Citation
Colorado Center for Biobehavioral Health

Material Information

Title:
Colorado Center for Biobehavioral Health architectural thesis document
Creator:
Blair, Mark Alan
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
72, 7, [1] leaves : illustrations, maps, color photographs, plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Psychiatric clinics -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Boulder ( lcsh )
Psychiatric clinics ( fast )
Colorado -- Boulder ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 8 (2nd ser.)).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Architecture and Planning.
General Note:
Includes brochures (in pockets).
Statement of Responsibility:
Mark Alan Blair.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
16686801 ( OCLC )
ocm16686801
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1987 .B55 ( lcc )

Full Text

ARCHITECTURAL THESIS DOCUMENT
University of Colorado at Denver College of Design and Planning
SPRING 1987 Mark Alan Blair


TABLE OF CONTENTS
THESIS PROPOSAL.............................................. 1
THESIS STATEMENT............................................. 5
BACKGROUND INFORMATION.......................................11
Interview with Dr. Ed Wilson Company brochure
Project specific notes from Richard L. Crowther, FAIA
SITE ANALYSIS................................................24
General description Proximity map Site plat Site photographs Climate information
FACILITY PROGRAMATICS........................................26
General discussion (concentric dissection)
Global building analysis Sphere analysis Entity analysis
ZONING ANALYSIS..............................................67
BUILDING CODE ANALYSIS.......................................70
FACILITY DESIGN DOCUMENTS....................................
Presentation drawings
SUMMARY......................................................
BIBLIOGRAPHY


THESIS PROPOSAL
Page 1


PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The Colorado Center for Bio-behavioral Health is to be a medical facility geared for the treatment of "psycho-somatic" disorders, or in other terms, disorders of the body and of mind that can be attributed to stressors and the interrelated effects these have on the physical and psychological well-being of an individual.
Broken down into the areas of treatment, this clinic will provide the services of general practicioners, psychiatrists, several psychotherapists and counselors, Aston Patterners, a chiropractor, a physiotherapist, a psyciatric social worker and bio-feedback clinicians.
In addition to these services there will also be research, development and small scale production of equipment specific to the diagnoses and treatment of this new and expanding field of medicine.
At the core of the development of this center are: Carol J Scheider, Ph.D., a licensed clinical psychologist, Edgar S. Wilson, M.D., John V. Davis, Ph.D. Psychology, Joseph Eglazar, physioyherapist, Bernice H.
Hill, Ph.D., a licensed Dsychiactric social worker, Walter Krier, B.S., Aston Patterner, Susan Mann, B.A., a bio-feedback therapist, Gale Osterberg, M.S.W., licensed psychiatric social worker, and Jack D.
Robinson, graduate of the Palmer College of Chiropractic specializing in craniosacral therapy in the osteopathic tradition. Also as corporation, is NEUROMAP- COMPUTERIZED PSYCHOPHYSICALOGICAL MONITORING AND FEEDBACK
Page 2


SYSTEMS. These peoDle are the clients of this thesis and as well a real life architectural project to be under taken in the near future.
The arcitectural Droblem presented here is as unique as the field of medicine to be conducted within the future solution. As this is an up and coming field few precedents exist as to what would constitute a successful solution. One thing is clear at the outset, however, and that is that existing medical facilities are relatively unusable. The requirements for our problem do contain many aspects of these medical clinics but also transcend the somatic sphere by not only including the issues of psychology but also melding these with other practices into a holistic approach to health within one clinic. The SDacial, functional, acoustical, visual and psychological requirements differ radically from service to service and the architectural solution must take all this into account as well as the interdependence of these same services. In consultation with the core group these differing requirements have surfaced and are secured. The present summation and assesment Dredicts a structure in the size range of 8,000 to 15,000 sq ft.
The primary staff wish the building to be located in Boulder, Colorado as this would be centraly located in the Colorado catch-basin. Property is currently being searched for in the areas adjacent to downtown and major arterial connection to Denver, Longmont, Greeley and Ft. Collins.
Page 3


THESIS TEAM MEMBERS
The Principle Advisor chooser for this thesis was Richard Crowther FAIA because of his particular interest in this field as well as his depth of knowledge in the architectural aspects of health, in a holistic sense.
Mr. Crowther has agreed to act in this capacity and I consider myself to be quite fortunate to have the opportunity to work with a man of such calibur. However, as of the close of the fall semester a Committee Chairperson has not been selected.
Page 4


THESIS STATEMENT
Page 5


The Colorado Center for Bio-behavioral Health is an
exceptional opportunity to address vital architectural issues of human well-being right at the core of human health itself... the preventative and treatment clinic. This Darticular study proposes that the health and general welfare of mankind at large is dependent on not only the group and individual attitudes of health, the specific biological and/or pharmacological assesment and treatment, the psycoloqical aspects of therapy or physical therapy, but of the combination of all these fields within one facility teamed with research, development and education.
Further, the environment of the facility is as much a factor as the functions and coordination within and without. As argument for the importance of determining more appropriate architectural consideration is the evolution of the varying schools of thought of promoting health, maintaining health and treating health that have emerged in recent history. To begin with, there has been a rapid emergence in preventative medicine, rather than treatment of illnesses after the fact, in the last decade. Also, it is widely understood that close to eighty percent of all "medical" illnesses contain components of mind/body issues that need to be addressed, to help specify cause-effect relationships. Finally, there is mounting information on the built environment in general contributing to the health, or lack there of, of users. In the broad scope this includes residences, public places and of particular importance, medical facilities.
In the narrow scope of the environment of a given structure we find the issues of architectural contribution to be
Page 6


still quite comprehensive and the medical clinic of this sort is an ideal model to explore these issues, however, some parametric guidelines must be set and adhered to. Therefore, the exploration and theoretical experimentation is confined to the following architectural issues.
The most important determinant here placed is that of sun utilization. Where the sun is used, how, in what ways it creates space and place, and how it is to be controlled for lighting, heating and cool ling including texturing, warmth and creating a nonthreatening environment.
Secondly, the issues of views, spaciousness and conversly, intimacy, privacy and the control of all these would be of high importance in the architectural solution. This at the outset may seem all too obvious, and indeed is considered in detail in almost all medical buildings, but the particular point to be addressed here is the emphasis and extent to which this issue is pushed. The widely used and accepted "cook-book" of space planning in the speculation medical market would be of little use considering the nature of human beings and how subtle we can be and quick to adversely react in such an environment that deals with subjects as personal as our own bodies and minds. Indeed, a tragedy would certainly exist if all else were successful except for the alienating feelings generated by undeveloped spacial considerations.
As with any discussion of spacial aspects and space itself, comes the subject of architectural form and its influence. With the experience of the staff including Dr. Ed Wilson and Carol Schnieder Ph.D., the overall concept should be of articulation and "nook-and-cranniness". This provides a unique
Page 7


dimension to the building interior... one of wonder and discovery shared by childeren and adults alike. However, this can be taken to an extreme and provide an environment that can be threatening and overwhelmingly complex, provoking feelings of disorientation. The staff feels rather strongly about developing unigue and inviting space via the form and even wish to promote such spacial detachment where applicable and required by the methods of treatment. Finally considering the buildings' exterior identity also, it can be reasoned that a coherent overall language should be used that can tell many diverse and artistically told stories of interest but remain strong and understandable in its vocabulary.
Next, of growing concern, is the subject of environmental conditioning. In the parameters set forth in this thesis this area of concern transcends usual mechanical and code reguired natural ventilation, into realms of SDecificity, indoor climatic variance and rapid control necessary for the differing modes of work. Peculiar to this clinic would be ion control, fine suspended particulate matter removal and eradication of pollens. However, this seems to dictate a rather sterile environment and at the very roots of the holistic movement we find a "back to nature" attitude concerning health. This conflict rears its ugly head repeatedly in medicine and psychology and in the area of environmental systems the issue is more complex than just when to allow in natural ventilation.
Indeed, the environmental systems of this facility are to be rather paramount, when looked at as a whole. Not only do the mechanical systems teamed with natural air need to be scrutinized, but the very current used to power lights and
Page 8


appliances should be phased from the standard 60 cycle oscilation to ones of quite differing frequencies. In fact, information has been collecting that points to the conclusion that artificially produced EMF within standard frequencies has many adverse effects on the physiology. This may seem to be far out of scope for this thesis and even ridiculous for such a clinic but the point can be made quite well that the Art of making people well is no art at all, but results obtained from yet unsecured and elusively complex scientific principles. Hence, the exploration into this vast unknown field should be taken up in such an academic setting for the advancement of knowledge and eventually a healthier mankind. Further, equipment necessary for research and treatment of brain physiology disorders requires laboratories isolated from virtually all EMF by means of bio-electromagnetic construction.
Next, there is the usual issue to address of function in terms of separation and access. As will be further disclosed in the programatics, the clinic, operating as a largly independent structure, will contain spheres of function that will be separated in some ways, yet integrated and accessible in others. Within these spheres there will need to be differing layouts as well as flexibility in configuration.
Finally, the configuation of the buildings' exterior will need to be quite site responsive in terms of indoor/outdoor utilization and also in terms of image. The message to be given would be similar in concept to that of Frank Lloyd Wright's organic architecture.
In summary, the field of medical arcitecture contains a very fertile soil for research and development in the academic
Page 9


specter and promises to bear many fruits of knowledge and for many reasons, including personal education, proves to be a worthy thesis for the world at large. Particularly, the project chosen, is timely and brings out many issues of architecture, medicine, art, scientific application, and most of all, a continued pursuit in the commitment of man's well-being.
Page 10


BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Page 11


Discussion between Dr. Wilson and Mark Blair
Mark Blair:
Dr. Wilson:
Mark Blair: Dr. Wilson: Mark Blair: Dr. Wilson:
Mark Blair: Dr. Wilson:
Mark Blair: Dr. Wilson:
Mark Blair: Dr. Wilson:
I'd like to talk about the background of how you came to all these conclusions and so I wanted to ask if you would mind if I recorded your wisdom on tape.
Sure, if you like. A lot of this background information about how this project came into being and so forth is in this brochure. You can have that.
I've got it.
You've got the big brochure?
Yes.
Good. And in the front of that brochure ... started back in '76 ...
I see.
With Carol when she was working on the ... with just one or two biofeedback instruments we started a private practice over what is now the Hagen Das ice cream place on Pearl and Broadway.
Is that right?
Yes. A one room office. And then it expanded to a little building on Tenth and Pearl. A three room, no, four room office and was there for another year, few years, about three or four years and then it expanded again to the top floor of 16th and Walnut.
It was a Victorian house and then this year it's expanding again to the Valmont address. 400 ft to 3000 ft in 10 years.
That's a pretty big expansion. Is there anything along the lines of the medical research that you've been doing that contributes to the timeliness of all this.
Yes. Let me study it. States of consciousness, trait patterns that people have seem to be fairly inflexible ways of viewing the world and we began to look at those a few years back. What trait patterns contribute to illness and then what state patterns are involved here. Traits involve more like character styles or adaptive styles that people have adopted early in life. States of consciousness means how they're adapting in their immediate environment, in their immediate ... settings. And there are many factors that contribute to a state change. Among them is the gestalt of conversation or what's going
Page 12


on in their mind at the time, the environment in which that is happening, both non-verbal gestures and people. And the physical environment in which they find themselves at that moment.
Mark Blair: So the two big concepts you're concerned with are state and trait modes of ...
Dr. Wilson: Yes, these are modes of attending to the world.
There are some people ... who attend to the world in a very narrow focus mode as we talked about before and some are very open focused. And that means a person in a very narrow focused mode can concentrate fully and completely on such things as an accounting spreadsheat or balancing his checkbook or doing mathmatical calculations. And a person with a more open focused mode of attention might be able to appreciate the sunlight, the ability to percieve the tone of the conversation rather than just the content. He'll take in facial expressions as well as the words that are being said. And an extremely open focused person will be able to percieve at the same time not only all the things we've talked about but be aware of skin temperature, to some degree his heart activity and is able to regulate more and more functions of his own body simultaneously.
Mark Blair: Through the awareness, through hooking him up via feedback. Hooking him uo to his brain.
Dr. Wilson: And we try to allow the individual to see how he's focusing his attention in the world. How rigid or flexible that style of attending may be. How much of it is a habit that can be changed or a trait that's part of his genetic makeup. There seems to be a gray zone between state and trait awareness and we don't really understand that. We don't know how much of what a person is attending to is state and how much is trait.
Mark Blair: I'd like to clarify this definition of state and
trait a little more. And also just to give you what I seem to have as a model of way of understanding this just so I can further grasp what you are talking about. Would state more or less than be sort of a method of say intelligence quotient, of how well they adapt from second to second, or how well they can solve a problem, but in terms of a biological sense rather than an intellectual sense?
Dr. Wilson: No, it's way before the problem solving stage.
There's your state of consciousness is a way of attending to the world. It's what inputs you allow in. And it's like a filter system for what inputs you allow in to process, as opposed to a way of processing. A way of processing information and the output so to speak is something we like to call adaptive style. And that means if you have a certain
Page 13


way of dealing say with an angry person in a unusual situation but you recognize anger in another person your adaptive style towards that person may be agressive, it may be trying to placate that person, trying to do any number of things that worked before. You learn what works in the world so you apoly it in this situation whether or not it's real or not. And that's state dependent learning. If every time you looked a certain way at a bully and he gave you a bloody nose, about the third or fourth bloody nose you'd learn not to look at the bully that way. And that's the school of hard knocks. It's state dependent learning. So you let in the information it takes to survive in any given situation.
Mark Blair: OK. State dependent learning.
Dr. Wilson: So state dependent learning is like that. Trait
dependent learning is ... has a lot more to do with very fundamental biological forces like turning on sexually, having love feelings, bonding to another person. How to assimulate fundamental survival strategies, if you're walking on uneven terrain, it's a trait dependent learning as to how you move your eyes, your arms and your legs in a kind of balancing, coordinating fashion. You learn how to do that early in life, but you're programmed, you're pre-wired to be able to do that. Trait dependent learning then is kind of a biological programming for survival in the world. State dependent learning is more actual experiential learning, direct experiential learning. But the reason why these things seem to be important the attentional style of a person, the adaptive style, state and trait stuff is that many illnesses are associated with fixations in these attributes.
In other words, people get fixed in their way of dealing with the world. For instance, chronic pain people, they have an automatic system that increases arousal when they're experiencing pain which in turn feeds the pain. People who have a tendency to doubt their personal experiences in any way, so called schizophrenics when he starts to have an unusual experience, or even a usual experience in an unusual situation, if he gets increased fear and vigilance and thus is likely to provoke more of the same experience. It's where our abilities to cope become impaired by their habitual ness, by their very repetitiousness.
Mark Blair: Where in terms of treatment is the effectiveness in terms of states and trait? It would seem such adaptive skills or adaptive things learned through experiential learning would be easier to correct and modify than would be the deeper hard-wiring.
Dr. Wilson: Sure. Absolutely.
Mark Blair: And where can you draw the line in such an escalation
Page 14


of these phenomena reaction, reaction furthering phenomena, phenomena furthering a reaction, escalation ...
Dr. Wilson: Catch-22, repetitious stuff.
Mark Blair: Where in this scheme of state and trait can we ... are you breaking into the cycle?
Dr. Wilson: It varies from person to person. At the present time there's no real good science for it. Science in the sense of some discrete methodology that says if the person has this trait we do this treatment. We are learning gradually how to enter into this cyclic repetitiousness at several levels. If you can enter into it at the level of just symptom suppression which is probably the lowest level and that means giving the person a drug. It only hurts if you're conscious. And we can suppress symptoms with a given medication if we know how to use the medication and if the medication isn't toxic to the individual.
This entails still a great of trial and error. Then you go a stage above that and you begin to learn more about what physiological states are associated with the symptoms the individual finds hurtful to him. If you can find some ways his body is reacting to what his mind is experiencing, you can help him associate the body reaction with the mind experience by things like biofeedback, by personally experiencing changes in movement patterns, changes in how he holds his body while he sits in a chair or drives a car. This is a second layer up from just suppressing the symptom. Then a third layer involves insight into why the trait developed in the first Diace. People go back and look at early conditioning patterns as in psychotherapy. And they learn to recognize when they are repeating themselves, when they're given the same metaphorical situations that they experienced early in life, they repeat themselves and have that same experience again and again. Even though it's a different time and a different place and the circumstances are certainly not the same they continue to repeat. By knowledge of that repetitious process, it motivates them to change that Pavlovian type of response to ...
Mark Blair: I was going to ask you, a lot of this sounds very Pavlovian.
Dr. Wilson: Yes. So that's a step up from just symptom
suppression though. It's recognition of patterns, which the brain is real good at. The brain can pick up patterns real well and if we know we have a pattern that leads us to respond in an unhealthy way, we can by knowledge recognize it. The problem is, it doesn't always change it just to recognize that you have a certain pattern. Then we enter into kind of a third realm of how to interrupt this cyclical
Page 15


disease. If you spell disease in two words instead of one, you get an idea of what I'm talking about.
Dis ease is a lack of homeostatic regulation in the body. So this third range of knowing how to get to this is to know something about how the nervous systems processes input and outputs. And if you understand how the nervous systems processes the nature of the body's experiences in the world, normally, you can then begin to see how these processes begin to go awry from overuse, disuse or underuse. In other words, if you respond every time you get in stress by oversecreting acid in your stomach, increasing the propulsion in the stomach, the spasm in the stomach, the likelihood if that stress response is continued is that you'll have an ulcer way down the road. You can supress the ulcer with Tagamet or Gelucell or countless remedies for an acid stomach or you can understand that that experience happens when you're angry or frustrated or whatever and try to avoid anger or frustration or learn to deal with it differently. Or via feedback, an awareness of when you're making the acid and learn how to suppress it, suppress the reaction, not suppress the cause. Because cause becomes harder and harder to discriminate the deeper you get into an understanding of how the body works because cause is not a singular thing. Causality is Dlural, pluralistic. So when you get to how the brain works you have to begin to look at a multi variant response system. It's responding simultaneously just like narrow focus to open focus. It's responding in open focus. It's responding to daylight. It's responding to the weather. It's responding to all sorts of inputs simultaneously. And the sum total of these inputs is greater than any of their parts. And so that's why things that don't seem to be causal may play a role in the cause. Frequency of lightwaves, the temperature, the ionic equalibrium in the atmosphere, the tone of the person that you're talking to, the way they respond to you, who they remind you of from the past, the chair you're sitting in, how well does it conform to your anatomy, how much do you have to defy gravity to maintain a posture in that chair, all of these are factors that contribute to the gestalt of your trait dependent behavior at that moment in time.
Mark Blair: So let me ask you a question. Then wouldn't it be of importance architecturally to understand these issues and how architecture solutions to our built environment influence them. Not only in a general sense, but more specifically in a treatment center like I'm working on?
Dr. Wilson: Yes. Of course it would be. We've never had the
options for control of this baseline environment for maintaining homeostasis that we have right now.
We're just learning about the wavelength of light and
Page 16


its effect on consciousness. For instance, the National Institute of Health has conducted ... several years now a study of people who get depressed in the winter months. And they've found that depression is only partly responsive to antidepressant medication, but it's very responsive to certain wavelength characteristics of light and the duration to which that light is provided to the individual. We all know about mood shifts during winds which the ionic equilibrium is shifted. There's a kind of net loss of negative ions in the atmosphere. And we have some good data to show that changes in ionic concentration are associated with suicide rate, combatic behavior, police arrests. All these diverse pieces of information say that, gee, how could all of these things that are human behaviors be governed in part by the winds.
Mark Blair: Yes, it does seem a little abstract, doesn't it?
Dr. Wilson: Yes, it does. Because they're very diverse pieces of information. And yet statistically they hold up quite valid. For instance, one of the things I'll never understand is why emergency room visits increase during the full moon. And this has been statistically validated in a study in New York and LA and in other parts of the world that during the period of time the full moon is over that area that there are more accidents and minor traumas and lapses in attention in people. Certainly we know the moon controls the tides, but what does it do in our head and why? It's almost embarrassing to ask those questions because they seem awfully flaky. But then you turn around and look at other data from, for instance, Alaska near Seward Alaska and the Kenai Peninsula, there's a large transmitter operated by the Navy for communication with submarines throughout the world and it carries a basic frequency of 20 Hz. And they transmit on an overriding frequency in that 20 Hz spectrum, a harmonic set of frequency. And people who live around that transmitter and for some distance have shown a vastly increased incidence of chronic pain. Why? We don't know. Except that when we look at chronic Dain patients, we find that pain patients have real slow frequency perturbations in their muscles. When we do an EMG study of their muscles, we find an area between about 12 and 30 Hz where they have increased activity. And they may be normal in the normal muscle frequency range which is 80 to 300 Hz. So here is some more disparity in information that doesn't seem to make sense. But when you begin to look at the physiology of the individual, it does. Now how can we study this type of thing in environments that presuppose that 60 Hz is normal and that the type of lighting that we have should be the most economical and mass producable and least trouble to put up. If you're trying to measure a phenomenon involving 60 Hz activity in an
Page 17


environment that's absolutely cluttered with 60 Hz in flourescent lighting that's driving 60 Hz constantly, how could you make some decision as to the effect of 60 Hz? It's like trying to judge the effects of the air we breath. And whether that air is contaminated or not, we don't have a monitor system sensitive enough to work in that environment. We have to change the environment to see what the effects of these things are on it.
Mark Blair: That's a pretty interesting concept because the
analogy is drawn that when studying a cell to try and understand the mechanisms of life itself, any time we try to probe or dissect or experiment, we alter the very delicate balance of the organism's existence itself such that it's no longer what it was that we wanted to discover... now it's dead.
Dr. Wilson: Yes, that's very true. Looking at the physiologic
nature of man in artificial environments, all we know is that 60 Hz is very recently come upon us in our biological age of millions of years. We have no way of knowing its effect. Because it's so pervasive at this point all we can look at is the incidence of certain illnesses that have occured. Now, I'm not saying that 60 Hz current produces a given illness. The fact that the incidence of cancer is increasing as the incidence of cardiovascular disease is kind of leveling off is attributable to many many factors. Here again we are dealing with multi variant input so I don't look at 60 Hz activity as being causal of anything. It's just a contributing factor to certain types of activity, increased nervous system activity and nervous tone may be part of that picture. Well we have no environments to study that because everything is so fused that these types of EMF and consequently we have no real way to see. So we try to create environments that not only facilitate communication, appropriate activities in terms of therapy and healing. We are confronted with the very fact that we work in environments that may produce disease whether we like it or not, because those environments are imposed on us by one the economics of building things, two the ignorance of the effect of our innovations on our biology and three the concept that doctors or therapists make people well. People make themselves well if they can create a .... They're only human. Certainly we can cut out a cancer, but why did the cancer start in the first place? We can get a person to quit having symptoms with an ulcer and gradually heal the ulcer, but it tends to come back when we cease to give the medications. We're not really alluding ourselves to very much because when we look at longevity, for instance, of man. In 1900, people died of infectious disease by in large. If you lived to the age of 20, your chances of living a normal lifespan, or the lifespan we now have, was just six months short of
Page 18


what we now have in 1980, the last time for which we've got statistics. Which means most people were dying in infancy, in early years, of infectious disease. But as far as the lifespan of man was concerned, it has only been increased by six months. It's a rather painful increase actually. We now spend 11 percent of our Gross National Product on the elderly which is mostly hospital and drug oriented treatment, surgery and that sort of thing. Less than two percent of our national budget goes to prevention. And we ask, what's the payoff for this? The payoff in 1900 was sanitation. We improved the water supply. We improved the quality of the milk that babies drank. We improved sanitation, not doctoring, sanitation. And people lived longer.
More people lived longer. And so the net duration of life is increased somewhat. But by all of the innovations that we have based on that reduction!'Stic paradigm, that disease is produced by germs which can be killed by antibiotics and results in health again, that paradigm is just petering out. It's not working anymore. What we're into now is a paradigm of adaptation. How does man adapt to rapid changes that are being imposed on him by the real world? That's the key question. How can we facilitate that adaptation in the real world? That's the key question. Not how can we ... We know how to kill germs. We know how to maintain a clean water supply. We know how to produce an environment conducive to biologic survival, but we've imposed on this environment a frenetic race for "success", perfectionism, a sense of driven need to be something that we're biologically not yet fit for and probably never will be. Because we've gradually separated our
heads from our bodies. We've become more attuned to
the external demand systems than we are to our own internal homeostatic functions. A farmer in the 19th century had time to listen to his gut growl and pace himself according to the seasons. He was in touch with his environment. A man in the 20th century walks into air conditioned building, incandescent lighting, driven by a desire to please his superiors. Somehow he loses touch with his roots, his fundamental adaptive style has changed. I'm not saying the change is all bad. I don't believe we can
go back to a time where we can be physiologically at
peace with our environment. Not any more. The race is on to survive and who can survive the best?
Perhaps the person who can create the arificial environment to be most advantageous to his own homeostatis and that engineering and architecture and design, electronics and these growth industries that exist have to become attuned to what it takes to survive, to adapt.
Mark Blair: When did you first start looking at these issues and wondering about these concepts?
Page 19


Dr. Wilson: Oh, I started before I even went to medical school, but when I started practicing and I began to see the same types of illnesses occuring in the same families and families perpetuate their own maladaptive styles on one another by their conditioning each other. And the family structure would create a substrate that was diseased, a substrate that ... an undercurrent that went through the behavior of the family that led each family member gradually to aquire the same type of illness that other members of his family suffered from. And, for instance, families with a lot of discord going on, their children would be sicker than families without much discord. They'd have more colds and flu. Their vulnerabilty to infection is increased. I visited these families because I was a country doctor. And then I began to notice within the individual that there were certain physical patterns that went along with certain illnesses. The most obvious of these is posture, the way a person walks and sits, moves their body, tells me about the tone of their being, whether they've got a lot of energy or no energy, whether they had any ... had some drive to survive or not.
Mark Blair: How much of this do you think is first of all related to genetics and biological hardwiring versus repetitively learned patterns and then again what roll do you think our built environment might take in the causation of all this?
Dr. Wilson: Well, it's a moot question, the first one because we certainly know that certain diseases are aquired through heredity. Down's Syndrome has a propensity ... it's a genetic fault. There are many syndromes that we know have hereditary basis. But there's a gray zone in between in which family patterns reemerge generation after generation and perpetuate certain types of disorders. Superimposed on that ongoing selection of the fittest is the gradual alteration of our environment and that alteration is accelerating almost logarithmically over the past hundred years. But that acceleration in change of the environment increases the adaptive demands on the individual. Now if an individual comes from a quote perfect home, perfect genetics and so forth, he's got a log of cheating space. Cheating space between good health, symptoms and disease. The person who comes from an environment with some genetic problems and some environmental problems the flaw becomes manifest easier.
That's what we're coasting on now basically. We have a very healthy population in the sense that we're well-fed, good nutrition, we're over-fed actually.
The genetic pool of people in the United States is pretty well filtered in the sense that we've taken people ... a large number of people came to this country because of opportunity and they were very
Page 20


success oriented people and they were willing to change and do things. But undercurrents in that is that we've tried to give each successive generation a formula for how to live in the world which isn't working anymore as well as it did at one time. The formula of Horatio Alger, for instance, the idea that by your bootstraps you can pull yourself up is giving way to more of an idea that there has to be a more cooperative arrangement between people to allow each of us to survive. And we begin to see many many people falling out of the race that Horatio Alger set up, bag ladies on the streets of New York, increasing numbers of homeless and jobless people because they cannot compete in ever increasing intensity of technological society by and large. So the amount of cheating space that we have because of our technological innovations and our frenetic pace in our society and what it takes to be a "winner" in our society has created more and more maladaptive people that in an agricultural environment would have never shown up as being maladaptive. In a pre-industrial or industrial environment they would not have been maladaptive, but in a post-industrial age as we're in now, they can no longer function, and with that lack of functional capacity comes disease, certain kinds of illnesses. We know that depression, repeated failure, sense of inadequacy and that sort of thing is associated with the onset of cancer. The immune process of the body are affected by lack of meaning and loss of love-objects and that sort of thing.
Mark Blair: So where do you see the role of an architect in the built environment come into play, particularly in the thesis that we're working on, but maybe also generally in the built environment?
Dr. Wilson: I think shifting focus from progressively more
crowded and economically feasible environments to more adaptive environments. This dichotomy between enhancing of activity and facilitating survival at the lowest level is something only this country is capable of at this time because we're the only country rich enough to look at what is a truly adaptive environment. Now, conversely to this, if you create "perfect" lighting systems, if you create "perfect" ion equilibrium and you create "perfect" temperature regulation, "perfect" fresh air infusion and you create a perfect room, the organism is most likely to suffer, because the organism thrives on struggle and the organism at least has to know the parameters in which it's struggling. Before we knew we struggled against starvation, cold, disease. ...
Mark Blair: These are knowable phenomena.
Dr. Wilson: Yes. This was man's domain, that's why he's so well fitted to deal with infections now. He's so well fitted to deal with colds and he's so well fitted to
Page 21


deal with a lot of natural calamities.
Mark Blair: Dr. Wilson:
Mark Blair:
Dr. Wilson:
Mark Blair: Dr. Wilson: Mark Blair:
Dr. Wilson: Mark Blair: Dr. Wilson:
He's not real fitted to deal with a totally stable homeostatic environment. As a matter of fact, that doesn't tax him anymore, that doesn't challange him and he doesn't even know where that that change has occured.
So obviously complacency is not to be strived for?
No. Complacency is not the desire that I have in architecture. Adaptivity, enhancing adaptivity is the desire that I have. I'm not interested that the office that I want be 70 degrees in temperature and have an ion concentration and light characteristics, that they be perfect. I'm interested in giving an individual an awareness of the homeostatic variables in his life that he can alter and struggle to change.
So the architectural design solution would best be not one that solves all the problems for the human, but that promotes the human to solving their own biological and psychological problems through learning to cope and adapt. So our environment that we're talking about architecturally could very well be the model with which to practice adaptive skills on a fundamental as well as an intellectual basis.
That's the key to this concept of creating an environment that enhances man's struggle to survive rather than takes away the few indicators that he has left of his struggle with his world because the healthiest people, the people that live the longest and live the best have not been those who have had perfectly stable environments. It's been those who had challange and meaning and wonder and a focus to their lives.
Something to overcome.
Yes. Given nothing to overcome we become a blob.
Well, I'm about out of tape, so, does that sew it up pretty well?
Yes. Does that make some sense?
Yes.
So what this continuum means is, yes, I'd like to have different light sources to let the person know what effect that other light source is having on them. I'd like to have a different ionic equilibrium distribution so that people can know more about the toneness, the effect on their body, the body ionic equilibrium. I'd like to be able to study those things in a real world without isolating variables so much that I create an artificial world. And I'd like
Page 22


to create wonder and speculation and drive to change in people. And that's what the change agent or healer or physician should be all about is giving people some options and inspiring them to use them.
Mark Blair: Well, that sums it up very well. Thank you very much for your time, Dr. Wilson.
Dr. Wilson: My pleasure.
Page 23


Notes re; Thesis / for Mark Blair / by Richard L. Crowther, FAIA Colorado Center for Bio-Behavioral Health
Fixed versus the dynamic factors of the site and architectural environment. Architecture is the most fixed element of the design equation.
Rhythmic factors of seasonal change, diurnal variation. From morning to night solar arc approximately 120 degrees in winter to 2A0 degrees in summer.
Factors of emphasis and de-emphasis that influence perceptual attention and holistic sensory response. (All senses including that of time and motion).
Dynamics of natural order sun, cloud cover, air movement, precipitation, vegetation, organisms (including humans), ionic and electromagnetic fields. Skyvault daylighting contrasts in its relative uniformity with the transient dynamics of direct solar radiation.
Dynamics of human migration to, around, and within the architecture. Migratory inducements and motivators. See-through space and openings and physical, move-through situations. Factors of a more fixed form (architectural and interior elements) that can be made more dynamic. For possible manipulation by physicians, clinician, or patient. Temperature, air movement, spectral range of lighting (possi ble control over daylighting), ionization, electromagnetic fields, humidity, aromas, tactile aspect of surfaces.
Seating or reclining elements precondition over scope of view and angle of perspective. Composure is accorded by avoiding visual alarm-zone situations, controlling character and loudness of sound, allowing for visual and physical escape attendance to privacy, contrained relationships of architecture, scale, color, configuration, and detail, controlled penetration of external or interior light, and its characteristics and Kelvin index, Discrete choice and arrangements of interior furniture and furnishings.


Notes page 2
People relate to people. Confrontation, avoidance, congeniality, coming together, moving apart, positional relevancy, influence of motion, attire, body language, sound of voice, aroma of persons all condition our judgment of others and our emotions. Loud talking, screaming and overactive children are factors that need elimination or attenuation. Large glass areas and hard architectural and interior surfaces require control. Separation by design is advisable.between active and relaxation areas.
Non-confrontational seating areas in waiting spaces and privacy of spaces for diagnosis and therapy are desirable. Sound transmission through walls should be attenuated and sound absorption employed within and between spaces. Smoking I presume would be prohibited, and in the interest of asthmatic and allergic patients perfumes and cologne use should be discouraged, If any smoking is per-mitted, it should be within separately enclosed and ventilated rooms.
For indoor and outdoor approaches circulation patterns should be considered to minimize confrontation. Berms and landscaping used to make the microclimate of the site more gentle during seasonal extremes can enhance interior privacy, attentuate street noise, and "soften" outdoor confrontation factors, Indoors, physicians need to "escape" from confrontation with patients. This can be in some measure by fixed or movable screening or interior piantscaping, so that waiting patients do not see down corridors,
Persons act differently to light, but by using low-level sidewall illumination that will light floor surfaces rather than people in corridors, the emphasis on personal recognition and cunfrontation is reduced. Within patient diagnosis and treatment areas variable levels of illumination can be provided with fixtures that are designed to ground off electromagnetism of fluorescent lighting and provide ful1-spectrum illumination.


Notes page 3
Although daylight in the interest of the patient and energy conservation should be a prime design focus, high-efficiency artificial illumination will reduce utility energy demand when it needs to be employed. Task lighting (artificial) should be used rather than general illumination anywhere. Windows located close to interior sidewalls will illuminate interior space more effectively without glare and provide more usable interior wall space. Outdoor ventilation can be more effectively provided by using lower panel awning-type vents with fixed glass above or separate louvered or hooded (near floor with cross-flow ventilation) vents.
Daylighting
Although daylighting should be optimized for human as well as for thermal benefits, the location, size, proportion, type and character istcs of the glazed areas and architectural and interior and exterior control features should be judiciously employed. Skylights and sloped glazing areas can be particularly troublesome energy problems. Skyvault daylighting can effectively serve interior illumination from any compass direction of glazing. Transient direct solar radiation is an architectural matter of careful calculation. Vision and composure are best served by consideration through all hours of the day and seasons of the year. West glazed areas are the most problematic for interior overheating and visual glare. Views to the west are compromised during afternoon and evening daylight hours by direct solar intensity.
Exterior wall and clerestory glazing is fraught with few of the problems of skylight glazing, namely maintenance for dust, streaking and water leaks, and the skyvault winter heat losses and excessive summer solar heat gains. Nevertheless, solar skylight (toplighting) for below-grade areas is more in line with energy conservation when the lower level is earth coupled.


Notes page 4
The greater the amount of controlled daylighting that is used, as much as 50 percent of air-conditioning costs can be saved on an annual basis. It is likely that air-conditioning costs will exceed those for heating.
Glazed areas should be tailored to the reality of the seasonal climate and solar radiation. In general, Heat Mirror #38 is appropriate for south glazing,
#77 is more suited to east, and #55 to west and north. An alternative is clear double glazing to south, with doubled-g1azed heat-absorbing glass to the east, highly reflective glazing to west, and triple or quadruple glazing to the north. Cost can be a determining factor. All fixed glazing can be set directly into the architectural surround. In any case, use therma1-break sash menbers.
It should be noted that glass cuts out much of the ultraviolet radiation beneficial for humans, but plastic glazing that allows this penetration has numerous practi cal drawbacks.
In any case, using double and triple glazing will largely exclude external street and other noises. However, when the background of noise is lessened, internal noises seem much louder.
Not to be neglected and to reduce feelings of claustrophobia or lack of escape glazing can be judiciously (for privacy) used in interior rooms and spaces for light penetration and lessening the sense of enclosure. Daylight where possible can add and illuminance to enclosed spaces through such means.
Solar Energy
Solar energy can be a means of indoor light and thermal gain effective during winter months for heating, for air tempering during cool and cold weather, and for inductive ventilation during warm and hot weather, Passive solar gains are best utilized when the east-west axis of the building is longer (preferably about 1.4:1)


Notes page 5
than the north-south width. The entire envelope of the building, with its fenestration and compatible interior use of direct gain passive solar heat, make the whole building in effect a solar collector. A passive solar direct gain system is the least expensive to employ to a high ceiling portion or upper-level (near ceiling) destratification and duct work distribution to lower levels. Thermal mass floor construction will aid the retention of solar-heated distributed air and act as a general stabilizer of temperature year-round.
Drain-back solar collectors can effectively heat the lower-level hot pool and other hot water needs and could be used to aid air tempering during cool and cold weather. Earth coupling below about a six-foot depth would aid the predominant need for lower-level temperature stabilization and offset internal heat gains of people and lighting. A ground source heat pump might be investigated for general heating and cooling of the entire building.
Site PIanning
Site dimensions, zoning setbacks, and access are critical to required parking and building "footprintM layout. Doub1e-1oaded parking with a minimum of 60 feet overall is most efficient. Direct winter solar exposure is most desirable for parking and building access areas. Landforming and planting with interspersed planting areas to screen cars should be planned. Patient protective cover and ease of access to the building entry is recommended.
Close, intimate garden patios and decks around the building can function for use and nearby views. All landforming and landscaping should lessen climatic extremes and energy demands on the building. Vines on the building or surrounding arbors can provide summer shade and when leafless in winter will allow for direct solar gain on exterior walls.


Notes page 6
Archi tectural Envelope
The building envelope can most economically and energy-wise conserve by having a minimal surface'to-interior-volume ratio. Insulative synthetic stucco-type systems for exterior surfaces provide tightness and act as an effective peripheral climatic barrier that avoids thermal conductivity through building members.
A new space age ceramic aggregate roof coating has the advantage of reflecting back about 78 percent of summer solar heat while acting as a thermal reflector against heat loss from the interior.
Inasmuch as annual cooling is a greater concern than heating, the building would be less thermally impacted by being a light color. An airlocked (unheated) entry preferably to the south or to east or west is preferable.
1ndoor Ai r Qua 1i ty
My booklet, Indoor Air: Risks and Remedies, is a good introduction to this subject. The selectionsof furniture, furnishings, and equipment and artificial lighting is critical to indoor air quality.


SITE ANALYSIS
The site selected for this facility is located in Boulder, Colorado and consists of two city lots adjacent to each other,
905 and 909 Alpine. The site occupies the north-east corner of the intersection of 9th and Alpine. On the lot just east there is an existing one story brick building which is also a medical clinic. This vicinity was chosen for the already established zoning clasification allowing such medical clinics and as such there is a concentration of them including the Alpine Medical Clinic. Also contained in the same block is Boulder Community Hospital.
Geographically, the site has little or no solar blockage on any front. The ground slopes gently from front to back (south to north) where it joins with a service alley. The other three corners of the intersection all contain single familly homes and low density apartments. Across 9th Ave. and one half block north is North Boulder Park... it is also clearly visable from the site. Finally, there is the possibility of great vistas of the front range foot hills only blocks away.
Page 24


CLIMATIC INFORMATION
The following information was obtained for this site from the National Center for Atmospheric Research, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Solar Energy Research Institute.
Please see copies on following pages.
Page 25


CLIMATOGRAPHY OF THE UNITED STATES NO. 20
Climate of Boulder,
Colorado
NATIONAL OCEANIC AND / ENVIRONMENTAL / NATIONAL CLIMATIC CENTER
I IVyWQ ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION / DATA SERVICE / ASHEVILLE. N.C. APRIL 1975


L>at Couv'Ttiy trunnw> nviu f wjn
r)viv?MMextai Lab Temperature
,^*u|de\r CoUv^cjo
Most consecutive days of highs of 100F or more Most consecutive hours at 0F or below ......
CX->UMyCK UOlOJVfVO
4 days (July 10-13, 1954)
42 hours (January 28-30, 1951) (109 hours unofficially recorded December 20-25, 1983)
Most severe cold spell .................December 20-24, 1983 (low of
-15F, high of 2F)
Earliest freeze ........................ September 9, 1941
Latest freeze...........................June 13, 1947
Record high.................104F (June 23 and July 11 1954)
Record low..................-33F (January 17, 1930)
AVERAGE HIGHS AND LOWS FOR EACH MONTH (F) (1897-1977)
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
45 47 52 61 70 80 86 84 77 66 54 46
20 23 27 36 45 53 59 58 50 40 29 23
Wind
"Chinook" winds blast down the mountains and canyons and across Boulder in winter, especially in January, breaking windows, flattening fences, and even tearing off roofs. These warm, dry winds can cause snow to disappear from the ground overnight. Over several hours, Boulder Chinooks have attained steady speeds of up to 65 mph (January 11, 1972). The strongest wind gust ever recorded in Boulder was 148 mph, at 3:30 p.m. on December 4, 1978.
Flood
Heavy runoffs from unusually deep mountain snowpacks, combined with spring rains, sometimes cause flooding in Boulder. Flash floods also can occur, triggered by slow-moving or stalled thunderstorms.
The greatest flood since the founding of the city of Boulder was on May 30, 1894, when, according to local news reports, water stood 8 to 10 feet deep in the area of Boulder Creek from 4th to 13th Streets.
Precipitation
Deepest snowfall, single storm ............ 36 inches (December 4-5, 1913)
Deepest snowfall, 24-hour period .......... 27 inches (November 19-20, 1979)
Most snow in one season Least snow in one season .
142.9 inches (1908-1909) 20.5 inches (1924-1925)
Snowiest month ..............
Earliest snow ...............
Latest snow .................
Most consecutive days of snow
56.7 inches (March 1970) trace (September 3, 1961) trace (June 13, 1969)
10 days (March 7-16, 1958)
Heaviest rain, single storm Heaviest rain, 24-hour period Most consecutive days of rain
7.37 inches (May 5-8, 1969) 4.80 inches (July 31, 1919) 15 days (May 11-25, 1935; June 4-18, 1967)
AVERAGE PRECIPITATION BY MONTH (INCHES) (1897-1977)
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Total
.56 .76 1.55 2.60 2.95 1.86 1.80 1.51 1.52 1.50 .91 .73 18.25


21
BOULDER
CLIMATE
Boulder is located on the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains nestled tightly against steep foothills. The climate is characterized by light precipitation, surprisingly mild temperatures, and light winds punctuated by occasional very strong Chinook winds. The average monthly temperature varies from 33 F in January to 74 in July. Average winter temperatures are 'elatively warm due to occurrences of warm Chinook winds. Boulder averages more than 80 inches of snow annually, but prolonged snowcover is unusual. March is by far the snowiest month.
The average annual precipitation is about 18 inches. Light afternoon thundershowers oc:ur frequently throughout the summer, but May is the wettest month.
DESCRIPTION OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration maintains a solar radiation calibration facility at the Environmental Research Laboratories in Eaulder. Data are collected by several independent instruments, but the data displayed here come from the National Network instrument, a Spectrolab SR-75 pyranometer. High calibration standards and frequent maintenance assumes good quality data at this site.


BOULDER
ELEVATION 5360 FEET MSL LATITUDE 40 DEC 1 MIN LONGITUDE 105 DF.C 15 MIN
SOURCE OF SOLAR RADIATION DATA -- NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES. NATIONAL NETWORK
INSTRUMENTATION SPECTROLAB MODEL SR-75 PYRANOMETER
OBSERVED SOLAR RADIATION DATA -- AVERAGE DAILY TOTAL HEMISPHERIC RADIATION ON A HORIZONTAL SURFACE,
JANUARY 1 9 7 7-DECEM BE R 1901.
TILTED SURFACE RADIATION DATA CALCULATED FROM THE OBSERVED HORIZONTAL DATA USING THE METHOD DEVISED BY LIU AND JORDAN (1960). VALID FOR SOUTH-FACING SURFACES. REFLECTIVITY 0.2
CLIMATIC DATA -- TEMPERATURE ANT) PRECIPITATION DATA FROM NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE COOPERATIVE OBSERVER RECORDS. TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION AVERAGES ARE FOR THE 1951-1900 PERIOD. DECREE DAY AVERAGES BASED ON 1941-1970 DATA. NO WIND SUMMARY AVAILABLE AT THIS TIME.
SOLAR RADIATION JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN
HEMISPHERIC (MJ/SQM DAY) 8.25 11.26 15.38 19.28 20.15 24.95
HEMISPHERIC (BTU/SQF DAY) 726 991 1355 1699 1775 2198
(HEMISPHERIC / ETR) RATIO .53 .54 .55 .55 .50 .59
COMPUTED TILTED SURFACES (MJ/SQM DAY) LATITUDE 15 DEG. 13.05 15.50 18.45 20.36 19.61 23.39
LATITUDE 15.01 16.96 19.02 19.68 18.16 21.16
LATITUDE + 15 DEG. 16.09 17.40 18.57 18.04 15.95 18.10
VERTICAL 14.95 14.92 13.89 1 1.24 8.93 9.23
CLIMATE
EXTREME MAXIMUM TEMP. (DEG F) 72.0 79.0 79.0 83.0 93.0 104.0
AVERAGE MAXIMUM TEMP. (DEG F) 45.0 48.5 52.8 62.2 71.9 82.4
MEAN TEMP. 32.6 36.3 40.0 40.9 58.6 68.2
AVERAGE MINIMUM TEMP. (DEG F) 20.1 24.0 27.1 35.5 45.3 54.0
EXTREME MINIMUM TEMP. (DEG F) -22.0 -15.0 -3.0 -3.0 22.0 30.0
DEGREE DAYS
HEAT INC(6 5 DEC. BASE) 992 826 809 482 236 88
COOLING(6 5 DEC. BASE) 0 0 0 8 29 154
PRECIPITATION (INCHES) .63 .75 1.48 2.27 3.28 1.98
SNOWFALL (INCHES) 10.2 11.2 18.3 11.7 2.0 1
JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC ANN RECORD (YEARS)
23.00 19.65 18.35 13.12 9.00 7.20 15.80 5
2026 1731 1616 11 56 793 634 1391 5
.56 .53 .60 .57 .53 .52 .55
ro
rx>
21.87 19.85 20.82 17.07 13.52 11.78
19.96 18.75 20.85 18.23 15.27 13.69
17.24 16.79 19.77 18.39 16.15 14.80
9.10 9.82 13.51 14.91 14.60 13.99
104.0 101.0 97.0 90.0 79.0 76.0 30
88.1 85.7 78.2 68.0 53.6 48.0 30
74.0 71.9 63.8 54.0 41.2 36.0 52.1 30
59.8 57.9 49.4 40.0 28.7 23.9 . 30
42.0 43.0 22.0 10.0 -7.0 -16.0 30
6 0 139 367 690 905 5 540 30
282 234 109 26 0 0 842 30
1.78 1.51 1.55 1.21 1 .01 .67 18.12 30
0.0 o o 1.4 5.0 11 .5 10.2 81.6 30


SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH INSTITUTE
So?r F-'rtrov *.** Cont3f
JAN 2 5 1983
COLOEN, COLORADO 80*0I
COLORADO SOLAR RADIATION DATA With Supplemental Climatic Data
Nolan J. Doesken, Thomas B. McKee, and David M. Ebel
Colorado Climate Center Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523
(303) 491-8545
August, 1982
Climatology Report No. 82-2


3
II. LOCATION OF COLORADO SITES
Solar radiation measurements in Colorado are being taken by several interested groups including the federal government, universities, utilities and private industry. Measurements taken by these various groups are not coordinated, and the data are being used for several different purposes There are no universal standards for the collection of solar radiation, and consequently a variety of instruments are in use, different maintenance and calibration procedures are employed, and the data appear in several formats. These inconsistencies, especially when it is impossible to verify the accuracy of a given data set, present serious problems to users of the data. To minimize the effects of the various inconsistencies, this report presents data from only those locations which meet the following requirements:
1) Data collected with an instrument of similar quality to those used in the National Solar Radiation Network (Flowers, 1979).
2) A routine maintenance and calibration schedule is maintained.
3) Data pass data quality control standards established by the Colorado Climate Center.
Eight sites in Colorado satisfy the above requirements at this time. Two additional sites, Akron and Center, do not meet the instrument quality requirement, but they have long data records and the data quality is adequate. The Golden site does not meet the instrument requirement, but is rigorously monitored and calibrated. The Buena Vista site also fails to meet the instrument quality requirement, but the instrument was calibrated, the data look good, and the site is a good one in close proximity to high mountains. Three stations outside of Colorado: Albuquerque, New Mexico, Cheyenne, Wyoming, and Dodge City, Kansas, were


4
added to show variations across the state line. Table 1 lists the selected stations, and their locations are shown on Figure 1. Earlier solar data from Boulder, Grand Junction, and Grand Lake have been summarized by the U.S. Department of Commerce (1968). These earlier observations, which were frequently used and referenced prior to the completion of the SOLMET data set, fail to meet all of the requirements put forth in this manual, and the data quality is still in doubt.
Climatic data are included for 4 stations with no solar radiation data. This was done to present at least a limited climatic description for areas that were otherwise not represented but which are likely to have an interest and need for solar radiation and other climatic information. The stations Colorado Springs, Durango, Eagle, and La Junta,
were chosen because relatively detailed climatic summaries including
*
wind data are available for those stations.


LATITUDE N40 00 CLIMATOLOGICAL SUMMARY BOULDER* CO
LONGITUDE W105 16 MEANS AND EXTREMES FOR PERIOD 1951-1973 ELEVATION 5420
MONTH TEMPERATURE (*F) PRECIPITATION TOTALS (INCHES)
MEANS EXTREMES MEAN h OF I JUMBER JAYS MEAN GREATEST MONTHLY YEAR GREATEST DAILY YEAR DAY SNOW, SLEET MEAN NUMBER OF DAYS
DAILY MAXIMUM DAILY MINIMUM MONTHLY RECORD HIGHEST 5 DAY RECORD LOWEST Ofi g > 2 MAX. MIN. MEAN MAXIMUM MONTHLY YEAR GREATEST DEPTH YEAR > s .10 or MORE .50 or MORE 1.00 or MORE
90 AND ABOVE 32" AND BELOW 32 AND BELOW a I b | BELOW |
JAN 46.0 21.4 33.7 72 53 9 -22 63 12 0 5 26 2 .63 1.52 62 98 62 08 10.1 25.1 62 15.0 62 08 2 0 0
FEB 48.4 24.1 36.3 79 54 8 -15 51 1 0 3 23 0 .81 1.53 56 1.03 57 26 12.0 25.6 65 12.0 71 21 2 0 0
MAR 52.4 27.0 39.7 79 71 26 -3* 60 3 0 3 22 0 1.54 3.86 70 1.48 52 21 19.5 56.7 70 27.0 70 31 4 1 0
APR 62.3 35.B 49.1 134 60 21 5 59 10 0 0 10 0 2.11 6.85 57 3.31 57 02 12.0 44.0 57 19.0 59 09 5 1 0
MAY 72.1 45. B 59.0 93 54 20 22 54 2 0 0 1 0 3.21 9.27 57 3.37 69 07 1.3 6.6 73 4.0 73 01 6 2 1
JUN 62.0 54.4 68.3 104 54 23 30 51 2 7 0 0 0 2.11 5.34 69 2.65 63 16 .1 2.2 51 5 1 0
JULY B7.9 60.3 74.1 104 54 11 42 72 5 14 0 0 0 1.82 5.20 65 1.49 69 17 0 5 1 0
AUG 66.2 58.8 72.5 101 69 8 43 72 25 10 0 0 0 1.58 7.49 51 3.06 51 03 .0 4 1 0
SEPT 78.1 49.8 63.9 974- 59 6 22 71 19 2 0 1 0 1.66 4.89 61 1.64 71 17 1.7 21.0 71 18.0 71 17 3 1 0
OCT 67.9 40.4 54.1 90 53 1 10 69 13 0 0 6 0 1.20 5.39 69 1.61 11 J05 5.9 49.3 69, lit! j69 12
NOV 54.0 29.0 41.6 79 52 4 -2 51 2 0 2 19 0 1.04 2.15 72 85 70 13 11.7 26.8 72 15.0 72 01 3 1 0
DEC 47.4 23.5 35.5 75 65 4 -16 72 6 0 3 25 1 .68 1.54 51 .55 72 29 10.6 31.4 67 9.0 72 29 3 0 0
fUL. JAN MAY I 1AY MAR MAR
YEAR 65.4 LilfJ LiidJ Lif!U lliJ biU 1 ll2l 1 1 1 l6l [mj L u 1 HU L!U HU Lll I -9 l.56-7 IZi 1 27,0i I70: lUJ L_^J 1 lol 1 1
ALSO ON EARUER DATES
FREEZE PROBABILITIES
PROBABILITY OF LATER DATE IN SPRING (M0/DA) THAN INDICATED
TEMP .10 .20 .30 40 .50 .60 .70 .80 .90
32 5/20 5/14 5/10 5/ 6 5/ 3 4/29 4/26 4/22 4/16
28 5/ 6 5/ 1 4/26 4/23 4/19 4/16 4/12 4/ 8 4/ 2
24 4/26 4/20 4/15 4/11 4/ 7 4/ 4 3/31 3/26 3/19
20 4/15 4/ 9 4/ 5 4/ 2 3/30 3/27 3/24 3/20 3/15
16 4/10 4/ 5 4/ 1 3/28 3/25 3/22 3/19 3/15 3/10
0/ 0 PROBABILITY OF OCCURRENCE OF threshold temp is less than indicated probability
PROBABILITY OF EARLIER DATE IN FALL (MO/DA) THAN INDICATED
TEMP .10 .20 .30 .40 50 .60 .70 .60 .90
32 9/23 9/29 10/ 3 10/ 7 10/10 10/13 10/17 10/21 10/27
28 10/ 3 10/ 9 10/13 10/17 10/20 10/24 10/27 11/ 1 11/ 7
24 10/12 10/20 10/25 10/29 11/ 2 11/ 6 11/11 11/16 11/23
20 10/20 10/27 11/ 1 11/ 5 11/ 9 11/12 11/17 11/21 11/28
16 10/28 11/ 4 11/ 9 11/13 11/16 11/20 11/24 11/29 12/ 5
0/ 0 PROBABILITY OF OCCURRENCE OP THRESHOLD TEMP IS LESS THAN INDICATED PROBABILITY
PROBABILITY OF LONGER THAN INDICATED FREEZE FREE PERIOD (DAYS)
TEMP .10 .20 .30 .40 50 .60 .70 .80 .90
32 185 176 170 164 159 154 149 143 134
28 200 194 190 186 183 160 176 172 166
24 238 227 220 214 208 202 196 189 179
20 250 240 234 228 223 217 212 205 196
16 260 251 245 240 235 230 225 219 211
PRECIPITATION WITH PROBABILITY EQUAL OR LESS THAN
LVL JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
0.05 0.09 0.15 0.40 0.26 0.80 0.47 0.63 0.10 0.08 0.15 0.33 0.12
0.10 0.14 0.22 0.54 0.45 1.09 0.66 0.80 0.20 0.17 0.25 0.43 0.18
0.20 0.23 0.34 0.76 0.76 1.56 0.97 1.05 0.40 0.36 0.42 0.57 0.26
0.30 0.32 0.45 0.96 1.05 1.97 1.25 1.26 0.62 0.58 0.56 0.69 0.37
0.40 0.41 0.56 1.15 1.36 2.37 1.52 1.45 0.86 0.84 0.76 0.61 0.47
0.50 0.51 0.66 1.35 1.69 2.BO 1.82 1.66 1.14 1.14 0.95 0.94 0.57
0.60 0.62 0.81 1.58 2.09 3.29 2.15 1.89 1.48 1.51 1.18 1.07 0.69
0.70 0.76 0.97 1.84 2.57 3.83 2.53 2.13 1.91 1.99 1.46 1.22 0.83
0.80 0.94 1.19 2.18 3.21 4.55 3.04 2.45 2.52 Z.67 1.83 1.42 1.01
0.90 1.26 1.55 2.76 4.30 5.78 3.90 3.00 3.54 3.84 2.47 1.75 1.32
0.95 1.54 1.86 3.22 5.26 6.77 4.61- 3.41 4.55 5.01 3.04 2.01 1.59
MEDIAN PRECIPITATION AMOUNTS (0.50 PROBABILITY LEVEL) IN THIS TABLE DIFFER FROM THE MEANS SHOWN IN THE ABOVE TABLE BECAUSE OF THE METHOD USED IN MAKING THE COMPUTATIONS. THESE VALUES WERE DETERMINED FROM THE INCOMPLETE GAW1A DISTRIBUTION WHOSE CURVE HAS BEEN FOUND TO GIVE BEST FITS TO PRECIPITATION CLIMATOLOGICAL SERIES.


STATION! 03 08*8
MAX TEMP
YR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUC SEP OCT NOV DEC ANNUAL
31 *2.5 *9.3 50.* 39.* 72.6 75.5 89.2 85.2 78.0 64.7 33.7 42.7 63.6
52 *7.9 50.2 *7.8 63.5 71.3 89.6 89.7 87.1 83.1 72.1 48.8 47.5 66,6
53 53.2 *8.3 59.7 37.* 67.6 85.8 89.2 87.* 84.9 70.7 37.9 47.1 67,6
5* 53.* 61.2 *9.2 71.2 72.0 87.2 92.8 88.3 81.1 68.8 59.6 52.8 69,8
35 *2.* *2.5 31.3 67.2 73.9 78.7 91.2 87.5 80.3 71.7 51.8 49.5 65.7
36 *8.3 *1.9 56.1 62.2 75.5 89.9 87.5 85.0 8*.5 72.9 54.1 51.5 67,5
37 39.0 5*.9 53.7 35.5 66,3 81.6 88.6 88.0 78.3 65.0 50.6 56.0 64.8
58 *8.7 51.8 *3.3 57.3 76.9 8*.* 85.3 88.3 80.6 70.8 56.8 48.9 66.1
59 *5.2 *2.3 53.3 60.0 69.5 85.3 86.9 87.0 7*.8 63.7 55.8 31.3 64,6
60 *3,0 38.* 52.* 65.8 72.8 85.3 87.7 88,4 80.6 67.6 57.6 47.4 65.6
61 50.0 52.1 51.0 61.8 71.6 80.6 86.3 85.5 70.6 66.*. 49.7 41,5 63,9
62 39.1 *6.2 *9.6 66.6 7*.* 79.9 86.3 88.2 77.8 71.4 59.0 50.9 65.8
63 36.9 52.9 53.8 65.5 77.0 83.6 91.0 82.6 81.5 72.7 58.1 46.5 66,8
6* *7.5 *3.7 *9.2 62.6 73.9 79.2 91.3 85.3 79.2 70.4 53.6 48.2 65.3
65 *9.9 *5.9 *3.* 6*.7 72.1 78.2 86.2 83.7 68.8 72.5 58.6 50.6 64,6
66 **.8 *3.8 60.6 62.6 77.9 81.* 91.2 85.2 78.2 69.0 56.4 46.3 66.5
67 *9.* 51.5 60.8 65.9 67.7 73.9 85.* 63.6 77.9 70.3 54.6 39.9 65.1
68 *6.7 *8.2 57.7 38.9 69.0 8*.9 86.0 83.4 78.6 70.1 49.8 44.9 64.9
69 *9.* *8.9 *7.3 67.6 7*.3 73.7 89.1 88.7 80.* 52.9 54.4 47.6 64.5
70 *5.7 55.3 *8.5 38.3 7*.6 78.7 86.0 86.5 73.9 58.9 52.0 46.6 63.8
71 *5.9 **.6 53.5 61.1 67.1 8*. 1 86.1 86.3 73.1 63.7 53.7 44.8 63.7
72 *6.3 52.8 61.0 62.7 70.2 82.* 85.2 83.1 76,0 65.2 45.0 40.5 64,2
73 *1.2 *7.0 . 50.* 35.9 69.3 82.8 8*. 3 88.1 73.3 69.9 51.3 46.9 63.4
SUM 1058.* 1113.5 120*.* 1*33.7 1657.7 1886.7 2022.5 1982.6 1793.5 1561.2 1242.9 1090.1 1504.4
YR STATIONl JAN 05 08*8 FEB MAR APR MAY MIN JUN TEMP JUL AUC SEP OCT NOV DEC ANNUAL
51 20.5 26.5 24.5 34.0 *6.0 49.2 60.6 58.8 *8.9 38.5 27.5 20.8 38.0
32 24.0 26.0 24.7 38.* *6.1 59.7 62.0 57.9 5*.0 *2.4 25.5 25.3 40.5
53 31.7 25.3 32.5 33.0 42.7 57.9 62.3 59.8 54.6 44.5 34.3 23.9 41.9
5* 26.2 34.0 25.2 *0.5 44.5 55.8 63.8 61.* 5*.9 *0.1 35.4 26.5 42,4
55 19.6 17.* 25.2 38.3 47.2 51.5 62,0 62,* 52.8 *2.2 26.0 24.4 39.1
56 26.4 19.8 29.3 36.2 48.5 60.0 60.8 59.0 54.2 *3.9 28.4 28.1 41.2
57 16.2 29.3 27.6 31.7 43.8 54.1 63.0 59.2 *8.5 *2.0 29.9 32.2 39.8
58 23.3 27.6 23.6 35.* 51.7 56.1 58.0 61.3 51.0 *1.6 28.3 25.7 40.5
39 19.9 20.9 27.6 33.9 44,6 55.9 56.8 59.0 *5.9 35.5 25.3 26.5 37.7
60 19.3 18.3 28.1 38.7 46.9 56.7 61.* 59.4 52.1 41.4 30.1 23.5 39.6
61 23.7 27.7 29.0 34.5 46.1 54.7 59.5 59.5 44.3 39.4 26.1 19.0 38.6
62 11.4 23.2 24.5 38.9 48.6 53.1 57.8 57.9 49.3 43.6 32.6 24.8 38,8
63 10.0 28.9 28.5 38.2 47.8 56.2 63.0 59.3 55.1 47.4 30.0 20.0 40.4
6* 23.3 20.3 23,2 34.9 48.1 53.7 62.7 57.5 49,5 41.1 30.0 24.6 39,1
65 26.8 19.5 18.2 39.3 44.9 54.7 59.7 57.7 43.0 4|.2 32.8 26.4 38,9
66 18.0 18.8 31.9 3*.* 49,0 53.6 6*.l 57,9 50.7 38.1 29.9 21.9 39.0
67 23.7 24.3 32.0 36.0 43.1 50.5 60.5 57.5 49.7 40.8 28.3 16.4 38.6
68 20.6 24.9 31.4 32.6 42.2 54.* 59.2 56,6 47.9 40.3 27.1 20.4 38.1
69 23.1 24.3 21.9 *0.2 *8.3 50.7 61.5 59.9 52.0 30.7 29.1 25.1 38,9
70 22.0 26.5 25.0 31.9 *7.1 53.2 60.7 60,* 47,8 36.3 31.1 24.7 38.9
71 23.6 21.1 26.9 34.7 41.8 54.0 56.9 58.0 44.7 37.7 28.6 20.9 37,4
72 19.0 27.5 33.9 36.5 43.5 53.7 5*.5 54.9 48.0 37.9 22.9 15.3 37.3
73 17.1 22.6 27.4 30.3 42.4 52.8 55,6 57.3 45.4 39.8 27.8 23.5 36.8
SUM 491.6 554.7 622.1 822.5 1054.3 1252.2 1386.4 1352.6 1144.3 928.4 667.0 539.9 901.5
YR STATIONl JAN 05 08*8 FEB MAR APR MAY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE JUN JUL AUC SEP OCT NOV DEC ANNUAL
51 31.5 37.9 37.5 46.7 59.3 62.* 7*.9 72.0 63.5 51.6 40.6 31.8 50.8
52 36.0 38.1 36.3 51.0 58.7 7*.7 75.9 72.5 68.6 57.3 37.2 36.4 53.6
53 43.5 36.8 46.1 45.2 55.3 71.9 75.8 73,6 69.8 57.6 46.1 35.5 54,8
5* 39.8 *7.6 37.2 55.9 58.3 71.5 78.3 75.0 68.0 54.5 47.5 39.7 56.1
55 31.0 29.9 38.4 52.8 60.6 65.1 76,6 75.0 66.6 57.0 38.9 37.0 52.4
56 37.4 30.9 42.7 49.2 62.0 75.0 7*.2 72.0 69.* 58.4 41.3 39.8 54.4
57 27.6 *2.1 40.7 43.6 55.1 67.9 75.8 73.6 63,* 53.5 40.3 44.1 52.3
58 37.0 39.7 33.5 46.4 64.3 70.3 71.7 7*.8 65.8 56.2 42.6 37.3 53.3
59 32.6 31.6 40.5 47.0 57.1 70.6 71.9 73.0 60.* 49.6 40.6 39.0 51.2
60 31.3 28.4 40.3 52.3 59,6 71.0 7*.6 73.9 66 * 54.5 43.9 35.5 52,6
61 36.9 39.9 40.0 48.2 58.9 67.7 72.9 72.5 57.5 52.8 37.9 30.3 51.3
62 J33 34.7 37.1 52.8 61.5 66.5 72.1 73.1 63.6 57.5 45.8 37.9 52.3
63 40.9 41.2 51.9 62.* 69.9 77.0 71.0 68,3 60,1 44.1 33.3 53,6
6* 32.0 36.2 48.8 61.0 66.5 77,0 71.4 6*.* 55.8 41.8 36.4 52,2
65 38.4 32.7 30.8 52.0 58.5 66.5 73.0 70.7 55.9 57.9 45.7 38.5 51.7
66 31.4 31.3 *6.3 48.5 63.5 67.5 77.7 71.6 64.5 53*6 43.2 34.1 52,8
67 36.6 37.9 46.4 51.0 55,* 62.2 73.0 70,6 63.8 55.6 41.5 28.2 51.9
68 33.7 36.6 44.6 45.8 55.6 69.7 72.6 70.0 63.3 55.2 38.5 32.7 51.5
69 36.3 36.6 34.7 53.9 61.3 62.2 75.3 74.3 66.2 41.8 41.8 36.4 51.7
70 33.9 40.9 36.8 45.1 60.9 66.0 73.* 73.5 60.9 47.6 41.6 35.7 51.4
71 34.8 32.9 40.2 47.9 5*.5 69.1 71.5 72.2 58.9 50.7 41.2 32.9 50.6
72 32.7 40.2 47.5 *9.6 56.9 68.1 69.9 69.0 62.0 51.6 34.0 27.9 50,8
73 29.2 34.8 38.9 *3.1 55.9 67.8 70.0 72.7 59.4 54.9 39.6 35.2 50.1
SUM 775.8 834.4 913.9 1128.7 1356.6 1570.1 1705.1 1668.0 1*70.6 1245.3 955.7 815.6 1203.4
MONTHLY normals OF TEMPERATURE/ PRECIPITATION AND HEATING AND COOLING 1 DECREE 1 DAYS (19*1-70)
JAN feb MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUC SEP OCT NOV DEC ANN
TEMPERATURE 33.0 35.5 38.9 *9.2 58.3 67.2 73.9 72.4 64.0 54.0 *2.0 35.8 52.0
PRECIPITATION 0.77 0.75 1.73 2.31 3.21 2.30 1.75 1.68 1.31 1.50 1.01 0.59 16.91
HEATING DECREE DAY 992 826 809 *82 236 88 6 0 139 367 690 905 55*0
COOLING DECREE DAY 0 0 0 8 29 154 282 23* 109 26 0 0 8*2



STATION!
05 0646
total precipitation
YR JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC annual
51 1.12 1.01 2.40 2.73 1.93 2.63 1.40 7.49 .68 2.77 1.51 1.54 27.41
52 .01 .48 2.26 3.29 4.45 .77 .91 2.19 .49 .42 1.71 .17 17.15
53 .46 .92 1.60 2.22 2.69 1.33 2.64 1.07 .01 .56 1.14 1.17 16.01
54 46 25 1.16 .83 1.33 1.16 1.73 83 1.37 .42 .67 .68 10.91
55 .59 1.41 2.14 .22 2.49 1.88 1.33 1.50 1.05 .56 1.42 .86 15.25
56 .41 1.53 1.59 1.46 3.67 1.90 2.50 2.24 .02 .50 1.83 .60 18.45
57 1.05 1.28 .63 6.85 9.27 .93 .92 1.97 .65 2.48 1.12 .08 27.43
56 .74 .53 2.60 3.19 6.17 2.05 1.99 .62 1.05 .56 .63 .75 19.28
59 1.01 1.29 1.91 2.06 3.73 .64 .62 1.35 3.Cl 2.18 .72 .11 16.65
60 .54 1.04 .72 1.90 3.79 1.03 1.28 .41 .67 2.38 .27 1.27 15.30
61 43 .70 2.68 .73 3.70 2.17 2.31 2.06 4.69 1.04 1.25 .43 22.39
62 1.52 .82 .48 .99 1.99 2.25 2.16 .19 .28 1.09 .84 .16 12.77
63 .96 .40 1.61 .15 1.37 4.62 .69 2.34 2.96 .34 .70 .61 16.95
64 .43 .65 1.48 .86 2.27 1.27 2.02 33 .36 .28 .64 .68 11.47
65 .73 1.19 2.11 2.38 1.42 2.49 5.20 23 2.64 .16 .26 .44 19.47
66 .20 1.33 .31 1.21 80 1.54 .92 .75 2.71 .60 .49 .27 11.13
67 .61 .49 .62 2.10 4.46 4.98 2.97 3.94 1.02 1.58 .73 1.19 24.69
66 .18 .99 .97 1.73 2.27 2.36 1.03 3.46 1.39 .54 .86 .41 16.19
69 29 .22 .53 1.14 8.66 5.34 2.75 .73 .76 5.39 .92 .79 27.52
70 10 .03 3.66 .63 1.17 2.61 1.35 20 3.63 1.09 1.60 .18 16.65
71 .51 1.36 .78 6.01 2.00 .41 1.37 .10 4.21 .72 .56 .66 18.69
72 1.15 .44 .68 1.52 1.22 3.66 2.24 1.79 1.16 1.26 2.15 1.14 18.43
73 1.09 .17 1.74 4.42 4.88 .48 1.14 .32 2.31 .69 1.64 1.13 20.21
SUM 14.41 18.53 35.46 46.64 73.73 48.50 41.87 36.31 36.14 27.63 23.66 15.72 422.80
STATION! 05 0848 TOTAL SNOWFALL
SEASON JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN SEASON
50-51 13.3 9.2 30.7 17.9 T 2.2
51-52 .0 .0 1.5 3.9 17.8 16.0 1.0 7.0 26.8 9.3 T .0 85.3
52-53 .0 .0 .0 2.5 26.7 3.5 5.3 11.6 11.8 24.4 3.0 T 69.0
53-54 0 .0 .0 0 10.3 15.7 6.7 3.4 14.2 6.8 6.5 T 63.6
54-55 .0 .0 0 4.2 4.0 7.5 6.5 21.3 26.0 2.5 T 0 72.0
55-56 0 .0 .0 2.0 14.7 9.2 5.1 25.3 18.8 9.6 .0 .0 84.7
56-57 0 .0 0 2.0 20.5 8.5 15.2 4.0 5.0 44.0 4.0 .0 103.2
57-58 .0 .0 T 1.6 4.6 1.0 11.9 6.4 28.8 16.1 .0 .0 70.4
58-59 .0 .0 .2 3.5 12.3 12.2 16.5 15.9 19.9 32.0 0 .0 112.5
59-60 .0 .0 10.9 14.5 13.6 .5 10.4 21.4 10.5 7.7 1.5 .0 91.0
60-61 .0 .0 .0 4.5 5.5 16.1 9.7 10.6 30.3 6 ^ T .0 85.1
61-62 .0 .0 T , 10.7 13.7 8.6 25.1 12.5 6.6 4.3 0 .0 61.5
62-63 .0 .0 .0 .0 6.9 1.5 15.4 5.6 28.6 1.5 .0 .0 59,5
63-64 .0 .0 .0 .7 4.5 11.2 7.5 12.0 22.1 16.0 0 .0 74.0
64-65 .0 .0 .0 T 11.0 12.5 12.0 25.6 31.7 6.1 .0 .0 98,9
65-66 .0 .0 4.2 .0 2.5 10.2 7.3 23.9 3.8 9.0 2.6 .0 63.5
66-67 .0 .0 0 6.1 8.4 5.2 13.3 7.3 9.8 T 6.3 .0 56.4
67-68 .0 .0 .0 3.1 13.8 31.4 .6 19.9 13.0 15.7 T 0 97.7
68-69 .0 .0 .0 .5 7.5 9.5 6.6 5.3 17.5 T .0 .0 46.9
69-70 .0 .0 .0 49.3 10.8 8.2 2.0 T 56.7 7.5 0 .0 134.5
70-71 .0 .0 1.5 6.2 8.0 4.0 8,0 18.7 11.5 9.3 T 0 67.2
71-72 0 .0 21.0 10.2 3.2 11.7 13.5 6.1 9.9 .7 .0 .0 76.3
72-73 .0 .0 .0 10.4 26.8 19.5 18.5 2.0 14.7 29.8 6.6 .0 128.3
73-74 .0 .0 T T 21.1 16.6
SUM .0 .0 39.3 135.9 268.2 244.3 231.6 275.2 448.7 276.6 30.5 2.2 1841.5
E AMOUNT is wholly or partly estimated.
T TRACE# AN AMOUNT TOO SMALL TO MEASURE.
M ONE OR MORE DAYS OP RECORD MlSSlNGj IF AVERAGE VALUE IS ENTERED# LESS THAN 10 DAYS RECORD IS MISSING. 0 WATER EQUIVALENT OF SNOWFALL WHOLLY OR PARTLY ESTIMATED.
Sale Price: 15 cents per copy. Checks and money orders should be made payable to Department of Cotn&erce, NOAA. Remittances and correspondence regarding this publication should be sent to: National Climatic Center, Federal Building, Asheville, N. C. 28801.
USCOMM-NOAA-ASHEVILLE
Kr X-C
7^6-l9lfe


FACILITY PROGRAMATICS
Due to the complex nature of the program and spacial requirements a unique method of organizing all the information was used. This method is one of scope based concentric analysis. There are three levels of scope here-in. First, the broad scope, which analizes the entire project in block concepts, this looks at large scale constituent parts and their relationships. This scope is called GLOBAL BUILDING. Zooming in on the next scope we look at each constituent part of the later scope. These are referred to as SPHERES, or realms within the GLOBAL BUILDING that contain even smaller parts. These smaller parts are identified and their relationships established. Finally, we zoom in on these individual small parts and examine them in detail. These are called ENTITIES.
Thusly, the GLOBAL BUILDING analysis contains several SPHERES, and each of these contain many ENTITIES. By dividing up the program into the scopes of wide, middle and narrow and being able to examine each, we have the opportunity to clearly understand the complex spacial, functional and design requirements of this facility.
Page 26


SECTION 1: GLOBAL BUILDING
Page 27


BUILDING:
Medical and physiological treatment clinic
SQFT:
16,000
DESCRIPTION:
This facility combines several originally separate fields of health because of their interdependency, according to the philosophy of treatment, and must be worked together programatically, because they contain aspects of incompatibility also.
SPHERES:
A. ADMINISTRATION
B. SOMATIC
C. PSYCHOTHERAPUTIC
D. PUBLIC/CONNECTION/ATRIUM
E. INFRASTRUCTURE
F. CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS
G. SITE
Page 28


SECTION 2: SPHERES
Page 29


SPHERE:
A, ADMINISTRATION
SQFT:
6,000
DESCRIPTION:
This sphere contains offices, reception, research and development and other hurly burly of running a business. This will be the main level and will strongly overlap the sphere, B. PUBLIC/CONNECTION/ATRIUM,being the main connection to the sphere, G. SITE. There will also be other private connections to entities in other spheres.
ENTITIES:
Al. RECEPTION AND WAITING A2. SECRETARY
A3! MALE AND FEMALE PUBLIC RESTROOMS A4. CONFERENCE/PRIMARY LIBRARY
A5. PATIENT DATA ENTRY AREA (to the central computer)
A6. RECORDS
A7. STORAGE
A8. CLOSET SPACE
A9. NEUROMAP (equipment research and design)
A10. OFFICES (ten)
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:


SPHERE:
B, SOMATIC
SQFT:
5,000
DESCRIPTION:
This contains all body working space, equipment and therapy rooms plus the body/mind research and treatment laboratories. It occupies the below ground level because it requires a high degree of isolation in many ways.
ENTITIES:
Bl. MOVEMENT AND SPORTS MEDICINE AREA
B2. CIRCUMFERENCE RUNNING TRACK
B3. THERAPY POOL ROOM
B4. BATH AND DRESSING
B5. BODY WORK ROOMS (eight)
B6. RESEARCH LAB B7. TREATMENT LAB B8. OBSERVATION BOOTH
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
HULL
8ELOU ce.ADE
Page 31


SPHERE:
C, PSYCHOTHERAPUTIC
SQFT:
4,000
DESCRIPTION:
Occupying the upper level, this sphere takes advantage of the utilization of views, sun, light, air and sound modulations.
ENTITIES:
Cl. PATIENT LIBRARY C2. CHILDRENS AREA C3. LARGE CLASSROOM C4. SMALL CLASSROOM C5. THERAPY ROOMS;
TWO GROUP FIVE INDIVIDUAL C6. BIO-FEEDBACK ROOMS (four)
C7. PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENT AREA C8. MALE AND FEMALE RESTROOMS
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:

MBIW
VIBW TO FLAT-TRONS
&
Al
V/EW
FOOT-HILUS
Page 32


SPHERE:
D, PUBLIC/CONNECTION/ATRIUM
SQFT:
1,000
DESCRIPTION:
This is the main component of the building and provides the central focus for all spheres, ideas and exemplary attitudes of the clinic, sphere proximity and circulation modulation and public space. It is the bonding of the spheres as well as a "place" to be.
ELEMENTS:
1. MUCH GLASS AND LIGHT 2 SOUTHERN EXPOSURE
3! OPERABLE ROOF OF GLASS AND OTHER VENTILATION OPTIONS
4. OPEN VOLUME BETWEEN UPPER AND MAIN FLOORS
5. GLAZED SEPARATION BETWEEN MAIN AND LOWER FLOORS
6. THE MAIN, AND ONLY, VERTICAL ACCESS IS HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE RAMPS, USED BY BOTH HANDICAPPED AND FULLY AMBULATORY PERSONS WITHOUT PRIVILEGE OR DISCRIMINATION.
Page 33


SPHERE:
E, INFRASTUCTURE __
600
DESCRIPTION:
This zone contains behind the scenes operations, that only the staff need be aware of, that are necessary for the existance of the building as an organism itself.
ENTITIES:
El. MECHANICAL ROOM AND CHASES
E2. CENTRAL COMPUTER ROOM
E3. ENERGY MANAGEMENT BRAIN CENTER
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
ALL contained m arba
NEAR, &EBLDG-: £?&A71Y fRO/V\ EACH GWBfL cn HER AREA S .
Page 34


SPHERE:
F, CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS
SQFT:
10-20% OF FLOOR AREA
DESCRIPTION:
This comDrises the functional connection network including emergency exit of the building. Used primarily by the staff, it is also well marked for the public use in the event of such an emergency.
Page 35


SPHERE: G, SITE
SQFTI
LOT AREA MINUS FOOTPRINT OF BUILDING PLUS ROOF TERRACES. DESCRIPTION:
North Loading and surface employee parking.
Minor landscaping.
East Minimum side lot setback yard.
South Heavily landscaped people area.
West Surface patient parking.
Minor landscaping.

'NORTH
Page 36
ALPINE


SECTION 3: ENTITIES
Page 37


ENTITY:
Al, RECEPTION/WAITING
SQFT:
300
DESCRIPTION:
This place is where all people come to check in and wait for their particular activity. This entity overlaps with sphere, D PUBLIC/CONNECTION/ATRIM, with only implied separation. Hence, this is a warm, sunny, and well-lit place of comfort to take the edge off any anxiety in waiting.
ADJACENCIES:
D PUBLIC/CONNECTION/ATRIUM F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS A2 SECRETARY
A3 MALE AND FEMALE PUBLIC RESTROOMS A5 PATIENT DATA ENTRY AREA *
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* WARM MATERIALS
* VISUAL ACCESSIBILITY TO SPHERE D
* HOMEINESS
* FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE/WELCOME FEELING
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
IVSM£D/AT^ PRoyQM \jy
<=
RADJEW HEAT PAN/X-S
JMPUBO
Sl;SlNFRONrrAL / sepmnen
xnFT ^^-^~pr7Lf=
RECEPTION)
OOMTIN&
SUN
VISUAL
Contact
Page 38


ENTITY:
A2, SECRETARY
SQFT:
250
DESCRIPTION:
This is a secondary person to the receptionist and requires work space and slight distance from public scrutiny. But because of the close tie to the receptionist they are to be in overlapping realms. Staff can also contact this entity without going through A or Al.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS Al RECEPTION/WAITING A6 RECORDS STORAGE
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* WORK STATION INCLUDING TERMINAL, TYPEWRITER, SHORTTERM FILES, REFERENCE BOOKS, ETC.
* WELL-LIT, DAY OR NIGHT
* ACOUSTICAL ABSORPTION OF PRODUCTION NOISE
* ANTHROPOMETRICALLY WELL-SUITED TO ONE PERSON
* AN ALCOVE FOR CONTINUAL WORK OFF THE RECEPTION AREA
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
RECORDS
Page 39


ENTITY:
A3, MALE AND FEMALE PUBLIC RESTROOMS SQFT:
120 EACH
ADJACENCIES:
D PUBLIC/CONNECTION/ATRIUM
Page 40


ENTITY:
A4, CONFERENCE/PRIMARY LIBRARY SQFT:
300
DESCRIPTION:
Staff conferences and reference source.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* ACOUSTICAL, VISUAL AND SPACIAL ISOLATION
* ACOUSTICAL ABSORPTION
* WELL-LIT ARTIFICIALLY
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
F, CJR10LAT/OY4
Page 41


ENTITY:
A5, PATIENT DATA ENTRY AREA
SQFT:
100
DESCRIPTION:
Alcove off of waiting area, Al, where a few terminals are situated for questioning patients for all pertinent information. These terminals are connected to the main computer system and this information is filed and accessible by appropriate staff.
ADJACENCIES:
Al RECEPTION/WAITING *
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* NOOK-LIKE AREA
* AUDIBLE AND VISUAL ACCESS TO RECEPTIONIST FROM EACH TERMINAL FOR QUESTIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:


ENTITY:
A6, RECORDS SQFT:
150
DESCRIPTION:
Place where any paper records and backups of the computer system are kept in archives.
ADJACENCIES: A2 SECRETARY
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION
* AUTOMATIC CLOSURE OF ORIFICE
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
ST£H_ Poor (Avt0Mat£c> cuoso^jC)
SBceew/
c oNceere
Page 43


ENTITY:
A7, DIVISABLE STORAGE
WT:
100
DESCRIPTION:
General storage space for the staff or office as a whole excluding the public.
Page 44


ENTITY:
A8, CLOSET SPACE(PUBLIC)
SQFT: 25
ADJACENCIES:
A1 RECEPTION/WAITING
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* OPEN ALCOVEISH NOOK FOR HANGING UP WET CLOTHES
* IMMEDIATELY NEAR THE ENTRANCE OF Al.
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
Al^ Ks^eptioH and
ujaitwct-

FJ OROJLhrioM
CLUB\e acs

WS
Page 45


ENTITY:
A9, NEUROMAP (EQUIPMENT RESEARCH AND DESIGN)
SQFT: 2,500
DESCRIPTION:
Research, design and manufacture of electronic equipment for the direct use in the clinic and for outside sales.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS G SITE
A10 OFFICE #1, DR. WILSON
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* IMMEDIATE AND FREQUENT ACCESS TO CIRCULATION, DR.
WILSON'S OFFICE AND LOADING DOCK.
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
^ICL Co#TAW SIMILAR ra9t57R/ST/oN TREArMEffr QjT
INTPifcjO^ UJtlU BE SPARED and BY
NEUPOMAf^
Page 46


ENTITY:
A10, OFFICES (I -> X)
SQFT:
APPROXIMATELY 100 EACH
DESCRIPTION:
These are the offices of all principals. They are their "get-work-done-in-private-space" offices. Those people that require additional settings for working with patients have specific entities for these functions ... i.e. therapy rooms and body workinq spaces, etc.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS
A9 NEUROMAP (FOR A10 I, ED WILSON, ONLY)
B8 LABORATORIES (FOR A10 I, ED WILSON, ONLY)
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* SEE ATTACHED XEROXES DONE BY EACH PRINCIPLE AS TO THEIR IDEAL CONSIDERATIONS
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
oFBclel Aiq>#l Dfr ED tuiLsoMi
pittcr ACCESS
NEc^omap

*1
Bl
6C.
j
VI 37


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uJEST EXPOSURE ^ 5* SEEfOUOVAjiNC, SHEEHS
Page 47



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ENTITY:
Bl, MOVEMENT AND SPORTS MEDICINE AREA
SQFT: 1,300
DESCRIPTION:
This area will be a large open space with movable partitions to isolate changing treatments. The circumference of this space will be covered with multi -positionable mirrors for visual feedback of posture and form training.
ADJACENCIES:
B2 CIRCUMFERENCE RUNNING TRACK B4 BATH AND DRESSING F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS B3,5(F) "BODY WORK AREA"
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* WELL-VENTILATED
* HIGHLY ADJUSTABLE ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABLES SUCH AS:
SPACE, LIGHTING, TEMPERATURE, FLOOR SURFACE, AND MIRROR FEEDBACK
* ACOUSTICAL SEPARATION FROM OTHER ENTITIES AND
SPHERES
* LOW ACOUSTICAL REVERBERATION TIME
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
tS10S7A6iJH- F/* *ED VMRSofc-S.
n
Vfpeo CAYffA pqurf

Page 48


ENTITY:
B2, CIRCUMFERENCE RUNNING TRACK
SQFT:
1,200
DESCRIPTION:
Used by those patients (and even doctors) that consider it a needed part of treatment, it is equipped with strategically placed mirrors and video monitoring systems for the improvement of running form.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS B1 MOVEMENT AND SPORTS MEDICINE AREA D PUBLIC/CONNECTION/ATRIUM(VISUAL ONLY)
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* FIVE FOOT WIDE TRACK WITH ALCOVES FOR STOPPING AND
PASSING
* SEVERAL LANES
* LOW ACOUSTICAL REVERBERATION TIME
* RUBBERIZED FLOOR SURFACE
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
sFbfWfc/AOf jnr*cif>K£F>
Page 49


ENTITY:
B3, THERAPY POOL ROOM
SQFTi
150
DESCRIPTION:
Contains spa for the dunking of people to "loosen them up" before and after body work.
ADJACENCIES:
B3,5(F) CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS B5 BODY WORK ROOMS
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* ARTIFICIALLY-LIT BOTANICAL BEAUTY
* OUTDOOR-NATURE FEELING
* POOL CONSTRUCTED AS ROCK POND WITH WATERFALL FOR
ENHANCEMENT OF STEAM
* SKY-LIKE VAULTED CEILING WITH UNSEEN DIFFUSE LATE
AFTERNOON LIGHT
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
pewAcy
gj zpoftr*
pe/vxv
oration F&t
Booy Ujcpk roowsT)
Page 50


ENTITY:
B4, BATH AND DRESSING SQFTl
300 EACH MALE AND FEMALE DESCRIPTION:
Locker type area with showers, storage cubicals and wash facilities.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS B1 MOVEMENT AND SPORTS MEDICINE AREA
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* WARM SPA-LIKE MATERIALS SUCH AS "BOULDER SPRINGS" (ARCHITECT: PHIL TAB, BOULDER)
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
U/ILL COf^rAlH ANPV'float CeANtNEss/'
.SOFT FLOcsRJNC* ^ &TC.
TlLTO
(oHruLi/ZAfTlQU ENABLBS
SPRAY TO R£AVAu
tv/Tfi )N
usitv-out kjsb. of Dco^ or. CURTAtsJ. ACSO ADfLS TO vAJOofcr A*C> C eAN)/ygs<: ^ gy
ALM6&T CAUp
CJfce.
Page 51


ENTITY:
B5, BODY WORK ROOMS
SQFT:
100 EACH
DESCRIPTION:
Must be equipped with movable and adjustable bed with built-in cabinetry for storage of liniments and such.
ADJACENCIES:
B3,5(F) CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS B3 THERAPY POOL
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* HIGH ACOUSTICAL SEPARATIONS TO KEEP PATIENT NOISE FROM UPSETTING OTHER PATIENTS
* INDIVIDUAL MUSIC SELECTION AND CONTROL
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
T rrrm
ACOUSTICAL ^ACOUSTICAL is£lAT>cH
C&SEV/ AbsoePTWH
cAS//&rj*y

AXiOsrs
AND
Rotates
B£D U6HTtHCr-
RAbiBN't'#.
HEAt-CBIUUC, PkNACi
OCUCRK STOOL/FUMITU^B ALCCV& -STORASH
UJAW* HO//VE-UKE-
ETC,
1//SCJ/SU TSOLATioH
Page 52


ENTITY:
B6, RESEARCH LAB
SQFT:
500
DESCRIPTION:
Spherical and contains all highly esoteric brain machinery. Completely separable from everything.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS B8 OBSERVATION B00TH(AUDI0 AND VISUAL)
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* CONSTRUCTION OF THIS AND ALL LAB AREAS ARE SHIELDED BY BIO-ELECTROMAGNETIC ISOLATION.
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
mm.
Y/SUAU
CONTAcr
A
S/
F
Page 53


ENTITY:
B7, TREATMENT LAB
SQFT:
300
DESCRIPTION:
Spherical and contains all highly esoteric brain machinery. Completely separable from everything.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS B8 OBSERVATION B00TH(AUDI0 AND VISUAL)
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* CONSTRUCTION OF THIS AND ALL LAB AREAS ARE SHIELDED BY BIO-ELECTROMAGNETIC ISOLATION.
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
see sC> lab>
pofc. NOT&
Page 54


ENTITY:
B8, OBSERVATION BOOTH SQFT:
150
DESCRIPTION:
Contains all highly esoteric brain machinery. Completely separable from every thing.
ADJACENCIES:
B6 RESEARCH LAB B7 TREATMENT LAB
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* CONSTRUCTION OF THIS AND ALL LAB AREAS ARE SHIELDED BY BIO-ELECTROMAGNETITIC ISOLATION.

Page 55


ENTITY:
Cl, PATIENT LIBRARY
SQFT:
250
DESCRIPTION:
General core of sphere C with many connections (modulationable) to other sphere C entities. Plus strong connection to sphere D with only implied separation. Houses all books for patient reading in-house and check out. Contains comfortable seating and a table.
ADJACENCIES:
D PUBLIC/CONNECTION/ACCESS F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS C3 LARGE CLASS ROOM C4 SMALL CLASS ROOM C5 GROUP THERAPY ROOMS
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* PLACE TO BE, EVEN WITH NO APPOINTMENT, TO COME IN AND JUST READ ABOUT HEALTH.
* SEE A4.
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
C3
^ £-2.
PAN
^ST^CXS
via sryi^vu
Page 56


ENTITY:
C2, CHILDREN'S AREA
SQFT: 600
DESCRIPTION:
Overall place for child psychotherapy containing sitter area for young children, education computer terminals and alcoves for one-on-one treatment.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS G SITE(R00F GARDEN)
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* LIGHT
* VIEW
* SUN
* MUCH "NOOK AND CRANNINESS"
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
C\
Page 57


ENTITY:
C3, LARGE CLASS ROOM
WTi
400
DESCRIPTION:
For formal lectures and discussions with the public.
ADJACENCIES:
Cl PATIENT LIBRARY
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* MOVABLE SEATING
* CHAIR STORAGE
* BLACKBOARD
* PROJECTION SHELF
* PROJECTION SCREEN
* AUDIO EQUIPMENT
Page 58


ENTITY:
C4, SMALL CLASS ROOM
SQFT:
250
DESCRIPTION:
Informal lecture discussion with public.
ADJACENCIES:
Cl PATIENT LIBRARY
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* MOVABLE SEATING
* CHAIR STORAGE
* BLACK BOARD
* PROJECTION SHELF
* PROJECTION SCREEN
* AUDIO EQUIPMENT
Page 59


ENTITY:
C5, THERAPY ROOMS
SQFT:
2 GROUP AT 300 5 INDIVIDUAL AT 150
DESCRIPTION:
Group rooms are coup!able and internal for promotion of group interaction. Individual are more casual and intimate with views and natural light and ventilation. These can open widely in pairs to form one large room.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS C5 THERAPY ROOMS
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* PARTITIONS FOR ROOM SEPARATIONS MUST HAVE HIGH STC RATING AND MUST OPEN WIDELY.
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:


ENTITY:
C6, BIOFEEDBACK ROOMS
SQFT:
150 EACH
DESCRIPTION:
Ultimate relaxation environment. All separation and environmental modulations apply. Contains special equipment and furniture. Can utilize views.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION
C6 OTHER BIOFEEDBACK ROOMS
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* ROOMS ARE COUPLABLE WITH A SMALLER ORIFICE.
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
bJbJEN pATP7l ^ /*G NtfoeBO
goqr-v ex t£c4.

Page 61


ENTITY:
C7, PSYCH0PHARMAC0L06ICAL TREATMENT AREA
SQFT:
400
DESCRIPTION:
This area is primarily a workshop for developing management skills in daily living for patients that have biological brain disorders and need to learn coping strategies and medication "rituals".
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS G SITE(R00F GARDEN)
DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS:
* SETUP AS A MOCK HOME ENVIRONMENT
* SUN, VIEWS
* CHEERY PLACE
* HOMELIKE ENTRY PROGRESSION OF F SPHERE
DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
Page 62


ENTITY:
C8, MALE AND FEMALE RESTROOMS
WT:
120 EACH ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS
Page 63


ENTITY:
El, MECHANICAL ROOM
SQFTl
300
DESCRIPTION:
All environmental systems machinery.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS
Page 64


ENTITY:
E2, CENTRAL COMPUTER ROOM
sorn
150
DESCRIPTION:
Chilled and isolated.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS DIAGRAMS AND NOTES:
Page 65


ENTITY:
E3, ENERGY MANAGMENT BRAIN CENTER SOFT:
150
DESCRIPTION:
All dials and readouts for inspection and alteration of environment.
ADJACENCIES:
F CIRCULATION/ACCESS/EXITS
Page 66


ZONING ANALYSIS
Page 67


Colorado Center for Bio-behavioral Health
905(+909) Alpine Boulder, Colorado 80302
Applicable Zonining Ordinance==> TITLE 9 LAND USE REGULATIONS
SECTION ITEM PROPOSED USES: Small medical clinic with no nonambulatory patients
Zoning map PRESENT ZONING CLASSIFICATION: CB-E
9-3-1 APPLICABLE ALLOWABLE USES: Medical or dental clinics or offices permitted without special review. ZONE CHANGE REQUIRED? No zoning change required.
9-3-2 MINIMUM LOT SIZE: area: 6000 sqft width: N/A
9-3-2 MINIMUM YARD REQUIREMENTS: front: 20 ft rear: 20 ft side: From interior lot line, 0 ft, but easement may be required and 12 ft if any yard is provided.
Consultation MAXIMUM FAR: Computed via other restrictions.
with city
9-3-2 MAXIMUM HEIGHT: 35 ft BULK PLANES: Are not mentioned.
9-3-2 OFFSTREET PARKING: rqd spaces by use: 1:300 rqd spaces for project: yet undetermined parking permitted in setbacks? No
9-3-10 OPEN SPACE REQUIREMENTS: Bldg 25-35 ft high must use 10% of lot as usable open space.
9-3-22 LANDSCAPING RQMTS: See section 9-3-22, A-F.
9-3-26 FENCES: See section 9-3-26, A-E.
9-3-28 SIGN RESTRICTIONS: See addressing, A-E.
9-8 9-3-13 9-3-15 9-3-17 OTHER SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: See sections following: Solar Access Curb Cuts Parking Parking Stall Requirements Page 68


9-3-18 Parking Area Design Standards
9-3-19 Offstreet Loading
9-3-21 Bycycle parking
9-3-23 Landscape design standards
9-3-25 Sight distance
9-3-27 Illumination
9-3-29 Solar
9-3-30 Utilities
9-3-36 Setback Enchroachments
9-3-37 Easements
9-3-38 Resource Conservation
9-3-39 Trash Storage
Page 69


BUILDING CODE ANALYSIS
Page 70


Colorado Center for Bio-behavioral Health
905 Alpine Boulder, Colorado 80302
Applicable Code Name==> UNIFORM BUILDING CODE, 1982, PLUS SUPPLEMENTAL CITY ORDINANCE NO. 4984
SECTION PAGE ITEM FIRE ZONE: N/A
1001 85 OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION: Group I, Div. 1
1002 85 CONSTRUCTION TYPE: Type II fire resistive
1002 (Table 5-C) 85 MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA: 15,100 If adjacent to open area on two or more sides: 100%+ If over one store: 100%+
1007 86 If sprinklered: 100%+ Increases for fires separations: n/a
1002 85 MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE HEIGHT: Refer to Table 5-D Stories: 3
507 56 Towers, spires, steeples: exceptions for
1003 85 FIRE RESISTANCE OF EXTERIOR WALLS: (see occupancy & construction types) North: 2 hrs less 5 ft, 1 hr elsewhere South: same, refer to table 5-A East: same West: same
1005 86 WINDOWS REQUIRED IN ROOMS: Window area: not less than 1/10 floor area
1005 86 VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS: Natural/mech Refer to sectgion 605.
4301 Refer to Table 17-A 596 FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS: Exterior bearing walls: 4 hrs Interior bearing walls: 2 hrs Exterior non-bearing walls: 4 hrs Permanent partitions: 1 hrs
1902 116 Structural frame:
4303 597 Refer to Table 43-A
1706 97 Vertical openings: 2 hrs
1904 117 Floors: 2 hrs
4305 599 Refer to Table 17-A.
1906 117 Roofs(refer to Table 17-A): 1 hr
1903 117 Exterior doors:
Page 71


504
1716
3202
1008
1901
1902
1905 1904
1906 Refer 3301
3303
3303
3303
3303
3303
3321
3321
52 Exit doors & frames:
105 Mezzanine floors(area allowed):
530 Roof coverings:
86 Boiler room enclosure: 1 hr
116 STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS:
116 Framework: refer to chapter 24, 26 & 27
117 Stairs:
117 Floors:
117 Roofs:
to Table 17-A Partitions:
543 EXITS: Chapter 33 VBC
Occupancy
Load = floor area / 80
545 Number of exits required: 2 per floor
546 Minimum width of exits: LOAD/50 distributed among all exits
(+ 50% for above floors)
546 Exit separation arrangement
546 Maximum allowable travel distance to exit: 150 ft
With sprinklers: 200 ft
547 Exit sequence(through adjoining or
accessory areas): Refer to subsection E.
564 EXIT DOORS:
Minimum width & height: 3 ft wide
6 ft 8 inches high (44 inches wide for wheelchairs)
Maximum leaf width: 4 ft
Swing: Open into direction of travel.
Refer to 3304.
Change in floor level at door: Floor or landing each side of door.
564 EXIT CORRIDORS: Refer to 3305.
Required width: 44 inches Required height: 7 ft Dead end corridors length: 20 ft max, if allowed
Openings: 1/4 inch wire glass in steel frame.
Page 72