Citation
Genesee children's outpatient clinic

Material Information

Title:
Genesee children's outpatient clinic an architectural study of the design of a children's health care facility
Creator:
David, Debra
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
94 unnumbered leaves : illustrations, charts, maps, folded plans ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Clinics -- Designs and plans -- Colorado -- Denver Region ( lcsh )
Clinics ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver Region ( fast )
Genre:
Architectural drawings. ( fast )
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Architectural drawings ( fast )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 92-93).
General Note:
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Master of Architecture, College of Design and planning.
Statement of Responsibility:
submitted by Debra David.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
15344063 ( OCLC )
ocm15344063
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1986 .D37 ( lcc )

Full Text
bAVlO
DebRA DAvid Thesis Program SpRiiNq 1986


THESIS
GENESEE CHILDRENS OUTPATIENT CLINIC
//
An architectural study of the design of a childrens health care -facility
Submitted by
Debra David
/
School of Design and Planning
n partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science University of Colorado Denver, Colorado Spring 1986


UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
WE HEREBY RECOMMEND THAT THE THESIS PREPARED UNDER OUR SUPERVISION BY DEBRA DAVID ENTITLED GENESEE CHILDREN* S OUTPATIENT CLINIC BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE.
Committee on Graduate Work


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I would like to dedicate this thesis to:
My -fellow students: -for helping me to learn as much as I did about architecture in these three short years.
To my parents: -for all the help and support that they gave to me through "another" degree.
To my -friends: Marguerite, Mike, Cheryl, E.J., Peter, Nan, (the list could go on) and especially Ste-fan, who always gave me support and encouragement through good
times and when li-fe was not so smooth.


TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
Thesis Statement
SITE ANALYSIS Summary Context
Soil and Erosion
CLIMATE
Summary
Design Recommendations
SPATIAL REQUIREMENTS Adjacency Diagrams Programmed Spaces Design Recommendations
CODES
Bui 1di ng Zoning
CONCLUSION
Conclusi on Drawi ngs
APPENDIX
REFERENCES


The art of dancing at the source of all the arts that express themselves first in the human person. The art of building, or architecture, is the beginning of all the arts that lie outside the person; and in the end they unite.
Havelock Ellis The Dance of Life (1923)




THESIS STATEMENT
The problem
Historically, until the turn of the century, health care facilities were viewed as charitable places for poor people to seek care. More affluent citizens could afford for the physician to come to their homes for care (Allen & von Karolyi, 1976; Lindheim, Glasser St Coffin, 1972).
Over the years, advances in health care have brought with them the need for elaborate and expensive equipment. With these advances, it became necessary for all patients to come to the hospital for treatment rather than the physician going to the patient. Additionally, with health care became more accessible to more of the public through government subsidies such as Medicaid and other social programs. In response to these factors, the health care center grew tremendously in size.
The large size of the hospital was a response to space requirements steming from advances in technology, centralizing care and the large equipment. However, as the structure became larger, the treatment became more depersonalized. As technology became more sophisticated, the facility and its equipment became outdated or obsolete even before construction was complete. The design of health care facilities was focused more on ease of


maintenence, and not the comfort of the patient (Malkin, 1982). The need for change in design and atmosphere was recognized by both the profession and patient. It was felt that the design of the health care facility directly effected the quality of care that the patient recieves (Lindheim, Glaser, & Coffin, 1972).
Rebellion against this kind of health care during the past twenty years has brought about examination and change of the present system of health care attitudes toward it. The health care environment has become less threatening or intimidating to the patient. People have become more involved in their own health care, working with the professional. The trend has been toward outpatient care, where the patient comes to the facility for treatment, then convalesces at home. There is no facility for overnight stay in this type of health care center. These changes have done much to change the image of the health care treatment center. Care has been taken to create an environment which is more welcoming and cheerful, which is less imposing to the patient.
Health care facilities for children have in the past focused on the treatment of nutritional deficiencies and infectious diseases (Lindheim, Glaser, & Coffin, 1972).
Now health care is focused on preventative care and regular checkups. This creates an opportunity to evaluate


and treat possible life threatening conditions while the child is still well. This is an important -factor in outpatient care because the overnight stay in the hospitial is very expensive and many times unnessary. It is much more positive -for the child to be given treatment and to be able to return home the same day. It is also desirable -for the chronical 1 y-i 11 child, who would visit an oncology unit -for cancer treatment. Many cancer treatments can be carried out and the child can return home to be with his/her family. Therefore, one of the advantages of the small outpatient clinic is to reduce unnecessary anxiety which can occur in the typical large hospi tal.
Statement of purpose
The proposed thesis will be to design a children's outpatient clinic. This facility will accomodate children from birth to 18 years old. A building of this type is intended to help ill or injured children who have come to the center for elective procedures as well at those children who are in need of emergency treatment. The main goal of this thesis is to design an efficient health care facility for children while responding to some of the psychological needs of the ill or injured child and their caregivers through specifics of the design. It will be


determined what the necessary specific physical aspects of the building and its special functions relate to one another.
The facility will include emergency care, outpatient surgery, doctors offices and an oncology (cancer treatment) center. The emergency care unit will provide care on a "walk-in" emergency basis. Emergency diagnosis and treatment will be the provided during regular operating hours as well as after hours when the rest of the clinic is closed. The outpatient surgery unit will allow the child to have simple surgery in the morning and to be able to return home in the afternoon or evening.
The doctor's offices will be the diagnosic and treatment portion of this health care facility. This area will function as does a typical doctors office setup, on an appointment basis. The oncology unit will be a small part of the facility, which will serve the child who needs ongoing treatment for cancer, although living at home. Support areas will be the waiting areas, maintenence and equipment, laboratory facility and data storage and lounge area for staff.
The size of this facility will be in the area of 30,000 square feet. The site for this project is west of Denver 20 miles on Interstate 70 at the Genesee Park exit.
The site was selected because of it's adjacency to Denver,


the populated nature of the area, and the the easy access to the citys hospitals via the interstate. This facility will provide a satellite clinic for the Children's Hospital in downtown Denver. This clinic will serve the many western towns and suburbs of Denver (i.e. Evergreen, Golden, Idaho Springs, Georgetown).
Psychological Issues
Designing a facilty for children is a complex problem. Children have special needs and the architecture of a childrens health care facility can respond to these needs in several ways. The solution comes not only from working with architecture as well as social issues. One must to consider the needs of the child, while not ignoring the adult in the setting. For example, the stressful experience of cancer treatment can perhaps be lessened by providing treatment in a "less stressful" or supportive envi ronment.
This brings up the issue of the psychological nature of health care. One wonders how much the mental state of a person effects his/her health. Children and adults do not enjoy being ill and dislike coming to this type of facility. Throughout history, health care facilities have been oppressive and depressing places. This has been due


not only to the attitude o-f the profession, but also to the scale and the darkness of the building. What type of design can help to soften the image of this building?
In this setting, it may be desirable to create a space which is similar to a place that the user is accustomed to and feels at ease. Malkin (1980) states that "if the individual can relate the medical environment to something else he or she has experiences with a positive association, much has been achieved toward reducing anxiety" (p. 2). Plants, easy chairs, televisions and play areas in the waiting area can make a waiting room a more friendly space and therefore less stressful.
Expanding upon the above idea, the texture of the building will need to be one of softness and richness which can relate back to the feeling of being at "home" in a place. The colors of the building can be bright and patterned wallpaper on the walls can reduce the institutional feeling of the facility. The user and the staff will feel that the space is more nurturing and supportive, therefore making the experience more friendly.
The program and coherent relationships between the different areas of the building will be a difficult task to solve. The health care facility should express a spirit of generosity and sympathetic understanding while embodying efficiency and economy. The relationships


between the programmed uses and the staff/ patient users will be explored as well. The image that this building can and does evoke from the user standpoint is pertinent to the solution of this design.


GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF CENTER
Use:
Users:
Hours:
Size:
Access
Outpatient center with -facilities -for outpatient surgery, emergency, doctors offices and limited oncology care
This is a limited facility with no provision for overnight care
Children from birth to 18 years old -Parents, caregivers and other family members -staff members (doctors, nurses, technicians, and receptionists) ,
OVERALL: 6:00 am to 12:00 am
Emergency care: 6:00 am to 12:00 am Doctor's offices: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm Outpatient surgery: 7:00 am to 5:00 pm Oncology: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
30,000 sq. ft. building (overall)
100 parking spaces
Building will be be situated on 15.13 acres
: off of Mt. Vernon Country Club Road or State Road
40 which are accessed from Interstate 70 at the Genesee Park exit.


Desion Considerations for a Childrens Outpatient Clinic (Lindheim, Glaser, & Coffin, 1972)
It is desirable to locate preventative, diagnostic, and treatment facilities away from large hospitals whenever medically possible
Make sure that the building is easily accessible
Locate health care facilities near to where people live. The closer that a facility is to a person's home the easier and more likely it is for him/her to bring the child (especially very small children) in for routine visits and simple illnesses
Make the corridors and any path that the child is required to take pleasant and nonthreatening
It is also important that the path be direct and not confusing to either the child or the parent. Clearly mark all corridors
The corridors can be made pleasant by using warm colors and surfaces textures, by carpeting the floor, by diffusing the lighting, providing points of interest along the way, and having many windows along the way for views
Entrances into nursing stations, support units and data areas should have entrances off of the corridor so that one does not have to pass through other units to get to desired destination
There should be ample storage space off of the corridor so that unsightly equipment can be stored out of view when not in use
Educational materials can be used on the walls of corridors and waiting rooms. They can be interesting to parents and children while occupying time while waiting
Entrances for emergency unit and doctor's offices should be separate and clearly marked
Waiting rooms should be comfortable and include interesting things for patient and parent to do floor should be warm and soft because it will be used as a play surface for small children electrical outlets, wheelchairs, and other hazards


to small children should be eliminated or placed out of reach (at least 55 inches)
-outdoor crawling areas can also be provided, using grass or outdoor carpet
-play area o-f the waiting room can be recessed into the floor, with the steps used for seating for the child
all play areas must be easily supervisable by adults
-Natural lighting is very important because a sunny and light atmosphere is healthful Where necessary, provide lighting near the floor so that child can work or read easily Use textured and patterened wall and floor coverings
Provide opportunities for the child to watch different activities, such as nurses at work, children at play and views out of windows
The indoor play area can be connected to an outdoor play area which is at the same level
Remove dangerous objects such as oxygen, heat and electrical outlets or place them at least fiftyfive inches from the floor
Avoid sharp corners, shelves that protrude into walkways or any other protrusions into the lower four feet of the room
Provide windows in doors at the childs height so that the child can be seen on the other side of the door, eliminating danger of opening blindly into hal1 way
Glass must be unbreakable or tempered in areas where children will be
Floor levels and changes must be ramped to facilitate use by gurneys, wheelchairs and crutches
Medication areas need to be securable from children
Window sills should be lowered so that even small children can look out of them easily. Varying heights of windows will make special windows for different ages of children


Provide toilets and sinks -for children. Mirrors should be hung at differnt heights to accomodate different ages of children
Storage units for childrens things should have lower hanging spaces so that child can help him/herself
Non-al1ergenic animals, such as fish and desert animals can be used in this type of facility for interest and diversion for the child
Parents enjoy having a facilty for coffee and snack preparation. This is also helpful for bottle preparation for infants.
Lobbies should be kept as small as possible to reduce institutional feeling




SITE
The proposed site -for this -facility is west o-f Denver on Interstate 70 at the Genessee Park exit. The site is located on the northeast corner of the intersection of Mount Vernon Country Club Road and Route 40 The legal description of this parcel is Section 12, Township 4, So. Range 71 W. The site covers 15.13 acres. There is a gentle slope to the southwest which not only provides excellent views to the southwest and west, but will allow for solar design. The site is covered by approximately 20% spruce trees, which will remain untouched on most cases.
A challenge of this thesis will be to fit the building into the site, attempting not to destroy the natural beauty of the site, while producing a pleasing, efficient design. It is important that the building is part of the landscape, not simply "perching" on top of it. For this reason care must be taken to include elements form the landscape, making the building design flow with the surroundings, not fighting against it. It is an important issue that the building looks as if it fits in this particular site and is not a generic building, dropped in from the sky. It is essential to consider the site in planning the design of this building.


U.S. Geological Survey, Evergreen Quadrangle Map. Denver, Colorado, 1903.




SOIL ANALYSIS
Soils developing on steep slopes are sandy, rocky, regosoils (poorly developed soils) and are greatly affected by erosion. Soils on the south and west slopes in this region often lack sufficient vegetation for adequate erosion protection. Care should be taken when roads are planned on steep slopes. They must be constructed to prevent too much runoff to be concentrated in one place which is commonly known as gully-washing. In the valleys, grasses and/or trees supply sufficient cover to lessen the effect of erosion
Soils which occur on gently sloping and elevated flat areas are usually rocky and sandy and well drained although at times there are small marshy areas created by insufficent drainage. The rocky-sandy soil is not affected by recreational traffic but the plant life is easily damaged by foot and vehicle travel. Sandy soils result in large moisture loss in ponds and waterways.
The steepness of the slope will effect the placement of the structure, septic system and road placement. Slopes which are greater than 30 percent would not be appropriate for placement of a structure.
In this area, the soil has a moderate to slow infiltration rate. This drastically limits the


effectiveness o-f septic sytems located on the site. This will also limit the number and type of vegetation used for landscaping. This is due to the limited natural ground water available in the area (Daniels, 1982).


EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL
Erosion and sediment control are problems associated with the construction of this building. Care needs to be taken to plan the building sequence to minimize hazards during the construction of this structure. Some considerations would be to:
-remove vegetation only from construction site -preserve all other vegetation at all costs -if an area needs to be graded in advance, mulch or temporary seeding of ground to prevent erosion grades of cut and fill slopes should be no greater than 3:1 to maintain the stability of the slope seed or sod roadbanks, or cut and fill slopes as soon as they are completed to stabilize If erosion still seems to be of concern or an eminent* problem, sediment basin can be placed at the base of the development. Additional stabilization can be provided with paving and tree planting.
During the actual construction process, the topsoil should be retained for redistribution over the site after completion. Native vegetation and trees should be saved at all costs to prevent wind and water erosion during and
after construction (Daniels, 1982)




CLIMftTE
The main factors which influence this sites climate is the altitude and location. The site is located on the eastern slope if the Rocky Mountains at a latitude of 39 42'30". The altitude of this place is 7700 feet above sea level. The mountains form a barrier to storms which originate in the Pacific Region. Therefore, there is much more precipitation in this area than in the area directly east of it.
These storms account for rapid changes in weather, bringing large fluxuations in temperature. There are often large swings in temperature during the same day. For example, in January, the minimum to maximum temperature varitation averages 30 degrees F, while in July the average variation is 29 degrees (Jefferson County Information, 1974). The temperature also varies more in the winter than it does in the summer (see Climat printout in appendix). The average temperature varies from 32.6 degrees F in January to 73.7 degrees F in July. Although these temperatures are in a very comfortable range, one needs to design to accomodate for large swings in temperature. Additionally, this site is at the top of a hill, so danger from cold spots which form at the bottom of the valley should not be any problem.


While this region maintains a low relative humidity, there is a -fair amount of precipitation. The yearly average is about 30 inches (Jefferson County Data). Much of this precipitation is account for in large winter storms, but on average the winter precipitation is approximately 80 inches. This average varies greatly from
year to year.




DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
LAYOUT:
Buildings should be oriented on an east-west axis with the long elevations -facing north and south to increase exposure to the sun.
SPACING:
I-f wind penetration is needed only -for part o-f the year, space between long rows o-f buildings should not be less than five times the height.
Compact planning is recommended if the air movement requirement is insignificant.
INDOOR/OUTDOOR:
Provide outdoor semi protectected areas like porches and courtyards for year round climate moderation. Design these spaces for winter sun collection.
Plan specific rooms or functions to coincide with the solar orientation. Design buildings so that the order of rooms in which the normal daily sequence of activities occur follows the path of the sun. Partition the interior spaces into separate heating and cooling zones.
Differ the thermal response of walls and roofs according to their respective orientations using heat capacities of different materials and their assorted time lags to achieve comfortable conditions indoors at different times of the day.
In lieu of or in addition to orienting the majority of the living areas for direct solar collection from the south, a single sunspace like an attached greenhouse or an internal glazed roof atrium should be used to fully maximize solar col lection.
PLANTS AND WATER:
Provide plants like climbing wall ivy on the walls so that they form a boundary layer near the wall thus performing an insulating function.


ROOFS:
A light but well insulated roof should be used it thermal storage is required tor less than six months.
EARTH SHELTERING:
Recess structure below grade or raise existing grade tor earth sheltering ettect. Insulate the wall and tloor below grade to prevent the radial tlow ot heat to the surtace.
Recess structure below grade or raise existing grade tor earth sheltering ettect. Insulated the tirst three to six teet ot wall below grade to prevent the radial tlow ot heat to the surtace.
Use sod roots mulched with leaves and other compost material which provide insulation in winter and dampen temperature swings.
WIND BREAKS:
Shape and orient building shell to minimize winter wind turbulence and pressure ditterential between the windward and leeward sides, smooth taces and berming on the windward side with low streamlined roots reduce conductive and convective heat losses.
Use neighboring land torms, structures or vegetation tor winter wind protection. Provide higher wind breaks to attain longer wind shadows. The width ot the wind break should be at least eleven to twelve times its height tor maximum wind shadow. Provide permeable barriers ot twenty-tive to sixty percent porosity tor reduced turbulence and an extended sheltered zone downwind.
SOLAR WALLS AND WINDOWS:
Shape and orient the building shell and glazed areas at an orientation between south and titteen degrees east ot south.
Maximize south tacing glazing in the torm ot large picture windows or sliding patio doors. Provide retlective panels outside ot glazing to increase winter irradiation.


Use solar wall and roof collectors on south oriented surfaces. Collectors should be oriented between due south and ten to fifteen degrees west of south. Vertical collector placement is suitable to get increases gain reflected from the snow.
Use solar wall and roof collectors on south oriented surfaces. Collector should be oriented between due south and tilted at an angle equal to (latitude + fifteen) degrees from the horizontal.
Use skylights for winter solar gain and natural illumination. Increase their efficiency by paying careful attention to solar geometry with provisions against heat 1 oss.
Use heat absorbtive materials and dark colors on the south wall surfaces to reduce winter heat loss by elevating exterior surface temperature.
THERMAL ENVELOPE:
Minimize the external wall and roof area. Use compact geometric forms to minimize the surface area to volume ratio. Partition these efficiently by avoiding excessive interior ceiling heights to achieve minimum surface area to floor area ratio.
Locate low use spaces like storage, utility and garage areas as a climatic buffer against the cold winter winds.
Use a vestibule at entry or an exterior wind shield like wing walls or vertical fin panels which deflect wind and act as a buffer at the entry.
Subdivide the interior into separate heating and cooling zones so that infrequently used and seasonal areas can be closed off from the heated areas so that less energy may be expended to maintain comfort in living areas.
Partition into closable cells to restrict air movement and therefore infiltration both horizontal and vertical.
Provide ventilation openings to exhaust internally generated humid and overheated air from specific spaces and appliances directly to the outside before it reaches the living areas.


Centralize heat sources like fireplaces, radiators, warm air registers, hot water heaters and laundry within a building interior to maximize use of heat generated by them.
Heat generated through specific activities and appliances should be conserved and recirculated. Combustion devices like furnaces and fireplaces with outside combustion air intake reduce infiltration by reducing the air that is drawn in through doors and windows to replace air released up chimney.
Provide air shafts for natural or mechanically assisted house heat recovery. Tap appliance and fireplace generated heat with recirculating air systems that instantaneously recover and convert to various areas or conduct to heat storage systems like rockbeds or alternatively couple with other storage systems like water storage tanks of roof mounted liquid collectors.
Detail window and door construction to prevent undesired air infiltration and exfiltration around the sash and frames.
Provide double or triple glazing with interior insulating aids like overhead rolling shades, unfolding accordian shades, sliding hinged or detached panels and shutters as well as drapes and storm windows on the exterior.
Apply vapor barriers on the warm side of the construction section including beneath slab on grade construction and on the floor of crawl spaces. Seal all joints and make bulding weathertight against air leakage. Develop construction details to minimize air infiltration and exf i1trati on.
Use a tightly insulated basement or crawl space as a buffer zone between the interior and ground. Insulated all perimeter walls particulary those above grade. Make surface and subsurface soil near the perimeter relatively impermeable to precipitation infiltration with provisions for drainage of water.
From: Climate Assessment (computer program written by Dr.
D. Stafford Woolard, Architectural Science Research, 1310 College Avenue, Suite 1228, Boulder, Colorado)


DESiqN ReCOMMENdATiONS
windows should be double glazed and -fitted with interior insulating shutters
SNOW
skylights can be used in this area with pleasing effects, but must deal with snow, wind and temperature fluctuations
roof to south for gain during winter
WINTER


\X/il\TER
wiNds
protect -from winter wind, but like winter sun
NORTk
entries should have maximum weather shielding and should not be located on the north side of the building (need airlocks)
protect west wall from storm winds (perhaps place storage areas along this wall)


locate outdoor spaces on the south and east of the building (however, need to provide some sun shade in the summer for these spaces)
low sun angle in winter may produce glare


SUMMER
need shelter -from south and southwest in the summer, but can utilize sun in the winter months
Design Recommendations:
(from McGinnis et. al., 1980 p. 29-32)




DEPARTMENT
PROGRAMMED SPACE (NET)
PEDIATRIC OFFICES: (8 Doctors) 12704 SQ. FT
ONCOLOGY 1200 SQ. FT
MAIN ENTRY (LOBBY) 650 SQ. FT
OUTPATIENT SURGERY 3615 SQ. FT
SERVICES 850 SQ. FT
EMERGENCY 2035 SQ. FT
SUPPORT SERVICES 928 SQ. FT
SUBTOTAL 21982
+ 307. CIRC 6595
28577 SO. FT. +/-
x 87. for
mechanical 1429
30006 SO. FT. TOTAL
ttall square -footages are subject to revision


OVERALL ADJACENCY PLftN
PARKING
+
+
******MAIL*****MAIN
* ROOM ENTRY++++++++++++++++ENTRY
MANAGEMENT + +
OFFICE+++++++++++++++ +
*
*
DATA
PROC.
*
+++++PHARMACY
+
+
* DOCTORS
* OFFICES
* *
* *
OUTPATIENT
SURGERY
*
*
+
+
ONCOLOGY
UNIT
*
*
********************************
* *
* *
************* *
* * *
* * LAB
* *
STAFF STAFF
ENTRY t *CLOTHING* * LOUNGE . X-RAY
CHANGE
AREA TRASH
AREA/ DELIVERY
+
+
+
+
+
+
*EMERGENCY
* staff access only + patient access other adjaciencies


OUTPATIENT SURGERY ADJACENCIES
* sta-f-f access only + patient access outside adjacencies
ENTRY
RECEPTION*** + *
+ *
+ *
+ *
TOILET
+
+
PATIENT++++++++WAITING++++++++++RECOVERY
DRESSING
ROOM
LOUNGE
SO
+ + * +
+ + * +
+ TOILET * +
+ * +
+ * * +
STAFF +************CONTROL*** +
ENTRY + STATION +
+ * +
. + * RECOVERY
a + DRUG +
STAFF + STORAGE +
CHANGE + * +
AREA + * +
* + STORAGE +
t + +
t + +
* + * *OPERATING++++++++ +
SCRUB + * ++++ROOM #1 ***** * +
* + * + * * + +
* + * + * * + +
**** * + ANESTHESIA * +
* + * + WORKROOM * + +
* + * + * * ++++++
* t * 4-
LED
WORKROOM
***********
*
*
+ STERILIZING ****+*** + * +
+ * +
* *+* *OPERATING* * +
++++ROOM #2
. to trash area
*****************************************


OUTPATIENT SURGERY
Main Waiting Area
Use: waiting room
Users: patients and -family
Hours: 6:00 am 12:00 am
Size: 400 sq -ft
Adjacencies: entry
reception area
Special Considerations: play area for children
space provided for coffee/soft drinks
restroom off of waiting area


OUTPATIENT SURGERY
Outpatient Change Areas
Use: outpatient changes from street clothes to gowns for
surgery
Users: patients, parents, and staff
Hours: same as O.R.
Size: 400 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: staff change area
operating room waiting area
Special Considerations: parents will be allowed
lockers for clothes storage
space for administration of medication
may have several changing rooms


OUTPATIENT SURGERY
Operating Rooms (2 units)
Use: noncritical one day surgery
Users: doctors, nurses, patients
Hours: 7:00 am 6:00 pm Monday-Friday
8:00 am -12:00 pm Saturday
Size: one room 18 X 18' (325 sq ft)
20 X 20 (400 sq -ft)
allow -for multiple use
Adjacencies: recovery rooms
x-ray
Special Considerations:
emergency communication needed w/ front desk
minimum corridor width
minimum O.R. door width
minimum ceiling height
no windows required
system
8 0
3-8 8 0 "
separate air circulation system to maintain sterile environment
floor conductive floor required,
extending 10-0" beyond room
smooth waterproof, vinyl tile/sheet tile
walls waterproof, painted, or g1azed


OUTPATIENT SURGERY
Recovery Room
Use: recovery and obvservation of patient immediately
following surgery
Users: nurses, patients
Hours: 7:00 am 6:00 pm Monday Friday
9:00 am 12:00 pm Saturday
Size: 725 sq ft
Adjacencies: operating room
recovery lounge
Special Considerations: minimum of two beds per recovery
room
minimum door width 38"
minimum ceiling height 8'0
if curtains ares used to separate spaces they must be flame-retardant
can have windows
emergency communication system needed
floor: smooth, waterproof surface vinyl tie or sheet vinyl
walls: water proof, painted,
glazed or similar, cove base at floor
painted gypsum board, vinyl or ceramic tile
ceiling: painted and waterproof
may have joints, suspended gypsum board or ceramic tile


OUTPATIENT SURGERY
Control Station Use: nursing staff
Users: to provide visual control of traffic in operating
area
scheduling and other services needed for operation procedure
Hours: same as O.R.
Size: 150 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: recovery room
data center operating room prep area
Special Considerations: maximize work space needed
still in relatively sterile area not a public area
daylight to make a pleasant work space
floor: smooth, waterproof surface,
vinyl tile
*
walls: painted or water resistant
paper or board
ceiling: painted gypsum board


OUTPATIENT SURGERY
Recovery Lounge
Use: next step -from recovery room or -for patients with very
minor surgery
place for vital signs to be stabilized
Users: patients, adult family members, nursing staff
Hours: 6:00 am 12:00 am
Size: 225 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: recovery room
public waiting room emergency
Special Considerations: family members may come to this room
more of a lounge area than recovery room
windows/daylighting is encouraged
toilet area is needed
can be shared with emergency room for patients who need further observation


OUTPATIENT SURGERY
Sterilizing Facilities
Use: sterilizing autoclave -for surgical instruments
Users: nursing staff
Hours: same as O.R.
Size: 2 rooms at 90 sq. ft. each (180 sq ft total)
Adjacencies: operating rooms
Special Considerations: doors should swing in from O.R.
one room serving both O.R.
room for storage
counter/workspace with sink
no windows permitted
floor: conductive
walls: same as O.R.
ceiling: same as O.R.


OUTPATIENT SURGERY
Drug Storage
Use: storage and preparation of medication
Users: nursing staff
Hours: same as O.R.
Size: 30 sq. -ft.
Adjacencies: O.R.
recovery room patient preparation
Special Considerations: work counter and cabinets


OUTPATIENT SURGERY
Scrub Facility
Use: -facility tor doctors/nurses to prepare tor surgery
Users: doctor, nursing statt
Hours: same as O.R.
Size: 180 sq. tt.
Adjacencies: O.R.
Special Considerations: work counter
hand washing sink waste receptacle linen receptacle no windows needed
space tor clean and sterile supplies
tloor: smooth, waterproot surtace
wear resistant vinyl tile walls: painted or waterproof
wallpaper or similar covering
ceiling: painted gypsum board


OUTPATIENT SURGERY
Soiled Workroom
Use: similar to scrub -facility but -for after surgery
Users: doctors, nursing staff
Hours: same as O.R.
Size: 100 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: Operating room
Special Considerations: linen receptacle
waste repectacle


OUTPATIENT SURGERY
Equipment Storage
Use: general equipment and supplies tor surgical unit
storage of anesthesia and equipment
Users: staff
Hours: same as O.R.
Size: 300-400 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: operating room
changing rooms
Special Considerations: stretcher storage
linen storage wheelchair storage equipment storage


EMERGENCY UNIT ADJACENCIES
ENTRY
+
+
+
RECEPTION* *NURSES + STATION + *
+ * ++TREATMENT *
+ * + ROOM #1
PUBLIC * +
WAITING+++++++++++++++++
ROOM * +
* * +
* * ++TREATMENT*
* STORAGE * ROOM #2
. .to x-ray .to lab to
outpatient
surgery
CLEAN *
SUPPLY *
STORAGE SOILED
WORKROOM
to
trash
area
* sta-f-f access only + patient access other adjaciencies


EMERGENCY UNIT
Entry
Use: Emergency entrance (highly visible)
Users: Public
Hours: 6:00 am 12:00 am
Size: 60 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: nurses reception
outside of building waiting area treatment rooms
Special Considerations: circular driveway for ambulances
(one way)
2-way swinging door (6 wide min.)
grade level entrance
emergency alert system
sheltered entrance and unloading area
separate entrance from other servi ces
easily seen from road
floor: slip proof corregated or
rubber mat


EMERGENCY UNIT
Emergency Reception Desk
Use: -first contact with emergency patients
Users: receptionist/nurse
Hours: 6:00 am 12:00 am
Size: 250 sq. -ft.
Adjacencies: entry (emergency)
waiting area treatment rooms bookkeeping
Special Considerations: highly visible


EMERGENCY UNIT
Public Waiting Area
Use: waiting room -for -family and patients
Users: public
Hours: 6:00 am 12:00 am
Size: 400 sq. -ft.
Adjacencies: entry
reception area treatment rooms
Special Considerations: perhaps can be combined with
outpatient surgery waiting room
should have some kind o-f screening from emergency entry
telephone
co-f f ee/snacks, etc. public restrooms play area included
perhaps include an outdoor play area
on outside skin o-f building


EMERGENCY UNIT
Treatment Rooms
Use: diagnosis and treatment of emergency cases
Users: patients, doctor, nurses
Hours: 6*00 am 12:00 am
Size: 380 sq. ft. (two treatment areas with beds)
Adjacencies: toilet area
radiology waiting area
Special Considerations: suction and oxygen piping
blood pressure sphygmanometers mounted on wall
storage for medication
work counter
x-ray film illuminators
cardiac monitor and resusitator
floors: smooth, waterproof, an
wear resistant vinyl
walls: waterproof painted, gla
etc.
cove at floor


EMERGENCY UNIT
Storage
Use: storage o-f wheelchairs, streachers, clean linen,
etc.
Users: emergency staff
Hours: same as emergency room
Size: 225 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: treatment facility
entry (easy access for wheelchairs)
Special Considerations: door to outside corridor


EMERGENCY UNIT
Nurses Station
Use: nurses station and patient charting area
observation of emergentcy department
Users: nursing staff
Hours: 6:00 am 12:00 am
Size: 480 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: reception area
treatment rooms data/patient files
Special Considerations: easily accessed by all staff members
floors: wear and slip resistant
vinyl or rubber tile
walls: painted or paper water
resistant
ceiling: accoustical tile


EMERGENCY UNIT
Clean Supply Storage
Use: storage of medical supplies for use in emergency treatment
Users: staff
Hours: same as emergency rooms
Size: 100 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: treatment rooms
Special Considerations: can be located in the treatment room
sink and work counter
cabinets


EMERGENCY UNIT
Soiled Workroom
Use: area to dispose of linen and waste material
Users: staff members
Hours: same as emergency room
Size: 140 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: treatment room
Special Considerations: clinical sink
work counter
sink for handwashing
waste and linen receptacles
floor: able to be germicidically
cleaned
wall: coved at floor
ceiling: painted and waterproofed


DOCTORS OFFICES (shows 1/2 of office space)
::::EXAM ROOM++ +
N! IRQpqttt DnnM4-4-
STATION ++++CONSULT ATION
++++EXAM ROOM++ . ROOM
+ + .
+::ADOLES EXAM+ .
+
SICK +
++WAITING +
+ ROOM +:::EXAM ROOM++ .
+ + + + .
+ + NURSES*** +:::EXAM ROOM + .
+ + STATION + ++++CONSULT ATION
+ + ++++EXAM ROOM++ . ROOM
+ +::ADOLES EXAM+ .
+ +
RECEPTION/ +
BUSINESS. -to data + . .to laboratory
+ process + to x-ray
+ +
+ +:::EXAM ROOM++ .
+ + + .
4- NURSES*** +:::EXAM ROOM++ .
+ STATION + ++4-+C0NSULT AT I ON
+ ++++EXAM ROOM++ -1- ROOM
+ : +:SADDLES EXAM+ .
++WELL +
WAITING +
ROOM +
+:::EXAM ROOM++ .
+ + .
NURSES*** +:::EXAM ROOM++ .
STATION + ++++CONSULTATION
++-++EXAM ROOM++ ROOM
+
:::ADOLES EXAM+
* staff access only
+ patient access (well waiting room) : patient access (sick waiting room) other ajacencies


PEDIATRIC UNIT
O-f-f ices
Use: private physicians who will be affiliated with center
will practice here. Rented out will be a means of supporting facility
Users: staff, patients, parents
Hours: 8: 00 am 5:00 pm
Size: 2 well waiting rooms (360 sq. ft. ) 720 sq. ft.
8 offices (1588 sq. ft. each) 7104 sq. ft.
a) recepti on/busi ness (196 sq. ft. )
b) examintation rooms (3 3 168 sq. ft. )
c) adolescent exam (96 sq. ft. )
d) toi1ets (60 sq. ft. )
e) consultation room (2 3 240 sq. ft. )
f) nurses station (96 sq. ft. )
g> storage (36 sq. ft. )
total 1588 sq. ft.
TOTAL
8124 SO. FT.
Adjacencies: data processing
main entry
Special Considerations: cluster around 2 waiting rooms
perhaps combine reception areas to waiting rooms
waiting rooms with outside view
PLAY AREA


ONCOLOGY UNIT ADJACIENCIE5
RECEPTION+++++WAITING
*
*
*
ROOM
+
NURSES++++++++++++++++++++++ STATION + +.
*
*
*
*
*
CLEAN AREA STORAGE *
*
*
STORAGE
TREATMENT
ROOM
*
+
+
TREATMENT
ROOM
*
*************
*
SOILED
WORKROOM
to laboratory to xray
to
trash
area
* staff access only + patient access other adjaciencies


ONCOLOGY UNIT
Oncology
Use: area -for walk-in cancer teatment -for patients who do
not require hospitalization
Users: public, staff
Hours: 8:00 am 5:00 pm
waiting room: 250 sq. ft.
treatment rooms: (2 3 200 each) 400 sq. ft.
nurses station: 150 sq. ft.
clean area storage: 100 sq. ft.
reception area: 150 sq. ft.
soiled workroom: 100 sq. ft.
storage: 100 sq. ft.
total 1200 sq. H-
Adjacencies: off of main lobby
Special Considerations: some specialized equipment
daylighting


SUPPORT UNIT ADJACENCIES
emergency
from outpatient surgery doctor's offices oncology
X-RAY
******CONTROL ******TOILET
* ROOM +
* * * +
* * +
* + +
* RADIOGRAPHIC++++PATIENT +
* ROOM DRESSING+++++
* * ROOM
*
* FILM
* STORAGE
*
**FILM FILM
PROCESSING****VIEWING AREA AREA
+
+
++++++LABORATORY t *
STORAGE
* staff access only
+ patient access/use
. other adjaciencies


SUPPORT SERVICES
Lobby Entrance (Main)
Use: main entrance of building
Users: public
Hours: 6:00 am 12:00 am Size: tentry
treception/information desk restrooms (male/female)
60 sq ft 60 sq ft 120 sq ft
240 sq ft
Adjacencies: entry
reception area bookeeping waiting room
Special Considerations: entrance at grade level, covered and
handicap/wheelchair access
provide airlock entry with southern exposure
telephone with provision for privacy
floor: carpet
walls: either painted or
wal1cover i ng
ceiling: acoustical tile


SUPPORT SERVICES
Management Office
Use: building administration
Users: staff and management personnel
Hours: 7:00 am 6:00 pm
Size: 500 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: centrally located
Special Considerations: windows desirable
room for data imput/computers can combine with mail/copy room


SUPPORT SERVICES
X-Ray
Use: area -for Xray examination
Users: staff and patients
Hours: 7:00 am 12:00 am
a) radiographic room: w/ table (3 -6" ; X 7'0")
200 sq. ft.
b) control station: 35 sq. ft.
c) film processing darkroom: 25 sq. ft.
d) film storage: 16 sq. ft.
e) toilet room: 20 sq. ft.
f) dressing room: 12 sq. ft.
film viewing area: 20 sq. ft.
TOTAL 328 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: centrally located for all departments
Special Considerations: RADIATION PROTECTION!
does not require windows
X-ray table & equipment
film illuminators
floors: chemical resistive,
waterproof, trowled on flooring
walls: painted waterproof with
x-ray shielding (lead) ceiling: painted gypsum board


SUPPORT SERVICES
Laboratory
Use: laboratory analysis
Users: laboratory technicians
Hours: 7:00 am 6:00 pm
Size: 150 sq. -ft.
Adjacencies: central location to all departments
Special Considerations: consists o-f counter spaces along
most walls with cabinet storage
blood storage -facilities
specimin collection -facilities


SUPPORT SERVICES
Pharmacy
Use: preparation and dispensation of prescription drugs
Users: pharmacy sta-f-f
Hours: 7:00 am 11:00 pm
Size: 250 sq. -ft.
Adjacencies: main entrance
Special Considerations: counter -for public access
smal1 pharmacy area security essential visibility to public
cabinets and storage -for drugs and contai ners


SUPPORT SERVICES
Mai 1/Copy Room
Use: delivery and sorting of mail
copying of documents
Users: staff
Hours: 8:00 am 6:00 pm
Size: 200 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: management office
close to entry
Special Considerations: ventilation for machines
mail boxes
room for copying machines room for mail sorting


SUPPORT SERVICES
Staff Lounge
Use: sta-ff lounge area with facility for heating food for meals, food storage and drinks
Users: staff only
Hours: 6:00 am 12:00 am
Size: 200 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: treatment rooms
doctors o-ffices toilet/shower room
Special Considerations: kitchenette needed
lockers -for personal belongings
outside entrance?


SUPPORT SERVICES
Staff Clothing Change Area
Use: area to change -from street clothes to work clothing
Users: staff
Hours: 6:00am 12:00am
Size: men 168 sq. ft. (room for 6 men)
women 192 sq. ft. (room for 6 women)
Adjacencies: centrally located in building
Special Considerations: toilet area
1ockers
shower
daylighting okay
floor: smooth, waterproof, wear and
slip resistant concrete,
1i noleum sheet or tile walls: waterproof painted, glazed
or similar ceramic tile, waterproof wall coverings or painted gypsum board ceiling: painted and waterproof
painted, moisture resistant gypsum board


SUPPORT SERVICES
Trash/delivery area
Use: trash and garbage disposal
delivery of supplies
Users: maintenance
Hours: 6:00 am 5:00 pm
Size: 150 sq. ft.
Adjacencies: on outside skin of building
centrally located
Special Considerations: shield by fence of some sort to
reduce unsightlyness
room for garbage truck to access
laundry delivery




CODE CHECKLIST (adapted from SLP checklist)
PROJECT NAME: Childrens Diagnostic Treatment Center LOCATION: Genesee Park, Colorado
APPLICABLE CODE NAME: Uniform Building Code, 1985 ed.
(number in ( ) refers to table/section
reference)
OCCUPANCY CLASSIFICATION: Group I, division 1 (1001)
Principal occupancy: I1 (lOOl)
^hospitals, sanatariums, nursing homes and similar buildings (each for 5 or more people)
CONSTRUCTION TYPE: I or II (must be fire resistive(5C)
will use type I const.
Construction type I: walls and permanent non-bearing
partitions of noncombustable fire resistive construction
permanent nonbearing partitions must be one- to two-hour fire resistive and may be fire retardant treated wood.
structural elements must be steel, iron, concrete or masonry
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE BASIC FLOOR AREA: I (F.R.) unlimited
(table 5-C)
may be increased if adjacent to open area on:
2 or more sides: where public space, streets or yard (506-A) is larger than 20 feet in width along
(2,3,4) sides, floor areas may be increased at a rate of (1.25%, 2.5%, 5%) for each foot by which the minimum width exceeds 20 ft, but does not reach 100%.
Sprinklered: areas specified in Table 5C and
Section 505b may be tripled in one story buildings and doubled in


buildings of more than one story if the building provided with an approved automatic sprinkler system throughout.
does not apply for atriums
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE HEIGHT (table 5-D)
Feet: Type I unlimited
Stories: Type I unlimited
FIRE RESISTANCE OF EXTERIOR WALL (table 5-A)
-2 hours less than 5 feet from property line -1 hour elsewhere (also see Section 1002)
OPENINGS IN EXTERIOR MALLS (table 5-A)
-not permitted less than 5 feet from property line -protected less than 10 feet
WINDOWS REQUIRED IN ROOMS (section 1005)
-exterior glazed openings needs to equal at least l/10th of the total floor area -natural ventilation by means of exterior openings with an area not less than l/20th of the total floor area.
if no window is provided artificial light and mechanically operated ventilating system is required (see section 605)
MINIMUM CEILING HEIGHTS IN ROOMS 8'-0"
FIRE RESISTIVE REQUIREMENTS: (section 17-A)
exterior bearing walls: 4 hours (1803a)
-interior bearing walls: 3 hours exterior nonbearing walls: 4 hours (1803a)
structural frame: 3 hours ^structural elements in exterior wall will be protecting against external fire exposure for external bearing walls or structural frame, whichever is greater.
-permanent partitions: 1 hour vertical openings: 2 hours -floors: 2 hours
roofs (1806): 2 hours
-exterior doors (1803): 3/4 hour if less than 20'
setback
-exterior windows: 3/4 hour if less than 20' setback -atrium: 3-4 stories 20 ft opening (min) and area of
400 sq. ft. (Table 17b): 1 hour


exits cannot be through atriums)
-mezzanine floors (area allowed) (1716): for unenclosed: 1 hour (not more than 1/3 area of room
can be mezzanine)
STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS:
Framework: structural steel or iron, reinforced
concrete or masonry (section 1802)
Stairs and stair platforms: reinforced concrete, steel
or iron (section 1805) Treads and risers: concrete, steel or iron
brick, marble, tile or other noncombustable materials can be used for finish
Floors: masonry or concrete fire resistive floors
-can use wood sleepers and wood floors over concrete if filled with fire resistive filling Roofs: where every part of roof structure is 25 feet
above any floor, balcony or gallery may be of unprotected noncombustable fire retardant materi als
Partitions: walls and permanent bearing partitions,
fire resistive, non-combustable
permanent nonbearing partitions can be 1-2 hours fire resistive construction (which are not part of a shaft enclosure)
EXITS: (Table 33-A)
floor area
occupant load = -----------------
sq. ft./occupant
-minimum of 2 exits other than elevators are required where number of occupants is at least 6 occupant load factor square footage: 300 sq. ft.
ENTRANCES: need to be protected from the weather if more
than one entrance at least one entrance needs to be handicapped accessable
MINIMUM WIDTH OF EXITS: 44 inches (3.66 ft) (section 3321) every exit opening through which patients are transported in wheelchairs, strechers, or beds shall be of sufficient width to permit the easy passage


-clear width of not less than 44 inches and no projections within 44 inch clear width -threshold must be flush with the floor *(section 3321b)
EXIT ARRANGEMENT; (section 3303c)
if only 2 exits are required, they should be at a distance not less than one half the diagonal dimension of the building
-or the area to be served measured in a straight line between exits
-if 3 or more exits are needed, need to be a reasonable distance apart so that if one becomes blocked, the others will be available
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE TRAVEL DISTANCE TO EXIT: (section 3303d)
-150 ft (unsprinklered)
-200 ft (sprinklered)
ALLOWABLE EXIT SEQUENCE; (section 3302e)
rooms may have one exit through an adjoining or intervening room which provides a direct obvious and unobstructed means of travel to an exit corridor, exit enclosure or until exit is provided from building total length of travel cannot exceed other provisions of the code
-rooms with a total load of 10 occupants or less can exit through more than one intervening room
EXIT DOORS: (3321a)
-open in direction of exit of travel -44 inches clear width
4 feet is maximum leaf width (3304f)
EXIT CORRIDORS:
-minimun allowable width : 44 inches (3305b)
Ihowever if cooridor serves area with one or more non-ambulatory person shall not be less than 8 -handrails on both sides of hallway preferred -required to have exit at each end of corridor dead end corridors are allowed -maximum length: 20 ft (3305e)
WALLS FIRE RESISTANCE REQUIRED: 1 hour (3305g)
DOORS AND FRAME FIRE RESISTANCE: 1 hour (3305h)
STAIRS:
-minimum width: 44" for occupancy load of 50+ (3306b)
36" for occupancy load of 50- (3306b) -maximum riser: 7 1/2 inches (3306c)


max imam tread: 10 inches (3306c)
-no winders are allowed
on each story, -floor level must remain consistent unless ramped
LANDINGS:
Minimum size: same size as stair width and no more than
4?if straight run <3306g)
Maximum vertical distance between landings: 12' (3306i>
Required height of rails: between 30-34" <3306j>
continuous for full length of the stairs 12" beyond top and bottom of risers
HANDRAILS:
-handgrips < 1 1/4" > 2
handgrips required at each side (3306j)
-intermediate rails required at stairs 88" wi de
-ends need to be returned or terminate in newel posts or safety terminals -30-34" above nosing
STAIRS:
-one exit accessible to every room below grade needs to lead directly to the exterior at grade level (3321d>
to roof required if 4 stories or more and slope of roof is less than 4:12 <3306o)
STAIR ENCLOSURE REQUIRED: with 2 hour fire rating when
floor is located more than 75 feet above lowest level of fire department vehicle access (3310a)
HORIZONTAL EXIT REQUIREMENTS (3308):
cannot be the only exit from the building 2 hour fire resistive wall
RAMPS: (3307)
1:12 maximum grade (3307c)
-non-slip surface
width same as stairway (3307b)
handrails required only if 1:15 or greater (3307e) on one or both sides of ramp 32" high must have a smooth surfaces
-extend at least 12" beyond top and bottom of ramp


enclosure not needed if serving only one adjacent floor (3309a)
EXITS SIGNS: are required at every required exit door with
ccupancy load of 50 or more (3314a)
BALCONY RAILS: are required when balcony is more than 30"
above grade or floor below
-42 (3-6") rail height required (1711)
PARAPET WALLS;
-required on all exterior walls, execpt for walls which butt up to walls with a fire rating of not less than 2 hour fire rating or roofs constructeded of non combustable materials (1709a)
-height needs to be 30" above the point where the roof surfaces and wall intersection (1709b)
FIRE EXTINGUISHING SYSTEM:
-sprinklers required on every flor with area of at least 1500 sq. ft. (3802b)
may be omitted in operating rooms, xray, etc. if room is equipped with smoke detectors (3802g)
Dry standpipes: (3805c)
-on every floor above first story of every required stai rway
-on each side of wall adjacent to exit opening of a horizontal exit
3way outlet above the roofline when the roof has a slope of less than 4:12
Wet standpipes: (3805d)
-nozzle attached to 100 feet of hose
-all portions of building must be within 30 feet to end of nozzle
Fire extinguishers: required at each standpipe
RESTROOMS:
need 2'8" clearance at door
door opens outward in case of fall; door will not be blocked
sink height at least 2-2" (for knee clearance)
mirrors need to be 3 1/2" sbovr dink hright of 31" to
33" using a 6" deep sink
grab bars need to support 250 lbs and should be provided at the water closet, shower, etc.


SKYLIGHTS:
-must carry tributary roof load
-separation/spacing of supports no more than 25" unless corregated wire glass
-0.030" minimum thickness and must be wired glass annealed glass, heat strengthened glass with mesh of no greater than 1" X 1"
PARKING:
-minimum of 12J width for 90 degree parking
-maximum of 200' from nearest entrance
-clearly marked as handicapped
WALKS:
-needs to be continual surface ramped, no steps or abrupt changes in level
-at entry; platform minimum 60" X 60" extending at least 12 beyond each side of door
doors may swing both ways
-if only swings one way need a level platform at least 36" deep and 60" wide with at least 12" on each side of the door


ZONING
Jefferson County Zoning Resolution: Section 24 MR-1 Mountain Residential-One District (6 November 1979)
The Mountain ResidentialOne Zone District is intended to provide -for low density residential development where certain agricultural uses are compatable with this development.
Contained in this section are the allowed land uses, building and lot standards (including minimum setbacks) and other general requirements specified in this zone district.
Lot and Buildino Standards
1. Height limitation: No building shall exceed 45 feet in height.
2. Lot Standards: The minimum lot area for a dwelling or other main building shall be 17,400 square feet.
3. Front Setback:
a. The minimum front setback for a dwelling or other main building shall be 30 feet.
b. Corner lots must comply with the vision clearance requirement outlined in the general requirements portion of this section.
4. Side Setbacks: The minimum side setback for any building shall be 20 feet on each side. The minimum side setback for any building adjacent to a street shall be 30 feet.
5. Rear Setback: The minimum rear setback for any
building shall be 20 feet.
6. Fences and Retaining Walls:
a. Maximum fence height: 6 feet
b. Fence permits are required for any fence over 42 inches in height.
c. No fence more than 42 inches in height of any type shall be permitted in the area between the front setback line and the front lot line.
d. Retaining walls over 42 inches in height which are withing 3 feet of a public right of way or public utility, drainage or other easement shall require a certification by a Professional


Engineer as to design and structural stability.
e. No barbed wire or electric fence shall be permitted in this zone district.
f. Fences on corner lots must comply with the vision clearance outlined in the general requirements portion of this section.
g. Dn adjacent lots where allowed fence heights differ, the lower height restriction shall govern.
7. Off Street Parking Requirements:
a. Each parking space shall be no less than 300 square feet in area. Spaces for small cars, may be 250 square feet in area.
b. Each parking space shall be at least 9 feet in width and 18 feet in length except for small car spaces. Small car spaces shall be no less than 7.5 feet in width and 16 feet in length.
c. For any use requiring more than 10 parking spaces, accomodation for small cars may be made in the review and approval of the parking plan submitted to the Zoning Administrator.
8. Signs and Outdoors Advertising Devices: Signs and outdoor advertising devices shall be in accordance with the provisions of Section 9 of this zoning resoluti on.
General Requirements
1. Corner Vision Clearance Requirement: No fence, wall, hedge, shrub, structure or other obstruction to view which is over 42 inches in height shall be erected, placed or maintained within a triangle formed by the point of intersection of lot lines abutting a street and/or railroad right of way and the points located along the lot lines 55 feet from the point of intersection.
2. All setbacks shall be measured from the foundation or wall; however, eaves, roof overhangs and fireplaces may protrude 25 inches into the setback.
3. No structure may be erected, placed upon or extend over any easment unless approved in writing by the agency or agencies having jurisdiction over such easement.
4. Outside ground and building lighting shall not cast direct light or glare on adjacent dwellings.
5. A structure with no more than 100 square feet of floor area and no more than 8 feet in height is


categorized as a "mini-structure". A mini-structure shall not be required to meet the side and rear setback requirements, providing it not used -for housing livestock; and providing it screened -from neighbors view.
i s i s




CONCLUSION
The real challenge of designing a children's health care facility did not become evident until the project was underway. The functionality of this type of building seemed to take over, leaving the playfulness of the child, as expressed in design, behind. Therefore, the challenge was to continue to design, working against the institutional image that this building could have easily had.
First, there was a need to employ some device which would be an obvious sign to the user that this was a building for children. There was a dicotomy in thought that although the building should look playful, it still is a building with a serious side. Care needed to be taken to not to make the image overstimulating or too busy. The device chosen was building blocks, which is a form easily recognized by most children. The massing of the building was generated not only by the arrangement of the units inside but also by the forms created by the child playing with blocks. Children do not stack their blocks evenly all around, but leave gaps and shift the pieces to create interesting designs. The front elevation of this building is the best example of this concept of building blocks, with the deliniation of the front facade


into square pieces. Although the parti of the building blocks is a strong one, it was difficult to use it throughout the building without creating a Disneyland-like effect.
Another important aspect of the design of this facility was to provide an environment which would make the health care clinic less intimidating to the patient. Display areas about health care will be provided along the walls in the hal1way/atrium. Educational materials presented in a pleasant, fun way would be changed several times a year. Interest in seeing what new display will be presented could possibly be a motivating factor in coaxing the child into coming to the doctor for a visit.
Color was introduced in the design to create a lightness and also provides a sign that this is a building designed for children. The block forms were separted by a banding of blue ceramic tile which was recessed by a few inches. The recessions created edges to the blocks while breaking up the facade of the building. The windows created the decoration on the blocks where normally one would expect to see a picture or alphabet letter as seen on the traditional toy.
Care was taken not to disturb the site by destroying the rural feeling. A majority of the trees were left as is, while additional, more regular planting was used to


lead one up to the bulding along the road. Parking and roadways were placed along the natural contours of the site because of grading and drainage. The building was also sited along the contour lines and therefore a berming effect was created along the back of the building.
Although there are many more factors that went into the design of this building description of them becomes tedious at best. The main challenge of this project was to soften the image of the health care center by introducing a relaxed, playful feeling. This was accomplished to some extent by introduction of colors and the building blocks, but could be explored more completely. In conclusion, this thesis project was a tremendous learning experience, educating the designer as to the complexity of merging internal design functions with the of creating a specific image.




NORMALS. MEANS. AND EXTREMES
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tl il f I! 1 II 1 r 1 f 1 if 1 > if 1 > H 1 > if 1 H 1 > If 1 1 1 l II I rv ii ll ll si Cm 9112 MM Ul
Ul 16 U 1 *1 *i 1 *1 n 11 19 11 27 11 26 26 2* 27 *1 *1 *1 1 *1 1 11 I* 11 l 19 1
4 *3.9 16.2 29.9 49 1771 -23 17*1 10M 0 0.41 1 ** 19*1 0.01 1*92 1.02 21.7 17*1 12.* 1*61 *2 *1 * *2 3.1 S * IS 176* 72 5.9 10 10 11 6 1 0 9 919.2
9 *6.2 16.* 17.1 7* 17*3 -11 17*2 702 0 0 7 1 1760 1*70 lt.1 1*60 3.3 1*37 *7 *1 * 7.3 9 *7 N mi Tl 9.9 9 11 * 2 27 1
N 90.1 71.1 7.0 * 1771 -4 17*2 Ml 0 1.21 2 7 17** 19* 1 27.2 1**1 1ft.1 1*37 *7 *2 *1 *1 10.0 S 11 ns 1*12 *.l 10 11 1
41.4 1.9 *7.5 * 17*3 -2 1*73 371 0 1.73 * 17 1 7*| 1**1 1.29 21.1 1*37 17.3 1*37 3 1* 1* > 10.* s 3* ns 1*60 6 6.1 7 10 11 1 !
n 90.1 *1.6 17.0 71 177* 2* 1772 2H 0 2.** 7 173 7 1*7* 1.13 1971 1 1.* 1*30 10.7 1*10 70 11 97 *1 7.1 1 ) 1* 13*4 6* 6.1 4 11 12 10 1 2
4 90.1 11.4 64.0 1771 1* 17*7 0 no 1.41 6* 1**7 0.10 1**0 1.1* 1970 0.1 1*31 0.3 1311 71 It 97 *2 *.l 1 *7 5 1*16 70 9.* 7 11 10 1
4 7.9 16.6 71.0 101 1771 I 1772 0 a*t i.Tt * 1 14* 0.1? 1*1* 2.*2 14*1 0.0 0.0 71 1* 16 9* t.ft 9 1* Iw 1**9 70 *.4 9 16 a 11 a 19 0 0 914.*
6 71.* 100 17*7 *1 17** o rot 1.17 * * T 1971 1*60 0.0 0.0 * * 1* I* ! t.I 1 2 IV 1*72 72 . 1 oi 1* 1 10
s * 7. i 12. 77 17*0 20 1771 120 i* l.ll *7 l*l T 2.** 21.1 1*3* 13.* 1*3* 7 1 *0 * *3 t.I S *7 MV 1731 79 *.* 11 10 6 1
0 4.8 17.2 17.0 7 1777 1 17*7 *01 i 1.19 * 17 17*7 1.7 1 11.2 1*** 12.* 1*3 3 1* 1* *0 4.2 3 *1 MV 1*1* 71 *.* 11 10 1 1
31.1 21.* 17. * 7f 1777 -2 17*1 7*1 0 0.7* > 77 17** l **7 1.2* 1*7 17. 1 I*** 11.1 1*** 7 *3 10 *7 9.7 1 *t V 1*62 *9 9.3 11 3 10 9 2*
*4.2 It.* 12.6 71 1*91 -1# 1772 100* 0 0.41 2 t* l*7 0.0* 1*** 1.19 1471 o.t 1*71 11.1 l*7t ** *1 12 *1 4.0 1 91 Ml 1713 * 3.1 11 10 10 9 1 10 1
2UI ov $ JUl
vt ** .0 >4.t 90.1 101 1771 -23 17*1 016 *21 19.11 7. 1 1*17 7 1*** 1.19 1499 14.1 1*** 17.4 1*1* 1 *0 0 *2 9.0 1 1* IV 1 1 70 9.1 119 11* 11* M 1* 10 It 16* 10
trawea abov arc fro* existing and comparable exposures. Annual Highest t rapere ture 105 In August 1878; lowest (*pr*turt -30 In February praclplcaclan 0.00 In 0Knbr 1881; maximal precipitation in 26 hour a 6.5 snowfall In 2* hours 23.0 In April 1085; fastest nil* of wind 45 frow Wait
RtrtMi have been axcaadad at other aitaa in tha locality as 1434; aailms monthly precipttacIon 8.57 In Hay 1876; atnlmm In May 1876, mrIsm monthly snowfall 57.6 In December 1913; In May 193 3 .
follows:
swnthly
aailam
I
Means and extremes above ara fro. existing mA comparable a*po*uraa. Maxima* monthly precipitation 3.68 In August 1936.
Annual axtraasa have baan ascended ae sthsr aitaa la thm locality aa fallow*
1 through 1444. Tha station did not ape rut a 24 homes dally. Fog nod rtwalsTStani data nay bn Wrolata.
Rut fner, J ames
m: .u: m -n -
A., Climates of the States, o R=>=Mi-r-H romnanv. 1980.
Detroi t, p. 96-113.
AddiTiONAl clilMATE dATA


CLIMAT dATA
LOCATION GENESEE PARK
Longitude 105.17
Latitude 39.42
ALTITUDE 7700
TABLE 1 CLIMATIC DATA (DEG C)
MONTH MAX MIN RANGE
JAN 5.7 -6.9 12. 6
FEB 8.7 - 5 5 14. 1
MAR 8. 3 --1.8 10. 1
APR 14 6.1 7.0
MAY 1B. 5 .1 0. 6 7.0
JUN '-yr 16.3 6. 9
JUL 25. 1 21. 1 3. 9
AUG 24. 3 20.7 3. 6
BEP 20.5 13. 3 7. 1
OCT 16. 5 5.5 1 1
NOV 10. 8 0 10. 7
DEC 6. 1 CM a 1 10. 2
HIGH = 25. 1 LOW = -6.9
AMT = 9.100001 AMR = 31.9
TABLE 2 CLIMATIC DATA (RH,PRECIP,WIND)
MONTH MAX MIN AVEG GR RAIN WP ws
JAN 61 59 60 3 .71 1>J NW
FEB 54 51 52.5 3 . 93 W NW
MAR 42 38 40 2 1.54 w NW
APR . j*. 30 31.5 2 2. 52 w NW
MAY 28 28.5 1 2.82 w NW
JUN 30 26 28 1 1.7 w SE
JUL 39 36 37.5 2 1.49 w SW
AUG 42 38 40 2 Qj w sw
SEP 38 34 36 2 1.41 w SW
OCT 38 34 36 2 1.34 w sw
NOV 48 48 48 2 1.03 14 NW
DEC 57 59 58 3 . 59 W NW
TOTAL 1 7.56


TABLE
DIAGNOSIS
MAX DAY- UP LOW NIGHT MIN UP ---> STRESS LOW D N
JAN 5. 7 26 19 -6. 9 19 C C
FED EL 7 26 19 -5. 5 19 C C
MAR 8.3 27 20 -1.0 20 C c:
APR 14 27 20 6.1 20 c c
HAY 18.5 30 21 10. 6 21 c c
JIJN 2 3 2' 30 21 3.6.3 23. 0 0
JOL.. 25. 1 27 20 21 1 20 0 H
AUG 24.3 27 20 20. 7 20 0 H
SEP 20.5 27 20 13. 3 20 0 0
OCT 16.5 27 20 5.5 20 c: C
NOV 10.8 27 20 0 20 c c:
DEC 6. 1 26 19 i & M 19 c c:
TABLE 4 INDICATORS
MONTH HI H2 H3 H4 01 02 03 04 Cl C2 C 3 C4
JAN 0 0 0 o 0 0 0 0 o o 2 0
FEB 0 0 Ci o o 0 o 0 Ci c> o
MAR 0 o o 0 0 o o o o 0 0
APR MAY 0 o 0 o 0 o o 0 2 0 o o
JUN 0 o c> o 0 o o o o o o
JUL o 1 o 0 0 1 0 o o o o o
AUG o 1 V o c 1 0 o o o o o
SEP o o 0 0 o '.I 0 0 o o 0 o
OCT 0 o o 0 (I) 0 >0 0 o 0
NOV o o o o o o 0 o o 0 0
DEC Ci o o 0 0 0 0 o o o '? o
TOTAL 0 x'.. 0 0 4 o o 3 7 6 o
Woolard, D. Stafford, Climate Assessment Computer Program. Architectural Science Research: Boulder, Colorado, 1983.


SUMMARY OF MONTHLY CLIMATIC DATA FOR KASSLER COLORAOO LAST DATA 1Z/19TZ SUBSTATION NO. * PRERAREO BY THE COLORADO CLIMATOLOS1ST, DEPARTMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE, COLORADO STATE UNIV., FT. COLL INCO BOSEJ
D
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC ANN
MONTHLY MEAN MAXIMUM TEMP (FI AVE. 67.7 50.1 56.6 66.2 72.3 82.3 07.9 06.2 79.6 69.6 56.6 69.7 66.7
MA X. 5 8*0 66.6 66.2 73.6 79.6 89.6 91.8 09.2 05.5 78.7 60.6 58.0
MIN. 36.0 36.6 63.0 57.0 62.6 73.6 06.2 02. 6 69.6 53.5 66. Q 39.5 506.
MONTHS OF RECORD 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62.
MONTHLY MEAN MINIMUM TEMP (FI AVE. 17.5 19.7 26.6 36.6 66.0 52.6 59.6 50.6 69.5 39.2 26.6 20.2 37.2
MAX. 27.2 30.8 31.1 61.9 51.3 50.2 63.6 62.6 53. 7 66.6 36.6 28.6
MIN. 3.6 7.9 16.0 29.0 39.7 60.2 55.2 55.3 62.0 30.3 20.9 9.7 506.
MONTHS OF RECORO 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62.
monthly MEAN AVERAGE TEMP (FI AVE. 32.6 36.9 39.6 69.3 58.2 67.6 73.7 72.3 6i*.6 56.6 61.6 35.0 52.0
MAX. 62.6 67.7 67.1 57.2 65.6 73.9 77.2 75. 0 68.9 61.8 51.5 63.2
MIN. 19.7 22.2 26.9 63.0 51.2 61.6 70.1 69. 3 56.1 61.9 32.7 26.6 506.
MONTHS OF RECORO 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62.
DEGREE OAYS (BASE 65FI AVE. 989.2 839.1 805.1 683.1 221.0 69. i 5.7 6.2 106.0 351.1 716.6 966.3 5512.5
MAX. 1308 1160 1110 609 353 139 31 21 205 712 963 1177
* MIN. 691 676 567 257 111 0 0 0 16 179 522 732 266.
"" . MONTHS OF RECORO 22. 22. 22. 2 2. 22. 22. 22. 22. 22. 22. 22. 22.
MO OAYS MAX TEMP GTR OR EQ 90F AVE. 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 .3 6.5 13.0 8. 8 2.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 31.0
MAX. 0 0 0 0 1 19 25 15 0 0 0 0
MIN. 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 3 0 0 0 0 292.
MONTHS OF RECORO 2%. 26. 26, 26. 26. 25. 25. 25. 25. 26. 26. 26.
MO OAYS MAX TEMP LESS OR EQ 32F AVE* 6.6 2.3 2.2 .2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.8 2 1.5 2.7 13.5
< MA X. 13 9 6 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 7 9
MIN. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
MONTHS OF RECORO 25. 26. 25. 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 25. 25. 292.
MC OATS MIN TEMP LESS OR EO 32F AVE. 27.8 26.9 26.3 12.6 2.0 .1 0.0 0.0 0 7.0 20.6 27.2 160.1
MAX. 31 29 31 20 7 1 0 0 5 10 29 31
MIN. 21 16 17 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 11 22 296.
MONTHS OF RECOPO 25. 25. 25. 25. 25. 2*6. 26. 26. 26. 25. 25. 25.
NO OAYS HIM TEMP LESS OR EO 0 F AVE. 3.3 2.1 1.2 .1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 .0 6 2.2 9.3
MAX. 11 7 6 2 o rn 0 0 0 0 1 3 . 11
MIN. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
MONTHS OF RECORO 25. 26. 25. . 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 26. 25. 25. 292.
HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (FI TEMP 76 77 03 05 93 102 101 100 90 90 82 70
YEAR AND 0AY 195605 193227 197126 196926 196226 195623 195611 196900 193305 193607 193102 193911
MONTHS OF RECORO . 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62.- 62. 62. 62. 62. 62.
LOWEST TEMPERATURE IFI TEMP -20 -29 -20 -6 17 31 62 61 21 -6 -16 -26
YEAR ANO OAT 196312 195101 196302 196506 1.95602 195102 193106 196017 197119 196913 195226 197206
MONTHS OF RECORO 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62. 62.
m
S3
S3
m
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JtrrERSON COUNTY TEXT ERA TUM


"U
SUMiRY Of MONTHLY CUMAT1C 0T FOR OaSSLeR COLORADO LAST DATA 12/|972 SUBSTATION NO. *is* OIV. *
HAEPARto by tn? couobaoo clImatolooist, department of atmospheric science, Colorado STATE unit., ft. Collins, co *os23
JAn FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUO SEP OCT NOV DEC ANN
MONTHLY PRECIPITATION (IN) AvE. T? .93 1.54 2.52 2.82 1.70 1.49 1.40 t.M 1.3* 1. n3 .59 17.57
MAX.- 2.22 2.85 3.7? 9.14 . 44 5.77 3.94 3.44 5.15 4.4. 4.44 2.29
MIN# u 12 32 .0* 42 04 M .35 .03 0.00 0*00 02
months or record *0. 42# 42. 42. 42. 42. 42. 42. 42. *2 *2* 4?. 502.
BCATEST DAILY PRECIP (IN) AMOUNT Tn .93 1.08 3.IT 2..3 2.3* 1.24 1..1 l.3 2.05 2.03 68
YEAR AND DAY 1.50 months Or Record 2. 25* 25. 25. 25. 25. 25. 25. 2*. 25 24. 25.
mCnTmLY SNOhEAlL (IN) AVE. 10.* 13.2 16.8 11.5 X.T 0.0 0.6 0.0 1.5 5.4 11.0 8.2 79.5
max. J3.p 45.7 43.0 41.5 17.0 0.0 o.o 0.0 10.0 43.0 54.5 21.0
r MJN. I .* 2.4 0.0 0.0 6.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 .P
MonTMS Or RECORO *1. 41. 42. 40. 31. 39. 39. 41 . 3*. 32. 4). 39. *42.
obtSt oeptm SNr* on grno in mon (jN) IT 14 12 IT 5 0 6 0 0 11 20 13
YEAR AND OAT 1.4V2B 19601* 194804 1^5702 1.5025 999 999 09. 1.71 It 194.0* 1.7201 I06OO6
months Or RECORD **. 22. 25. 22. 21. 25. 25. 25. 2*. 19. 22. 24.
NC Oats PRECIP OTR OR EO 0.1 IN AVE. 2.9 3.3 5.0 5.3 4.4 5.* 5.9 4.T 3.3 3.1 2.8 2.3 50.4
MAX. In 7 11 12 IT 17 13 11 T 9 4 7
MIN. n 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0
MONTHS or RECORO . 2*. 25. 2*. 25. 25. 25. 25. 2*. 25. 25. 25. 2.7.
no Days prCCIp oTr or eq 0.5 in ave. .3 . 1.0 1.3 2.3 i.l 1.0 .5 1.0 . .* .2 10.2
max. 3 2 4 3 T 5 3 2 4 4 2 1
MIN. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
MONTMS or RECORO 2*. 2*. 2*. 24. 2*. 2*. 24. 23. 24. 2*. 2*. 287.
JEfFERSON COUNTY TFECIfITATIOH


Jefferson County, Colorado County Information Service,
Colorado State University, United States Department of Agriculture, March 1974.
tn n
> o 32 CO
CO o M M H
CO M >
. t- s CO H
w > M
H O
M 2 z
?0
16 20 to 28 32 16 20 24 28 32 16 20 to 28 32 FREEZE TEMPERATURE F
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o MEAN DATE OF LAST
tn to 1 to 1 N> tn c- 1 to U1 1 t* tn 1 to
1 o o 1 to 1 M 1 o 1 M 1 M 1 M SPRING OCCURRENCE
M 'O tn to m tn 'O C7V H* to 00 vl to ON
W* f* M H* M M M M t I-* M H* M o MEAN DATE OF FIRST
h* I | O | ? ? H* 1 O M 1 O ? ? ? m i o O | ? ? VO 1
M o to M O to t* O to H* o to FALL OCCURRENCE
H1 tn 00 tn VO VO LO tn O to tn ^4 to to
to to M M M ' N> to M M t1 to H* I* M MEAN NO. OF DAYS
N> H* vO Ul to M VO ^1 o VO to
tO cr\ M O to to *-* ON o to to o BETWEEM DATES
CO CO LO to CO H* M M M t-* to to to to to YEARS OF RECORD
o o o o o o O O O o o o o o o SPRING
CO CO CO w CO M K* M h- M to to to to to YEARS OF RECORD
o o o o o o O O o o VO o o o o FALL
JEFFERSON COUNTY FREEZE DATA


SOLAR dATA
L 0 CATION = GENESEE SOLAR TIME
OR IENTAT 1ON = 160
LA 111 ODE = 39.42 LONGITUDE - 105.17
MONTH = 3 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ VS A HSA
6 = SUNRISE
7 11.3 100 21.8 -60
8 22.4 110. b -52. 5 -49.
9 TO O 1 OO 7 39 -37.
.1.0 41.6 138 43.8
1 1 47.9 157. 3 47.9 -2. 7
12 50.2 180 51.9 20
13 47.9 202. 7 56.4 42. 7
14 41.6 222 £ 2. 2 62
15 32.8 237. 3 71.1 77. 3
16 I "7 22.4 249. 5 88.9 39.5
j. / 18 J. i a iC'V -.3 269. 7 .8 0
18 = SUNSET

LOCATION = GENESEE SOLAR TIME
OR IENTATION = 160
LA TITUDE = 39.42 LONGITUDE = 105.17
MONTH = 6 DAY = 21
HR AL. AZ VS A HSA
4.6 = SUNRISE
5 4 62. 7 0 o
6 14.6 71.5 84. 4 _oo I *_ K.J
7 25. 9 80 70. 3 -80
8 37. 4 88.8 67. 1 -71.:
9 48. 9 99.2 67 -60.1
10 60 1 13. 3 68. 5 -46. '
1 1 69. 6 137. 1 71.1 -22.1
12 74 180 74. 9 20
13 69. 6 222. 9 80. 4 62. 9
14 60 246. 7 88. 1 86.7
15 48. 9 260. 8 0 0
16 37.4 271.2 0 0
17 25. 9 280 o o
IS 14.6 288. 5 0 o
19 4 297. 3 o 0
19. 4 = SUNSET


105.17
LOCATION = GENESEE SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 160 LATITUDE = 39.42 LONGITUDE = MONTH = 9 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ VS A I4S A
6 = SLJ NR I BE
7 1 1 . 4 99. 8 22. 1 -60 7
8 2 j:. . 6 110. 32 7 -49 . 7
9 T7 122. 6 39.2 -37 . 4
10 41 .8 137. 9 44 7 . 1
1 1 48 . 1 157. 7 48. 1 2 8
12 50 . 4 180 52. 1 20
13 48 . 1 202. 8 w J 6> m £j 42. 8
14 41 . 8 2 7 7 1 62.4 62. 1
15 "T ~:t 237. 4 71.4 77. 4
16 O'l . 6 249. 7 89. 3 89. ~7 t
17 11 . 4 260. 7 0 0
ii. rn 1 269. 8 . 4 0
i CD -i = s UNSET
LOGATI ON = GENESEE SOLAR : TIME
ORIENTATION = 160
EAT ITUDE = 39. 42 LONGI TUDE = 105.17
MON TH 1 or DAY = : 21
HR AL AZ VS A ITS A
/ T / =r. SUNRI SE
8 5 . 8 127 6.9 __ !i y
9 14 . 4 138 15.5 7 7 X- .u_
10 21 2. 150. 5 21.4 -9. 5
1 1 '->cr m P 164. 7 25. 7 4. 7
12 2~7 . 1 180 28. 6 20
13 25 . 6 195. 30. 4 35. "T
14 21 7 209. 5 30. 8 49. 5
15 14 . 4 222 Op 7 jDU / 62
16 nr 8 7 "T T 19.3 73
16. 7 = SUNS ET
Solarsoft, Inc., Solar Computer Program and manual Snowmass, Colorado, 198o.




it. vernon Duntry clt Dad
v..
genesee
childrens
outpatient
clinic
n site plan
debra david masters thesis university of Colorado 9 may 1986