Citation
Little Bear Lodge

Material Information

Title:
Little Bear Lodge
Creator:
Braun, Marianne
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
179 leaves in various foliations : illustrations, maps (some folded), plans (some folded) ; 29 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Youth hostels -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Rocky Mountain National Park ( lcsh )
Restaurants -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Rocky Mountain National Park ( lcsh )
Restaurants ( fast )
Youth hostels ( fast )
Colorado -- Rocky Mountain National Park ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references.
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Architecture and Planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
Marianne Braun.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
16686851 ( OCLC )
ocm16686851
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1987 .B687 ( lcc )

Full Text
1
wnwg


LITTLE BEAR LODGE
An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Architecture and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture
MARIANNE BRAUN Spring 1987
AL


The Thesis of Marianne Braun Is approved
Robert Kindlg, Committee Chairman
University of Colorado at Denver
Date


TABLE OF CONTENTS
------------------------------------------------------------- PAGE
INTRODUCTION - 1
THESIS STATEMENT 2
BUILDING TYPE 3
HISTORY OF THE AREA 5
PARK POLICY 10
ZONING 12
THE APPROVAL PROCESS 13
THE REALITY OF THIS PROPOSAL 14-
BUILDING CODES 15
CLIMATE 22
SITE 38
CURRENT ACTIVITY PATTERNS 4-1
ACTIVITY PATTERNS ENHANCED BY LITTLE BEAR LODGE 42
GUIDELINES FOR THE DESIGN OF A YOUTH HOSTEL 44
SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS SUMMARY 45
SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS (BY AREA) 46
USING A PATTERN LANGUAGE 70
THE QUALITY OF SPACES ?1
FOOTNOTES 75
BIBLIOGRAPHY 77
DRAWINGS 79
APPENDICES
80


1
LITTLE BEAR LODGE
The building I will design is a 20,00 sq. ft, restaurant and small youth hostel in the tradition of the American National Park Lodge system. It will be located at Bear Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.
In designing this building, I will create a transition experience for the visitor entering the wilderness.


2
THE THESISt
The most magical moments in life seem to be fragile and shortlived. They can be the few minutes between dark and light called dawn or twilight. They also can be the few weeks each year that are my favorites.. spring and autumn. There is value in honoring these times. Like the slight widening in the oath or a turn along the way, they are times to cause and reflect about what comes next. Without these causes, man goes headlong into the new experience without that gentle, quiet moment, so necessary to bridge the abruptness inherent in shifting experiences. These transitions are the true gateways from one dace, time or csychic state into another.
A lodge is the threshold between civilization and wilderness.
It is that comfortable point of balance that allows peocle to pause and take their time to change from their everyday state of mind into the timeless ways of the wilderness.
The primary issue that my thesis will address is the design of a small lodge which will act as a balance coint and gateway into the wildness of Rocky Mountain National Park.


3
THE BUILDING TYPEs
During the past I have travelled extensively through the National Parks in the United States and Canada. In this process, I have discovered a type of architecture which, as far as I am aware, is unique to the American West that is, the Grand Lodges of the National Parks. Among these are Old Faithful Inn, Yellowstone Lake Lodge, Many Glacier Hotel, and Mac Donald Lake Lodge. Each is different in it's own way but each addresses the same issue, the incorporation of a grand building into even more grand natural surroundings.
In exploring these parks I also ran across smaller lodges hidden away near lakes or in less visited destinations.
Although not nearly as grand, some of these smaller lodges were equally striking aesthetically, while serving a different need and clientele. (I'll call them Destination Point Lodges.) They generally sheltered fewer Deople but had a large food service area which catered to families or visitors who were either camping or staying in another hotel but had chosen to visit that location during the day. They also often included services such as boat or horse rental. Many were also trailheads for backpackers and climbers.


u
The third building- type I discovered was trie Youth Hostel.
The quality of these lodgings differed greatly from luxurious and centrally located to very rustic and remote, but the purpose remained the same, to provide very low cost lodging for international travellers who were willing to share a room with others in order to save money,
My proposal is for a Youth Hostel and Restaurant. That is, lodging conditions would be primitive with shared rooms and a few family rooms as found in many International Hostels, There would be a large food service system which would be able to feed various numbers of visitors who might not be staying at the hostel itself. Housing for those managing the facility would also be provided.
The site for my project is at Bear Lake in the southeast portion of Rocky Mountain National Park. It is at the end of a road rather than on Trail Ridge Road, therefore giving it "destination" status according to my definition. It is a trailhead for many hiking: trails and, since the road is maintained in the winter, it is accessible for cross-country
skiing- and winter mountaineering


HISTORY OF THE AREA
5
The history of Bear Lake is directly related to that of Estes Park and the surrounding area.
The first known human visitors were Early Man (also Known as
1
Paleo Indians) Game was plentiful at plains level to the East and they hunted mammoths and an early larger type of bison. They did not actually inhabit the mountain regions, but evidence has been found to show that they used the Trail Ridge area as a path from the east to the west side of the mountains.
As time passed, the mountains became used more as hunting
grounds. At this time, very primitive systems of game runs
were built by the hunters. The walls were constructed of
rocks piled on top of each other and were used to direct
game towards hunters armed with spears, located hidden
2
towards the end of the runs. There are numerous game runs in the nark, mostly in the Trail Ridge area, and they aopear to have been used and slowly built up over thousands of years.
The Ute Indian tribe is the one most intimately connected with the area. Between 650 and 1000 AD they established


6
their priority in the area and their territory spread over the entire western slope of Colorado, into Utah, as far as *
3
Wyoming and New Mexico and onto the Eastern plains. They were nomadic hunters and gatherers who wintered together in small bands at lower elevations and split into smaller family groups during the summer to hunt the plentiful game both on the plains and in the mountains. Grand Lake and Estes Park were both used as summer gathering areas. In the springtime, all the Utes came together near Grand Lake to participate in the annual Bear Dance.
Around 1680 horses were introduced to the Utes by the Spanish and their way of life changed dramatically.
Their naturally nomadic ways were facilitated and they were able to roam even farther than they had before. During this time they became warlike and conducted raids on other tribes, primarily to acquire more horses.
The Arapaho arrived in the area around 1790 from the northern
5
areas of Minnesota and North Dakota. They were bison hunters and settled along the front range. At this time the Continental Divide became the symbolic division between the Utes to the West and the Arapaho to the East and battles were
6
fought to establish territory and protect prime hunting grounds.


7
The downfall of the Indians was swift and dramatic. In 1858
gold was discovered in Eastern Colorado and by 1878 the
7
Araoaho had been removed entirely from Colorado. Similarly, when gold was found in the San Juan Mountains in 18731 the Utes were virtually all removed by the 1880's. The nomadic lives of these tribes was completely destroyed when they were forced to stay on reservations.
In the 1880's fur traders and trappers shared the land
with the Indians. Mostly of Canadian origin, the traopers
8
lived like Indians and frequently took Indian brides.
They thrived for the few years when beaver and other fur products were popular in Europe, but their way of life was a relatively short period in the history of the area.
The Rockies were first explored formally by Rufus Sac:e in 9
l8^1-^3 When gold was discovered in the area, prospectors
from the East flooded in, and with them came Joel Estes. He
started out as a prospector himself, but soon realized that
more money was to be made by providing meat to the other
10
miners and to the citizens of Auraria/Denver. In i860 he established large claims to the Estes Park Valley and brought his family there to ranch. They ran a heard of cattle there and also harvested the plentiful elk and deer


8
to be sold in markets at lower elevations. Winters were
hard for the Estes family and when the very wealthy Earl
of Dunraven arrived with a vision of owning the whole valley,
Estes sold his holdings and moved to Southeastern Colorado to
ranch In a more hospitable climate. Dunraven envisioned
the area as a hunting resort which wealthy easterners or
11
Europeans could visit during the summer. In 1877 he built the Estes Park Hotel (also known as the English Hotel) and started his empire.
At this time an adventurous lady named Isabella Bird arrived
12
and spent some time in the region. She stayed at the Evans Ranch in a small cabin and explored the area in her spirited way.
Long's Peak had been scaled for the first time in August
13
of 1868 by William Byers, John Powell and party, but Isaoella Bird became the first woman to climb it, being partly dragged up it by a local character named Rocky Mountain Jim. Her letters to her sister have been published as A Ladle' s Life in the Rocky Mountains and make interesting reading.
Visitations to the area increased during this time and lodges sprang up throughout what is now the Park. Wealthy eastern


10
PARK POLICY
The official policy of Rocky Mountain National Park has
fluctuated during the years as opinions on the best tactics
for wilderness conservation have changed and as the full
impact of automobile travel was felt at the 1920 opening of
Fall River Road and the 1930 completion of Trail Ridge Road.
Use of the park began to cater less to the needs of visitors
who stayed for awhile and began to be more centered around
those visitors in cars who stayed only a few days and
preferred to camp. The Impact really began to be felt
during the post-war tourism boom and in 1956, Mission 66
was begun, a 10-year plan designed to make the park a more
16
enjoyable experience for visitors in automobiles. The official policy became to buy out all private land holdings in the park and to remove or destroy the old structures. All private lodges were forbidden in the park. Three Visitor's Centers were built during this time to be used as educational centers for tourists. Camping grounds were built to facilitate car camping. There was a strong policy to cret all private lodges out of the park and into Estes or Grand Lake, which was generally approved by conservation groups such as the Colorado Mountain Club. The Estes Park Trail Gazette published an editorial which stated "a hundred people living
at a lodge create less confusion, less muss and fuss, than
17
100 camping out."


11
In the mid 60s a Master Plan was drawn up for Rocky Mountain
National Park (See Appendix B) clarifying the goals and policys.
In 1982 a Development Concept Plan (See Appendix D) was
published for the Bear Lake area. In January, 198^
a plan to designate 238,000 acres of the park as wilderness
(as defined by the Wilderness Act of 196^) was proposed. The
plan was submitted and public hearings were held. (See
Appendix C) It was approved in theory, however Congress
has not yet acted. Currently, the thrust of the Park policy
is to act as if the area is wilderness, so no new roads are
planned. Although the natural environment of Rocky Mountain
National Park is a fragile one which certainly deserves to
be treated gently, the designation of 91# of wilderness area
throws virtually all the visitor usage onto a relatively
small area. The Bear Lake road is extremely overused at
this time. On a typical summer day in 197^, ^,280 vehicles
carrying approximately persons each (approximately 15,000
IS
per day) passed along Bear Lake Road. Traffic congestion
and illegal parking became a large problem and in 1978 a
shuttle bus was introduced and significantly helped the 19
situation


12
ZONING
There is no formal zoning in the National Parks, Federal
land is exempt from local zoning except in the area of water
20
usage and sewer treatment. Each project is developed and proposed based on appropriateness and sensitivity to the site.
The project must be consistent with the Comprehensive Plan written and published for each park. These plans cover such issues as percent of area to be set aside as undeveloped wilderness, location of future development, preservation of historical buildings or archaeological sites, etc. The plans also divide the parks into different usage zones.


13
THE APPROVAL OF PROPOSED PROJECTS IN THE NATIONAL PARKS
1. A General Development Plan is proposed, outlining the scope and character of the project being initiated,
2. Public Hearings are held to determine positive or negative reactions,
3. A more complete design is submitted and is either approved or denied.
If the project is approved, it is given a priority-
status and is constructed as budget monies become 21
available


THE REALITY OF THIS PROPOSAL
My proposal goes against all the park policies published to date. No development of this kind at Bear Lake would be approved. Although I believe that lodges are a conservative approach to the wilderness, there are many who would disagree. I chose the site purely for aesthetic and emotional reasons involving the character and visual beauty of the land and because it is the place where I see my building. I don't presume to try to justify it's practicality or impact on the environment. The convenient fact of a Thesis project is that it is the one point in an architect's career where he can make all his own decisions based purely on what he feels will enhance and support his design concept. I therefore decided to build my lodge here, where my heart tells me to, as a purely aesthetic choice.


15
BUILDING CODES
The nolicy of the National Parks is to use the Uniform Buildinm Code as their reference document unless other codes are more apnronriate for specific climates or regions. For this thesis, I will use the UBC.
PROJECT NAME:
Little Bear Lodere LOCATION:
Bear Lake, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado APPLICABLE CODE NAME:
Uniform Buildinm Code (198,5 Edition)
DATE:
1/12/87
ITEM LOCATION
1 FIRE ZONE unknown
2. OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION Mixed Occunancy:
PRINCIPAL OCCUPANCY: Restaurant (Group A-3)
OTHERS: Hotel (Oroun E-l)
3. OCCUPANCY SEPARATIONS REQUIRED:
Restaurant to Hotel = 1 hour
i*. CONSTRUCTIC"'-' TYPE.
Tyne ITT Heavy Timber
IN
CODE
501
1201
Table 5


16
MAXIMUM ALLOWAILD "LOOP AH^Ai 135
Tf gi 1acent to onen area on two or more sides*
1 a, ^ ,
lx over ora story* 27,coo If sortn> 1 ered v.nlin 11ad
f'- / i r - it .i :TTnT''' 1 r-'H .
A.-va.nji-. Alji.L jA-L^.- . ,x < :
'ahi a eC
SO 6 A
50 5r?
AO''
Table 5U
leet* 65 Stories* A3 3 2* R1 3
7. FIRS RESISTANCE CF EXTERIOR WALL
A31 2 hours if less than 5ft, from other bide: Table 5A
^ i 11 11 A(-0ft, " " "
Rl* 1 hour " " " 5ft. "
8. OPENINGS IN EXTERIOR WALLS
A3* protected if less than 10ft. from bldg Table 5A not permitted if less than 5ft. from bide:
Rl*
II H
9. WINDOV/S REQUIRED IN ROOMS:
1/10 floor area of room or 10 sq. ft. whicheverl205A is bigger
10. ENCLOSED OR SEMI-ENCLOSED COURTS SIZE REQUIRED*
3 x 10* if 2 stories U x 12* if 3 5 x 14 1206c
11. MINIMUM CEILING HEIGHTS IN ROOMS*
7ft.6in. 1207A
12. MINIMUM FLOOR AREA OF ROOMS 70 sq.ft.
1207B


17
13. FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTSi
Exterior bearing wallsi ^ hours 17A
Interior bearing wallsi 1 hour
Exterior non-bearing wallsi hours
Structural framet 1 hour or H.T.
Permanent Partitionst 1 hour or H.T.
Vertical Openings! 1 hour
Floorsi H.T.
Roofsi H.T.
Exterior Doorsi 3/^ hour 21033
Inner Court Wallsi 1 hour 1206C
Mezzanine floorsi 1 hour 1716
(Area less than 1/3 area of room)
Roof coverings! H.T. 17A
Boiler Room Enclosure! 1 hour 1212
STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS!
Framework i H.T. 2106B
Stairs i H.T. 2106J
Floorsi H.T. 2106C
Roofs! H.T. 2106D
Partitions H.T. 21061


18
15. EXITSi
OCCUPANCY LOAD BASIS (sq.ft./occupant)
Occupancy type Basis Actual load 3303A
Restaurant 15sq.ft./occupant
Hotel 200sq.ft./occupant
NUMBER OF EXITS REQUIREDi
If restaurant holds more than 50 3, exits 3303A
" " " less 500 exits
Hotel 2 exits Minimum width of exitsi
total occupant load distribute between exits 3303B 50
400 =
Restaurant! 50 8 ft.
40 =
Hosteli 50* 36in. (always the minimum)
Exit separation arrangement!
must be less than 150ft. from any place 3303D
If sprinklereds 200ft. 3303D
Allowable exit sequence!
OK to pass through 1 other room 3303E
EXIT DOORSi
Minimum width 3ft. 3304F
Maximum leaf width 4- ft. 3304>F
Width required for number of occupants! 3ft. 3304a


19
EXIT CORRIDORS:
Minimum width A3 ^in. R1 3^in. 3305B
Recommended to have exit at feach end of corridor 3305B
Dead end corridors OK if less than 20ft. 3305E
Wall fire resistance required lhr. 3305G
Doors and frames fire resistance 20min. 3305H
16. STAIRS
Minimum width: ^in, occ load of 50 or more 3306b
36in. occ load of ^9 or less
Maximum riser allowed: ?in. 3306c
Minimum tread allowed: llin.
Winders allowed in Hotel portion 3306D
Landings are equal in width to the width of the stair width 3306G
Maximum distance between landings: 12ft. 33061
Minimum distance between landings to keep 3306p
headroom of 6ft.6ln.
HANDRAILS:
Required at both sides in A3* not R1 3306J
If stair is greater than 88in. wide, an 3306J
intermediate rail is required.
Railings must be 30-3^in. above stair nosing 3306J


20
Blausters are required 3306J
Maximum post spacing allowed is such that 1711
a 6in. ball could not pass between them
Handrails may not return to wall ends
Handrails must extend at least 6in. beyond 3306J
stair
Stair to roof is required if Bldg, is over 330^0 ^ stories high.
Stair to basement can't end at same landing 3306J
as descending stairs
No stair access to roof is required 3306J
No access to roof is required. 3306m
A 2hr. stair enclosure is required 3309B
A 2hr. rating is required for horizontal exits 3308B RAMPS t
Maximum slopei It 12 3307C
Handrails are required if slope exceeds 1*15 3307E
Exit signs (lighted) are required 3313A
BALCONY RAILSi
Required if balcony is more than 30in. from 1711 floor
Required heighti ^2in. 1711
Blausters are required (must not be able to 1711 pass through lOln. ball)


21
17 TOILET ROOM REQUIREMENTSi OCCUPANCY Hotel
Comfort Station Restaurant
GUIDELINES USED Hostel Guidelines RMNP Bear Lake Plan Timesaver Standards
FIXTURE COUNT REQUIREMENTSi
Comfort station restaurant hostel
MEN i
lavatories 3 8 4
water closets 7
urinals 2 3 2
WOMENi
lavatories 4 10 k
water closets 6 16 5
Drinking Fountain requirements! 1 per floor, 605
1 must have spout 33in. from floor 511C
Showers required 6
HANDICAPPED REQUIREMENTS!
60in. circle must be free of incumbrances in 51 IB n
toilet room
A space 42in. wide x 48in. long must be left in front of 1 WC stool.
Doorways to Toilet Room must be 32in. wide
There must be i|4in. clear on either side of the door


I
CLIMATE
Bear Lake is located on the Eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains within miles of the Continental Divide and is considered to be in a high montaine ecological zone.
Wind data is not measured in the area however winter
22
wind studies have been conducted on Trail Ridge Road at the Alpine Visitors Center. Gusts up to I37mph were recorded. On Long's Peak, a trust of 201mph was recorded in 197*4-.
RECORDED WIND DATA PROM TR3 WIND STATION
J F M A M Period
average mph 36 31 34 23 26 30
#days w gusts 15 11 17 5 9 57
^days w gusts 62 39 6l 20 32
peak gusts 122 108 115 113 111 122
Rangers have estimated gusts at Bear Lake as up to 130mph. Summer winds are gentler estimated at approximately 30mph. All winds come down the glacial valley from the west.
I
I


23
Monthly temperatures, precipitation, heating and cooling
days as averaged from 1941 to 1971 (Estes Park weather Station)
23
are as tabulated:
AVERAGE MONTHLY WEATHER FIGURES JFMAMJJASOND
Mean
Temperature:
27.1 28.3 31.1 40.0 48.4 56.2 62.2 60.9 53.8 45.5 35.1 29.5
Precipitation Normals:
.55 .59 l.oo 1.72 2.15 2.05 2.29 1.93 1.20 1.02 .78 .59
Heating Degree Day Normals:
1175 1028 1051 750 515 269 105 138 336 605 897 1101
Monthly Annual Cooling Decrree Day Normals:
000005 18 11 0000
Hear Lake is at N4462'30", W10537', Altitude 9475'
25
SOLAR TIME
Altitude 6AM 7AM 8AM 9AM 10AM 11AM NOON
Azimuth 6PM 5PM 4pm 3PM 2PM 1PM
Dec. 21 3 11.5 17 21.5 29
52.5 S1T5 2FT5 1575 0
Equinox 10.5 21 31 38.5 44 46
90 79.5 68 55 40 21.5 0
June 21 l£.5 ZLjS 22*1 58.5 66.5 _62
107.5 98 88.5 76 60.5 36.5 0


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DAY OF MONTH TIME OF OBSN 24 HOURS ENDING AT OBSERVATION at time OF OBSERVATION DEPTH OF SNOW ON THE GROUND' IN. NEW SNOW DEPTH 1/2 OF IN. WATER EQUIV. OF NEW SNOW 1/100 OF IN. WATER FROM RAIN 1/100 OF IN. NEW SNOW TYPE BY 6 HR PERIODS (1) l/ > fN 00 t X CN § 8 £ £ INTENSITY BY 6-HR PERIODS (2) in £ CN 00 V r- ** On
MAX F MIN F AIR TEMP. F 20 CM BE LOW SNOW SFC C
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45
i 1 l 7A 7 4 ^7 -7 o r - 0 5 72 Q.O. O.OQ i
2 i ** 0 5 7- 3k j>o 30 - 07 7 / _JLPl PlPl
3 ! 1 H 2 33' 25 3 2 iSLi 7 C op _oc a
4 5 74 -027 6,4 00 0.7 c
5 oS'ov 3 4 ^>C 0 7 67 0.') -O n . a
/ 6 1 i- 3Q 0/7 cn o.o -OH a
7 C 9 3C' 3q 21 23 v r 07 0.0 -jo_Q.
8 01 HT 3 4 >7 37. - ot bO Op CD
9 0^01 30 - 0 5 b(b 3.0 ,o
1 0 10 1? 30 ^0 24 - c 0 8 3 0
1 1 O^H 1 3J3 z3 - 05? 4 3 .0.5
1 2 on ? 4 67
1 3 C 1 33 77 1 0 26 -o 1 4 a 11 75 i q 20 - 10 0 0 .00
1 5 01 44 20 22, - 10 64 3,5 /- I
1 6 C 3 76 37 1 2 l 5 - 11 fc 1 7 i C >1 73 >4 73 - 04 70 >.5 ,70
1 8 osoa psi / 6 i -i - 1 O 7) 3.0 .70
1 9 Vo ) 4 1 V 7 ( I C' Ph
20 0 5 H b 31 i 4 l 4 - i 7 / 7 ,0 2
2 1 nQ a^y a"a l 3 P>8 -on 70 O.0 .00
22 3 ?S3 33 Ob 48 - 07 o.o .0 0
23 0?a a 3 k 20 30 - oo 6 8 O.o .00
24 O'. 3 7 31 27 30 - 0 0 b 7 OP ,00
2 5 of\i,a 77 SO -Ofc 6 6 0\(! ,oT>
26 : 6 5 J 07 3 O / on 0
27 5 3 7 $ i - b£ * 0 <> C o
28 Oil £ 1 4(5 - os 6.3 op 29 0 7 2k 4 1 33 3 1 -04 0| op ,0 6
30 0? 50 40 37- 3 6 -04 fco Do ,oo
3 1 sa -OH £>!? 0.0 .O/)
SUMS -. (1) New snow types 1 = aggregates or c 2 - other (interrm
MEANS -
SNOW STUDY PLOT
ANEMOMETE B
ELEVATION LOCATION
rimed crystal"


29
;fe
SNOW CONDITIONS
rrpcx
-f C re-'xxlidL
i- goo 2^3IM.
I KCO- VH S- ~7< t:tr>
STRATIC TEST SLO FROM KEY13). 1 SIGNIF (CAN UfilED 20 2 SNOW St EXPOSURE UPPER N E S W iR APHY PES ONLY ZHOOGt MOST T LAYER(S) DOOM BELOW J R FACE OF SLOPE LOWER N E S W £ -7 z> V) Uf a o z 5 V) -to tu h* (41 LSI 0 AVAL HAZARC: 0*none 1 low 2*bor derline 3=high AM PM 5 CLOSURES REMARKS (Use for clarifying statements about any entries, noting any unusual or interesting events. Please limit remarks to one line per day.)
>f 7 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
1 . _J
CjoJLsy\- (3")
1 / Q/n/iu M/, /vl*3 \JJ S-/Q
'svJiiv'U ^ \ J' w c\ >v- OAv VA
1 Irv f- V Jp-7/;>< Ay CpL
P>ciaHij rJoudcf 'J SuJ unnds O'10. gurries
1 nfriHui cl0ud-cA urf 5 irft-'u'cUAz. (*r
1 clcuxdd Lv i^inrlS 40-30 rnpl^ OL
1 mrt.nCCLoi i UnndS 0-0 rvrph (4.
1 r v.10-20 A/
>- > / J i /%r
1 . unhc/5 £>-.5 omh l/LA 4*3
J siuutm. urmcLS f-5 mph
1 CXernck, m^d. Ca-Q-sr, (fk
curfACaii, CoGsri J (21
4 mrCnCapf. caArn
I Ppstfllj Cj.frUJlLU UMSWjLa /0 -an nuph (b> ) 03.
1 f^W'4'tio Clo^StA C:Ccc-^., unl irl £~/0 CA
i OMli( cioiA^J Ulhds G-*> rr\ oU C3^
1
oOi'dtjLi cioudu ujinds 5~>S mph
! i j J i ~ P Sl^fvfOM UT-ihr/3 O'S
i i coaHu, cloudu i(J. inM5 0~5 ry\p^ (A/
i ! 1 1 (J S s r I > -u Ch&7rn<3~ v/.Vt^S \3-
1 ! . LA/. 10 twl .2/7 y U^2/|r
1 1 i CV/Se'Is. ^-/T /?- ) | i \ | CV,J.C i -SivUinv. U/^c/5 5^20 mph
l 1 ^Unnv i/U/hrl3 5'/5/PPh
I hZ/i'A A'/< iu'^iC'L. /O')
[i( Intensity (3) Stratigraphy x (4) Test skiing (5) Closures
R,in 1 ho, 2 = graupel, 3 ice. 4 large wet grains. 5 = 1 no cracking 1 road closed. 2 ski area partly or
'Qht £ light other Innse rohpcmnlpcc nrainc fi = eliieft 7 *= Irorh *) * ** *------------*


KEYPUNCHING ONLY col
JO,
c * i a
____A r *-i1----------v,AM
p c
MONTHLY SUMIVIA!
I r* I <£> I m
I
I n I cx I -
k
TEMPERATURE
DAY OF month TIME OF OBSN. 24 HOURS ENDING AT OBSERVATION at time of OBSERVATION DEPTH OF SNOW ON THE GROUND* IN. NEW SNOW DEPTH 1/2 OF IN. WATE R EQUIV. OF NEW SNOW 1/100 OF IN. V.A ; : f U / Pi : w. fj : 1 NTENSITY 1 BY 6-HR
MAX F MIN F AIR TEMP. F 20 CM BELOW SNOW SFC C : i y. 1/1r// 9 ?. Ol K. \ i j rtnlODb f (2) £ ?! s a i i s i 00-0 DIR XT 361
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 >. 3/ -j>. V- 41L 2 43 44 45|4 6 47
1 -)3CC 3b ~?n c_a^ 36 .-4b... i s
2 n :t h \ Ke a - i
3 cA HO 3 7 lb lb -Ob _22 33,0 410
4 a i 5 0 J |9 - 0 7 S4 _A0 £LS0
5 Cl 5b Jb *0 P-b -07 J0 -JLCl
6 b % 3 <1 9 4 3 2 -03 72 _4lo
7 Pi 4C 3b 30 31 - cl- 74 _0£. *
8 "m \ 3 b oPl 30 Hj JU CO ffO
9 > c hci - ft4
l
1 0 0135 3A 3 0 3 0 - os 7/ _x_ -Jin. i
1 1 OSJ? 3^ _3l 30 - 0 b 11 0.0 -4 O
1 2 CIS 3 3 4 3 0 - 05 -.7./- 4 -jj *
1 3 014 4 3? 30 30 - OS ts as i_
1 4 O 74 & 5 o / b l 8 -o 1 5 0 is \ 0~b 111 ab un. til 0.D
1 6 - 5 3U - pb 4 o ...P-b ; .o>
1 7 3b? a & 33 ~(yb l.U
1 8 O $4/ 33 -on 3 9_S
1 9 o 20 30 -07 ,_L_ .(5 0
2 1 0 9 39 34 2b _3l 3i b b 0.0 JO
2 2 2 3.4 44 ziii _Oo
2 3 08o i -LL ^M2 -04 b 1 b P
24 'JO -4V LO cr_ Pt.7 *
2 5 l 26 0 SO __3 4 _£2 ^ ^g. 2 7 of \ ^ 3.J i_^4 -24 l .o .O 1
2 8^ -4-4- -cPb _s$ > 0/9 i i i
2 9 0^-05 3 0.0 po i 1 j t
3 0 ^>hc > 3b -CcS _Q6 4S.C i
3 1 - 1 i - * 1 1
SUMS - 11) New snow types re cord jsters ate) rim unsta
MEANS - 1 * aggregates or cli 2 - other (intermed
SNOW STUDY PLOT fc LfcVATION LOCATION 3 = needles, graupe 1 rimed crystals i
ANEMOMETER .
PREr-'t- */- V


t
31
'I.m
ID SNOW CONDITIONS
mm
oect v t ns
Rain '1 6 light
7 mod
irate
8 heavy
1 hoar. 2 graupel, 3 = ice, 4 large wet grains. 5 -other loose cohesionless grains. 6 = sludi, 7 fresh damp stow. 8 3 combination of two or more, 9 3 other
1 = no cracking
2 minor cracking
3 * major cracking
4 = slab release
1 road closed, 2 ski area partly or wholly closed, 3 = ski touring closed or not rec., 4 comb. 1 & 2, 5 = comb. 1 & 3, 6 comb. 2 & 3, 7 comb. 1, 2, & C


FOR
KEYPUNCHING
ONLY
32
[ELEVATION LOCATION
(1) New snow
1 * aggrega
2 * other (
3 * needles
rimed i


-ID SNOW CONDITIONS
oBlit n y i RI
STRATIGRAPHY
TEST SLOPES ONLY
FROM KEY (3) .CHOOSE MOST SIGNIFICANT LAYER(S) JURIED 20 200CM BELOW SNOW SURFACE
EXPOSURE OF SLOPE
UPPER N E S W
LOWER N E S W
SI or I
AVAL I HAZARD.
0* none 1 low 2*bor-derline 3=high
(4) AM PM
REMARKS
(Use for clarifying statements about any entries, noting any unusual or interesting events. Please limit remarks to one line per day.)
Bi 17 68 69 70
71 72 73 74
75
76 77
78
79 80
Cftlr*. C'Vtrtas'i'. iTghtSn^i^
Tl
cr^/,n c.ua\y
Oft VAvi? C
Pa 0/pij CXld^c
If l SMph Cki-Ct-tQ CtA.clAutrCC C,C PudJ- A


). i V i.^vi
is
'l ~t~TP
l' ^
-*r-

-i. Li..
I i M
0/1 07; ? 0^ frucf
IN; _r\ u.


21
U)flJ(jU tytixJUf Sc rnfh
is /Joo tfiHLALXud' hjji! Mi . > (
2-
ts So-hd mph foUrtri
2.
STJFZ'J^A '"r*yj<&* C(UC\y^ a
p&'vVCij
r/o ucL


Wjnj&IC-J5_ Vj-cS-t
3tMxnAj ; is^A^ndS. /C'tS mph gi/SIS -S(/^ (T- -fl
VA/ir>cUx 3'10 Wptv^U^ p£^vbUj cCc-

iUS^nft) winds W- 7b"3Qry\pV^
LA 5 hC'jjG
ii^eAC^ clew, j?$~-?ownh k N ^
OiwCait, uindcj giot5 15'20^ SnOti1 fofrct
ffc&n, Mm IQ rv\prv
o£jgA/if3uJ Unnds (0 mph


m.^Cao^, (TnjZrr), XOjhi Sncio^^(jUr\£p
rfo<3n. cakirv
ftvri O O'^v^S, ^s~ ~ I 0 /np/,.
OH
p.
iadlii


c
f
2
J Y
Pp-hI h clg>uc^^ ^ cqii/v\
£
J$r
M
0j\r\dS bot/Ohiv' Vffel^v ~ K'^h cloths
W\r\c\> lflw not'^ri y c i uuo y ~ r
&W* r~/d/l)J ,
0/
itH Intensity Rain
liflht 6 light 7 mod
sf 8 heavy
V
h__ y
HjPO wthd frr?m U/\ nnOSitcj doudly
jffis
i
i
i
(3) Stratigraphy
1 hoar. 2 graupel, 3 ice. 4 large wet grains. 5 = other loose cohesionless grains. 6 slush, 7 fresh damp snow, 8 combination of two or more, 9 = other
(4) Test skiing
1 * no cracking
2 - minor cracking
3 = major crackinq
4 * slab release
(5) Closures
1 road closed, 2 = wholly closed. 3 = ski not rec., 4 = comb. 1 & 3, 6 = comb. 2 & 3,
ski area partly or touring closed or
6 2, 5 comb. 1
7 = comb. 1, 2, & 3


_ w Cc'
Lck
f; t a **( ...
fVl ONTHLY survirviARY
IJ C .10NTH 'J <- TIME OF OBSN. _ VI AH 10 A. temperature DEPTH OF SNOW ON THE GROUND* IN. PRECIPITATION"
24 HOURS ENDING AT OBSERVATION AT TIME OF OBSERVATION NEW SNOW DEPTH 1/2 OF IN. WATER EQUIV. OF NEW SNOW 1/100 OF IN. WATER FROM RAIN 1/100 OF IN. NEW SNOW TYPE BY 6 HR PERIODS (1) fc fM 00 V ^ *- cs § g * INTENSITY BY & HR PERIODS (2) h CN 00 rr ^ r\ 6 8 S £ 00-06hrs (ENTER DIR C (0G36) MPH (0
MAX F MIN F AIR TEMP. F 20 CM BE LOW SNOW SFC C
( ? 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 123 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 5
1 £> 7 i| ~7 ^ q O C, i y ' n> C. \ * o. rN .0 .0 1
2 1 1 L- e. i C-< J- ^ r 1 ^ 0 3 OS \ 1 0.0 C *
3 NO REA plNJOr * T j >
4 1 I £9 30 -2 2* -08 -A~L Cm 1220
5 1 3 4 S 24 2.fc 2$ - 0 4 i 7 cc .00
6 f K (7 0 30 2-0 2S -04 I b 00 0 0
7 013 0 30 a4 2 b - 04 >7 .5 -JJk 1
- 8 1 1 7.1 i f 7-7 -f?S 1 7 o.p .00
9 1 s?o CA - /0 2 | GO
0 0 7 53 1 0 - 0 2 O ip. i 7- Iff i.3 fos
1 1 0 % 20 0 fe 1 7 -07 i? 0.0 .00
2 o%io 2 7 l 1 2b - 0 7 is 0.0 .00
1 3 OSes 3 2 \ic 90 - 07 IS 6.0 ,oo
4 o 7 35 44 u 24 -Ob 4 0.0 .00
1 5 - 7 4 0 v\ 9-3 - 0 (c O./? .CD
6 7A\ - 0 (p Li 0.0 .0 0
l 7 - 7 S 7 Aci i * 1 i/ - 07 i 0.7 a> c\
1 8 0 3 95 0% i 0 - o 8 1? 0.0 .0 0
I 9 Moo 94 04 22. -07 70 2.0 .IS
I ? 0 01 45 23 i b ts -07 20 Op .00
2 1 0 iOO 10 1 0 - 04 W ao .00
22 h l 5 5 ' 3-4 2 3 c Him Hr t 0 23 -ofi 17 0 0 QOO
I 24 DIM & >0 -r?£ no DC /
2 5 Cl SO 31 os 08 -0? H Cp ,00
I 26 1 500 2 9 07 20- -o f 2 7 on ko 34 12 1 2 - i c 1 * c.o .0 0 i
I 28 0 <5 1 0 20 1 4 1 S -04 IS Op .oo
1 29 5 1 *. S : s '7 73 -07 Ift ac AA | ;
30 D7S o 3 0 73 7,1 -07 1 i D.o .0 0
3 1 c 1 Lt\ 7ft i 0 t 0 - Oft I B 0.3 .CO
SUMS (1) New snow types record the doming 1 = aggregates or clusters of crystals, 2 = other (intermediate)
MEANS -
E LEVATION LOCATION rimed crystals (unstable)
SNOW STUDY PLOT
ANEMOMETER


35
fim


wrr
v yiLPW
ID SNOW CONDITIONS
1 STRATIGRAPHY * 1 *V*l 1 A.'ARIt n VI m-
T t ST SIOPLS ONI Y
ROV Kt YC3J^>KX*>t MOL T SlGNIHCANT LAYER(S) BURIED 20 200CM BL LOW SNOW SURFACE e i k V 0'non* 1 low 2bor V) UJ a D c REMARKS
C XPOSUHl Of SLOPE t- <3ef lin* .
UPPE R t s w LOWE R N E S W (4) 3*- high am pm (5) Please limit remarks to one line per day )
>6 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
%
1 . CoA-s £
H
clearf ccilm
1 / Ddt 1 U-1 fic c\d y. tf-SVcntf / St \cit -f wi rr l-i 11incl 5 /V" ^ 0.
' / > ^ / 5 rV;cci rxf\ Vf ry j i <3 HP£'V 1 Snou'/n^ y Cal rry t OvertfrSt; leu'Cloud fci H*\4 (l
CtiCiVvi Lilirn i.Md:rUarU i?
| s cv'^k (j?\*+s n\:r.r.^~h
, uy s->c /
1 CVu^M- clciAcht 1 1 ri'irn It11 nd 5 ^ ioi S rn Mi u ks+ ( L
1 £Xol, (JiOUck; bunhd,5 5 mnh cc
ftilid.h,'} LOL'iUt \b"ZO & (0
| c&uxp / \p ?c> rwph (J
Po/ljx 1 i Ck-ar,ca(m &
* S vvnx'unq 0
1 ' ^7 7T q Cucn CaiMOn (0
1 | rikaa, Ca£*y^
1 ^ 7 cikjicoi, (LcUi'w
1 5V0 SsLO tr-'fil htshU^LU f ika.vRO /
*1 J J ^ 7 jg^/p, . TIT
1 C QjlCO\ CaO-nn Aj'>
* ! ClZtAg. GbOfy,. 0"
1 i ]0 Cruder , (V.
| i nOJirfLu ( ie> UcUi Urn id S 0~S hn£>ly -Q
I 1 i S -Cli) 0:
I i i pihXUi C \cmCU.A cyufaSiO l-ZSi,*r\ h
f tiLi Ci), dbu\h, t;m,xr lo^zc (J)
iti Intensity Rain
I 6 light
7 mod r8te o*h,>,
(3) Stratigraphy
1 hoar, 2 = graupel, 3 = ice, 4 large wet grains, 5 other loose cohesionless grams, 6 = sludt. 7 fresh damp snow, B combination of two or more, 9 *
(4) Test skiing
1 * no cracking
2 = minor cracking
3 major cracking
A -I- U ..I._
(51 Closures
1 = road closed, 2 ski area partly or wholly closed, 3 = ski touring closed or not rec., 4 = comb. 1 & 2, 5 = comb. 1


FOR
KEYPUNCHING ONLY col
l*rw"
i *
n ""v
<< < _____
MO NTH liV s u r.. r
I rv
I <0 I m I *
I n I DAY OF MONTH TIME OF OBSN. Yt AM L TEMPERATURE DEPTH OF SNOW ON THE GROUND* IN. NEW SNOW DEPTH 1/2 OF IN. PF WATER EOUIV. OF NEW SNOW 1/100 OF IN. iecipita WATER FROM RAIN 1/100 OF IN. TION* NEW SNOW TYPE BY 6 HR PERIODS (1) v> £ cn co ^ CN § 8 2 t INTENSIT BY 6-HR PERIODS (21 ^ N 00 S i *
74 HOURS ENDING at observation at time of OBSERVATION
MAX F MIN F AIR TEMP. F 20 CM BELOW SNOW SFC C
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44
1 0 7 40 \ (r 1 O - cl e ,0 0
2 09 3 I 25 11 2-0 - o 1 22 LL0 a
3 0 7 30 22 M ) H - oo 21 _L0 ,0 5 a
4 n 7 q 5 1A f o - 07 2 l .00 a
5 0 "7 3 £ - oA _13 p o
, 6 o is i n ^ 11 ! 3 - 0 £ At .? k
7 r,-7 5 2- ' X2- . 1 2 1 ^ - 7 7! ' 5 ./t
8 07MC- I % Q 7 07 - 07 23 1.0 .0 5 t
9 rJ o o o l / OS 1 0 - 1 1 22 0.0 .00 a
1 0 f! 'IHF 1 7 f n -1 i (M .0 £
1 1 01 SO 33 0% 3a - 10 0 oo .0 0 a .. .
1 2 D 7 ST1 ?.Q 3 - 0 to AD c.\o or? ,, a, ... ,
1 3 ~ R-eai dir/V > K'C _LT ^4 w 1
r -Ak -T |\j
1 4 f] 3 5 77 / 6 tfn -07 / 1 5 OS 1 0 27 0 7 07 - 07 1.7 .05
1 6 C fc 3 I OT -02 - 02 i io <2 0 0.0
1 7
1 8 ~
1 9 ~
20 -
2 1 ~
2 2 -
2 3 -
2 4 -
2 5 ~
26 ~
2 7 -
2 8 -
29 ~
30 -
3 1 -
SUMS ~ (1) New snow type 1 - aggregates c 2 = other (inter
MEANS -
i elevati DN LOCAT ION rimed cryr
SNOW STUDY PLOT
ANEMOMETER


37
u-pwvmp"*i'h n i'..'m'wtijjjj.1*! j., wi#j|,j|^iBiyip! r-Bgjg'jjp
,.D SNOW CONDITIONS
ST RAT 1C Tt St S* O r Kt YU' .< SlGNlf ICAN BURlf D 20 2 SNOW S :XPOSURE UPPER N E S W iRAPHY 'l r ON L Y >*LXJtt mcxh 7 LAYERIS) XJCM BE LOW (RfACL OF SLOPE LOWE R N E L W 0 £ h (4) A/A*> 0 non* 1 * low 2'bor rt**r line 3 high AM PM S CT D ir. C _j u (5) CRM n v r REMARKS (Use lor clarifying statements about any entries, noting any unusual or interesting events Please limit remarks to one line per day.)
5 a 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
1 f\\CSiW c IcCr wes-t u1 Ms lO'li mph. CjU5i\r (L
clcijdv) 1/ahfSntu'd lling ;u/nd5 20 rv\ph U'esi 0J
i mC'S1 c ltd f, hi^Kclouds winds I0 is. GL'S'tv u>* 0.
1 1 7 ; t~* /'Z, COtd c'cctUx ^ ( 1;
/ Ctokid UvlS mph ^l)
t&L^i 2c -2 ,/W ;;J ^ mCS-fk, Cloudy calm. -feu) c,nDu.>( lakes (P*j
c\eOJ~L (jj wW S-O'^S' mpd (
| U&'.ZZ'r^ph u> CMcrt (Zi
cL cii,


5-/0 mph ua, clfiUdtA lightflumes CL)
mrsK^' c /cud v Cd? tm. u{ fa hi' Show fas'
1 nO^iu cfaudu Calm.
}
<

1

1

1
I H
i
1
1. .
1

1
10 ntensity (3) Stratigraphy
gt Rain 1 hoar, 2 = graupel, 3 ice, 4 = large wet grains. 5 =
6 light other loose cohesionless grains 6 = slush, 7 = fresh
7 mod damn snow ft mmhinatinn of twn or more Q -
(4) Test skiing (5) Closures
1 = no cracking 1 road closed, 2 ski area partly or
2 1 minor cracking wholly closed, 3 tci touring closed or
3 - maior crack mo not ree. 4 1 comb. 1 & 2. 5 comb 1


38
SITE
Bear Lake is located in Rocky Mountain National Park on the Eastern side at the end of Bear Lake Road, a 30 minute drive from the East enterance to the park. It is at N4462'30M, W105O35' and at 9^75 altitude.
Bear Lake is the trailhead for major hiking and equestrian trails into the wilderness area. The lake is a small one formed by recent glacial activity. It is in a glacial valley and has healthy tree cover surrounding it. Fishing is forbidden
in Bear Lake since an attemot is being made to re-instate
26
the native greenback cutthroat trout.
Currently, there are only 2 buildings in the area. Both are being considered for Historical Register status. On the East side of the lake is a small ranger's cabin and a public restroom which is open only in the summer. Historically,
Bear Lake was the site of two camps and of Bear Lake Lodge, an educational camp for children. Because the Park policy was to discourage the operation of private lodges, these buildings were moved down into Estes Park and are currently in use as
the Sunrise Resort


39
The area is classified as "General Outdoor Recreation" surrounded by "Natural".(see map p.l^, Appendix 3)
"The water system that presently serves the Bear Lake area consists of a surface water Intake, chlorination, storage reservoir and distribution system with a capacity of over 20,000 gallons per day. The system is more than adequate for the present and future demand. This untreated surface water source does not meet U.S. Public Health Standards and has occasionally produced contaminated samples. The sewage system that presently serves the Bear Lake comfort station consists of a sewer line to a septic tank with both a leach line and a seepage pond. The existing system is in
2?
very poor condition and does not meet State Health Standards."
The locations of the intake, water tank and leach field have been marked on the map, page 10, Appendix D.
The naming of Bear Lake is an interesting story. In the late 1800,s a black bear was seen in the area, hence the
28
name, however no bears have been seen in the area since.


40
FOR MAPSi See p.p. 4,20, and 23 Appendix B
p.t>. 2, 3. 10A, and 10F, Appendix D


1*1
CURRENT ACTIVITY PATTERNS
Currently, the visitor to Bear Lake arrives by car or shuttle bus. The path around the lake Is paved with asphalt and a nature tour pamphlet guides him in a counterclockwise pattern. Excellent views are experienced at both the East and West ends of the lake and benches are provided for a pause of contemplation.
Other visitors may choose to dayhike or backpack from the trailheads which are located here. There is a comfort station with 8 fixtures which is insufficient for the present
volume of visitors and long lines are frequent, A new
29
facility is proposed that will provide 16 fixtures.
The average pattern seems to be to walk on the path around
the lake and then leave the area (taking about \ hour).
! 30
Day hikers are usually gone about 2? to 3 hours.
In the winter, this is a popular area for cross country skiers.


k2
ACTIVITY PATTERNS ENHANCED BY LITTLE BEAR LODGE
There is no question that a facility such as Little Bear Lodge would change the experience of the visitor. Since two groups are served by this facility, I will discuss them separately,
RESTAURANT
First are the individuals or families who are lodging in town oe are camping further down the valley and have chosen to go to Bear Lake during the day. Some will not choose to use the facilities and will just pass the Lodge as they circumnavigate the lake. Perhaps to them, it would seem to be an intrusion. Others, especially those with families, might choose to use the Lodge. If they entered, they would be treated to a very small version of the Lodge experience as found in other National Parks. Here would be found the basics in facilities such as shelter, comfort station, and simple food service. Also,) hopefully, they would find a building in which to relax for a time in a comfortable chair or on an outside balcony, enjoying the spectacular views. They might choose to sit by the fire if the weather was chilly, but most important they would find a resting place and a focus for their time at Bear Lake.


^3
HOSTEL
The others who would use this facility are those visitors in the youth hostel. This is meant to be a very small hostel used primarily as a jumping off point for hiking or cross country skiing. The facilities will be designed to be comfortable without being at all luxurious, only meant to provide a bed, shower, storage and a community kitchen to international or national travellers. A large lounge room centered around a fireplace and game tables woiild be designed to foster interchange and fellowship between travellers for the short time that they stayed here.


GUIDELINES FOR THE DESIGN OF A YOUTH HOSTEL
The umbrella group for the youth hostel program is the
International Youth Hostel Federation. They have published
31
a book of guidelines which has been quite helpful.
At its most basic, a youth hostel is a large dormitory space, where the beds of the men and women are separated by a partition. Toilets must be provided as well as an area for the storage and cooking of food. All youth hostels are supervised and subscribe to curfews and other rules designed to promote a safe experience for the young International traveller.
Many youth hostels are adaptive re-use of existing buildings and they are designed around these structures, however, a new building can take full advantage of the guidelines developed over years of experience.
1/2 hour fire doors are required, however other than that UBC codes are stricter, so I will use those.
In the section called SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS I have used the published guidelines directly to determine room sizes, number and type of bathrooms and fixtures, etc.


SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS SUMMARY
There are three categories of spaces summarized herej li Hostel 2i Restaurant
3 Lodge (all public spaces not specifically used for 1 or 2)
li
HOSTEL
Entrance Hall 200
Office 50
Baggage, Ski Storage 100
Lounge 800
Kitchen 250
Dining Common 600
Restrooms 500
Bedrooms 2,000
Family Rooms 500
Apartment 1.500
Laundry 100
HVAC koo
Circulation . -30Q
6,000
2i RESTAURANT
Dining Room Kitchen Service Circulation
^,500
1.500
100
1,000
77m
3i LODGE
Entry 300
Lounges 1.700
Comfort Stations 1.700
Supply Shop 100
Circulation 2,000
Mechanical/Workshop 850
6,650
TOTAL
21,750


SPACE
HOSTELi ENTRANCE HALL
DESCRIPTION
Entry to Hostel
SPATIAL QUALITIES
comfortable, small entry.
DIAGRAM
SQUARE FOOTAGES
200 sq. ft.
activities
Entry
USERS
Hostel patrons
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
Bulletin Boards
ADJACENCIES
E-NTE-Y

Office, outdoors


**7
SPACE
HOSTELi OFFICE
DESCRIPTION
Place for guests to check In
SPATIAL QUALITIES
preferably unenclosed
DIAGRAM
r A Cj30HT£.t\
I k-ciRcj^riivI
Q u i v-T.

SQUARE FOOTAGES
50 sq.ft.
ACTIVITIES
Check ln/out central information center
USERS
Hostel personnel
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
counter, cash drawer, shelves for blankets and bedding
ADJACENCIES
check point between entry and hostel area


SPACE
HOSTELi BAGGAGE, SKI STORAGE
DESCRIPTION
In this hostel, especially it is necessary to provide storage for patrons who may-be staying for awhile in the backcountry.
SPATIAL QUALITIES unimportant
DIAGRAM
SQUARE FOOTAGES
100 sq.ft.
ACTIVITIES
Storage
USERS
Hostel personnel have access
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
shelves, ski racks
ADJACENCIES
Hostel Office


1*9
SPACE
HOSTEL; LOUNGE
DESCRIPTION
Comfortable gathering place for hostel patrons.
SPATIAL QUALITIES cozy
SQUARE FOOTAGES 800 sq.ft.
ACTIVITIES
Relax, conversation
USERS
Youth Hostel Patrons
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
DIAGRAM
Comfortable seating,
Fireplace, Game tables Storage for games, bookshelves
JH.
ADJACENCIES
Hostel entry, corridors to rooms


SPACE
HOSTEL KITCHEN
DESCRIPTION SQUARE FOOTAGES
A community kitchen 250 sq. ft.
used and maintained by the hostel guests
ACTIVITIES
Guest cooking and food storage
SPATIAL QUALITIES USERS
functional
Hostel guests
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
DIAGRAM
1 EbislitOe
12 hotplates, 1 oven,
6 electrical outlets, refrigeration, food storage locker (1 cu. ft. per person) garbage disposal, sinks (2)
ADJACENCIES
Dining commons


51
SPACE
HOSTELi DINING COMMON
DESCRIPTION
Place to eat food prepared In hostel kitchen
SPATIAL QUALITIES
Good natural light and views
DIAGRAM
SQUARE POOTAGES 600 sq.ft.
ACTIVITIES
Eating and socializing
USERS
Hostel patrons
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
Tables, Chairs, Trash containers
ADJACENCIES
Hostel communal kitchen
1 (OH


52
SPACE
RESTROOMS FOR HOSTEL
DESCRIPTION
These restrooms are communal (men's and women's separate) showers are provided
SQUARE FOOTAGES
2 restrooms (men and women) at 220 sq.ft, each 1 handicapped RR 60 sq.ft. (500 total)
ACTIVITIES
Sanitary and bathing
SPATIAL QUALITIES USERS
functionality Is Important as well as handicapped access
DIAGRAM
Youth hostel natrons only
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
Mem ^ lav., U WC, 2 urinals 4 mirrors, 3 showers,
*4 shaver points
Womem *4 lav., $ WC, *4- mirrors, 3 showers,
Handicappedi 1 lav, 1 wc,
1 shower, 1 mirror
ADJACENCIES
adjacent to corridors to bedrooms


53
SPACE
HOSTELj BEDROOMS
DESCRIPTION
10 bedrooms will be provided designed to sleep 4 persons each.
Guidelines:
allow 50 sq.ft, per
person
allow 2.5 ft. between beds.
SPATIAL QUALITIES
SQUARE FOOTAGES
200 sa. ft. each room (2000 total)
ACTIVITIES
sleeping, dressing, personal storage
USERS
Window (see code) Hostel patrons
must be provided
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
k Beds (79"x32"), lockable storage cabinets, luggage shelves, clothes hooks,
DIAGRAM mirror, towel racks
ADJACENCIES
corridors and egress
cck\.. ix v


5^
SPACE
HOSTEL LEADER OR FAMILY ROOMS
DESCRIPTION SQUARE FOOTAGES
Each hostel provides 250 sq. ft. each
1 or 2 rooms for families (500 total)
or leaders of groups of youths ACTIVITIES
SPATIAL QUALITIES
Sleeping, dressing personal storage
USERS
simple (needs window) Families or group leaders
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
Same as other bedrooms
DIAGRAM

\\
\
ADJACENCIES
Corridors and egress


55
SPACE
HOSTEL SUPERVISOR'S APARTMENT
DESCRIPTION SQUARE FOOTAGES
A small apartment for 1*500 sq. ft.
the on-slte supervisor
ACTIVITIES
SPATIAL QUALITIES
All living activities of a normal apartment
USERS
a comfortable Hostel supervisor
homelike apartment
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
As found in an apartment
DIAGRAM
ADJACENCIES
Within hearing distance of hostel activities


56
SPACE
HOSTEL LAUNDRY
DESCRIPTION SQUARE FOOTAGES
Pay laundry facilities 100 sq. ft.
for hostel guests
ACTIVITIES
Washing clothes
SPATIAL QUALITIES USERS
unimportant
Hostel patrons
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
DIAGRAM
2 washers, 2 dryers, sink, clothesline, soap and change machine
ADJACENCIES
Near sleeping rooms


57
SPACE
HOSTELi HVAC
DESCRIPTION SQUARE FOOTAGES
MECHANICAL ^00 sq. ft. ACTIVITIES HVAC
SPATIAL QUALITIES USERS
unimportant Hostel managers
DIAGRAM PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings) 2 boilers (Domestic hot water and and radiator heating water)
ADJACENCIES
unimportant


58
SPACE
HOSTEL CIRCULATION
DESCRIPTION
Circulation
SPATIAL QUALITIES functional
SQUARE FOOTAGES 1,000 sq, ft.
ACTIVITIES
Circulation
USERS
Hostel patrons
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
DIAGRAM
As
ADJACENCIES
Dorm rooms, entry, egress, lobby, kitchen, etc.


59
SPACE
RESTAURANTi DINING ROOM
DESCRIPTION
Dining room serves 375 guests (120 sq. ft.
/ guest) Restaurant is a self-service, short order style food service.
SPATIAL QUALITIES
Most of the seating will be oriented towards the views outdoors and large windows will provide abundant natural light. Mezzanines are being considered
DIAGRAM
1
SQUARE F00TAGES *4-,500 sq. ft.
ACTIVITIES
Visitor eating and relaxing.
USERS
Restaurant patrons, youth hostel patrons and other visitors
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
Tables, Chairs, Trash recept. ADJACENCIES
N
kitchen and lobby


60
SPACE
RESTAURANT! KITCHEN
DESCRIPTION SQUARE FOOTAGES
Kitchen should 1500 sq. ft.
primarily be functional
ACTIVITIES
COOKING/SERVING
SPATIAL QUALITIES USERS
Restaurant employees
DIAGRAM
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
Commercial ranges ,Refrioration, Freezing, Storage, Food prep, Range Hood, Oven Counter to service area


61
SPACE
RESTAURANT
DESCRIPTION
Service area
SPATIAL QUALITIES unimportant
DIAGRAM
SERVICE/RECEIVING/GARBAGE
SQUARE FOOTAGES 100 sq ft.
ACTIVITIES
receiving and garbage disposal USERS
Kitchen staff
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
Loading dock, Garbage dumpsters
\
ADJACENCIES
Kitchen


62
SPACE
RESTAURANT: CIRCULATION
DESCRIPTION SQUARE FOOTAGES %
1,000
ACTIVITIES
Circulation
SPATIAL QUALITIES USERS
functionality and handicap accessibility are primary considerations Restaurant patrons
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
DIAGRAM staging area for cafeteria line, serving line, etc.
T^~ t ADJACENCIES
kitchen, dining room and as needed


63
SPACE
LODGE ENTRY ROOM
DESCRIPTION
SQUARE FOOTAGES
Entry should be 300 sq. ft.
large enough to provide a
significant entry ACTIVITIES
experience.
Entering Lodge
SPATIAL QUALITIES USERS
Lighting level Anyone
should be fairly
low to draw user into
brightly lit central PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS
nave. Ceiling height (Equipment/Furnishings)
should be lower than central nave
DIAGRAM
ADJACENCIES
Outdoors and lobby


6^
SPACE
LODGE: LOUNGES
DESCRIPTION
SQUARE FOOTAGES
Comfortable, Intimate seating areas
1,700 sq. ft
ACTIVITIES
seating, relaxing, looking at people/views or sitting around the fire
Anyone
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
Large Fireplace and comfortable seating
ADJACENCIES
restaurant, entry, comfort station, suoply shop, circulation
SPATIAL QUALITIES intimate
USERS
DIAGRAM


I
65
SPACE
PUBLIC COMFORT STATION
DESCRIPTION
SQUARE FOOTAGES
This facility will replace the public restrooms currently found to be inadequate, it also includes the restrooms for the restaurant
2 restrooms (men and women) at 85O sq, ft. each (1700total)
ACTIVITIES
sanitary
SPATIAL QUALITIES
functionality is the most important criteria
Handicapped requirements must be met.
DIAGRAM
USERS
Any visitors to the Bear Lake area
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Hquipment/Furnlshinjrs)
Men'si 11 lav.,11 WC,
$ urinal s mirrors
Women's! 1^4. lav.,22WC mirrors
ADJACENCIES


66
SPACE
SUPPLY SHOP
DESCRIPTION SQUARE FOOTAGES
A very small concession 100 sq. ft.
to provide basic needs of film, maps, information and minimal supplies ACTIVITIES for backpackers
purchase of necessary items
SPATIAL QUALITIES USERS
Probably unenclosed
Anyone
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
Counter, cash register storage and display
DIAGRAM
A CCUvJTt^s^
ADJACENCIES
Preferably near another station where lodge personnel are working

X


SPACE
STAIRS/ELEVATOR/FIRE STAIRS/CIRCULATION
DESCRIPTION SQUARE FOOTAGES
All circulation for lodge section Elevator 150 sq. ft. Formal Stairs 600 sq. Exit Stairs 1000 sq. Circulation ? ACTIVITIES Circulation
SPATIAL QUALITIES USERS
depends on function Anyone PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
DIAGRAM Hydraulic elevator
ADJACENCIES Depends of function


68
SPACE
MSCHANICAL/KAINTENANCE ROOM
DESCRIPTION SQUARE FOOTAGES
housing for mechanical 860 sq. ft.
systems and janitor gardener maintenance functions
ACTIVITIES
mechanical/maintenance
SPATIAL QUALITIES USERS
Mainly functional
Lodge personnel
DIAGRAM
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
Domestic hot water heater, boiler for radiators, storage of cleaning supplies and tools
ADJACENCIES
preferably near areas needed (Kitchens, bathrooms, etc.)


69
SPACE
OUTDOOR SEATING
DESCRIPTION
Outdoor seating patio is both for eating and relaxing. Seating will be oriented toward views.
SPATIAL QUALITIES
a movable canvas cover may be included for light control
SQUARE FOOTAGES
1,000 sq. ft. or more ACTIVITIES
Outdoor eating and relaxing USERS
All visitors
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS (Equipment/Furnishings)
DIAGRAM
Outdoor type tables and chairs
C
-piiliKXiv
ADJACENCIES
Ucu-'^E.
seATiMC-So H'DCFXWT
ViE'u'
Lobby and restaurant


70
USING A PATTERN LANGUAGE
32
I recently read A Pattern Language by Christopher Alexander and associates and found it to be of great help in conceiving my design. I find it remarkable that someone should have chosen to put down in an orderly manner so many ideas that I have always considered to be "intuitive". I have decided to systematically apply Pattern Language in my desicrn in the manner Alexander outlined in his book The Timeless Way of Building. Following are the patterns I have decided to
work with and their numbers in the
25 Access to Water 121
21 4 Story Limit 125
31 Promenade 126
36 Degrees of Publicness 128
53 Main Gateways 129
55 Raised Walk 130
62 High Places 133
64 Pools and Streams 135
69 Public Outdoor Room 176
91 Traveler's Inn 180
104 Site Repair 181
105 South Facing Outdoors 182
106 Positive Outdoor Space 184
107 Wings of Light 190
110 Main Entrance 191
112 Entrance Transition 192
115 Courtyards Which Live 205
116 Cascade of Roofs 206
117 Sheltering Roof 207
118 Roof Garden 212
120 Paths and Goals 222
book.
Path Shape Stair Seats
Something Roughly in the Middle
Indoor Sunlight
Common Areas at the Heart
Entrance Room
Staircase as a Stage
Tapestry of Light & Dark
Garden Seat
Window Space
The Fire
Eating Atmosphere
Cooking Layout
Ceiling Height Variety
Shape of Indoor Space
Windows Overlooking Life
Structure Follows Social Spaces
Efficient Structure
Good Materials
Columns at the Corners
Low Sill


SPATIAL ANALYSIS, QUALITY AND GUIDELINES In this section I will summarize a characteristic that I would like to include in my building. I will describe it and then do a diagram to illustrate it visually.
GATEWAYS
As the Torii gate is the entry to a Japanese temple, or as a row of trees introduces an experience. So, the experience of Bear Lake should be introduced.
IKSdijO
TVE £Atr_ pc -S7-5
PATH SHAPE
The shape of a path should be carefully chosen, as it controls the experience. Bach bend changes the view that the visitor focuses on and each swelling in the width offers an opportunity for a pause.
//
T^S-iD.

HIGH PLACESi ABOVE THE TREES
The trees on my site are about 35 ft. high. It does not seem to make sense to cut them all down in order to open up the view to the Southeast (which is excellent) I propose, to build hitch enough to have the top floor above the trees, giving it a treehouse feeling.
6i&- ou i
v*.........xl
i i
I
*


72
PUBLIC OUTDOOR ROOMi POSITIVE OUTDOOR SPACE
In a site so connected with nature as this one is, it is necessary to create an outdoor space that is as much a positive statement of place as the lodge itself is. A place to gather, sit wander, wait, meet.
WINGS OF LIGHTj LIGHT FROM 2 SIDESj LIGHT FLOODING-IN
The use and control of natural light is a strong motivator in my design. In Colorado, where light is unfiltered by atmospheric particles, it can be intense.
The seating areas of the restaurant, especially, will have the character of "Light Flooding in". This be
accomplished by building a wing (Long, narrow room) that will allow light to come in from 2 sides.
LIGHT FILTERING AND MODULATION
Too much light can be uncomfortable. In this thesis I will control direct light by systems such as overhangs, movable canvas coverings, and light shades to provide a light filled but non-glaring interior 4nvironment.
'AAJ
-ANvAL
Fuu-£r.r./ LXUmcl or r*ero
/
, A 9
9 I4'

C\lLiv .
TAPESTRY OF LIGHT AND DARK
An experience is controlled by light levels. The entry to the lodge will have a lower light level than the lobby to draw the visitor in, as the lighting of a church draws the visitor into the nave.

tV''


73
ENTRANCE TRANSITION
The entry experience is especially important in this building, since the Thesis involves transitions from civilization to wilderness, outside to inside.
-
^
. -i.
A *'V'
Cr V?
^ I
CEILING HEIGHT VARIETY
The experience of the lodge will change dramatically as the level of the cieling changes. This will be accomplished by a central (very tall) area and mezzanines
THE FIRE
A comfortable place will be found next to the fireplace. Here will be comfortable chairs, meditation, daydreaming, conversation
EFFICIENT STRUCTURE
Heavy timber has been chosen for structure for historical and aesthetic reasons, however, it will be handled in a contemporary way. Timber is an excellent way to achieve the structure I envisage and will be wonderful to expose and express.
L\ M U.;'f


7^
|

ROOF GARDEN
As it was important to create positive outdoor space, so it is desirable to have outdoor space which is elevated, Some people feel safer sitting and watching when they are elevated and can look down on the activity or can look out, without seeing people below.

SHELTERING ROOFS
The roof is the primary element of shelter. Many primitive structures are merely roofs supported. In a building with heavy snow loads, such as a lodge, it seems important that the roof should make a strong, sheltering statement
LOW SILL: TALL WINDOW
To take advantage of the excellent views afforded at this site, the windows will be large. The sills will be kept low so that seated patrons can see down to the lake and the windows will be tall, so they can see up to the sky.


75
FOOTNOTES
1. C.W. Buchholtz, Rocky Mountain National Park, a History
(Boulder, Colorado Colorado Associated University Press,
1983), 9.
2. Ibid., 13.
3. Ibid., 15.
4. Ibid., 18.
5. Ibid., 20.
6. Ibid., 20.
7. Ibid., 27.
8. Ibid., 34.
9. Ibid., 38.
10. Ibid., 47.
11. Ibid., 66.
12. Ibid., 73.
13. Ibid., 58.
14. Ibid., 120.
15. Chester Brooks & Lorraine Mlntzinflrer, Land AquisitL Plan for Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP. 1981).
16. Buchholtz, Rocky Mountain National Park, 203.
17. Ibid., 205.
18. Ibid., 223.
19. Ibid., 223.
20. Conversation with Istran Lipoai, (Civil Engineer, National Park Regional Office
21. Ibid.


76
22. D.E. Glidden, Winter Wind Studies In Rocky Mountain National Park (Estes Park, Coloradoi Rocky Mountain Nature Association, 1982)
23. Cllmatography of the United States No. 81, by state (U.S. Dept of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Monthly Normals of Temperature,
Precipitation and Heating and Cooling days 19^1-71)
ZU. United States Geological Survey Mapi McHenrys Peak, Colo
25. William McGuinness, Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings (New Yorki John Wiley & Sons, 1980)
Table 19.2, 778.
26. Natural Resources Management Plan & Environmental Assessment (Rocky Mountain National Park, 1983) 3&.
27. Environmental Assessment Development Concept Plan (Rocky Mountain National Park, 1980) 18.
28. Conversation with Susan Winter (Naturalist) RMNP
29. Bear Lake Development Conecpt Plan (RMNP, 1982) 11.
30. R.D. Trahan, Day Use Limitation in National Parks (Denver, Colorado! U.S. Department of the Interior,
National Park Service, 1977). Part2, pp3-5.
31. International Youth Hostel Federation, The Design, Construction and Equipment of Youth Hostels (Welwyn Garden City, England, 1975)
32. Christopher Alexander, A Pattern Languagei Towns, Buildings, Construction (New Yorki The Oxford University Press,1977)


BIBLIOGRAPHY
Alexander, Christopher, A Pattern Language, Towns, Buildings,
Construction. New York: The Oxford University Press, 1977.
Birren, Faber, Color Psychology and Color Therapy. New York: University Books, New Hyde Park, 19^1.
Buchholtz, C.W., Rocky Mountain National Park, a History.
Boulder, Colorado: Colorado Associated University Press, 1983.
Clark, Kenneth, Civilization. New York: Harper and Row, 1969.
Glidden, D.E., Summer Wind Studies in Rocky Mountain National
Park. Estes- Park, Colorado: Rocky Mountain Nature Association, 1982.
Greene, Herbert, Mind and Image. University Press of Kentucky, 1976.
Hansen, Ed Hans Jurgen, Architecture in Wood. New York: Viking Press, 1971.
International Youth Hostel Federation, The Design, Construction and Equipment of Youth Hostels. Garden City, England: Welwyn, 1975.
Lang, Jon, Burnette, Charles, Moleski, Walter, Vachon, David, (editors), Designing for Human Behavior: Architecture and the Behavioral Sciences. Stroudsburg, PA: Dowden Hutchinson & Ross, 197^.
McGuinness, William, Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 19S(V.
Oliver, Paul, Shelter, Sign and Symbol. Woodstock, New York, 1977
Porter, Tom, How Architects Visualize. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1979.
Pritchard, M.D.W., Environmental Physics, Lighting. New York: American Elsevier Publishing Co., 1969
Rocky Mountain National Park, Bear Lake Development Concept Plan. 1932.
Rocky Mountain National Park, Environmental Assessment Development Concept Plan. 1980.
Rocky Mountain National Park, Land Aqulsltlon Plan for Rocky Mountain National Park. 1981.
Rocky Mountain National Park, Natural Resources Management Plan and Environmental AssessmentT 1983.
Rudofsky, Bernard, Architecture Without Architects. New York: Museum of Modern Art, 19^5.
Smithies, K.W., Principles of Design in Architecture. Berkshire England: Van Nostrand Reinholt Co., 196l.
U.S. Department of Commerce, Cllmatography of the United States No. 81, by State.(Monthly Normals of Temperature, Precipitation and Heating and Cooling Days for Colorado) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 19^1-71.
U.S. Department of Commerce, Climatological Data, Colorado Jan-Dec, 1982, Vol. 87, #7, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.


78
U.S. Department of the Interior, Day Use Limitation in
National Parks. Denver, Colorado! National Park Service, 1977.
U.S. Department of the Interior, Draft Environmental Statement, Proposed Master Plan for Rocky Mountain National Park. Denver, Colorado! National Park Service,
U.S. Department of the Interior, Final Master Plan, Rocky
Mountain National Park. Denver, Colorado! National Park Service, 197&.
U.S. Geological Survey, Mapi McHenry's Peak, Colorado, 1957.
LECTURE
"People of the Shining Mountains" Judy Rosen, Naturalist, Rocky Mountain National Park.
INTERVIEWS!
At Rocky Mountain National Park Administrative Office:
Skip Betts (Naturalist)
Christy Metz (Public Information Specialist)
Susan Winter (Naturalist)
At National Parks System Regional Office and Service Center Thomas Bush (Architect)
Frank L. Huntsman (Director of Architecture)
Istran Lippai (Civil Engineer)
Dwayne Venner (Planning, Project Director, RMNP)
At Regional Headquarters, International Youth Hostel Federation Lou Livingston (Regional Director)


DRAWINGS



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SCALE:
MM
LEGEND:
ED textiles
wood
f=[ outdoor deck
[M3 EE) indoor plants open to below
mw quarry tile
HOSTEL:
COMMUNITY FLOOR
S? MANAGERS APARTMENT


MEZZANINE:
SUPPLEMENTARY
SEATING




Wall SSisi
spilt cedar shingles 3/U-" exterior grade plywood 3" rigid Insulation moisture barrier 3A" plywood (vertical 3/U* plywood (crosswise 3/^" tongue 4 groove deckl main perimeter (tension) beam (1/2H glulam) tension cable.
plate glass window
glulam beam-:------
plate glass window ------
plate glass sliding door
main glulam perimeter beam 1/2" tongue 4 groove decking 2"xi+" douglas fir, 2V* o.c. $-xQ" douglas fir main glulam Interior beam deck support beam steel beam hangers.
moisture barrier 8" batt Insulation 3/U" exterior grade
reinforced concrete wal (deck foundation) stone foundatioi
concrete foundatlo (6' below grade)

SCALE: l- 1


APPENDIX A
Rocky Mountain National Park Pact Summary


rocky mountain national park
FACT SHEET May 1986
PARK DATA nfi)
Established:
January 26, 1915 (10th oldest park)
Acreage:
Square Miles: Wilderness:
Land Acquisition:
265,193
414
2,917 acres established; additional 235,668 acres propose-Inholdings 11/85, 67 owners, 79 parcels, 738,82 acres
(0.9% of Parks land and water \
Precipitation: 1985 Estes Park 13,30, Grand Lake 24.71"
Elevation: Park Headquarters 7,800 ?
West Unit Headquarters 8,700 t
Longs Peak 14,255 t
104 Peaks above 10,000 named
VISITATION 1985
1973 2,521,690 1979 2,579,986 Jan 74,249 Jul 529,128
1974 2,501,093 1980 2,654,197 Feb 50,689 Aug 611,872
1975 2,854,789 1981 2,917,080 Mar 56,572 Sep 317,802
1976 2,741,377 1982 2,578,902 Apr 60,367 Oct 91,298
1977 2,894,994 1983 2,704,066 May 119,424 Nov 56,271
1978 3,037,866 1984 2,220,219 Jun 340,357 Dec 46,851
Total 2,354,880
PERSONNEL
Permanent, full-time Temporary
INTERPRETIVE ACTIVITIES Center Operations Fixed Stations Roving Assignments Guided Walks, Hikes Non-personal Services Demonstrations Talks and Campfire Prog. Outreach
Park Environmental Ed.
LAW ENFORCEMENT INCIDENTS Part I Offenses Part II Offenses Citations Incident Reports Traffic Accidents Courtesy Tags Fires
Major Rescues BLTS USE
87 250 337
1982 1983 1984 1985
1,315,190 872,133 845,764
41,162 90,633 105,715
7,591 19,261 23,759
13,307 14,682 15,786
678,793 737,426 711,031 710,250
565 783 2,172 2,269
79,269 72,178 30,156 81,801 69,336
1,436 1,437 1,320 1,773
1982 1933 1984 1985
51 32 69 39
432 287 346 588
1,028 871 829 1,218
408 374 678 652
87 115 92 30
1,075 825 1,213 1,037
3 3 2 1
13 9 11 10
1982 1983 1984 .1985
114,031 115,051 108,273 4,939 1,681 104,089 2,628
114,031 115,051 114,893 106,717
Glacier Basin Moraine Park Fern Lake


AQUATIC RESOURCES 15"6 fakes
50 lakes with fish 1,151 acres 539 acres with fish
WILDLIFE POPULATIONS
Bighorn Sheep 350
Elk 1,500
Deer 250
Bear 40
Coyote Common
(Winter) 3>000 (Summer) (Winter) Common (Summer)
CAMPGROUNDS
Aspenglen Longs Peak Timber Creek Glacier Basin Moraine Park Organized Group
*26 30 100 152 250 12 570
1982 Lawn To be rebuilt
Closed due Lake Flood, with approximately 65 sites.
BACKCOUNTRY CAMPSITES East Side
Crosscountry zones, 17 sites § 7 campers 105 individual sites @ 7 campers 9 group sites @ 20 campers
Total campers
West Side
Crosscountry zones, 32 sites !? 7 campers 94 individual sites § 7 campers
10 group sites Total
119 735 180 1,034
224 658 200
campers 1,082
ROADS
1986 26 sites open Primary Secondary
1 Park (Visitor Use) (Service Only)
Graded 35.3 23.0 12.3
Sealed 4.2 1.9 2.3
Paved 79.4 73.9 5.5
118.9 98.8 20.1
Fall River Road opened September 14, 1920
Trail Ridge Road opened July 16, 1932
44.2 miles, West Side border to East Side border
28.8 miles, Deer Ridge Junction to Phantom Valley
11 miles above timberline
Trails
355.6
BUILDINGS East West
Quarters 113 40
Museums 4 1
Amphitheaters 4 1
Entrance Stations 2 1
Modem Comfort Stations 27 4
Comfort Station (oil flush) 3 0
WATER SYSTEMS 22 7
Total Feet of Water Lines Both Sides 109,751
PICNIC AREAS
East Side West Side
Sprague Lake 25 tables Lake Irene 8 tables
Upper Beaver Meadows 10 tables - Timber Lake 8 tables
Endovalley 37 tables * .. - Beaver Ponds 6 tables
Hollowell 10 tables Beaver Creek 4 tables
Hidden Valley 10 tables Colorado River 4 tables
Wild Basin 8 tables Kawuneeche 6 tables


APPENDIX B
Rocky Mountain National Park Pinal Master Plan


final master plan
January 1976
NATIONAL PARK / COLORADO
4


ADDENDUM Delete: Last complete and partial sentence, page 26, and first partial sentence, page 27.
Substitute: "The visual and environmental impact of the interior liveries led to a recommendation that the livery stables within the park be eliminated. However, between now and the 1979 expiration of the current contract, the disadvantages as well as the merits of the two interior livery operations will be observed."
RECOMMENDED
Glenn 0. Hendrix February 2, 1975
Manager, Denver Service Center
Roger Contor December 17, 1975
Superintendent, Rocky Mountain National Park
APPROVED
Lynn Thompson Janaury 9, 1976
Regional Director, Rocky Mountain Region
United States Department of the Interior / National Park Service


ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK
final master plan


INTRODUCTION 1 THE SETTING 3 THE RESOURCE 6 THE FRAMEWORK 10 THE ACTIONS 19
APPENDIXES 32


INTRODUCTION
A master plan is the conceptual planning document which, consistent with congressional and administrative policies, establishes the guidelines for the overall use, preservation, management, and development of an area in the National Park System. It identifies the purposes of the area, its relationship to regional environs, its resource values, what human needs it should meet, and the objectives for its management. It contains a land classification plan and a general development plan for its management and interpretation.
Rocky Mountain National Park was established by an act of Congress of January 26, 1915: ". and said tract is dedicated and set apart as a public park for the benefit and enjoyment of the people of the United States with regulations being primarily aimed at the freest use of the said park for recreation purposes by the public and for the preservation of the natural conditions and scenic beauties thereof.
The park experience, now and in the future, should be a dynamic interaction of human values based on the perpetuation of natural features in as near to pristine conditions as possible. This plan recognizes man, where present, as part of the park's ecosystem, but the major emphasis is on the perpetuation of natural processes.
Major new development in the park is not recommended. Rather, a rearrangement or reduction of existing facilities as necessary to meet current demands for esthetic and recreational opportunities offered by the park, consistent with perpetuation of its natural resources, is called for. Man's impact must be minimized and controlled. To this end, living plant and animal communities the dynamic culmination of natural processes in the park provide visible indicators against which to measure and evaluate the condition of those processes.
1


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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT Pc THE INTERIOR / NATIONAL PARK SERVICE


THE SETTING
THE REGION
Rocky Mountain National Park lies within easy driving distance of millions of people who live in the fast-growing metropolitan area of Pueblo, Denver, Cheyenne, and Laramie. Its ready accessibility, due to a network of state and interstate highways, makes it especially attractive for visits by regional residents and also a goal for cross-country travelers. Its popularity and accessibility make it important to the Estes Park anci Grand Lake local economies.
The park is the primitive core of a vast mountain region. Within this region, thousands of acres of primitive lands are being studied for wilderness designation.
Serving both regional and national visitors to the park are strategic local bases of accommodation Estes Park, Allenspark, and Glen Haven on the east, and Grand Lake and Granby on the west. These serve park visitors and are also growing with second-home developments. On the threshold of the primitive core, and accessible by vehicle within the park proper, are campgrounds, visitor centers, and trailheads. Trail Ridge Road serves as a unique, readily accessible viewing platform passing through this primitive heartland.
Shadow Mountain National Recreation Area, adjacent to the park's southwest corner, is also an area of intensive use. It has water-oriented recreation, and a seasonally urban foreground with an outstanding scenic backdrop. Its use complements, but is largely separate from, that of Rocky Mountain National Park. Shadow Mountain National Recreation Area urgently needs legislation for boundary establishment and selective land management authority.
Grand Lake and vicinity serves the western entrance for the park and is the base of accommodations for surrounding Federal recreation lands. A proposed ski area on national forest land, if established, will increase winter and summer use of the Grand Lake-Shadow Mountain-Granby complex.
Broadly speaking, the park lends itself to short-term use and the recreation area lends itself more to extended use. This is due to the relative position of the areas within the surrounding regional road network. A loop drive through both areas from front-range cities is popular and this use is increasing.
Although regional residents tend to enter and return through eastern park entrances, cross-country travelers during the summer season, pass through the park on Trail Ridge Road.
3


ROOSEVELT
MT. ZIRKEL
NATIONAL
WILDERNESS
LEGEND
EXISTING WILDERNESS AREA
ROADLESS AREA UNDER STUDY FOR WILDERNESS DESIGNATION
MANAGED AS PRIMITIVE AREA NATIONAL FOREST BOUNDARY COLORADO STATE FOREST
ROCKY
MOUNTAIN
PRIMITIVE CORE FOR THE REGION
VICINITY MAP
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SCALE MILES AUG 74 DSC
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR / NATIONAL PARK SERVICE