Leona Partney, Mr. Leon Selig. Adult members of the center are eligible to vote at the election. Voting will begin at 3:00 p.m. and last until 8:00 pm. on the evening of the Annual Meeting, May 21. The Board of Directors encourages persons interested in the center to make nominations, join the center, and plan to attend and vote at the annual meeting.
Headstart News
Eleanor Lucero, parent programmer at Aurarias Head Start, will be leaving soon for a seven-week training program at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas. Mrs. Lucero and other Denver Head Start staff will be living in dorms at the University.
Head Start at Auraria is looking for pre-school clothes for the youngsters. Neighborhood people whose children are older and who would like to donate clothes should call Clietta Hatcherson at 534-7614.
* *
There was an error in the material submitted to the Recorder in February. Antoinette Valdez, not Elsie Valdez, is substituting at the Elati Head Start for Mrs. Jay Martinez. Apologies are extended to both Antoinette and Elsie.
Beware of Quacks
Before you buy a product or service that is being promoted as an arthritis cure contact Arthritis Foundation, Rocky Mountain Chapter, 1375 Delaware Street, Denver .Colorado, 623-5191. Time and money invested in any sure cure for arthritis invites only disappointment.
New Program For Youth Started
There is a new youth program on the West side sponsored by C.S.U. extension center. The program is involved in total youth development. Community youth counselors have been hired to work with the community youth. So get to know them. Feel free to ask them anything, since they are here to help in any way they can.
Now dig: We want to hear from everybody between 8 and 22 years old. As the counselors put it, Just rap it to us. You talk: we listen. We really want to hear from you people.
Antoinette Gonzales is one of the counselors and would be glad to answer any questions at 623-0773 after 3 p.m.
If any West Side agency or organization would like to participate on a volunteer basis, we would 'greatly appreciate it.
WESTSIDER RUNS FOR STATE REPRESENTATIVE
Betty Benavidez, a long time resident of the West Side, this week announced her candidacy for state representative.
Mrs. Benavidez has long been active in West Side activities. She is a Democratic District Captain, belongs to the Womens Auxiliary of the American G.I. Forum, H.E.L.P. (Hispanic Education Leadership Program), is coordinator for the West Side Improvement Association, and helped form and is active in the Coalition for the Betterment of the West Side.
She is also recording secretary of the West High P.T.A., and is on the task force of the West Side Recorder.
Mrs. Benavidez, and her husband, Waldo, have four children and live at 1110 Mariposa St. They are members of St. Cate-jans parish.
Mrs. Benavidez believes that the West Side has been neglected by many of our public officials but of equal importance is the lack of meaningful legislation that would benefit the poor
Betty Benavidez
and unrepresented people of our area.
Some of the major points In her platform are as follows:
1) Programs for low and moderate income housing construction in the inner city area.
2) More funds for scholarships for minorities, and better education faculties, statewide.
3) Fairer welfare legislation.
4) Consumer protection bills against unfair trade practices.
SANTA FE-VICTORY THEATER
974 Santa Fe Dr. Denver, Colo. 80204 892-0613 or 455-1698
9 Open Fridays & Saturdays at 5:30 p.m.
Sundays 11:30 a.m.
3 Mexican Movies; Cartoons
Admission: Adults $1.25, Children with parents free, otherwise 25c.
9 Mexican Food Served.
9 The only Mexican Theater with a Wide-Giant Screen.
9 El unico teatro en Denver exhibiendo las ultimas peliculas Mexicanas directamente de Mexico.
Abe I Gallegos Manager
Don Kromer, (right) branch director at the Arthur E. Johnson center, compliments members of his Boys Club who recently took part in winning the Colorado first place trophy in the games tournament held in Grand Junction. From left are Mike Manzanayea, 1553 Meade St.; Danny Chavez, 3533 W. Colfax Ave.; Benji Gonzales, 1581 Hooker St.; and Eddie Martinez, 1576 Meade St. The tournament incluuded chess, pool, ping pong, and checkers. The center competed against Boys Clubs from all over the state. Lincoln Parks Boys Club is at 8th and Inca. Drop by sometime.
The West Side Recorder Staff Appreciates Your Cooperation
Westside Action Ministry
West Side Recorder 465 Galapago St. Denver, Colo. 80204
Non-Profit
Organization
U. S. POSTAGE PAID
Denver, Colo. Permit No. 149S